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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

2

Z .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 3342 Differences in seawater particulate organic carbon concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the organic carbon retained by a glass-fiber filter against the volume filtered. The interceptZ .Marine Chemistry 67 1999 33­42 Differences in seawater particulate organic carbon concentration August 1998; accepted 11 May 1999 Abstract Z . Z . ZParticulate organic carbon POC data collected

3

Inferring Black Carbon Concentrations in Particulate Organic Matter by Observing Pyrene Fluorescence Losses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inferring Black Carbon Concentrations in Particulate Organic Matter by Observing Pyrene Fluorescence Losses ... For example, most atmospheric scientists are interested in the “blackness” of aerosols and the resultant effect on the radiative heat balance (3, 7), while oceanographers and soil scientists are interested in the refractory properties of BC in soils and sediments influencing its role in carbon cycling (5). ... Studies since the late 1970s and early 1980s have suggested that absorption into biogenic and diagenetic organic matter is a key process controlling the fate and effects of hydrophobic organic pollutants (8, 9), and this process has been described using a linear sorption model where Kd is the solid?water distribution coefficient (L/kgsolid), and this parameter is estimated using the product of the total organic carbon (TOC) fraction (fTOC, kgTOC/kgsediment) and the TOC-normalized distribution coefficient (KTOC, L/kgTOC). ...

D. Xanat Flores-Cervantes; Christopher M. Reddy; Philip M. Gschwend

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Kinetics and Yields of Pesticide Biodegradation at Low Substrate Concentrations and under Conditions Restricting Assimilable Organic Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurrence of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in experimental systems which can be present...the target substrate. The occurrence of AOC effectively makes biodegradation assays...biodegradation at low concentrations by restricting AOC in our experiments. We modified an existing...

Damian E. Helbling; Frederik Hammes; Thomas Egli; Hans-Peter E. Kohler

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

The effect of low concentrations of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in water on biological clogging of sand beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infiltration of pretreated surface water with recharge wells is hampered by biological clogging processes in the aquifer. The influence of the concentration of easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in water on clogging was investigated in filter beds operated under well-defined laboratory conditions using acetate as a model substrate. Acetate concentrations in the water as low as 0.01 mg C/l promoted clogging with the main head loss, caused by bacterial growth, in the first centimeter of the sand bed. An empirical model was developed describing a linear relationship between the operation period to reach a certain increase in head loss (TPi) and the reciprocal value of the acetate concentration or acetate load [Lac g C/ (m2 · d)] at a constant filtration rate. The rate of clogging, designated as the microbiological clogging factor (Cr), is defined by the slope of the linear relationship between the square root of the increase of the head loss (P112) and the operation time. This linear relationship demonstrated that the increase in clogging rate was constant with time. Observations at several locations with experimental recharge wells revealed that the AOC concentration is an important parameter for the biological clogging potential of water. The AOC concentration of water used for infiltration in a recharge well should be less than 0.01 mg acetate-C equiv/l to prevent biological clogging for a period of more than a year.

W.A.M. Hijnen; D. Van der Koou

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High DON bioavailability in boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45 :1298-1307. 32. Mulholland...organic nitrogen in minimally disturbed montane streams of Colorado, U. S. A. Biogeochemistry 74 :303-321. 44. Chrost...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

7

Organic modification of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed ... and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects: organic covalent modificat...

Luqi Liu; Zhixin Guo; Liming Dai; Daoben Zhu

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Carbon nanotubes for organic electronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated the use of carbon nanotubes as active components in solution processible organic semiconductor devices. We investigated the use of functionalized carbon nanotubes… (more)

Goh, Roland Ghim Siong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 2–3 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A microfabricated dielectrophoretic micro-organism concentrator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project focuses on the development of a micro-organism concentrator. Pathogen detection, particularly MEMS based detection, is often limited by sample concentration. The proposed concentrator will interface with a ...

Muller, Rikky, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

5, 11391174, 2008 Organic carbon and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S. Waldron et al of Biogeosciences The significance of organic carbon and nutrient export from peatland-dominated landscapes subject Union. 1139 #12;BGD 5, 1139­1174, 2008 Organic carbon and nutrient export from disturbed peatlands S

Boyer, Edmond

12

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Allocation in Underground Storage Organs Studies on Accumulation of Starch, Sugars and Oil Cover: Starch granules in cells of fresh potato tuber visualised by iodine staining. #12;Carbon By increasing knowledge of carbon allocation in underground storage organs and using the knowledge to improve

13

Excretion of dissolved organic carbon by eelgrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract. The release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by eelgrass (Zosteru marina) and its epiphytic ... tive agreement between the U.S. Energy Research.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bacterial Growth in Distribution Systems:? Effect of Assimilable Organic Carbon and Biodegradable Dissolved Organic Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the distribution systems fed by ozonated water, HPCs were correlated (R2 = 0.96) using an exponential model with the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at each sampling site. ... Also, it was observed that ozonation caused a significant increase in the AOC concentration of the distribution system (over 100% increase) as well as a significant increase in the bacterial counts of the distribution system (average increase over 100%). ... The HPCs from the distribution systems fed by nanofiltration in parallel with lime-softening water also displayed an exponential correlation (R2 = 0.73) with an exponential model based on AOC. ...

Isabel C. Escobar; Andrew A. Randall; James S. Taylor

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Optical design and efficiency improvement for organic luminescent solar concentrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical design and efficiency improvement for organic luminescent solar concentrators Chunhua Wanga and efficiency improvement method. Keywords: Organic luminescent solar concentrators, Photovoltaic, solar energy, efficiency, multi-layer, solar cells, liquid crystal, molecular alignment 1. INTRODUCTION By using

Hirst, Linda

16

Carbon Monoxide Concentration Trends in Urban Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BOVE, J.L., AIRBORNE LEAD AND CARBON MONOXIDE...various procedures that release transmitter has been...conclusion for trans-mitter release. He also provided evidence...suburban counties, a larger fraction of the gasoline is undoubtedly...in the huts (indoor fires are used for space heating...

Merril Eisenbud; Laurel R. Ehrlich

1972-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

A study of the remineralization of organic carbon in nearshore sediments using carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the remineralization of organic carbon was conducted in the organic-rich sediments of Buzzards Bay, MA. Major processes affecting the carbon chemistry in sediments are reflected by changes in the stable carbon ...

McNichol, Ann P., 1956-

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries. The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries....

19

The relation of energy and organic carbon in aquatic invertebrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oct 24, 1975 ... The ratio of energy content to the weight of organic carbon ... Even the use of the mean conversion factor of 46 kJ g-l organic carbon yields.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis and removal of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) from treated drinking water using a biological activated carbon filter system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is focused on reducing the concentration of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in treated drinking water. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of AOC removal by biological activated carbon filters (BACF) in a pilot-scale system. The results show that BACF reduces the total concentration of AOC. The concentration of AOC primarily indicates microorganism growth in a water supply network, and the amount of AOC in water is significantly reduced after BACF treatment. The predicted and measured values of AOC in output water treated by the BACF system show linear relationships, and their correlation coefficients are high. An AOC empirical equation was established by determining the relationship between water quality parameters such as total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, UV254, ammonia nitrogen, and total phosphorous. These findings may be relevant to conventional water treatment plants or to water distribution systems to provide treated drinking water with a high level of biological stability.

Jie-Chung Lou; Chih-Yuan Yang; Che-Jung Chang; Wei-Hsiang Chen; Wei-Bin Tseng; Jia-Yun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimizing Carbon Nanotube Contacts for Use in Organic Photovoltaics: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research on optimizing carbon nanotube networks for use as transparent electrical contacts (TCs) in organic photovoltaics (OPV).

Barnes, T. M.; Blackburn, J. L.; Tenent, R. C.; Morfa, A.; Heben, M.; Coutts, T. J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Influence of organic salt concentration on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of organic salt on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cell was investigated by varying the concentration of...6). Organic solar cells based on TBAPF6-blended poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl...

Nasehah Syamin Sabri; Chi Chin Yap…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Investigation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in flemish drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the study was to investigate the drinking water supplied to majority of residents of Flanders in Belgium. Over 500 water samples were collected from different locations, after particular and complete treatment procedure to evaluate the efficiency of each treatment step in production of biologically stable drinking water. In this study assimilable organic carbon (AOC) was of our interest and was assumed as a parameter responsible for water biostability. The influence of seasons and temperature changes on AOC content was also taken into account. The AOC in most of the non-chlorinated product water of the studied treatment plants could not meet the biostability criteria of 10 ?g/l, resulting in the mean AOC concentration of 50 ?g/l. However, majority of the examined chlorinated water samples were consistent with proposed criteria of 50–100 ?g/l for systems maintaining disinfectant residual. Here, mean AOC concentration of 72 ?g/l was obtained. Granular activated carbon filtration was helpful in diminishing AOC content of drinking water; however, the nutrient removal was enhanced by biological process incorporated into water treatment (biological activated carbon filtration). Disinfection by means of chlorination and ozonation increased the water AOC concentration while the ultraviolet irradiation showed no impact on the AOC content. Examination of seasonal AOC variations showed similar fluctuations in six units with the highest values in summer and lowest in winter.

Monika Polanska; Koen Huysman; Chris van Keer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 959970 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters This paper addresses the assessment of terrestrially derived organic carbon in sediments from two Scottish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Comparison of assimilable organic carbon and UV-oxidizable carbon for evaluation of ultrapure-water systems.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and UV-oxidizable carbon tests. An...greater than or equal to 0.05) alter AOC values. UV radiation decreased UV-oxidizable carbon and increased AOC. Comparison of assimilable organic carbon...

R A Governal; M T Yahya; C P Gerba; F Shadman

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

FROELICH, P. N. Analysis of organic carbon in marine sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jun 4, 1979 ... is analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, the .... tice is needed to achieve reliable sealing ... oxygenated Cr,O, reactor at 1,600”C. This.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Dissolved Organic Carbon Thresholds Affect Mercury Bioaccumulation in Arctic Lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Barkay, T.; Gillman, M.; Turner, R. R.Effects of dissolved organic carbon and salinity on bioavailability of mercury Appl. ... Barkay, Tamar; Gillman, Mark; Turner, Ralph R. ...

Todd D. French; Adam J. Houben; Jean-Pierre W. Desforges; Linda E. Kimpe; Steven V. Kokelj; Alexandre J. Poulain; John P. Smol; Xiaowa Wang; Jules M. Blais

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in permafrost regions September 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint One of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century lies in predicting the impacts of anthropogenic activities on Earth's carbon cycle. Soil is a significant component of the carbon cycle, because it contains at least two-thirds of the world's terrestrial carbon and more than twice as much carbon as the atmosphere. Although soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks were built over millennial time scales, they are susceptible to a far more rapid release back to the atmosphere due to climatic and land use change. If environmental perturbations negatively impact the processes regulating the storage of SOC, significant amounts of this carbon could be decomposed

29

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber surfaces through fluorescent labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber of surface functional groups (OH, COOH and CHO) on activated carbon fiber surfaces. The chromophores were rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon fibers; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Infrared spectroscopy

Borguet, Eric

30

New Method for Assimilable Organic Carbon Determination Using Flow-Cytometric Enumeration and a Natural Microbial Consortium as Inoculum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concentration of easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) largely determines the microbiological stability of drinking water. However, AOC determination is often neglected in practice due to the complex and tedious nature of the conventional bioassay. ...

Frederik A. Hammes; Thomas Egli

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and specific natural organic matter (NOM) fractions during ozonation of phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of natural surface water increases the concentration of oxygen-containing low molecular weight compounds. Many of these compounds support microbiological growth and as such are termed assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Phytoplankton can contribute substantially to the organic carbon load when surface water is used as source for drinking water treatment. We have investigated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) formation from the ozonation of a pure culture of Scenedesmus vacuolatus under defined laboratory conditions, using a combination of DOC fractionation, analysis of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones, and an AOC bioassay. Ozonation of algae caused a substantial increase in the concentration of DOC and AOC, notably nearly instantaneously upon exposure to ozone. As a result of ozone exposure the algal cells shrunk, without disintegrating entirely, suggesting that DOC from the cell cytoplasm leaked through compromised cell membranes. We have further illustrated that the specific composition of newly formed AOC (as concentration of organic acids, aldehydes and ketones) in ozonated lake water differed in the presence and absence of additional algal biomass. It is therefore conceivable that strategies for the removal of phytoplankton before pre-ozonation should be considered during the design of drinking water treatment installations, particularly when surface water is used.

Frederik Hammes; Sébastien Meylan; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Köster; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fossil organic carbon in wastewater and its fate in treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the presence of fossil organic carbon in wastewater and its fate in wastewater treatment plants. The findings pinpoint the inaccuracy of current greenhouse gas accounting guidelines which defines all organic carbon in wastewater to be of biogenic origin. Stable and radiocarbon isotopes (13C and 14C) were measured throughout the process train in four municipal wastewater treatment plants equipped with secondary activated sludge treatment. Isotopic mass balance analyses indicate that 4–14% of influent total organic carbon (TOC) is of fossil origin with concentrations between 6 and 35 mg/L; 88–98% of this is removed from the wastewater. The TOC mass balance analysis suggests that 39–65% of the fossil organic carbon from the influent is incorporated into the activated sludge through adsorption or from cell assimilation while 29–50% is likely transformed to carbon dioxide (CO2) during secondary treatment. The fossil organic carbon fraction in the sludge undergoes further biodegradation during anaerobic digestion with a 12% decrease in mass. 1.4–6.3% of the influent TOC consists of both biogenic and fossil carbon is estimated to be emitted as fossil CO2 from activated sludge treatment alone. The results suggest that current greenhouse gas accounting guidelines, which assume that all CO2 emission from wastewater is biogenic may lead to underestimation of emissions.

Yingyu Law; Geraldine E. Jacobsen; Andrew M. Smith; Zhiguo Yuan; Paul Lant

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC):: complementary measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the necessity of measuring both assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) as indicators of bacterial regrowth potential. AOC and BDOC have often been measured separately as indicators of bacterial regrowth, or together as indicators of bacterial regrowth and disinfection by-product formation potential, respectively. However, this study proposes that both AOC and BDOC should be used as complementary measurements of bacterial regrowth potential. In monitoring of full-scale membrane filtration, it was determined that nanofiltration (NF) removed over 90% of the BDOC while allowing the majority of the AOC through. Heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) remained low during the entire period of monitoring due to high additions of disinfectant residual. In a two-year monitoring of a water treatment plant that switched its treatment process from chlorination to chlorination and ozonation, it was observed that the plant effluent AOC increased by 127% while BDOC increased by 49% after the introduction of ozone. Even though AOC is a fraction of BDOC, measuring only one of these parameters can potentially under- or over-estimate the bacterial regrowth potential of the water.

Isabel C Escobar; Andrew A Randall

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Carbon isotope ratios of organic compound fractions in oceanic suspended particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiocarbon evidence of fossil-carbon cycling in sediments1968), Metabolic fractionation of carbon isotopes in marineof particulate organic carbon using bomb 14 C, Nature,

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Title Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., and Tracy L. Thatcher Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 12 Pagination 6067-6072 Abstract A spectroscopic analysis of 115 wintertime partic- ulate matter samples collected in rural California shows that wood smoke absorbs solar radiation with a strong spectral se- lectivity. This is consistent with prior work that has demon- strated that organic carbon (OC), in addition to black car- bon (BC), appreciably absorbs solar radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. We apportion light absorp-

36

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Kenji Sumida , David L. Rogow , Jarad A. Mason , Thomas M. McDonald , Eric D. Bloch , Zoey R. Herm , Tae-Hyun...

37

A versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture and cooperative catalysis Previous Next List Jinhee Park, Jian-Rong Li, Ying-Pin Chen, Jiamei Yu, Andrey A. Yakovenko,...

38

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 655674 Determining true particulate organic carbon: bottles, pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 655­674 Determining true particulate organic carbon: bottles, pumps or by in situ filtration with pumps and analyzing the filters. The concentrations measured by these two methods-latitude waters. Here we report that the ratio of bottle POC to pump POC ranged between 20 and 200 in the Ross Sea

Hansell, Dennis

39

Uncertainty of Concentration–Terrestrial Carbon Feedback in Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon uptake by land and ocean as a biogeochemical response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is called concentration–carbon feedback and is one of the carbon cycle feedbacks of the global climate. This feedback can have a major impact ...

Tomohiro Hajima; Kaoru Tachiiri; Akihiko Ito; Michio Kawamiya

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.) Didier. Evaluations of carbon fixation and storage in this forest are facilitated by its general homogeneity for expansion factors and carbon concentration in the biomass, and more accurate results could be obtained

Bert, Didier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

of carbon dioxide containing 12 but the low concentration of 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon dioxide containing 12 C and 13 C, but the low concentration of 14 C has made its measurement in carbon dioxide extremely difficult. Using an ultrasensitive technique called saturated carbon at values well below radiocarbon's natural abundance in carbon dioxide. In their technique

Zare, Richard N.

42

Management effects on labile organic carbon pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following the proposal...

Kolodziej, Scott Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Thermal instabilities of organic carbonates with discharged cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal instability of lithiated cathode materials with organic...4, LiMn2O4, and LiCoO2...were mixed with diethyl carbonate, dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, ethyl methyl carbonate, and propylene carbonat...

Wei-Jie Ou; Chen-Shan Kao; Yih-Shing Duh…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Uncorrected Latitudinal Trends in Organic Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of freshwater wetlands to sequester C. Keywords Cesium-137 (137 Cs), climate change, Histosol, precipitation author: e-mail: ccraft@indiana.edu J. Vymazal (ed.), Wastewater Treatment, Plant Dynamics and Management relation- ships between climate (temperature) and C accumulation. Organic C accumulation was inversely

Craft, Christopher B.

45

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Characterization of Bioluminescent Derivatives of Assimilable Organic Carbon Test Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jersey 08043 The assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test is a standardized measure of the bacterial...describe the design and initial development of an AOC assay that uses bioluminescent derivatives of AOC test bacteria. Our assay is based on the observation...

Pryce L. Haddix; Nancy J. Shaw; Mark W. LeChevallier

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Development of a Rapid Assimilable Organic Carbon Method for Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measurement of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is proposed. The time needed to perform...There was no significant difference between AOC values determined with strain P17 for the...bacterial levels in some samples. Comparison of AOC values obtained by the Belleville laboratory...

Mark W. LeChevallier; Nancy E. Shaw; Louis A. Kaplan; Thomas L. Bott

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Impact of Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions on 21st Century Carbon Dioxide Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The impact of light-duty passenger vehicle emissions on global carbon dioxide concentrations was estimated using the MAGICC reduced-form climate model combined with the PNNL contribution to the CCSP scenarios product. Our central estimate is that tailpipe light duty vehicle emissions of carbon-dioxide over the 21st century will increase global carbon dioxide concentrations by slightly over 12 ppmv by 2100.

Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page

2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of Organic Carbon Supply Rates on Uranium Mobility in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentration and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes remediation. Dissolved oxygen, nitrate and denitrification products have been demonstrated to mobilize U

Hazen, Terry

50

Preservation of Organic Matter in Marine Sediments: Controls, Mechanisms, and an Imbalance in Sediment Organic Carbon Budgets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preservation of Organic Matter in Marine Sediments: Controls, Mechanisms, and an Imbalance in Sediment Organic Carbon Budgets? David J. Burdige* Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Old.1. Organic Geochemistry of Marine Sediments: General Considerations 468 2. Molecularly Uncharacterized

Burdige, David

51

Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol Phase at a Sub-Urban Site Near Mexico City in March 2006 During Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and...

52

Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2 Yao Huang,1), Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 27, doi:10 carbon (SOC) in cropland is of great importance to the global carbon (C) balance and to agricultural

Pittendrigh, Barry

53

Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir Sebastian. Wehrli (2012), Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir; revised 25 November 2011; accepted 30 November 2011; published 4 January 2012. [1] Organic carbon (OC

Wehrli, Bernhard

54

A method for carbon oxide concentration evaluation in high-temperature combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for evaluating carbon oxide concentration in high-temperature combustion processes is presented. The paper offers an optimizing control problem for fuel combustion process using a stabilizing regulatory controller, which affects the fuel/air ...

K. E. Arystanbaev, A. T. Apsemetov

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A method for carbon oxide concentration evaluation in high-temperature combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for evaluating carbon oxide concentration in high-temperature combustion processes is presented. The paper offers an optimizing control problem for fuel combustion process using a stabilizing regulatory ...

K. E. Arystanbaev; A. T. Apsemetov

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Concentrations on the Rise as Kyoto Era Fades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to on-site measurements by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations reached 391.3 parts per million (ppm) in 2011, up from 388.56 ppm in 2010 and fro...

Xing Fu-Bertaux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Feedbacks in Emission-Driven and Concentration-Driven Global Carbon Budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere affect the carbon budgets of the land and ocean as biogeochemical processes react to increased CO2 concentrations. Biogeochemical processes also react to changes in temperature and other climate parameters. ...

G. J. Boer; V. K. Arora

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and carbon dioxide. Introduction Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per capita are released annually into the atmosphere.1a,b CarbonStorage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks

Yaghi, Omar M.

59

Investigation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and bacterial regrowth in drinking water distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigated the variation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentrations in water from several typical water treatment plants and distribution systems in a northern city of China. It is concluded from this study that: (1) The AOC in most of the product water of the studied water treatment plants and the water from the associated distribution systems could not meet the biostability criteria of 50–100 ?g/L. (2) Only 4% of the measured AOC concentrations were less than 100 ?g/L. However, about half of the measured AOC values were less than 200 ?g/L. (3) Better source water quality resulted in lower AOC concentrations. (4) The variation of AOC concentrations in distribution systems was affected by chlorine oxidation and bacterial activity: the former resulted in an increase of AOC value while the latter led to a reduction in AOC. (5) The variation of AOC concentration followed different patterns in different distribution systems or different seasons due to their respective operational characteristics. (6) Less than 30% of AOC could be removed by a conventional treatment process, whereas 30–60% with a maximum of 50–60% could be removed by granular activated carbon (GAC). (7) The observation via scanning electron microscope (SEM) on distribution pipe tubercle samples demonstrated that the pipe inner wall was not smooth and bacteria multiplied in the crevice as well as in the interior wall of distribution pipes.

W Liu; H Wu; Z Wang; S.L Ong; J.Y Hu; W.J Ng

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy of an Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). The purpose of this effort Frontier Research Center proposal: "Integrated Science of Geological Carbon Sequestration" to BES office

Zhou, Chongwu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Atomic-Scale Detection of Organic Molecules Coupled to Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic-Scale Detection of Organic Molecules Coupled to Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sung You Hong.green@chem.ox.ac.uk; ben.davis@chem.ox.ac.uk Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) bearing organic molecules functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can tailor critical proper- ties such as solubility

Davis, Ben G.

62

Carbon Dioxide Separation with Novel Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.doe Richard Willis Principal Investigator UOP LLC 50 East Algonquin Road Des Plaines, IL 60016 847-391-3190 Richard.Willis@uop.com Carbon DioxiDe Separation with novel MiCroporouS Metal organiC FraMeworkS Background UOP LLC, in collaboration with Vanderbilt University and the University of Edinburgh, is working to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated process for the removal of CO 2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. This innovative project will exploit the latest discoveries in an extraordinary class of materials (MOFs) having extremely high adsorption capacities. MOFs have previously exhibited

63

Questions and Answers - Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atoms make up sugar? atoms make up sugar? Previous Question (What atoms make up sugar?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (In the equation for methane, why is there more hydrogen than carbon?) In the equation for methane, why isthere more hydrogen than carbon? Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter? The answer is yes and no. Yes, carbon IS found in all organic matter, but NOT in inorganic matter. Although there are many definitions of "organic," in the scientific disciplines, the basic definition comes from chemistry. In chemistry, organic means chemical compounds with carbon in them. In a more general sense, organic refers to living things. And this is connected to the idea of organic chemistry being based on carbon compounds. Organic

64

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

65

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Carbon–Concentration and Carbon–Climate Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnitude and evolution of parameters that characterize feedbacks in the coupled carbon–climate system are compared across nine Earth system models (ESMs). The analysis is based on results from biogeochemically, radiatively, and fully coupled ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer; Pierre Friedlingstein; Michael Eby; Chris D. Jones; James R. Christian; Gordon Bonan; Laurent Bopp; Victor Brovkin; Patricia Cadule; Tomohiro Hajima; Tatiana Ilyina; Keith Lindsay; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Tongwen Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

69

Characterization and biotoxicity assessment of dissolved organic matter in RO concentrate from a municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate from municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis (mWRRO) system containing organic compounds may associate with toxic risk, and its discharge might pose an environmental risk. To identify a basis for the selection of feasible technology in treating RO concentrates, the characteristics and biotoxicity of different fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in RO concentrates from an mWRRO system were investigated. The results indicated that the hydrophilic neutrals (HIN), hydrophobic acids (HOA) and hydrophobic bases (HOB) accounted for 96% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of the total DOM in the RO concentrate. According to the SEC chromatograph detected at 254 nm wavelength of UV, the DOM with molecular weight (MW) 1–3 kDa accounted for the majority of the basic and neutral fractions. The fluorescence spectra of the excitation emission matrix (EEM) indicated that most aromatic proteins, humic/fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like substances existed in the fractions HOA and hydrophobic neutrals (HON). The genotoxicity and anti-estrogenic activity of the RO concentrate were 1795.6 ± 57.2 ?g 4-NQO L?1 and 2.19 ± 0.05 mg TAM L?1, respectively. The HIN, HOA, and HOB contributed to the genotoxicity of the RO concentrate, and the HIN was with the highest genotoxic level of 1007.9 ± 94.8 ?g 4-NQO L?1. The HOA, HON, and HIN lead to the total anti-estrogenic activity of the RO concentrate, and HOA occupied approximately 60% of the total, which was 1.3 ± 0.17 mg TAM L?1.

Ying-Xue Sun; Yue Gao; Hong-Ying Hu; Fang Tang; Zhe Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in marginal seas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer… (more)

Chen, Ya-Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dissolved organic carbon dynamics in anaerobic sediments of the Santa Monica Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an organic-rich coastal sediment. Geochim. Cosmochim. Actaorganic carbon in sediments from the North Carolinaexchange between deep ocean sediments and sea water. Nature

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Long-term patterns of dissolved organic carbon in lakes across ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in 55 lakes during ice-free periods in five regions across eastern Canada in relation to total solar radiation (

73

Sensitized energy transfer for organic solar cells, optical solar concentrators, and solar pumped lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation of chromophore absorption and excitonic processes, such as singlet exciton fission and photoluminescence, offers several advantages to the design of organic solar cells and luminescent solar concentrators ...

Reusswig, Philip David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to minerals and low-organic-carbon aquifer sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The molecular mechanisms and major geochemical factors ics. controlling the sorption of nontoxic organic chemicals (NOC) to mineral surfaces in low-organic-carbon soils and sediments remain unclear. The objectives of this research were to study...

Grimaldi, Gabriel Orlando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to minerals and low-organic-carbon aquifer sediments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The molecular mechanisms and major geochemical factors ics. controlling the sorption of nontoxic organic chemicals (NOC) to mineral surfaces in low-organic-carbon soils and sediments remain… (more)

Grimaldi, Gabriel Orlando

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Viscosity of carbon nanotubes water based nanofluids: Influence of1 concentration and temperature 0019 Fax: +33 (0) 2 23 23 40 5120 21 Abstract:22 23 Experimental results on the steady state viscosity, the nanofluids are quite Newtonian. It is also observed that the relative viscosity of30 nanofluids at high shear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents requires drastic modifications to the current energy infrastructure. Thus, carbon capture and sequestration for use as carbon capture adsorbents. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) estimates of CO2 selectivity

Kamat, Vineet R.

80

Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly efficient carbon dioxide capture with a porous organic polymer impregnated environmental crises such as global warming and ocean acidication, efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) capture As CO2 capture mate- rials, numerous solid adsorbents such as silica5 and carbon materials,6 metal

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: magnitude, mechanisms and its implications of SOC enrichment in dust emissions is necessary to evaluate the impact of wind erosion on the carbon) across landscapes and soil carbon emissions (van Oost et al., 2007). The dust cycle rep- resents

82

Sample storage impact on the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of sample storage on the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay using Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17 and Spirillum strain NOX have not been fully quantified to date, and in the current Standard Method, it is stated that samples can “probably be held for several days” (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, ed. A. D. Eaton, L. S. Clesceri, A. E. Greenberg, 19th Edn., (1995)). Experiments were performed by splitting 22 samples after chlorine residual neutralization and pasteurization at 70°C for 30 min, and holding one half of the replicate samples at 4°C for one week prior to analysis. The majority of the samples were taken from a local water treatment plant and distribution system with source water from the deep Floridan aquifer. The others were taken from the laboratory tap water, whose source was also the Floridan aquifer. All collected samples were tested for effects due to storage, with each sample tested for AOC as soon as possible while an identical replicate was stored for one week. After one week, the AOC of the held samples was also determined. By comparing the AOC of samples that were not stored with samples that were stored, it was observed that after one week of storage, the AOC of the stored identical sample replicates increased by approximately 65%. This was determined to result from BOM (biodegradable organic matter) fermentation to AOC by a yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans. Of the 22 samples tested, only four displayed no significant change in AOC and none displayed a significant decrease in AOC. It was then determined that samples heat treated at 70°C for 30 min could be stored for less than 2 days, but a modified pasteurization of 72°C for 30 min immediately followed by an ice bath for 30 min allowed storage for at least 7 days without significant changes in AOC.

Isabel C Escobar; Andrew A Randall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sedimentary sources of old high molecular weight dissolved organic carbon from the ocean margin benthic nepheloid layer  

SciTech Connect

Average {sup 14}C ages of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean are 3--6,000 years, and are influenced by old DOC from continental margins. However, sources of DOC from terrestrial, autochthonous, and sedimentary organic carbon seem to be too young to be responsible for the old DOC observed in the ocean. Since colloidal organic carbon (COC, i.e., high molecular weight DOC), which is chemically very similar to that of bulk DOC, can be effectively isolated from seawater using cross-flow ultrafiltration, it can hold clues to sources and pathways of DOC turnover in the ocean. Radiocarbon measurements on COC in the water column and benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) from two continental margin areas (the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico) and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study sources of old DOC in the ocean margin areas. Vertical distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and DOC in the water column and bottom waters near the sediment-water interface all demonstrate a well developed benthic nepheloid layer in both ocean margin areas. COC from the BNL was much older than COC from the overlying water column. These results, together with strong concentration gradients of SPM, POC, PON, and DOC, suggest a sedimentary source for organic carbon species and possibly for old COC as well in BNL waters. This is confirmed by the results from controlled laboratory experiments. The heterogeneity of {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures in bulk SOC thus points to a preferential release of old organic components from sediment resuspension, which can be the transport mechanism of the old benthic COC observed in ocean margin areas. Old COC from continental margin nepheloid layers may thus be a potential source of old DOC to the deep ocean.

Guo, L. Santschi, P.H.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Changes in O2 and CO surface chemistry with increasing carbon concentration on W(100)  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that tungsten carbide (WC) is of interest as an important industrial catalyst. According to a proposed model, the WC surface consists of a layer of carbon atoms beneath the first layer of tungsten atoms. Stefan et al. (1985) have conducted photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) experiments which show significant similarities in the surface chemistry and electronic structure of WC and the model surface. In the present investigation, PES is employed as a tool to study the changes in O2 and CO surface chemistry on W(100) with carbon concentration increasing from zero to that of the model surface. It was found that 1/2 monolayer of carbon was sufficient to produce a reduction in the tungsten surface peak. Attention is given to carburization of W(100), oxygen adsorption, and CO adsorption. 14 references.

Jupiter, P.J.; Viescas, A.J.; Carbone, C.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Unexpected carbon-carbon coupling between organic cyanides and isopropyl {beta}-carbon in a hafnium ene diamide complex  

SciTech Connect

Reaction of the ene diamide complex Cp*Hf({sigma}{sup 2},{pi}-iPr-DAB)Cl (1; Cp* = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}, iPr-DAB = 1,4-diisopropyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene) with organic cyanides was investigated. The crystal structure of the product, Cp*Hf[iPrNCH{double_bond}CHNC(Me){double_bond}CHC(tBu){double_bond}NH]Cl, is reported. The reaction is thought to proceed by two hydrogen transfers and a C-C coupling on the {beta}-carbon of an isopropyl group. NMR was used to identify reaction intermediates in the hydrogen transfer scheme.

Bol, J.E.; Hessen, B.; Teuben, J.H. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands); Smeets, W.J.J.; Spek, A.L. [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Modified Polymer Organic Photovoltaics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since the carbon nanotubes were first discovered by Iijima in 1991, CNTs have been the focus of intense research by many groups. Nearly 7000 papers… (more)

Chen, Tzu-Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Snowball Earth prevention by dissolved organic carbon remineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... model of the co-evolution of Neoproterozoic climate and the carbon cycle that provides an alternative interpretation to the ‘hard snowball’ hypothesis of the origin of the observed ?13C variations ... carbon cycle component of the model. Supplementary Fig. 4 shows equivalent results for the case X = 1. ...

W. Richard Peltier; Yonggang Liu; John W. Crowley

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data  

SciTech Connect

Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Activated carbon aerogel as electrode material for coin-type EDLC cell in organic electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a carbonization of resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) polymer gels, and it was chemically activated with KOH to obtain activated carbon aerogel (ACA) for electrode material for EDLC in organic electrolyte. Coin-type EDLC cells with two symmetrical carbon electrode were assembled using the prepared carbon materials. Electrochemical performance of the carbon electrodes was measured by galvanostatic charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetry methods. Activated carbon aerogel (20.9 F/g) showed much higher specific capacitance than carbon aerogel (7.9 F/g) and commercial activated carbon (8.5 F/g) at a scan rate of 100 mV/s. This indicates that chemical activation with KOH served as an efficient method to improve electrochemical performance of carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode in organic electrolyte. The enhanced electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel was attributed to the high effective surface area and the well-developed pore structure with appropriate pore size obtained from activation with KOH.

Soon Hyung Kwon; Eunji Lee; Bum-Soo Kim; Sang-Gil Kim; Byung-Jun Lee; Myung-Soo Kim; Ji Chul Jung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ab-initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ab-initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks Previous Next List A. Dzubak, L.-C. Lin, J. Kim, J. A. Swisher, R. Poloni, S. N. Maximoff, B. Smit, and L. Gagliardi,...

92

Improvement of the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) analytical method for reclaimed water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbial growth is an issue of concern that may cause hygienic and aesthetic problems during the transportation and usage of reclaimed water. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is an important parameter which dete...

Xin Zhao; Hongying Hu; Shuming Liu…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Evaluation and simplification of the assimilable organic carbon nutrient bioassay for bacterial growth in drinking water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A modified assimilable organic carbon (AOC) bioassay is proposed. We evaluated all aspects of the AOC bioassay technique, including inoculum...raw waters need to be filtered prior to an AOC analysis. Glass fiber filters used with either...

L A Kaplan; T L Bott; D J Reasoner

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development and Application of a Bioluminescence-Based Test for Assimilable Organic Carbon in Reclaimed Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Jersey 08043 Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is an important parameter governing the...protection) can have dramatic impacts on AOC levels in drinking water, few water utilities routinely measure AOC levels because of the difficulty of the...

Lauren A. Weinrich; Eugenio Giraldo; Mark W. LeChevallier

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Variation and removal efficiency of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in an advanced water treatment system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the microorganism growth indicator and determines the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) content at the Cheng-Ching Lake Advanced ... (CCLAWTP) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Notably, AOC is associat...

Jie-Chung Lou; Bi-Hsiang Chen; Ting-Wei Chang…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Highly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly efficient separation of carbon dioxide by a metal-organic framework replete with open metal capture of CO2, which is essential for natural gas purifi- cation and CO2 sequestration, has been reported media. carbon dioxide capture dynamic adsorption reticular chemistry Selective removal of CO2 from

Yaghi, Omar M.

98

Energy-Density Enhancement of Carbon-Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors with Redox Couple in Organic Electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-Density Enhancement of Carbon-Nanotube-Based Supercapacitors with Redox Couple in Organic Electrolyte ... The redox molecule also contributes to increasing the cell capacitance by a faradaic redox reaction, and therefore the energy density of the supercapacitor can be significantly increased. ... More specifically, the addition of redox-active decamethylferrocene in an organic electrolyte results in an approximately 27-fold increase in the energy density of carbon-nanotube-based supercapacitors. ...

Jinwoo Park; Byungwoo Kim; Young-Eun Yoo; Haegeun Chung; Woong Kim

2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Limiting diffusion coefficients of heavy molecular weight organic contaminants in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted...

Orejuela, Mauricio

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon Dioxide Separation with Novel Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation with Separation with Novel Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks Background UOP LLC, the University of Michigan, and Northwestern University are collaborating on a three-year program to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) suitable for CO 2 capture and separation. MOFs are hybrid organic/inorganic structures in which the organic moiety is readily derivatized. This innovative program is using sophisticated molecular modeling to evaluate the structurally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Given the rapid increase in atmospheric concentration of CO2, the development of efficient CO2 capture technologies is critical for the future of carbon-based energy. Currently,… (more)

Lin, Kun-Yi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermoelectric Behavior of Flexible Organic Nanocomposites with Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been significant researches about thermoelectric behaviors by applying carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer nanocomposites. Due to its thermally disconnected but electrically connected junctions between CNTs, the thermoelectric properties were...

Choi, Kyung Who

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture with metal-organic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U. Wang, Hong-Cai Zhou, Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol, 2: 239-259, 2012 DOI: 10.1002ghg.1296 Abstract: Uncontrolled massive release of the primary greenhouse gas carbon...

104

Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment  

SciTech Connect

Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC supply rates in order to optimize bioreduction-based U stabilization.

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic matter was carried out at elevated temperature and pressure after collection of a large number of samples. The resulting carbon dioxide was flushed through a gas chromatograph with helium as the carrier gas and the signal was recorded on a strip... chart recorder. Chromatographic analysis time was approximately eleven minutes per sample with a precision of + Q. 1 mg C/l. The organic carbon content of the sample was determined by measurement of the peak area using an appropriate carbon dioxide...

Fredericks, Alan D

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Developing carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising, rapidly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Performance and production solutions to electronics, displays, solar cells, white lighting and room lightingDeveloping carbon-based "organic" compounds for microelectronic applications is a promising inorganic materials such as silicon and copper, organic microelectronics are flexible, lighter weight, less

Hayden, Nancy J.

108

Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67 ± 0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (?30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1 ? 1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2 ? 2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

Prashant Rajput; M.M. Sarin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

August 22, 2002 Contribution to Stein, R. and Macdonald, R. W. (eds.) The Organic Carbon Cycle in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 August 22, 2002 Contribution to Stein, R. and Macdonald, R. W. (eds.) The Organic Carbon Cycle. This problem is highlighted by a recent study of the carbon budget of the Mackenzie shelf by Macdonald et al

Eicken, Hajo

110

Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth System Models  

SciTech Connect

Microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is one of the fundamental processes of global carbon cycling and it determines the magnitude of microbial biomass in soils. Mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls is important for to improve Earth system models ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. Although microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is broadly considered to be an important parameter, it really comprises two separate physiological processes: one-time assimilation efficiency and time-dependent microbial maintenance energy. Representing of these two mechanisms is crucial to more accurately simulate carbon cycling in soils. In this study, a simple modeling framework was developed to evaluate the substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon using a new term: microbial annual active period (the length of microbes remaining active in one year). Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality (lower C:N ratio) leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon and vice versa. Increases in microbial annual active period from zero stimulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon; however, when microbial annual active period is longer than an optimal threshold, increasing this period decreases microbial biomass. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global dataset at the biome-level. The modeling framework of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls developed in this study offers an applicable ways to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models for simulating carbon-climate feedbacks and to explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL] [ORNL; Schimel, Joshua [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Song, Xia [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Santonu [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Soil temperature is an important regulatory control on dissolved organic carbon supply and uptake of soil solution nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of abiotic processes on dissolved organic matter (DOM) production is often underappreciated. However, abiotic processes appear to be especially important in subsoils where, with increasing depth, microbial activity declines and soil organic matter (SOM) becomes a progressively more important contributor to DOM. Within three soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm) in a temperate forest, soil temperature was positively associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.23–0.77) and the DOM humification index (R2 = 0.35–0.72) for soil solutions in slow and fast flowpaths. With increasing soil temperature from 5 to 24 °C, average DOC concentrations increased by 86% at 20 cm, 12% at 40 cm and 12% at 60 cm soil depths. Our data suggest that DOM supply, especially in subsoils, is temperature dependent. We attribute this to the influence of temperature on DOM replenishment through direct processes such as SOM dissolution, diffusion and exchange reactions as well as indirect processes such as rhizodeposition and exoenzyme activity. In contrast, negative relationships (R2 = 0.71–0.88) between temperature and nitrate concentrations in subsoil suggested that the temperature-dependent supply of DOM drives microbial processes such as dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate consumption.

Ehsan R. Toosi; John P. Schmidt; Michael J. Castellano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Enhanced top soil carbon stocks under organic farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the farming systems was still significant...zero net input systems for all data...compost or waste products from...by returning plant residues and...into the system. It is therefore...those from integrated or conventional...and do not control for potential...the organic treatment is ?1.0 ELU...

Andreas Gattinger; Adrian Muller; Matthias Haeni; Colin Skinner; Andreas Fliessbach; Nina Buchmann; Paul Mäder; Matthias Stolze; Pete Smith; Nadia El-Hage Scialabba; Urs Niggli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of organic carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the SOA potential of diesel emissions, especially...improve heavy-duty diesel engine performance with postcombustion...attention to gasoline and diesel fuel composition and emissions...carbon. Although total consumption of oil is minor relative...

Drew R. Gentner; Gabriel Isaacman; David R. Worton; Arthur W. H. Chan; Timothy R. Dallmann; Laura Davis; Shang Liu; Douglas A. Day; Lynn M. Russell; Kevin R. Wilson; Robin Weber; Abhinav Guha; Robert A. Harley; Allen H. Goldstein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Simulating Field-Scale Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics Using EPIC  

SciTech Connect

Simulation models integrate our knowledge of soil organic C (SOC) dynamics and are useful tools for evaluating impacts of crop management on soil C sequestration; yet, they require local calibration. Our objectives were to calibrate the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model, and evaluate its performance for simulating SOC fractions as affected by soil landscape and management. An automated parameter optimization procedure was used to calibrate the model for a site-specific experiment in the Coastal Plain of central Alabama. The ability of EPIC to predict corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields and SOC dynamics on different soil landscape positions (summit, sideslope and drainageway) during the initial period of conservation tillage adoption (5 years) was evaluated using regression and mean squared deviations. Simulated yield explained 88% of measured yield variation, with greatest disagreement on the sideslope position and highest agreement in the drainageway. Simulations explained approximately 1, 34 and 40% of the total variation in microbial biomass C (MBC), particulate organic C (POC) and total organic C (TOC), respectively. Lowest errors on TOC simulations (0-20 cm) were found on the sideslope and summit. We conclude that the automated parameterization was generally successful, although further work is needed to refine the MBC and POC fractions, and to improve EPIC predictions of SOC dynamics with depth. Overall, EPIC was sensitive to spatial differences in C fractions that resulted from differing soil landscape positions. The model needs additional refinement for accurate simulations of field-scale SOC dynamics affected by short-term management decisions.

Causarano, Hector J.; Shaw, Joey N.; Franzluebbers, A. J.; reeves, D. W.; Raper, Randy L.; Balkcom, Kipling S.; Norfleet, M. L.; Izaurralde, R Cesar

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Organic carbon burial efficiency in lake sediments controlled by oxygen exposure time and sediment source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic carbon burial efficiency in lake sediments controlled by oxygen exposure time and sediment : deposited OC) in a diverse set of 27 different sediments from 11 lakes, focusing on the potential effects burial efficiency was high (mean 48%), and it was particularly high in sediments receiving high input

Wehrli, Bernhard

118

Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment Upal Ghosh1 , Richard G. Luthy1 , J. Seb Gillette2 , and Richard N long-term issue confronting sediment bioremediation is the lack of understanding of contaminant-sediment

119

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

120

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture preservation of the IRMOF structure. Carbon dioxide capture from combustion sources such as flue gas in power this carbon capture challenge. The preferred method for measuring the efficiency of a given material

Yaghi, Omar M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Layered Organic Structure at the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water Interface Dennis K. Hore, Dave S. Walker, and Geraldine L. Richmond*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layered Organic Structure at the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water Interface Dennis K. Hore, Dave S remediation. The carbon tetrachloride-water interface in particular has been the subject of numerous the density profile across the interface. No detailed studies of the carbon tetrachloride structure

Richmond, Geraldine L.

122

Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 10. The role of amino acids in sedimentary carbon and nitrogen cycling  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolyzable amino acids were measured in cores and surface sediment samples collected over a 14 month period from the rapidly accumulating, anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC. The concentration of total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAAs) shows an exponential decrease with depth, in a manner similar to total organic carbon and total nitrogen. Carbon and nitrogen in THAAs averages 10-15% of the total organic carbon and 30-40% of the total nitrogen in these sediments. In surface sediments the concentration of THAAs do not show strong seasonal variations, with the exception of a small apparent decrease during the winter months. Aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine and alanine are the most abundant individual amino acids in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. The distribution of individual amino acids in these sediments is very similar to that observed in the two major sources of organic matter, vascular salt marsh plants and marine plankton. The mole fractions of most amino acids show no depth variation in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Kinetic modeling of these data indicates that the deposition of amino acids to the surface of these sediments is 5.8 {plus minus} 1.0 mol{center dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}. Approximately 46 {plus minus} 16% of this input is remineralized in the upper 40 cm. The recycling of amino acids accounts for 82 {plus minus} 43% of the total nitrogen regeneration and 27 {plus minus} 11% of the regeneration of total organic carbon in these sediments. The mean residence time of metabolizable amino acids is approx. 9 months, a value which is comparable to the mean residence time of both metabolizable organic carbon and nitrogen in these sediments.

Burdige, D.J.; Martens, C.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

High-temperature formation of concentric fullerene-like structures within foam-like carbon: Experiment and molecular dynamics simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

car- bon ion implantation,4 and arc discharge from a carbon target in water.5 Onionlike structures of concentric fullerene-like structures, car- bon onions can be formed in a variety of harsh environments laser operating at 532 nm, generating 12 ps pulses at a rep- etition rate of 1.5 MHz, with average power

Powles, Rebecca

124

Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of solid phase calcium was produced. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. These research results demonstrate the potential of using cyanobacterial catalyzed “whitings” as a method to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere.

Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Title The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Lux, Simon F., Ivan T. Lucas, Elad Pollak, Stefano Passerini, Martin Winter, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochemistry Communications Volume 14 Start Page 47 Issue 1 Pagination 47-50 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords Hydrofluoric acid, LiPF6 degradation, Lithium ion batteries, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the time-dependent formation of HF upon the thermal degradation of LiPF6 at 50 °C in a lithium ion battery electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate. The generated HF was monitored by following the etching rate of a 300 nm thick SiO2 layer, grown on both sides of a silicon wafer substrate, as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte at 50 °C. It was found that the formation of HF starts after 70 h of exposure time and occurs following several different phases. The amount of generated HF was calculated using an empirical formula correlating the etching rate to the temperature. Combining the results of the HF formation with literature data, a simplified mechanism for the formation of the HF involving LiPF6 degradation, and a simplified catalytical reaction pathway of the formed HF and silicon dioxide are proposed to describe the kinetics of HF formation.

126

Nanostructured electrodes for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Model study using carbon nanotube dispersed polythiophene-fullerene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanostructured electrodes for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Model study using carbon for organic pseudo-bilayer solar cells J. Appl. Phys. 112, 084511 (2012) Addition of regiorandom poly(3 (2012) Tunable open-circuit voltage in ternary organic solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 163302 (2012

Hone, James

127

T E C H N I C A L A D V A N C E Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T E C H N I C A L A D V A N C E Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source emission, soil organic carbon Received 16 April 2013 and accepted 21 May 2013 Introduction Uncertainty, Gunnedah, NSW 2380, Australia Abstract Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within

128

Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites  

SciTech Connect

By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4??VK{sup ?1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50?K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, 501 Deacon Blvd., Winston Salem, North Carolina 27105 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

Responses of primary production and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors used the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2, driven by the ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

130

Fluid Phase Equilibria of Ethanol and Carbon Dioxide Mixtures with Concentration Measurements by Raman Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase equilibria data for the system ethanol/carbon dioxide for T = 313.15 K and pressures up to p = 7.9 MPa are presented. The measurements were made by Raman...

Stratmann, A; Schweiger, G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Calcite growth rates as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio, saturation index and strontium concentration  

SciTech Connect

Using in situ atomic force microscopy, the growth rates of the obtuse and acute step orientations on the calcite surface were measured at two saturation indices as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and aqueous strontium concentration. The amount of strontium required to inhibit growth was found to correlate with the aqueous calcium concentration, but did not correlate with carbonate. This suggests that strontium inhibits attachment of calcium ions to the reactive sites on the calcite surface. Strontium/calcium cation exchange selectivity coefficients for those sites, Kex, of 1.09 0.09 and 1.44 0.19 are estimated for the obtuse and acute step orientations, respectively. The implication of this finding is that to avoid poisoning calcite growth, the concentration of calcium should be higher than the quotient of the strontium concentration and Kex, regardless of saturation state. Additionally, analytical models of nucleation and propagation of steps are expanded from previous work to capture growth rates of these steps at multiple saturation indices and the effect of strontium. This work will have broader implications for naturally occurring or engineered calcite growth, such as to sequester subsurface strontium contamination.

Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Grantham, Ms. Meg [Georgia Institute of Technology; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dissolved organic carbon transformations during laboratory-scale groundwater recharge using lagoon-treated wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Reuse of treated wastewater through groundwater recharge has emerged as an integral part of water and wastewater management in arid regions of the world. Aerated-lagoon wastewater treatment followed by surface infiltration offers a simple low-tech, low-cost treatment option for developing countries. This study investigated the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through laboratory-scale soil aquifer treatment (SAT) soil columns over a 64-week period. Aerated-lagoon wastewater (average DOE = 17 mg/l) and two soils were collected near the USA/Mexico border near Nogales, AZ. Laboratory-scale SAT columns exhibited three phases of aging where infiltration rates and DOC removals were delineated. DOC removal ranged from 39% to greater than 70% during the study, with DOC levels averaging 3.7 and 5.8 mg/l for the SAT columns packed with different soils. Soil with a higher fraction of organic carbon content had higher effluent DOC levels, presumably due to leaching of soil organic matter. UV absorbance data indicated preferential biodegradation removal of low molecular weight, low aromatic DOC. Overall, SAT reduced the potential towards forming trihalomethanes (THMs) during disinfection, although the reactivity ({mu}g THM/mg DOC) increased. SAT and groundwater recharge would provide a high degree of DOC removal in an integrated low-tech wastewater reuse management strategy, especially for developing countries in arid regions of the world.

Westerhoff, P.; Pinney, M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Bioavailable organic carbon in wetland soils across a broad climogeographic area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by; David A. Zuberer (Co-Chair of Committee) Larry P. Wilding (Co-Chair of Committee) Thomas W. Boutton (Member) Mark A s ey (Head of Department) May 2002 Major Subject: Soil Science... ABSTRACT Bioavailable Organic Carbon in Wetland Soils Across a Broad Climogeographic Area. (May 2002) Andrew Dwight Baker, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee. Dr. David A. Zuberer Dr. Larry P. Wilding Soils from a broad...

Baker, Andrew Dwight

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative awarded Southern Research Institute (SRI) through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging Equilibrium Mechanisms for Engineering New Thermochemical Storage (CSP: ELEMENTS) funding program.

138

Organic Solar Cells with Graded Exciton-dissociation Interfaces.................................................................................................................EN.1 Luminescent Solar Concentrators for Energy-harvesting in Displays ........  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Organic Solar Cells with Graded Exciton-dissociation Interfaces.................................................................................................................EN.1 Luminescent Solar Concentrators for Energy-harvesting in Displays ...................................................................................EN.3 Nano-engineered Organic Solar-energy-harvesting System

Reif, Rafael

139

Correlations of fuel economy, exhaust hydro-carbon concentrations, and vehicle performance efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORRELATIONS OF FUEL ECONOMY, EXHAUST HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS, AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY A Thesis by PHILIP DOUGLAS BAUMANN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Civil Engineering CORRELATIONS OF FUEL ECONOMY, EXHAUST HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS, AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY A Thesis by PHILIP DOUGLAS BAUMANN Approved as to style and content by...

Baumann, Philip Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Use of organic functional group concentrations as a means of screening for energetics  

SciTech Connect

One of the safety concerns associated with the waste tanks on the Hanford site is the presence of organics in a highly oxidizing environment that could potentially act as a fuel source to maintain a propagating reaction. To determine this risk, it is necessary to determine the amount of high enthalpy organics present in the tanks. Currently, the primary ways of obtaining this information are to either rely on tank-fill histories, which are often unreliable and do not account for waste-aging processes, or obtain samples from the tank and speciate the organics present through a series of analytical procedures. While organic speciation has been successful in providing very valuable information about organics present in the tanks and the waste aging processes that are occurring in general, it can be costly and time consuming analyzing a large number of waste tanks. Differential scanning calorimetry has previously been used to obtain heat of reaction measurements of Hanford tank waste samples. However, differential scanning calorimetry is shown here to inadequately measure calculated heats of reaction of simulant tank mixtures. Overall, the preliminary results presented here, suggest that indeed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determination of C-H and COO- organic content in tank waste samples analyzed in a hot cell environment. These techniques however, are not truly quantitative for this application and would be primarily used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that would require further, more detailed confirmatory analysis by organic speciation techniques.

Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.; Camaioni, D.M.; Hallen, R.T.; Lerner, B.D.; Scheele, R.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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141

Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...min (ultrasonic cleaner, model 2210; Branson Ultrasonics...ANOVA) using JMP statistical software (version 10; SAS Institute...analysis (62). R statistical software (version 2.15.1 for Windows...boreal streams during a spring flood. Limnol. Oceanogr. 45...

Suchismita Ghosh; Laura G. Leff

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Designing a Dynamic Data-Driven Application System for Estimating Real-Time Load of Dissolved Organic Carbon in a River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding the dynamics of naturally occurring dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a river is central to estimating surface water quality, aquatic carbon cycling, and global climate change. Currently, determinat...

Ying Ouyang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

TEXIN2: a model for predicting carbon monoxide concentrations near intersections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association emitted along straight roadways, where traffic is wel 1-def ined and flows uniformly at constant speeds. This scenario is extremely inap- propriate for intersections. A simple conversion from straight... are presented in Chapter V. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW The task of modeling pollutant concentrations near intersections has traditionally been approached by first enlisting an emissions model to estimate a composite emission rate for vehicular traffic...

Korpics, J. J

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

Muhammad Shahid; Tiantian Xiong; Maryse Castrec-Rouelle; Tibo Leveque; Camille Dumat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Will elevated carbon dioxide concentration amplify the benefits of nitrogen fixation in legumes?  

SciTech Connect

Growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}] stimulates photosynthesis and increases carbon (C) supply in all C3 species. A sustained and maximal stimulation in productivity at elevated [CO{sub 2}] requires an enhanced nutrient supply to match the increase in C acquisition. The ability of legumes to exchange C for nitrogen (N) with their N{sub 2}-fixing symbionts has led to the hypothesis that legumes will have a competitive advantage over nonleguminous species when grown at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. On balance, evidence suggests that in managed systems, legumes are more responsive to elevated [CO{sub 2}] than other plants (e.g. Ainsworth and Long, 2005); however, in natural ecosystems, nutrient availability can limit the response of legumes to elevated [CO{sub 2}] (Hungate et al., 2004; van Groenigen et al., 2006). Here, we consider these observations, outline the mechanisms that underlie them, and examine recent work that advances our understanding of how legumes respond to growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}]. First we highlight the global importance of legumes and provide a brief overview of the symbiotic relationship.

Rogers, A.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Leakey, A. D. B.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) perspective on AOC (assimilable organic carbon) research as related to coliform colonization and compliance problems  

SciTech Connect

The biological stability of treated drinking water has become a major concern for water utilities. The U.S. E.P.A. is concerned from the perspective of coliform MCL compliance and remediation of coliform biofilm problems. The levels of readily assimilable nutrients present in treated water are affected by water treatment processes, but of greatest concern are those processes, such as ozonation, that cause increases in the levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and therefore contribute to biological instability of the water. Thus, the combined use of ozonation (pre-oxidant) and a lower disinfectant residual as an approach to reducing disinfectant byproducts may result in increased bacterial growth, including coliforms, in the distribution system. Information is needed on: the AOC flux level that stimulate coliform growth in biofilm: the specific nutrients and concentrations that can stimulate growth of both coliforms and HPC; treatment strategies to reduce AOC levels and strategies to effectively control biofilm formation where AOC levels cannot be reduced.

Reasoner, D.J.; Rice, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Stability of Organic Solvents and Carbon Electrode in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The effect of different kinds of aprotic organic solvents on the discharge performance and discharge products in Li-O2 batteries was systematically investigated. The discharge products deposited in air cathodes were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, in situ gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We found that a significant amount of Li2O2 can be formed in glyme-based electrolytes during the discharge process, while only small amount of Li2O2 is produced in electrolytes of phosphate, nitrile, ionic liquid and sulfoxide. However, in all the seven types of solvent systems we studied, Li2CO3 and LiF were still formed as byproducts whose compositions are strongly related to the solvents. Li2CO3 is produced not from the carbon air electrode but from oxidation and decomposition of the solvent as we verified by using a 13C-labeled carbon electrode and the solid-state 13C-MAS NMR technique. The formation of Li2CO3 and LiF during discharge will greatly reduce the Coulombic efficiency and cycle life of the Li-air batteries. Therefore, better electrolytes that can ensure the formation of Li2O2 but minimize other reaction products formed on air electrodes of Li-air batteries need to be further investigated.

Xu, Wu; Hu, Jian Z.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Towne, Silas A.; Hardy, John S.; Xiao, Jie; Feng, Ju; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhang, Jian; Ding, Fei; Gross, Mark E.; Zhang, Jiguang

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation  

SciTech Connect

In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97  

SciTech Connect

'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterization and biodegradation of water-soluble biomarkers and organic carbon extracted from low temperature chars  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates that wildfires/biomass combustion may be an important source of labile pyrogenic water-soluble organic matter (Py-WSOM) to aquatic systems. Spectroscopic analysis (of the solid char and Py-WSOM) with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the Py-WSOM extracted from two low temperature chars (one wood, one grass) was dominated by polar moieties (-OH and C-O) derived from depolymerization and fragmentation of lignocellulose. Incubation experiments under aerobic conditions with unsterilized river water suggested that Py-WSOM and associated biomarkers may have turnover rates on the order of weeks to months, consistent with mixing and transport conditions of riverine systems. For example, pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon (Py-DOC) had a half-life of 30-40 days. Turnover rate for the combustion biomarkers was shorter, with levoglucosan and free lignin phenols having a half-life around 3-4 days and polymeric lignin components 13-14 days. The latter observations contradict earlier studies on the biodegradation of dissolved lignin and point to the need for re-assessment of lignin degradation kinetics in well-mixed riverine systems, particularly when such lignin components are derived from thermally altered plant material that may exist in a form more labile than that in highly processed riverine DOM.

Norwood, Matt J.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Harvey, Omar

2013-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBR–NF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBR–NF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 92 ± 5.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBR–NF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4+-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34 mg L?1, respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5 mS cm?1, respectively; these values meet China’s water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBR–NF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate.

Jianxing Wang; Kun Li; Yuansong Wei; Yutao Cheng; Dongbin Wei; Mingyue Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Bioluminescence-Based Method for Measuring Assimilable Organic Carbon in Pretreatment Water for Reverse Osmosis Membrane Desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioluminescence-based assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test was developed for determining the...luminescence and is nutritionally robust. AOC was measured in both a pilot plant and a...treatment. This article presents a marine AOC test for determining the biological growth...

Lauren A. Weinrich; Orren D. Schneider; Mark W. LeChevallier

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic Framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine- Appended Metal-Organic Framework, stationary sources like coal-fired power plants, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been proposed.4 viable absorbents for carbon capture under the aforementioned conditions, and they are presently used

157

Black carbon in the Gulf of Maine : new insights into inputs and cycling of combustion-derived organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of black carbon (BC), the soot and char formed during incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels, have increased over the last century and are estimated to be between 8 and 270 Tg BC/yr. BC may affect ...

Flores Cervantes, Déborah Xanat, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program: flux of organic carbon by rivers to the oceans. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 15 papers presented in this workshop report. The state of knowledge about the role of rivers in the transport, storage and oxidation of carbon is the subject of this report. (KRM)

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mechanistic and kinetic evaluation of organic disinfection by-product and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) formation during the ozonation of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of drinking water results in the formation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic by-products. These compounds are easily utilisable by microorganisms and can result in biological instability of the water. In this study, we have combined a novel bioassay for assessment of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with the detection of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones to study organic by-product formation during ozonation. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of LMW compounds as a function of ozone exposure. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds formed immediately upon exposure to ozone and organic acids comprised 60–80% of the newly formed AOC. Based on experiments performed with and without hydroxyl radical scavengers, we concluded that direct ozone reactions were mainly responsible for the formation of small organic compounds. It was also demonstrated that the laboratory-scale experiments are adequate models to describe the formation of LMW organic compounds during ozonation in full-scale treatment of surface water. Thus, the kinetic and mechanistic information gained during the laboratory-scale experiments can be utilised for upscaling to full-scale water treatment plants.

Frederik Hammes; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Köster; Hans-Peter Kaiser; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Organic carbon and nitrogen in the surface sediments of world oceans and seas: distribution and relationship to bottom topography  

SciTech Connect

Information dealing with the distribution of organic carbon and nitrogen in the top sediments of world oceans and seas has been gathered and evaluated. Based on the available information a master chart has been constructed which shows world distribution of sedimentary organic matter in the oceans and seas. Since organic matter exerts an influence upon the settling properties of fine inorganic particles, e.g. clay minerals and further, the interaction between organic matter and clay minerals is maximal, a relationship between the overall bottom topography and the distribution of clay minerals and organic matter should be observable on a worldwide basis. Initial analysis of the available data indicates that such a relationship does exist and its significance is discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tracing the Fate of Enhanced Organic Carbon Production during a Southern Ocean Fe Fertilization Experiment using Natural Variations in Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the N and C natural stable isotope response during SOFeX--a purposeful iron (Fe) addition experiment in the Fe limited Southern Ocean. One purpose of the study was to determine if relief of phytoplankton Fe stress would increase productivity sufficiently to enhance C export from surface to deep waters. We proposed that N and C stable isotopes would be useful for tracing this export. Iron was added to waters north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front in waters to the southwest of New Zealand. While both sites have high-nutrient, low chlorophyll conditions (HNLC) typical of Fe limitation, [SiO4] a required nutrient for diatoms was low at the northerly site and high at the southern location. The most extensive coverage occurred at the southern site. Here, FeSO4 was added four different times over an {approx}two week period. We found that: (1) Particulate organic nitrogen and carbon in the mixed layer increased by a factor of 2-3 in response to the Fe addition in the southern patch. (2) PN accumulation and NO3- drawdown were both 1-2 {micro}M during the occupation of the bloom, suggesting retention of particulates within the mixed layer of the southern patch. (3) {sub 15}N of PN and of NO{sub 3}{sup -} increased by 1-2{per_thousand} as [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] decreased, and there is a clear contrast between in- and out-patch stations with respect to particulate {sub 15}N. The isotopic fractionation factor for NO{sub 3}{sup -} was near 5-6{per_thousand} and appears to have been unaffected by Fe fertilization. In contrast, there was little change in {delta}{sup 13}C. (4) The > 54 {micro}m size fraction was typically lighter than the 1-54 {micro}m size fraction by about 0.5 {per_thousand} in {delta}{sup 13}C. In the south patch, this difference increased as the bloom progressed, and with increasing PN concentration. This result may have been caused by large chain-forming diatoms responded to the Fe addition and were likely isotopically lighter than smaller flagellates. Similar observations were made for {delta}{sup 13}C.

Altabet, M.A.

2005-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Phenolic Compounds in Secondary Particulate Organic Matter Formed by Photooxidation of Toluene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios for phenolic compounds in secondary particulate organic matter (POM) formed by photooxidation of toluene were studied. Secondary POM generated by photooxidation of toluene using a continuous-flow reactor and an 8 cubic meter indoor smog chamber was collected, and then extracted with acetonitrile. Eight phenolic compounds were identified in the extracts by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer, and their compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios were determined by a gas chromatograph coupled with a combustion furnace followed by an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The majority of the products, including methylnitrophenols and methylnitrocatechols, were isotopically depleted by 5 to 6 permil compared to the initial isotope ratio for toluene, whereas the isotope ratio for 4_nitrophenol remained the same as the initial isotope ratio for toluene. Based on the reaction mechanisms postulated in literature, stable carbon isotope ratios of these produc...

Irei, Satoshi; Huang, Lin; Auld, Janeen; Collin, Fabrice; Hastie, Donald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture: High Performance Metal Organic Frameworks/Polymer Composite Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: A team of six faculty members at Georgia Tech are developing an enhanced membrane by fitting metal organic frameworks, compounds that show great promise for improved carbon capture, into hollow fiber membranes. This new material would be highly efficient at removing CO2 from the flue gas produced at coal-fired power plants. The team is analyzing thousands of metal organic frameworks to identify those that are most suitable for carbon capture based both on their ability to allow coal exhaust to pass easily through them and their ability to select CO2 from that exhaust for capture and storage. The most suitable frameworks would be inserted into the walls of the hollow fiber membranes, making the technology readily scalable due to their high surface area. This composite membrane would be highly stable, withstanding the harsh gas environment found in coal exhaust.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Organic carbon contents of sediments from Lake Schalkenmehrener Maar: A paleoclimate indicator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations on orgnaic carbon in sediments of Maar lakes reveal a relationship to paleotemperatures as reconstructed from Camp Century ice cores. Of great influence are also...

B. Rein; J. F. W. Negendank

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of...strategy for converting electrical energy harvested with renewable strategies, such as solar or wind, into forms that can be stored...particular concern for solar energy, because it is a vast energy...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Organic and Elemental Carbon Measurements during ACE-Asia Suggest a Longer Atmospheric Lifetime for Elemental Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additional measurements made aboard the ship and used in this analysis include concentrations of SO2 and total particle number (27), O3 (28), CO (29), and radon (30). ... This research is a contribution to the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP) and is part of the IGAC Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE). ...

H.-J. Lim; B. J. Turpin; L. M. Russell; T. S. Bates

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Determination of the Concentration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Dispersions Using UV?Visible Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

36 A drop of the solution was deposited on a TEM grid coated by a holey carbon film (lacey carbon, 300 mesh, Ted Pella, Inc.), automatically blotted with a filter paper, and plunged into liquid ethane at its freezing point. ... (11)?Vigolo, B.; Penicaud, A.; Coulon, C.; Sauder, C.; Pailler, R.; Journet, C.; Bernier, P.; Poulin, P. Science 2000, 290, 1331?1334. ...

S. Attal; R. Thiruvengadathan; O. Regev

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

The role of organic carbon, iron, and aluminium oxyhydroxides as trace metal carriers: Comparison between the Trinity River and the Trinity River Estuary (Galveston Bay, Texas)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of many trace elements in aquatic systems can become enriched due to anthropogenic as well as natural processes. In order to investigate particle enrichment processes from the river through an estuary, the changes in solid phase speciation and particle–water partitioning of a number of trace metals (e.g., Fe, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, Co, V) were evaluated from the Trinity River through Galveston Bay to the Ocean. An established way to detect anthropogenic contamination is by normalization of contaminant concentrations to Fe, Al, and/or organic carbon (OC). Particulate metal (Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, V, Ni, Zn, Cd) to Fe, Al, and metal to OC ratios were determined in waters of the Trinity River and Galveston Bay, in order to test 1) if the system is contaminated, and 2) whether Fe, Al, or organic carbon act as a master variable for determining metal concentrations. All particulate trace metals from Trinity River were present in ratios to Fe or Al similar to those from drainage basin soils, which were similar to world world-average soil. As expected, concentrations of Fe, Al and OC in particles from both the Trinity River as well as Galveston Bay were strongly correlated, from which one might conclude that Fe can be used as a reference element that is representative for all three of them. However, ratios to Fe of particle-reactive elements, such as Pb, were found to be significantly and positively correlated to the Fe content of particles from Galveston Bay, while nutrient-type elements, such as Cu, Ni, and Cd, were negatively correlated to their Fe content. Interestingly, suspended particles from the Trinity River did not exhibit any such correlations at all and only varied within a very limited range. The reason for such distinctive correlative behavior that distinguishes riverine from estuarine particles is likely caused by internal cycling of these elements within Galveston Bay, and their relationship to OC. Relationships of trace metals to OC revealed that differences in sources and cycling of OC in the estuary significantly altered the soil imprinted particle make-up. Results from selective leaching experiments of suspended particles in Galveston Bay confirmed the selective enrichment and fractionation processes for the different metals.

Liang-Saw Wen; Kent W. Warnken; Peter H. Santschi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Carbon Sequestration Rates in Organic Layers of Soils Under the Grey Poplar (Populus x canescens) Stands Impacted by Heavy Metal Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To describe carbon sequestration processes in organic layers of forest soils ... limit-value method was used to estimate C sequestration rate in poplar litters. A two-year ... using the ignition method. Input of ...

Agnieszka Medy?ska-Juraszek; Leszek Kuchar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bacterioplankton and Organic Carbon Dynamics in the Lower Mesohaline Chesapeake Bay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...organic matter fuels the upper mesohaline...organic matter fuels the upper mesohaline...of the oxygen consumption (25-27) and...aboard the research vessel immediately after...north, serving to fuel bacterial oxygen consumption. Major differences...

Robert B. Jonas; Jon H. Tuttle

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extracellular organic compounds...directly to the cells with a graphite...dioxide to organic compounds...microbial production of multicarbon...to convert solar energy that...hydrogen production was verified...outlet, but a solar-powered...a) H-cell device for...errors of the organic acid and...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A New Organic Acid to Stimulate Deep Wells in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonate acidizing has been carried out using HCl-based stimulation fluids for decades. However, at high temperatures, HCl does not produce acceptable results because of its fast reaction, acid penetration, and hence surface dissolution, and its...

Al-Douri, Ahmad F

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Changes in soil organic carbon storage predicted by Earth system models during the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown et

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Oxygen Utilization and Organic Carbon Remineralization in the Upper Water Column of the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a part of the JGOFS synthesis and modeling project, researchers have been working to synthesize the WOCE/JGOFS/DOE/NOAA global CO2...survey data to better understand carbon cycling processes in the oceans. Wor...

Richard A. Feely; Christopher L. Sabine; Reiner Schlitzer…

176

The carbon isotope composition of ancient CO2 based on higher-plant organic matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carbon dioxide, and global warming. Geophys. Res...an indicator of global ecological change...invertebrates and coals from the Australian...potential of humic coals from dry pyrolysis...Fossil plants and global warming at the TriassicJurassic...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

RESPONSES OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND TOTAL CARBON STORAGE TO CHANGES IN CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total. For contemporary climate with 315 ppmv CO2, TEM estimated that global NPP is 47.9 PgC/yr and global total carbon-q climate and +20.6% (9.9 PgC/yr) for the GISS climate. The responses of global total carbon storage are +17

178

Chlorine Decay and Disinfection By-product Formation of Dissolved Organic Carbon Fractions with Goethite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water from the raw water intake at Barberton, Ohio water treatment plant was collected on two separate dates and fractionated into operationally defined dissolved organic… (more)

Wannamaker, Christopher L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A model for the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon in harvested tidal freshwater marshes to surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems and its response to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The tidal freshwater marshes dominated by Phragmites australis (common reed) in the Chongxi Wetland are important components of the Yangtze River estuary in China. The litter from P. australis is exported to the surrounding estuarine area and the sea with the tidal flushing in the form of plant residue, particulate organic matter, and dissolved organic matter and is an important organic carbon resource of the East China Sea. A model was constructed using STELLA® software (version 9.1.3) to simulate the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon to surrounding estuary and ocean ecosystems. The model is based on the monitoring and observational data from field surveys and published information on the Chongxi Wetland from 2008 to 2011, and the response of the total organic carbon flowing out of the wetland to global changes was also predicted in conditions of plant shoots that were annually harvested in winter. The results demonstrate the following: (1) the annual contributed organic carbon is 891 g C m?2, of which 612 g C m?2 flows out of the wetland directly as plant residue; (2) total organic carbon continually increases after a short decrease at the start of April of 2010, retains a high value from mid-July to mid-November and rapidly decreases to approximately zero during the harvest of the aboveground plant organs; and (3) accumulated annual organic carbon contributions to the surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems are predicted to increase as the global average temperature rises, and the sea level increases.

Jiarui Zhang; Sven E. Jørgensen; Jianjian Lu; Søren N. Nielsen; Qiang Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...powered by solar energy is...converted to organic compounds...strategies for the production of fuels...harvesting solar energy...electrodes to cells, has received...microbial fuel cells. Bioresour...microbial production platform...challenges in solar energy utilization...conversion of organic matter to...

Kelly P. Nevin; Sarah A. Hensley; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Jianhong Ou; Trevor L. Woodard; Oona L. Snoeyenbos-West; Derek R. Lovley

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube probe resolves the subunit organization of protein complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......synthesized by the conventional DC arc discharge method. Synthesized carbon nanotubes...aligned on a glass plate. An ac electric field of 5 MHz and 1.8 kV cm...Hl-induced compaction in aligned in an arc. The largest subunit was always......

Ken I. Hohmura; Yutakatti Itokazu; Shige H. Yoshimura; Gaku Mizuguchi; Yu-suke Masamura; Kunio Takeyasu; Yasushi Shiomi; Toshiki Tsurimoto; Hidehiro Nishijima; Seiji Akita; Yoshikazu Nakayama

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA Citation Nevin, K...attractive strategy to convert solar energy that is harvested intermittently...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products more effectively...nature of renewable sources of energy, most notably solar and wind, is leading to a search for strategies to capture the electrical energy produced from these sources in...

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ultrafast Viscous Permeation of Organic Solvents Through Diamond-Like Carbon Nanosheets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fig. S14 and table S3). This membrane thus offers an innovative ultrafiltration membrane for organic solvents. The observed flux is overwhelmingly...synthesis (23), production of biofuels (24), environmental remediation (25), and oil extraction in the food industry (19...

Santanu Karan; Sadaki Samitsu; Xinsheng Peng; Keiji Kurashima; Izumi Ichinose

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

Potential responses of soil organic carbon to global environmental?change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...this organic matter fraction. The Bomb 14 C Tracer. The incorporation of 14 C produced in the early 1960s by atmospheric thermonuclear weapons testing (bomb 14 C) into SOM during the past 30 years provides a direct measure of the amount of fast-cycling...

Susan E. Trumbore

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Rapid removal of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon over the Eurasian shelves of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOC pool based on apparently conservative mixing behavior of tDOC across the Eurasian continental shelf water, introduced by rivers, after a few years residence on the shelf. Elevated concentrations of DOC (N120 M C) were observed in low salinity (~27) water over the Makarov Basin, suggesting inputs of t

Hansell, Dennis

187

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

188

Organic Carbon Cycling in East China Sea Shelf Sediments: Linkages with Hypoxia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Phenols ............................................................................................. 80 3.3.4 Plant Pigments .............................................................................................. 87 3.3.5 PCA and Cluster Analysis ............................................................................ 88 3.4 Discussion...). Lambda-8 (?8), defined as the total weight in milligrams of the sum of V, S, and C phenols, normalized to 100 mg of OC, has been commonly used as an index of LOP concentrations (Hedges and Parker 1976). ?6, which does not have the C LOPs included, can...

Li, Xinxin

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

SciTech Connect

UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary building units bound by DOBDC resulting in 1D hexagonal pores about 11 angstroms in diameter. Surface areas range from 800 to 1500 sq m/g for the different MOFs. Mg/DOBDC outperformed all MOF and zeolite materials evaluated to date, with about 25 wt% CO{sub 2} captured by this MOF at flue gas conditions ({approx}0.13 atm CO{sub 2} pressure, 311K). In simulated flue gas without oxygen, the zero-length (ZLC) system was very useful in quickly simulating the effect of long term exposure to impurities on the MOFs. Detailed adsorption studies on MOF pellets have shown that water does not inhibit CO{sub 2} adsorption for MOFs as much as it does for typical zeolites. Moreover, some MOFs retain a substantial CO{sub 2} capacity even with a modest water loading at room temperature. Molecular modeling was a key activity in three areas of our earlier DOE/NETL-sponsored MOF-based research on CC. First, the team was able to effectively simulate CO{sub 2} and other gas adsorption isotherms for more than 20 MOFs, and the knowledge obtained was used to help predict new MOF structures that should be effective for CO{sub 2} adsorption at low pressure. The team also showed that molecular modeling could be utilized to predict the hydrothermal stability of a given MOF. Finally, the team showed that low moisture level exposure actually enhanced the CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of a particular MOF, HKUST-1.

David A Lesch

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of implantation energy and carbon concentration on the friction and wear of titanium?implanted steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry sliding friction and wear measurements were used to evaluate two implantation processes which increase the C concentration in Ti?implanted steels. In the first process Ti ions were implanted at a low energy (50 keV) in order to enhance the efficiency of vacuum carburization over what is achievable at higher energies (e.g. 190 keV). In the second a dual implantation process C ions were implanted into steels already implanted with Ti ions at high energy (190 keV). The first process produced a low friction (?=0.3) scuff resistant surface at a fluence of 2×101 7/cm2 40% lower than the fluence required for similar behavior by 190?keV implants. At fluences of 2×101 7/cm2 each the dual implantation produced a modest decrease in friction (?=0.5) accompanied by stick slip and some wear resistance compared to nonimplanted steel (?=0.6). Auger spectroscopy and energy?dispersive x?ray analysis were used to analyze the surface composition produced by the two processes at fluences of 2×101 7/cm2. The dual implanted surface had more Ti more C and a greater C/Ti ratio than the low?energy implanted surface. The latter however had more C derived from vacuum carburization than the dual implanted surface. Both processes resulted in identical surface C concentrations. We concluded therefore that the improved tribological surface of Ti?implanted steel results from vacuum carburization and not just the presence of excess C.

I. L. Singer; R. A. Jeffries

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Steam plasma jet for treatment of contaminated water with high-concentration 1,4-dioxane organic pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A steam plasma jet (SPJ) by using both water and 1,4-dioxane aqueous solution (DAS) as working medium was injected into contaminated water to decompose 1,4-dioxane. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis showed that the formation of the excited species CH* and C2* depended on the concentration of 1,4-dioxane. The influences of SPJ gas temperatures for different working mediums were discussed. The 1,4-dioxane decomposition was enhanced when DAS was used as working medium and SPJ was injected into DAS. Synthesis gas (a mixture of H2 and CO) and CO2 were the main products in gaseous effluents.

G. H. Ni; Y. Zhao; Y. D. Meng; X. K. Wang; H. Toyoda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

194

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods  

SciTech Connect

This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effect of cropland management and slope position on soil organic carbon pool at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil organic matter is strongly related to soil type, landscape morphology, and soil and crop management practices. Therefore, long-term (15–36-years) effects of six cropland management systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in 0–30 cm depth were studied for the period of 1939–1999 at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds (pool ranged from 24.5 Mg ha?1 in the 32-years moldboard tillage corn (Zea mays L.)–wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–meadow–meadow rotation with straight row farming and annual application of fertilizer (N:P:K=5:9:17) of 56–112 kg ha?1 and cattle (Bos taurus) manure of 9 Mg ha?1 as the prevalent system (MTR-P) to 65.5 Mg ha?1 in the 36-years no tillage continuous corn with contour row farming and annual application of 170–225 kg N ha?1 and appropriate amounts of P and K, and 6–11 Mg ha?1 of cattle manure as the improved system (NTC-M). The difference in SOC pool among management systems ranged from 2.4 to 41 Mg ha?1 and was greater than 25 Mg ha?1 between NTC-M and the other five management systems. The difference in the SOC pool of NTC-M and that of no tillage continuous corn (NTC) were 16–21 Mg ha?1 higher at the lower slope position than at the middle and upper slope positions. The effect of slope positions on SOC pools of the other management systems was significantly less (water conservation farming on SOC pool were accumulative. The NTC-M treatment with application of NPK fertilizer, lime, and cattle manure is an effective cropland management system for SOC sequestration.

Y Hao; R Lal; L.B Owens; R.C Izaurralde; W.M Post; D.L Hothem

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Generic Approach for Dispersing Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes:? The Strength of a Weak Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generic noncovalent approach for dispersing high concentrations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in organic as well as aqueous solutions of synthetic block copolymers is presented. It is suggested that a weak, long-ranged entropic ...

Rina Shvartzman-Cohen; Yael Levi-Kalisman; Einat Nativ-Roth; Rachel Yerushalmi-Rozen

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

SciTech Connect

A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

198

Influence of Stand Composition on Soil Organic Carbon Stabilization and Biochemistry in Aspen and Conifer Forests of Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Quacking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is an iconic species in western United States that offers multiple ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration. A shift in… (more)

Roman Dobarco, Mercedes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fully Printed Separated Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistor Circuits and Its Application in Organic Light Emitting Diode Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advantages of printed electronics and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are combined for the first time for display electronics. Conductive silver ink and 98% semiconductive SWCNT solutions are used to print back-gated thin film ...

Pochiang Chen; Yue Fu; Radnoosh Aminirad; Chuan Wang; Jialu Zhang; Kang Wang; Kosmas Galatsis; Chongwu Zhou

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Barium in Twilight Zone suspended matter as a potential proxy for particulate organic carbon remineralization: Results for the North Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considering TdR conversion factors 1 and 2 x 10 18 cellsrates using TdR conversion factors of 1 - 2 x 10 18mol -1 and a carbon conversion factor of 15 fg C cell -1 ;

Dehairs, F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Production of fullerenes using concentrated solar flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing soot containing high amounts of fullerenes comprising: providing a primary concentrator capable of impingement of a concentrated beam of sunlight onto a carbon source to cause vaporization of carbon and subsequent formation of fullerenes, or providing a solar furnace having a primary concentrator with a focal point that concentrates a solar beam of sunlight; providing a reflective secondary concentrator having an entrance aperture and an exit aperture at the focal point of the solar furnace; providing a carbon source at the exit aperture of the secondary concentrator; supplying an inert gas over the carbon source to keep the secondary concentrator free from vaporized carbon; and impinging a concentrated beam of sunlight from the secondary concentrator on the carbon source to vaporize the carbon source into a soot containing high amounts of fullerenes.

Fields, Clark L. (Greeley, CO); Pitts, John Roland (Lakewood, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Hale, Mary Jane (Golden, CO); Bingham, Carl E. (Denver, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Widespread influence of resuspended sediments on oceanic particulate organic carbon: Insights from radiocarbon and aluminum contents in sinking particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between proxy records in a sediment drift, Science, 298,the Japan Sea measured with sediment traps, Mar. Chem. , 91,and organic constituents in sediments from the con- tinental

Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M; Eglinton, Timothy I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

PII S0016-7037(99)00066-6 Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from California continental margin sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sediments DAVID J. BURDIGE,1, * WILLIAM M. BERELSON,2 KENNETH H. COALE,3 JAMES MCMANUS,4 and KENNETH S) from marine sediments represent a poorly constrained component of the oceanic carbon cycle that may measurements of DOC fluxes from continental margin sediments (water depths ranging from 95 to 3,700 m

Burdige, David

205

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Recovery of Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling and Microbial Community Functionality in a Post-Lignite Mining Rehabilitation Chronosequence in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al., 2005). Organic carbon is important for 4 many soil processes, like water and nutrient holding capacity. On a larger scale, soil carbon sequestration is important for mitigating increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Nitrogen... in determining the microbially-driven portion of ecosystem recovery and its influence on soil carbon sequestration. For the nitrogen side of the organic matter equation, mineralization rates were evaluated to determine nitrogen turnover rates. Mineralization...

Ng, Justin

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Quantifying the flux of CaCO3 and organic carbon from the surface ocean using in situ measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) determined from in situ measurements of oxygen and nitrogen gas concentrations measured on the same mooring; Wong et al., 1999] and by sediment water dissolution and burial measurements [Hales and Emerson, 1997

208

Constraining the propagation of bomb-radiocarbon through the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of long term frozen storage of seawater for DOC analyses.storage rather than an intrinsic property of the seawaterstorage on DOC concentration and isotopic ?delity in small aliquots of seawater

Beaupré, Steven R; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The feasibility of low CO2 concentration targets and the role of bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC 1992) calls for stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interferenc...

Christian Azar; Kristian Lindgren; Michael Obersteiner; Keywan Riahi…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Transcriptome-Wide Changes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Gene Expression Regulated by Carbon Dioxide and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism Regulator CIA5/CCM1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microalgae because of the poor solubility and diffusion rate of CO2 in water and the critical importance...to 152 ppm). Selection of gas flow lines and position on...Nar1 gene family by carbon and nitrogen. Protist 157 : 421-433...

Wei Fang; Yaqing Si; Stephen Douglass; David Casero; Sabeeha S. Merchant; Matteo Pellegrini; Istvan Ladunga; Peng Liu; Martin H. Spalding

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

One-step production of lactate from cellulose as the sole carbon source without any other organic nutrient by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

step step production of lactate from cellulose as the sole carbon source without any other organic nutrient by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis Xiao-Zhou Zhang a , Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh a,b , Zhiguang Zhu a , Y.-H. Percival Zhang a,b,c,n a Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 December 2010 Received in revised form 9 April 2011 Accepted 25 April 2011 Keywords: Bacillus subtilis Cellulase engineering Consolidated bioprocessing Endoglucanase Lactate Metabolic engineering Directed evolution a b s t r a c t Although intensive efforts have been made to create recombinant cellulolytic microorganisms,

217

Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine collected indoor and outdoor 3-4 day samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2

Paciorek, Chris

218

Relation between surface adsorption states and emf in a solid electrolyte concentration cell during carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum studied by local current measurement  

SciTech Connect

The importance of measuring adsorption during surface catalysis has been emphasized often. This is true for the oxidation of carbon monoxide on a platinum surface. Surface adsorption states during the reaction under steady states can be learned from electromotive force (emf) measurement with appropriate assumptions. Two mechanisms for emf generation have been proposed, one is that only oxygen activity generates emf, the other is that both oxygen and CO adsorption generates emf.

Okamoto, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kudo, T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Preparation of activated carbon aerogel and its application to electrode material for electric double layer capacitor in organic electrolyte: Effect of activation temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon aerogel was chemically activated with KOH at various activation temperatures with the aim of improving the electrochemical performance of carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode. Electrochemical performance o...

Soon Hyung Kwon; Eunji Lee; Bum-Soo Kim…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in tap water in relation to utilization of substrates at concentrations of a few micrograms per liter.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concentration of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) available for strain P1525 varied from...C has been obtained (28). Hence, the AOC available for strain P17 varied from 1...rate in the types of tap water tested. The AOC concentration available for P. aeruginosa...

D van der Kooij; J P Oranje; W A Hijnen

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development and Field-Scale Optimization of a Honeycomb Zeolite Rotor Concentrator/Recuperative Oxidizer for the Abatement of Volatile Organic Carbons from Semiconductor Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Also the developed rotor performance’s was evaluated in the field; (2) Direct Fired Thermal Oxidizer (DFTO), Recuperative Oxidizer (RO), Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer (RTO) and Regenerative Catalytic oxidizer (RCO) are the available incinerators and the RO was selected as the oxidizer in this work; (3) The overall performance of the developed rotor/oxidizer was explored in a field scale under varying conditions; (4) The energy saving strategy was fulfilled by reducing heat loss from the oxidizer and recovering heat from the exhaust gas. ... The available types of oxidizers include Direct Fired Thermal Oxidizer (DFTO), Recuperative Oxidizer (RO), Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer (RTO) and Regenerative Catalytic oxidizer (RCO). ... cost models were derived for recuperative thermal (TO) and regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTO). ...

Ji Yang; Yufeng Chen; Limei Cao; Yuling Guo; Jinping Jia

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System...

223

PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition dissolved organic carbon concentration. On two occasions during the austral summer, bacteria-free water of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR

Sommaruga, Ruben

224

Changes in soil organic carbon under biofuel crops K R I S T I N A J . A N D E R S O N -T E I X E I R A *, S A R A H C . D AV I S w , M I C H A E L D . M A S T E R S * and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in soil organic carbon under biofuel crops K R I S T I N A J . A N D E R S O N - T E I X E of growing biofuel crops will be the sequestration or release of carbon (C) in soil. Soil organic carbon (SOC) represents an important C sink in the lifecycle C balances of biofuels and strongly influences soil quality

DeLucia, Evan H.

225

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

228

Linking development and determinacy with organic acid efflux from proteoid roots of white lupin grown with low phosphorus and ambient or elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration  

SciTech Connect

White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) was grown in hydroponic culture with 1 {micro}M phosphorus to enable the development of proteoid roots to be observed in conjunction with organic acid exudation. Discrete regions of closely spaced, determinate secondary laterals emerged in near synchrony on the same plant. One day after reaching their final length, citrate exudation occurred over a 3-d pulse. The rate of exudation varied diurnally, with maximal rates during the photoperiod. At the onset of citrate efflux, rootlets had exhausted their apical meristems and had differentiated root hairs and vascular tissues along their lengths. Neither in vitro phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase nor citrate synthase activity was correlated with the rate of citrate exudation. The authors suggest that an unidentified transport process, presumably at the plasma membrane, regulates citrate efflux. Growth with elevated atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] promoted earlier onset of rootlet determinacy by 1 d, resulting in shorter rootlets and citrate export beginning 1 d earlier as a 2-d diurnal pulse. Citrate was the dominant organic acid exported, and neither the rate of exudation per unit length of root nor the composition of exudate was altered by atmospheric [CO{sub 2}].

Watt, M.; Evans, J.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Carbon sequestration and carbon management policy effects on production agriculture in the Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially of carbon dioxide, has led to attempts to implement carbon policies in order to limit and… (more)

Zivkovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Concentrating Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the concentrated information of tripartite quantum states. For three parties Alice, Bob and Charlie, it is defined as the maximal mutual information achievable between Alice and Charlie via local operations and classical communication performed by Charlie and Bob. The gap between classical and quantum concentrated information is shown to be an operational figure of merit for a state merging protocol involving shared mixed states and no distributed entanglement. We derive upper and lower bounds on the concentrated information, and obtain a closed expression for arbitrary pure tripartite states in the asymptotic setting. In this situation, one-way classical communication is shown to be sufficient for optimal information concentration.

Alexander Streltsov; Soojoon Lee; Gerardo Adesso

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

232

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Drivers of phytoplankton, bacterioplankton, and zooplankton carbon biomass in tropical hydroelectric reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Studies of carbon sources in plankton communities are important because carbon content has become the main currency used in functional studies of aquatic ecosystems. We evaluated the contribution to the total organic carbon pool from different plankton communities (phytoplankton, bacterioplankton, and zooplankton – C-biota) and its drivers in eight tropical hydroelectric reservoirs with different trophic and hydrological status and different physical features. Our systems were separated into three groups based on trophic status and water residence time: (i) mesotrophic with low residence time (ML); (ii) mesotrophic with high residence time (MH); and (iii) eutrophic with low residence time (EL). Our hypothesis that reservoirs with low water residence times and low nutrient concentrations would show the lowest C-biota was supported. Phytoplankton carbon (C-phy) showed the highest concentrations in the EL, followed by MH and ML systems. The EL group also showed significantly higher zooplankton carbon (C-zoo). No significant difference was observed for bacteria carbon (C-bac) among the three system groups. In addition to trophic status and water residence time, regression analyses revealed that water temperature, light, pH, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were the main drivers of plankton communities in these large tropical hydroelectric reservoirs.

Lúcia H.S. Silva; Vera L.M. Huszar; Marcelo M. Marinho; Luciana M. Rangel; Jandeson Brasil; Carolina D. Domingues; Christina C. Branco; Fábio Roland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Wetland (peat) Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wetland (peat) Carbon Cycle Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, twenty times more potent than CO2, but atmospheric concentrations of CH4 under future climate change are...

235

11, 26552696, 2011 Organic functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) name biomass burning (BB) as the largest (42%) combustion source of pri- mary organic carbon fossil-fuel combustion and burning and non-burning forest sources of the measured organic aerosol. The OM

Russell, Lynn

236

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field S. Q. LANG,1 G environment, the Lost City hydrothermal field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Total hydrolizable amino acid (THAA carbon (2.5­15.1%). The amino acid distributions, and the relative concentrations of these compounds

Gilli, Adrian

237

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil Cation Composition Sarah E the influence of tree species on soil carbon and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a common garden of replicated substantial divergence in foliar and soil base cation concentrations and soil pH among spe- cies, we

Minnesota, University of

238

Correlation of Soil and Sediment Organic Matter Polarity to Aqueous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compared with published partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution of the measured partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vs. percent polar organic carbon (POC to their organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (Koc) for carbon tetrachloride (CT) and 1

239

Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization: Imperial College-London Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Biomass, - Waste to Energy, - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar PV, Wind Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: workspace.imperial.ac.uk/energyfutureslab/Public/2010-03-17-Bangladesh Country: Bangladesh Southern Asia Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Bangladesh Screenshot

240

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of etch pits during carbon doping of gallium arsenide with carbon tetrachloride to examine the effects of carbon tetrachloride concentration and temperature on the morphology of carbon with increasing carbon tetrachloride concentration. Step bunching and pinning was observed at a IV/III ratio

Li, Lian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

242

Panoramic View of Electrochemical Pseudocapacitor and Organic Solar Cell Research in Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Panoramic View of Electrochemical Pseudocapacitor and Organic Solar Cell Research in Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM) ... His research group is engaged in a wide range of interdisciplinary research projects at the intersection between interfacial and transport phenomena, material science, and biology for sustainable energy conversion, storage, and efficiency technologies. ... Of these, carbon capture was phased out in the early stages of the project to concentrate available resources on the electrochemical pseudocapacitor and organic solar cell themes. ...

Jordan C. Aguirre; Amy Ferreira; Hong Ding; Samson A. Jenekhe; Nikos Kopidakis; Mark Asta; Laurent Pilon; Yves Rubin; Sarah H. Tolbert; Benjamin J. Schwartz; Bruce Dunn; Vidvuds Ozolins

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

244

CarbonSolve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarbonSolve CarbonSolve Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarbonSolve Agency/Company /Organization: CarbonSolve Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.carbonsolve.com Web Application Link: www.carbonsolve.com Cost: Paid CarbonSolve Screenshot References: CarbonSolve[1] Logo: CarbonSolve The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability objectives - including carbon, water, waste, employee engagement, or supply chain related initiatives into measureable metrics and trackable processes. Overview The CarbonSolve platform is designed to address a broad spectrum of needs, and makes possible for organizations to transform their sustainability

245

Development of Land Use Regression Models for elemental, organic carbon, PAH and hopanes/steranes in 10 ESCAPE/TRANSPHORM European study areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to model concentrations of mainly traffic related air pollutants (nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) mass or absorbance). ...

Aleksandra Jedynska; Gerard Hoek; Meng Wang; Marloes Eeftens; Josef Cyrys; Menno Keuken; Christophe Ampe; Rob Beelen; Giulia Cesaroni; Francesco Forastiere; Marta Cirach; Kees de Hoogh; Audrey De Nazelle; Wenche Nystad; Christophe Declercq; Kirsten Thorup Eriksen; Konstantina Dimakopoulou; Timo Lanki; Kees Meliefste; Mark J Nieuwenhuijsen; Tarja Yli-Tuomi; Ole Raaschou-Nielsen; Bert Brunekreef; Ingeborg Kooter

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - authigenic carbonate formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the flux of carbon... to the deep sea. However, the accumulation rate of authigenic uranium depends not only on the organic carbon... into an organic carbon rain rate (export...

248

Carbon Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystems in Response to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Altered Nutrients Availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Our results show that elevated CO2 led to enhanced photosynthetic carbon uptake and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production. DOC occupied larger percentage in total organic carbon production in high CO2 environment. N addition stimulated biomass...

Song, Chao

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

Chorover, Jon

250

Carbon for Farmers: Assessing the Potential for Soil Carbon Sequestration in the Old Peanut Basin of Senegal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in soil organic matter of degraded Sahelian ... could play a significant role in the global carbon (C) uptake through terrestrial sinks while,...in situ soil and biomass carbon

Petra Tschakert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Black Carbon and the Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduces net CO 2 release by permanent deforestation...constitute a substantial fraction of the “missing carbon...estimate of oxygen release assuming 10% of...constitute a substantial fraction of sedimentary organic...formation by vegetation fires may be important...from soils becoming airborne by wind erosion...

Thomas A. J. Kuhlbusch

1998-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING QUANTITATIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / SEPTEMBER 2000 / 865 CARBON FIBER ADSORPTION USING carbon fiber (ACF) adsorbents. The DR isotherm parameter, k, depends on the adsorbate as well volatile organic compound adsorbates and activated carbon fiber adsorbents. INTRODUCTION Activated carbon

Cal, Mark P.

253

Investigation on the Charging Process of Li2O2-Based Air Electrodes in Li-O2 Batteries with Organic Carbonate Electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

The charge processes of Li-O2 batteries were investigated by analyzing the gas evolution by in situ gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) technique. The mixture of Li2O2/Fe3O4/Super P carbon/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was used as the starting air electrode material and 1M LiTFSI in carbonate-based solvents was used as electrolyte. It was found that Li2O2 is reactive to 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and PVDF binder used in the electrode preparation. During the 1st charge (up to 4.6 V), O2 was the main component in the gases released. The amount of O2 measured by GC/MS was consistent with the amount of Li2O2 decomposed in the electrochemical process as measured by the charge capacity, indicative of the good chargeability of Li2O2. However, after the cell was discharged to 2.0 V in O2 atmosphere and re-charged to ~ 4.6 V in the second cycle, CO2 was dominant in the released gases. Further analysis of the discharged air electrode by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that lithium-containing carbonate species (lithium alkyl carbonate and/or Li2CO3) were the main reaction products. Therefore, compatible electrolyte and electrodes as well as the electrode preparation procedures need to be developed for long term operation of rechargeable Li-O2 or Li-air batteries.

Xu, Wu; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Wang, Deyu; Towne, Silas A.; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Jiguang

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nonlinearity of Ocean Carbon Cycle Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon cycle feedbacks are usually categorized into carbon–concentration and carbon–climate feedbacks, which arise owing to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and changing physical climate. Both feedbacks are often assumed to operate ...

Jörg Schwinger; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Christoph Heinze; Laurent Bopp; James R. Christian; Marion Gehlen; Tatiana Ilyina; Chris D. Jones; David Salas-Mélia; Joachim Segschneider; Roland Séférian; Ian Totterdell

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

256

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water...

257

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Carbon and Energy Reporter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon and Energy Reporter AgencyCompany Organization: Johnson Controls Sector: Energy User Interface: Website, Mobile Device ComplexityEase of...

259

Carbon Jungle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jungle Jungle Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Jungle Place El Segundo, California Zip 90246 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Jungle's mission is to decrease CO2 in the atmosphere by planting and managing tree plantations, increasing awareness of the facts behind increased CO2 in the atmosphere, and giving companies a means to participate in carbon credit trading. References Carbon Jungle[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Jungle is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "Carbon Jungle" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Jungle&oldid=343237" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

260

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration” refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

OrganicHybrid PV Background.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Excitonic solar cells, comprised of materials such as organic semiconductors, inorganic colloidal quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes, are fundamentally different than crystalline,...

263

WithCarbonSequestration Biological-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological BARRIERS · Cost · Feedstock availability · Fermentative micro-organisms #12;Targets and Status 322726Net

264

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sludge organics bioavailability  

SciTech Connect

Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Black Carbon-Inclusive Modeling Approaches for Estimating the Aquatic Fate of Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three versions of the model were developed in which sediment-water partitioning was described using (i) an amorphous organic carbon (AOC) partitioning sorption model without BC sorption, (ii) a combined AOC and BC sorption model based on the Freundlich isotherm, and (iii) a combined BC-AOC model based on the Langmuir isotherm. ... However, for estimation of KTOC or dissolved water concentrations, both versions of the combined AOC and BC sorption models provided greatly improved estimates compared to the AOC-only model. ... Multimedia fate models typically assume that amorphous organic carbon (AOC) is entirely responsible for the sorbing capacity of solids for hydrophobic compounds and that the solid-water distribution coefficient Kd (LW/kgdw) can be readily estimated from the mass fraction of organic carbon in the solid and the organic carbon normalized solid-water partition coefficient (KAOC) (1), where fAOC is the mass fraction of AOC in dried soil or sediment and KAOC (LW/kgAOC) is the organic carbon normalized solid–water partition coefficient. ...

James M. Armitage; Ian T. Cousins; N. Johan Persson; Örjan Gustafsson; Gerard Cornelissen; Tuomo Saloranta; Dag Broman; Kristoffer Næs

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Organic matter in the Paleogene west European rift: Bresse and Valence salt basins (France)  

SciTech Connect

The Bresse and Valence basins are two adjacent segments of the West European rift. They contain thick Paleogene halite sequences including intercalated and interfingering siliciclastic material and carbonate and sulfate deposits. Source rock samples in this study were mainly taken from the depocenters because of maximum sampling coverage. Organic matter (OM) is generally immature and occurs primarily within intercalated nonhalitic beds. The Bresse basin seems to contain more OM in (1) the Intermediate Salt Formation (Priabonian), composed of alternating laminated carbonate and halite beds; (2) the upper part of the Upper Salt Formation (clayey carbonate beds; Rupelian), affected by synsedimentary halite solution; and (3) the solution breccia which immediate overlies the salt sequence. In the Valence basin, the organic-rich layers are concentrated in the Subsalt Formation (carbonate beds; Priabonian), and the upper part of the Lower Salt Formation (laminates; Rupelian). In both basins, type III organic matter is associated with terrigenous facies. Type I is abundant in the Valence basin (laminites), and type II seems to be more abundant in the Bresse basin. The amount of OM varies considerably, and we suppose it is higher toward the basin margins. From studies made in evaporite basins in other region, which are also known to have significant amounts of organic matter, we find a similar range of organic composition. Such studies are of interest because of their petroleum potential and for understanding precise depositional environments and waste disposal problems (gas generation with local heat source).

Curial, A.; Dumas, D.; Moretto, R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

VOLUME 89, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 JULY 2002 Self-Organization of a Carbide Superlattice during Deposition of Carbon on Mo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbides in transition metals has long been a subject of interest since the Industrial Revolution. Re- cently, many of the same transition metals have been used as catalysts for the production of single-Organization of a Carbide Superlattice during Deposition of Carbon on Mo F. Tsui* and P. A. Ryan Department of Physics

270

NETL: Carbon Storage - Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRCSP MRCSP Carbon Storage Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing MRCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) was established to assess the technical potential, economic viability, and public acceptability of carbon storage within a region consisting of nine contiguous states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. A group of leading universities, state geological surveys, non-governmental organizations and private companies, led by Battelle Memorial Institute, has been assembled to carry out this research. The MRCSP currently consists of nearly 40 members; each contributing technical knowledge, expertise and cost sharing.

271

Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species  

SciTech Connect

Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Emission Controls Versus Meteorological Conditions in Determining Aerosol Concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games  

SciTech Connect

A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on August 8th-24th, 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale to improve the air quality over Beijing.

Gao, Yi; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Meigen

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Polyethylene passive samplers for measuring hydrophobic organic chemical concentrations in sediment porewaters and their use in predicting bioaccumulation in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) from sites near Boston, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to determine the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, the following areas of research were explored: (1) the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices in ...

Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Microbially induced magnesium carbonation reactions as a strategy for carbon sequestration in ultramafic mine tailings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased due to anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion, causing higher global temperatures and other negative environmental effects. CO2 sequestration… (more)

McCutcheon, Jenine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plant… (more)

Kochsiek, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Introduction to carbon physics Carbon is in many ways a unique element. Most importantly, it is crucial for life on earth as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

out of carbon. Scientifically, the whole huge field of organic chemistry deals entirely with carbon with producing nanotubes with specific properties. A number of reviews and books about carbon nanotubes have been

Johannesson, Henrik

278

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

280

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

282

Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Portal Forest Carbon Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forest Carbon Portal Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United States Agency for International Development, United Kingdom Department for International Development, Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com/ Forest Carbon Portal Screenshot References: FCP[1] "Ecosystem Marketplace's Forest Carbon Portal is a clearinghouse of information, feature stories, event listings, project details, 'how-to' guides, news, and market analysis on forest-based carbon sequestration projects. Deforestation and land-use change are responsible for 17% of the

283

Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Common Carbon Metric Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Common Carbon Metric Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/Common-Carbon-Metric-for_Pilot_Testing_220410.p Common Carbon Metric Screenshot References: Common Carbon Metrics [1] "This paper is offered by the United Nations Environment Programme's Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative (UNEP-SBCI), a partnership between the UN and public and private stakeholders in the building sector, promoting sustainable building practices globally. The purpose of this

284

Establishing Policy Relevant Background (PRB) Ozone Concentrations in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado ... Processes that contribute to PRB ozone concentrations include photochemistry associated with natural emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide (CO) from sources such as biogenic emissions (not including agricultural activities), wildfires, lightning, the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from outside of North America, and stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone. ... Models generally find little ozone production in wildfire plumes for short aging times (days) because NOx emissions are low and conversion to peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) is rapid. ...

Elena C. McDonald-Buller; David T Allen; Nancy Brown; Daniel J. Jacob; Daniel Jaffe; Charles E. Kolb; Allen S. Lefohn; Samuel Oltmans; David D. Parrish; Greg Yarwood; Lin Zhang

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

Gaspar, P.P.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in the presence of zero-valent iron.  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to achieve the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride through anaerobic and aerobic bioremediation and chemical transformation have met with limited success because of the conditions required and the formation of hazardous intermediates. Recently, particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used with limited success for in situ remediation of carbon tetrachloride. We studied a modified microparticulate product that combines controlled-release carbon with ZVI for stimulation of in situ chemical reduction of persistent organic compounds in groundwater. With this product, a number of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes were combined to create very strongly reducing conditions that stimulate rapid, complete dechlorination of organic solvents. In principle, the organic component of ZVI microparticles is nutrient rich and hydrophilic and has high surface area capable of supporting the growth of bacteria in the groundwater environment. In our experiments, we found that as the bacteria grew, oxygen was consumed, and the redox potential decreased to values reaching -600 mV. The small modified ZVI particles provide substantial reactive surface area that, in these conditions, directly stimulates chemical dechlorination and cleanup of the contaminated area without accumulation of undesirable breakdown products. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ZVI microparticles in reducing carbon tetrachloride under laboratory and field conditions. Changes in concentrations and in chemical and physical parameters were monitored to determine the role of the organic products in the reductive dechlorination reaction. Laboratory and field studies are presented.

Alvarado, J. S.; Rose, C.; LaFreniere, L.; Environmental Science Division

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

SciTech Connect

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Carbon Capture and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

290

Lesson Summary Students will learn about different carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson Summary Students will learn about different carbon sources and sinks and the release · Knowledge of carbon as the main constituent of living organisms AAAS Science Benchmarks The Physical Setting Materials · 1 copy of The Carbon Cycle (Figure 1) · 1 copy of The Carbon Cycle A4 sheet for each student · 1

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

291

Studies in the Respiratory and Carbohydrate Metabolism of Plant Tissues. IV. The Relation between the Rate of Carbon Dioxide Production in Potato Tubers in Air Following Anaerobic Conditions, and the Accompanying Changes in Lactic Acid Content and Sugar Concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Following Anaerobic Conditions, and the Accompanying Changes in Lactic Acid Content and Sugar Concentration J. Barker A. F. El Saifi In part III of this series data were presented for the changes in air following periods of anaerobiosis in the rate of production...

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake in the Northern High Latitudes in the 21st century from the Coupled Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project model projections H A I F E N G Q I A N *, R E Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project. Our analysis suggests that the NHL will be a carbon the intense warming there enhances SOM decomposition, soil organic carbon (SOC) storage continues to increase

Zeng, Ning

294

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

295

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

296

Offsetting China's CO2 Emissions by Soil Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel emissions of carbon (C) in China in 2000 was ... % or more of the antecedent soil organic carbon (SOC) pool.Some of the depleted ... . A crude estimated potential of soil C sequestration in China is 1...

R. Lal

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solar Concentration in Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar concentrators go space. Lens and mirror-based solar concentrators have recently begun to boost photovoltaic power supplies for satellites in space. In 1998, the first mission carrying solar concentrators...

Dr. Ralf Leutz; Dr. Akio Suzuki

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Postmortem Memantine Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......case-report Case Report Postmortem Memantine Concentrations Nichole Bynum * Justin...Postmortem fluid and tissue concentrations of memantine (Namenda), a drug recently approved...in a suspicious death. In addition, memantine concentrations considered to be incidental......

Nichole Bynum; Justin Poklis; Diana Garside; Ruth Winecker

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Organic Carbon - PAHs and n-PAHs - Elemental Compounds - Ionic Species - Carbonyls - Dioxins and Furans - Bioassays Sampling System Diluted Exhaust 1 0 11 6 7 8 a 8 b 3 4 BXDX...

300

Critical Review of Desalination Concentrate Management, Treatment and Beneficial Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, enhancement of water re- covery, removal of organic contaminants, and recovery of valuable products and energy into product and concentrate (also known as retentate, brine, or reject) streams. Concentrate management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Historical warming reduced due to enhanced land carbon uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...JP ( 2012 ) ESM2 global coupled climate-carbon Earth System Models Part II: Carbon system formulation and baseline simulation...emissions and airborne fraction simulated by CMIP5 Earth System models under 4 representative concentration pathways. J...

Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev; John P. Krasting; George C. Hurtt; Stephen W. Pacala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Part I,?445‰ in the deep NE Pacific Ocean (Table S1). The Suwanneein the northeast Pacific Ocean. If the BC in the Amazon

Ziolkowski, Lori A; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Aged black carbon identified in marine dissolved organic carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Asia: Biomass or fossil fuel combustion? , Science,of combustion, in Sediment Records of Biomass Burning andduring biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion, the sinks

Ziolkowski, L. A; Druffel, E. R. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Metal binding in an aluminum based metal-organic framework for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal binding in an aluminum based metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture Link to article...

307

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

308

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Agency/Company /Organization: Sandbag Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Industry, Solar, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: sandbag.org.uk/carbondata/cers Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Screenshot References: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map[1] Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a massive issue and personal actions like switching off lights and unplugging televisions can feel like small contributions. Background "Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a

309

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

310

Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth in Ukraine AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy,...

311

Investigation of the stress induced properties of coke during carbonization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The large polycyclic aromatic plates within coal tar pitches do not flow freely enough to organize into large anisotropic domains during pyrolytic carbonization. It was… (more)

Maybury, James Joshua.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents such as hybrid carbon nanotubes, aerogels, and nanofibers, as well as metal-organic frameworks and conducting polymers. A...

313

Philippines-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LCP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) AgencyCompany Organization World Wildlife Fund Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission...

314

Turkey-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LCP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Turkey-Country Specific Low Carbon Plans (LCP) AgencyCompany Organization World Wildlife Fund Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low...

315

Waterjet injection of powdered activated carbon for sediment remediation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"In situ sediment remediation through waterjet-activated carbon amendment delivery is an innovative means to mitigate the dangers posed by hydrophobic organic compounds. Ease of use… (more)

Redell, Chris J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low Carbon World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon World Low Carbon World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: LowCarbonWorld Agency/Company /Organization: LowCarbonEconomy Partner: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.lowcarboneconomy.com/Low_Carbon_World/Data/Home LowCarbonWorld Screenshot References: LowCarbonWorld[1] Background The idea behind this project was conceived at the 2008 United Nations Conference of Parties (COP14) event in Poznan (Poland). By listening to many speeches by energy ministers from numerous countries in the high level segment of the event, Toddington Harper Managing Director of The Low Carbon Economy Ltd (TLCE) became aware of the depth of valuable information being

317

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

318

Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) in Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments in water treatment The removal in water treatment of microorganisms causing the so-called “water-borne” diseases and the prevention of contamination of drinking water with these orga...

D. van der Kooij

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Total Organic Carbon Rejection in Osmotic Distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The osmotic distillation (OD) system is a spacecraft wastewater recycling system designed to produce potable water from human urine and humidity condensate. The OD… (more)

Shaw, Hali Laraelizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermoelectric power in carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical results for the temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power of graphite and semimetal carbon nanotubes are reported. In the calculations, the cylindrical superatomic range structure of nanotubes is taken into account. The Boltzmann equation and the {pi}-electron model of semimetal carbon nanotubes are used. The basic parameters of the calculation are the concentration of electrons, the Fermi energy, and the energy of the local level associated with the cylindrical structure of carbon nanotubes. The theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data.

Mavrinskiy, A. V., E-mail: mavrinsky@gmail.com; Baitinger, E. M. [Chelyabinsk State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Reverse osmosis concentrate treatment by a PAC countercurrent four-stage adsorption/MF hybrid process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, in order to reduce the impact of reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) on the receiving body of water and/or improve the recovery rate of reverse osmosis (RO) system by reusing the treated ROC as a feeding, a powdered activated carbon (PAC) countercurrent four-stage adsorption/MF hybrid process was developed for organic removal from ROC. The process could achieve good organic removal at lower PAC consumption. For dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal efficiency of 70.0%, the PAC dose was 21.6% less than that in countercurrent two-stage adsorption and 50.9% less than that in single-stage adsorption. The calculation method for correlating removal efficiency and PAC dose was deduced and validated. The validation result showed that the relative error between the average experimental DOC removal efficiency and the calculated one was less than 5% throughout the experiment, exhibiting good accuracy for the calculation method. Compared with countercurrent two-stage adsorption, the membrane fouling in the new process could be mitigated to a certain extent. The total number of sub-cycles in a cycle (n) influenced the hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the total volume of the reactors. Results showed that the HRT increased as n increased.

Xiaozhu Wei; Ping Gu; Guanghui Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: www.adb.org/documents/studies/carbon-efficiency-prc/carbon-efficiency- Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Carbon dioxide sequestration underground laser based detection system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon dioxide (CO 2) is a known greenhouse gas. Due to the burning of fossil fuels by industrial and power plants the atmospheric concentration of… (more)

Barr, Jamie Lynn.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

About Us Organization Organization Organization Printable PDF News & Blog CIO Leadership Organization Contact Us...

328

Organization | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About Us Organization Organization Organization News Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us...

329

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the scanning transmission x-ray microscope at ALS Beamline 11.0.2 provided valuable insight into how proton irradiation can cause carbon to transform into a ferromagnetic material. Now, researchers are using x-ray spectroscopy at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 to study the magnetism of proton-irradiated graphite surfaces in order to understand the effects of hydrogen (i.e. protons) on the electronic structure of carbon. In studying the properties of electrons responsible for magnetic order in graphite, researchers found that a very large magnetic moment is essentially switched on when hydrogen atoms are incorporated at the surface of graphite.

330

Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development  

SciTech Connect

This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (US)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Comparison of organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age in Indiana with New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect

Abundant black organic-rich shales occur in rocks of Pennsylvanian age in southwestern Indiana. They have not been well characterized except for a few thin intervals in small areas, the best example being at the abandoned Mecca Quarry in west-central Indiana. Although these shales are thinner and less widespread than the organic-rich shales of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian age) they warrant characterization because of their accessibility during strip mining of underlying coals. Organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age contain up to 44% organic carbon and might be considered potential oil shales. Carbon to hydrogen ratios in these shales are similar to those in the New Albany. Relatively high concentrations of certain metals occur in shales of both ages, especially where phosphate is abundant, and sulfur values for both shales range from < 1 to 6%. Sulfur values are much higher for thin pyrite-rich units. Siderite nodules are common in Pennsylvania shales, but little siderite if found in the New Albany. Dolomite, commonly ferroan, and calcite in a variety of forms are the dominant carbonates in the New Albany. Some Pennsylvanian shales may contain large fossils or mica flakes, but such coarse-grained features are uncommon in the New Albany Shale.

Shaffer, N.R.; Leininger, R.K.; Ennis, M.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to energy-consuming activities that burn fossil fuels. On a yearly basis, the average Ameri- can produces 22 of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or nearly half of the fossil fuel carbon emissions over this period sea life that depend on the health and avail- ability of these shelled organisms. At present, ocean

333

Allied Carbon Credit GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Credit GmbH Carbon Credit GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Allied Carbon Credit GmbH Place Hessen, Germany Sector Carbon Product Frankfurt-based carbon advisory and consultancy firm. References Allied Carbon Credit GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Allied Carbon Credit GmbH is a company located in Hessen, Germany . References ↑ "Allied Carbon Credit GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Allied_Carbon_Credit_GmbH&oldid=342020" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

334

Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores  

SciTech Connect

Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Recycling of organic matter in Antarctic sediments: A transect ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first porewater distributions of O2 and NO3= and organic carbon data in the solid phase in this part of the ocean were used to model the recycling of organic ...

336

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011. “Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage inOrganization (UNIDO). 2010. Carbon Capture and Storage in92 3.9. Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies for the Iron

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

338

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Towards a carbon nanotube antibody sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work investigated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer-protein A complexes for optically reporting antibody concentration via a change in near infrared fluorescent emission after antibody binding. SWNT have ...

Bojö, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles  

SciTech Connect

Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ? To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ? ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ? PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ? The findings suggest that ELF has a protective role against PM. ? The synthetic ELF system could reduce the use of animals in PM-driven ROS testing.

Chuang, Hsiao-Chi [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hui-Hsien [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Organic aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Carbon Management Plan 1. Executive summary 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy intensive buildings have been constructed, whilst at the same time disposals have concentrated. Background and context 16 4. Carbon management strategy 18 5. Carbon emissions baseline and projections 22 6 Plan interventions 55 Appendix B: Possible future actions 76 #12;4 #12;5 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Foreword

Haase, Markus

346

BOOKS & MEDIA UPDATE Carbon Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic semiconductors are introduced in this book, which also gives a clear impression of the rangeBOOKS & MEDIA UPDATE Carbon Nanotechnology Liming Dai (ed.) Elsevier · 2006 · 750 pp ISBN: 0 are reviewed. Contributions by different authors are grouped into three sections on the synthesis, chemistry

Elliott, James

347

NETL: Carbon Storage - West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WESTCARB WESTCARB Carbon Storage West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing WESTCARB efforts can be found on their website. The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is led by the California Energy Commission and represents a coalition of more than 90 organizations from state and provincial resource management and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and research institutions; colleges and universities; conservation non-profits; oil and gas companies; power companies; pipeline companies; trade associations; vendors and service firms; and consultants. The partners are engaged in several aspects of WESTCARB projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects on the west coast of North America. WESTCARB

348

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SWP efforts can be found on their website. The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is led by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and represents a coalition composed of a diverse group of experts in geology, engineering, economics, public policy, and outreach. The 50 SWP partners represent state and federal agencies, universities, electric utilities, non-governmental organizations, coal, oil and gas companies, and the Navajo Nation. The partners are engaged in several aspects of SWP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in the southwestern region of the United States. SWP encompasses Arizona,

349

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Climate, Land Focus Area: Forestry Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/urban-forests/ctcc/ Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator[1] Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator is the only tool approved by the Climate Action Reserve's Urban Forest Project Protocol for quantifying carbon dioxide sequestration from GHG tree planting projects. The CTCC is programmed in an Excel spreadsheet and provides carbon-related information

350

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Statistical model for source rock maturity and organic richness using well-log data, Bakken Formation, Williston basin, United States  

SciTech Connect

A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. Principal components, cluster, and discriminant analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. Present-day total organic carbon values are high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin, and low in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using a regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, hydrocarbon maturity effects were partially separated from depositional effects. These analyses suggest that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the limits of the Bakken and increased to a high in northeastern Montana. The pre-maturation distribution of total organic carbon and the present-day total organic carbon distribution, as determined by statistical analyses of well-log data, agree with the results of geochemical analyses. The distributions can be explained by a relatively simple depositional pattern and thermal history for the Bakken. 6 figures, 3 tables.

Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

353

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

354

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted wildland fire greenhouse gas and aerosol (organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) emission inventories

355

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is a rendering of a scattering solar concentrator. Light collected by a cylindrical Fresnel lens is focused within a curved glass "guide" sheet, where it is redirected into...

358

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the scanning transmission x-ray microscope at ALS Beamline 11.0.2 provided valuable insight into how proton irradiation can cause carbon to transform into a ferromagnetic material. Now, researchers are using x-ray spectroscopy at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 to study the magnetism of proton-irradiated graphite surfaces in order to understand the effects of hydrogen (i.e. protons) on the electronic structure of carbon. In studying the properties of electrons responsible for magnetic order in graphite, researchers found that a very large magnetic moment is essentially switched on when hydrogen atoms are incorporated at the surface of graphite.

359

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the scanning transmission x-ray microscope at ALS Beamline 11.0.2 provided valuable insight into how proton irradiation can cause carbon to transform into a ferromagnetic material. Now, researchers are using x-ray spectroscopy at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 to study the magnetism of proton-irradiated graphite surfaces in order to understand the effects of hydrogen (i.e. protons) on the electronic structure of carbon. In studying the properties of electrons responsible for magnetic order in graphite, researchers found that a very large magnetic moment is essentially switched on when hydrogen atoms are incorporated at the surface of graphite.

360

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the scanning transmission x-ray microscope at ALS Beamline 11.0.2 provided valuable insight into how proton irradiation can cause carbon to transform into a ferromagnetic material. Now, researchers are using x-ray spectroscopy at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 to study the magnetism of proton-irradiated graphite surfaces in order to understand the effects of hydrogen (i.e. protons) on the electronic structure of carbon. In studying the properties of electrons responsible for magnetic order in graphite, researchers found that a very large magnetic moment is essentially switched on when hydrogen atoms are incorporated at the surface of graphite.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile element. Now, another use has been found: magnets. One would not expect pure carbon to be magnetic, but for more than ten years scientists have suspected that carbon can be made to be magnetic by doping it with nonmagnetic materials, changing its order ever so slightly. Years ago, the first x-ray images obtained using the scanning transmission x-ray microscope at ALS Beamline 11.0.2 provided valuable insight into how proton irradiation can cause carbon to transform into a ferromagnetic material. Now, researchers are using x-ray spectroscopy at ALS Beamline 4.0.2 to study the magnetism of proton-irradiated graphite surfaces in order to understand the effects of hydrogen (i.e. protons) on the electronic structure of carbon. In studying the properties of electrons responsible for magnetic order in graphite, researchers found that a very large magnetic moment is essentially switched on when hydrogen atoms are incorporated at the surface of graphite.

362

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

363

Bacterioplankton Community Shifts in an Arctic Lake Correlate with Seasonal Changes in Organic Matter Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacterial production beneath the...terrestrial organic matter (33...terrestrial organic matter diminishes...to weeks, solar insolation...Phytoplankton production reaches its...Bacterioplankton production in humic Lake...of bacterial cells and input of allochthonous organic carbon. Microb...

Byron C. Crump; George W. Kling; Michele Bahr; John E. Hobbie

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: PricewaterhouseCoopers Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.pwc.co.uk/ Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Screenshot References: Low Carbon Economy Index 2010[1] "PwC re-examines the progress of the G20 economies against the Low Carbon Achievement and Low Carbon Challenge Index. This post- Copenhagen report provides an update on the progress over 2009." Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 References ↑ "Low Carbon Economy Index 2010" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Low_Carbon_Economy_Index_2010&oldid=3841

365

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

368

Carbon dioxide emission reduction using molten carbonate fuel cell systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The contribution of the molten carbonate fuel cell system (MCFCs) to carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction in power application is analyzed. \\{MCFCs\\} can separate and concentrate CO2 emitted from traditional thermal power plants (PPs) without reducing the plant's overall energy efficiency. \\{MCFCs\\} can also be used by itself as an effective CO2 separator or concentrator by managing the anode gas stream to increase the heat utilization of the system. The CO2 separated and concentrated by \\{MCFCs\\} is most effectively captured by condensation. \\{MCFCs\\} is currently used as a CO2 separator only to a limited extent due to its high cost and relatively small scale operation. However, \\{MCFCs\\} will substantially contribute to reduce CO2 emissions in power generation applications in the near future.

Jung-Ho Wee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Use of carbonates for biological and chemical synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of using carbonates, especially water-insoluble or sparing soluble mineral carbonates, for maintaining or increasing dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in aqueous media. In particular, the system generates concentrated dissolve inorganic carbon substrates for photosynthetic, chemosynthetic, or abiotic chemical production of carbonaceous or other compounds in solution. In some embodiments, the invention can also enhance the dissolution and retention of carbon dioxide in aqueous media, and can produce pH buffering capacity, metal ions, and heat, which can be beneficial to the preceding syntheses.

Rau, Gregory Hudson

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Concentration in Green Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, energy, infrastructure or transport. Participants in this specialization area work closely with the GreenConcentration in Green Design Research and Education Opportunities Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering www.ce.cmu.edu M.S. Concentration Green Design - Course Only Track As an extension

Shewchuk, Jonathan

372

Crop Residue Removal for Bioenergy Reduces Soil Carbon Pools: How Can We Offset Carbon Losses?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue removal for bioenergy can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) ... been, however, widely discussed. This paper reviews potential practices that can be used to offset the SOC lost with residue removal. Literature

Humberto Blanco-Canqui

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete  

SciTech Connect

The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrós

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling Course Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Economic Development, People and Policy Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/low-carbon-development Cost: Paid References: Low Carbon Development: Planning & Modelling[1] Program Overview This course has the following modules - (i) Introduction to Low Carbon Development Planning; (ii) Overview for Policymakers; (iii) Power; (iv) Household; (v) Transport - which introduce you to climate change

376

The evolution of inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms in photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...role for increased oxygen (Price et al. 2007), while the...an extant cycad (Decker de Wit 2006; see Griffiths et al...Badger et al. (1998, 2002), Price Badger (2003), Giordano et al. (2005) and Price et al. (2007) b. Energized...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Frustrated Organic Solids Display Unexpected Gas Sorption  

SciTech Connect

Calixarene based organic solid can hold guests such as toluene and other organic molecules we have discovered a new type of material which believe involves a frustration of the solvate lattice as it moves toward the thermodynamically stable desolvated state. The intermediated phase with partial solvent content unexpectedly sorbs gases such as carbon dioxide and highly explosive acetylene deep inside the crystal lattice.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

379

Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfying the world's growing demand for energy is an urgent societal challenge. Organic photovoltaics holds promise as a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly solution.

Kippelen, Bernard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Variable ageing and storage of dissolved organic components in the open ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the largest reservoir of exchangeable organic carbon in the ... carbon cycling are thus limited by the need for information on temporal scales of carbon storage in DOM subcomponents, produced via the ‘biological pump’, relative to their recycling by ...

Ai Ning Loh; James E. Bauer; Ellen R. M. Druffel

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Index Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations Foundation Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.forestcarbonindex.org/ Web Application Link: www.forestcarbonindex.org/maps.html Cost: Free References: Forest Carbon Index [1] The Forest Carbon Index (FCI) compiles and displays global data relating to biological, economic, governance, investment, and market readiness conditions for every forest and country in the world, revealing the best places and countries for forest carbon investments. Please use this site to

383

Optimization of Stationary Concentrators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, the main characteristics of stationary nonimaging solar concentrators are optimized in respect of the latitude of their installation and the direct fraction of solar radiation incident on the ...

Dr. Ralf Leutz; Dr. Akio Suzuki

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Concentrator silicon cell research  

SciTech Connect

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Concentrated Thermoelectric Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and night using no moving parts at both the utility and distributed scale. Concentrating Solar Power MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: SunShot CSP R&D 2012 TOPIC:...

386

Joined concentric tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

388

Atmospheric outflow of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds from East Asia in Spring 2004  

SciTech Connect

To estimate the emissions of anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from East Asia and to identify unique SOC molecular markers in Asian air masses, high-volume air samples were collected on the island of Okinawa, Japan between 22 March and 2 May 2004. Contributions from different source regions (China, Japan, the Koreas, Russia, and ocean/local) were estimated by use of source region impact factors (SRIFs). Elevated concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorcyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), and particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were attributed to air masses from China. A large proportion of the variation in the current-use pesticides, gas-phase PAHs, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations was explained by meteorology. Chlordanes showed a technical mixture profile and similar concentrations regardless of source region. {alpha}/{gamma} HCH and trans/cis chlordane ratios did not vary significantly with different source regions and had regional averages of 2.5 {+-} 1.0 and 1.2 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Particulate-phase PAH concentrations were significantly correlated (p value {lt} 0.05) with other incomplete combustion byproduct concentrations, including elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}), CO, NOx{asterisk}, black carbon, submicrometer aerosols, and SO{sub 2}. By use of measured PAH, CO, and black carbon concentrations and estimated CO and black carbon emission inventories, the emission of six carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs was estimated to be 1518-4179 metric tons/year for Asia and 778-1728 metric tons/year for China, respectively. These results confirm that East Asian outflow contains significant emissions of carcinogenic particulate-phase PAHs. 39 refs., 3 figs.

Toby Primbs; Staci Simonich; David Schmedding; Glenn Wilson; Dan Jaffe; Akinori Takami; Shungo Kato; Shiro Hatakeyama; Yoshizumi Kajii [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Departments of Chemistry and Environmental and Molecular Toxicology

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effects of CO2-Induced Seawater Acidification on Microbial Processes Involving Dissolved Organic Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We used laboratory experiments covering a wide range of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced seawater acidification to simulate ocean CO2 storage and assess the potential effects on heterotrophic microbial processes associated with labile dissolved organic matter (DOM). There was no noticeable effect of increased CO2 concentration on short-term decomposition of labile DOM or nutrient uptake. However, microbial activities producing “new” DOM were apparently enhanced under treatments with 2000 or 5000 ppm CO2. Under these conditions, production of aggregates was inhibited in early stage. Both of acute and chronic effects should be included for assessment of biogeochemical cycle related to microbe process.

Namiha Yamada; Nobuo Tsurushima; Masahiro Suzumura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.wri.org/publication/carbon-value-analysis-tool Cost: Free Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) Screenshot References: CVAT[1] he Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) is a screening tool to help companies integrate the value of carbon dioxide emissions reductions into energy-related investment decisions. The tool has two main purposes: To test the sensitivity of a project's internal rate of return (IRR) to "carbon value" (the value of GHG emissions reductions). CVAT integrates this value into traditional financial analysis by ascribing a market price, either actual or projected, to carbon emissions reductions.

391

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

392

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. NREL collaborates with industry to further the research and development (R&D) of concentrating solar power (CSP) plant and solar thermal technologies. NREL's projects in concentrating solar power focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. In addition, NREL has received funding through the following competitively awarded projects: 10-megawatt supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) turbine test Near-blackbody, enclosed-particle receiver integrated with a

393

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

394

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

395

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

396

Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies  

SciTech Connect

A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina..., which is a polar adsorbent, to remove total organic carbon (TOC) and some trace organics from domestic wastewater has been evaluated. Batch adsorption experiments were used to investigate the effect of pH and total dissolved solids on activated...

Yang, Pe-Der

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

399

Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil  

SciTech Connect

Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Photovoltaics Research to Organic Photovoltaics Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions Organic Photovoltaics Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Organic Photovoltaics Research Graphic showing the seven layers of an organic PV cell: electrode, donor, acceptor, active layer, PEDOT:PSS, transparent conductive oxide, and glass.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Place New York, New York Zip 10170 Product AirShares is a commodity pool for exchange-traded futures contracts for EUAs. References AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AirShares_EU_Carbon_Allowances_Fund&oldid=341942" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

402

Photovoltaic solar concentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

404

Reduction of carbon monoxide emissions with regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect

Regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been extensively used for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from various sources. However, very little information is available on the ability of RTOs to control carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. This paper presents the results of extensive tests conducted on two RTOs to determine their VOC and CO control efficiencies. The inlet gas stream to the RTOs includes VOC and CO concentrations as high as 2,000 ppm and 3,600 ppm, respectfully. The testing demonstrated that both RTOs were capable of controlling greater than 98% of both inlet VOCs and CO. While the destruction efficiencies within the combustion chambers exceeded 99.9%, direct leakage past valves accounted for the lower control efficiencies. The tests indicated that the overall VOC and CO control efficiencies of the RTOs may be limited by valve leakage. The design and permitting of a RTO should include conservative control estimates which account for possible valve leakage.

Firmin, S.M.; Lipke, S.; Baturay, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Temperature-driven decoupling of key phases of organic matter degradation in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature-driven decoupling of key phases of organic matter degradation in marine sediments for review August 29, 2005) The long-term burial of organic carbon in sediments results in the net and atmosphere. Sediment microbial activity plays a major role in determining whether particulate organic carbon

Weston, Nathaniel B.

406

Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

On carbon footprints and growing energy use  

SciTech Connect

Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) region consists of nine neighboring states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Battelle Memorial Institute leads MRCSP, which includes nearly 40 organizations from the research community, energy industry, universities, non-government, and government organizations. The region has a diverse range of CO 2 sources and many opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions through geologic storage and/or EOR. Potential locations for geologic storage in the MRCSP states extend from the deep rock formations in the broad

409

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Klaus S. Lackner (kl2010@columbia.edu; 212-854-0304) Columbia University 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 Patrick Grimes (pgrimes@worldnet.att.net; 908-232-1134) Grimes Associates Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 Hans-J. Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov; 505-667-7265) Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O.Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Abstract The goal of carbon sequestration is to take CO 2 that would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere and put it in safe and permanent storage. Most proposed methods would capture CO 2 from concentrated sources like power plants. Indeed, on-site capture is the most sensible approach for large sources and initially offers the most cost-effective avenue to sequestration. For distributed, mobile sources like cars, on-board capture at affordable cost would not be

410

The Marketing Concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Marketing Concentration The Manning School of Business www.uml.edu/management Who We Are, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain and operations management we provide education possible." -- Andy Hwang Marketing Major "I chose UMass Lowell because of its high level

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

411

The Role of H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2. The Role of H2O in the Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2. Abstract: The water concentration dependence of...

412

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

413

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

414

Campus Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Campus Carbon Calculator Campus Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Campus Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.cleanair-coolplanet.org/toolkit/inv-calculator.php The Campus Carbon Calculator(tm), Version 6.4, is now available for download. Version 6.4 includes new features, updates and corrections - including greatly expanded projection and solutions modules, designed to aid schools that have completed greenhouse gas inventories in developing long term, comprehensive climate action plans based on those inventories. The new modules facilitate analysis of carbon reduction options, determining project payback times, net present value, cost per ton reduced,

415

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

416

The microbial fate of carbon in high-latitude seas: Impact of the microbial loop on oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation examines pelagic microbial processes in high-latitude seas, how they affect regional and global carbon cycling, and how they might respond to hypothesized changes in climate. Critical to these interests is the effect of cold temperature on bacterial activity. Also important is the extent to which marine biological processes in general impact the inorganic carbon cycle. The study area is the Northeast Water (NEW) Polynya, a seasonally-recurrent opening in the permanent ice situated over the northeastern Greenland continental shelf. This work was part of an international, multi-disciplinary research project studying carbon cycling in the coastal Arctic. The first chapter describes a simple model which links a complex marine food web to a simplified ocean and atmosphere. The second chapter investigates the inorganic carbon inventory of the summertime NEW Polynya surface waters to establish the effect of biological processes on the air-sea pCO{sub 2} gradient. The third and fourth chapters use a kinetic approach to examine microbial activities in the NEW Polynya as a function of temperature and dissolved organic substrate concentration, testing the so-called Pomeroy hypothesis that microbial activity is disproportionately reduced at low environmental temperatures owing to increased organic substrate requirements. Together, the suite of data collected on microbial activities, cell size, and grazing pressure suggest how unique survival strategies adopted by an active population of high-latitude bacteria may contribute to, rather than detract from, an efficient biological carbon pump.

Yager, P.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Concentrating Energy by Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent article [A. Kurcz et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 063821 (2010)] we predicted an energy concentrating mechanism in composite quantum systems. Its result is a non-zero stationary state photon emission rate even in the absence of external driving. Here we discuss the possible origin of the predicted effect. We attribute it to the presence of a non-trivial interaction between different system components and to repeated environment-induced photon measurements.

Almut Beige; Antonio Capolupo; Andreas Kurcz; Emilio Del Giudice; Giuseppe Vitiello

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

URBAN OZONE CONCENTRATION FORECASTING WITH ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK IN CORSICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perceptron; Ozone concentration. 1. Introduction Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollution problem, both, Ajaccio, France, e-mail: balu@univ-corse.fr Abstract: Atmospheric pollutants concentration forecasting is an important issue in air quality monitoring. Qualitair Corse, the organization responsible for monitoring air

Boyer, Edmond

419

Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries: Public Finance Mechanisms to scale up private sector investment in climate solutions Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: sefi.unep.org/fileadmin/media/sefi/docs/publications/PublicPrivateWeb. Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries: Public Finance Mechanisms to scale up private sector investment in climate solutions Screenshot References: Catalyzing Low Carbon Growth in Developing Countries[1]

420

Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use AgencyCompany Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bangladesh-NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 AgencyCompany Organization National Institute for Environmental Studies Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects marine carbon Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the organic carbon content of marine aerosols... . Potential impact of ocean ecosystem changes due to global warming on marine341 ... Source: Russell, Lynn - Scripps...

423

State Externalities Policy and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Who Bears the Risks of Future Regulation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ITEM...: In January 1991, representatives of 38 state consumer advocacy offices and 17 environmental organizations warned utilities that failures to anticipate future carbon-dioxide-emission cost i...

Ralph Cavanagh; Ashok Gupta; Dan Lashof; Marika Tatsutani

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting carbon tetrachloride Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: affecting carbon tetrachloride Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds...

425

Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ci-Dev) Ci-Dev) Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Climate Topics Finance, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://wbcarbonfinance.org/Rou References Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev)[1] "The World Bank is proposing a new initiative, the Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev), which aims at helping low-income countries create sustainable access to financing for low-carbon investments through carbon markets. This initiative has three components: A Readiness Fund will support carbon capacity building, knowledge development and advocacy work for improving carbon market mechanisms, asset creation, and developing innovative approaches to leveraging carbon

426

Extraction of carbonate complexes of trivalent transplutonium elements with alkyl pyrocatechols  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of trivalent americium curium, californium, and europium with a technical mixture of mono-and didecyl pyrocatechols (TAP) in different diluents from carbonate solutions is studied. The influence of various factors (pH, K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, TAP and metal concentration, phase contact time) on the degree of extraction and separation of the elements is clarified. It is shown that the elements concerned are extracted quantitatively by TAP solution in toluene and cyclohexane in the K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ concentration range 0.25-1.5 M. A difference is noted in the coefficients of americium and curium distribution when they are extracted with TAP from 0.25 M K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution. The separation coefficients of this pair rise with the pH of the carbonate solution. The separation coefficients of this pair rise with the pH of the carbonate solution. The separation can be improved at the stage of reextraction of the elements with a mixture of K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and DTPA or EDTA from alkyl pyrocatechol because the americium and curium reextraction rate constants differ widely. The composition of the compounds in the organic phase based on 4-(..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dioctylethyl)pyrocatechol (DOP) is studied by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy.

Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Fedorov, L.A.; Sokolovskii, S.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's concentrating solar power (CSP) projects focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies. We support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its CSP deployment efforts in the following areas: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. NREL received funding from DOE for concentrating solar power research projects. Through a competitive process, NREL was selected to lead the following projects: Novel Components to Overcome Existing Barriers-Particle Receiver Integrated with a Fluidized Bed Thermodynamic Cycle to Revolutionize CSP Systems-10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (s-CO2) Turbine Test Nanomaterials for thermal energy storage in CSP plants In addition to these efforts, NREL is also a key partner on two other

428

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

429

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

430

SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

431

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Exploration model for shallow Silurian (Kankakee) carbonate reservoirs in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Reservoirs in shallow (600-650 ft deep) basal Silurian Kankakee carbonates at Buckhorn consolidated, Siloam, and Kellerville oil fields in western Illinois have produced nearly 2 million bbl of oil, but were developed essentially by random drilling. A new exploration model that combines lithologic studies and isopach mapping has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Isopach mapping of Silurian and Devonian rocks between an organic facies in the Mississippian-Devonian New Albany Shale and the top of the Ordovician Maquoketa Shale reveals thickened sequences that coincide with most of the oil fields. These thickened intervals apparently reflect subtle paleovalleys eroded into the Maquoketa shale during the Ordovician-Silurian hiatus. During the initial Silurian marine transgression, these paleovalleys at the base of the Kankakee were filled with carbonates to form the thickened sequences. Differential erosion at the top of the Kankakee does not satisfactorily explain the locally thickened sequences in the Kankakee. Lithologic studies suggest that subsurface fluid flows concentrated along these paleovalleys contributed to subsequent diagenesis of valleyfill carbonates. Diagenetic alteration of these carbonates resulted in development of basal Kankakee reservoirs within the paleovalleys. This concept of Kankakee reservoirs occurring within paleovalleys at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity is a new exploration model that can aid in the search for similar traps in western Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Seyler, B.J.; Whitaker, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient aerosol concentrations Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. Summary: organic aerosol concentrations and individual organic...

434

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

436

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

437

Organizations and Networks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organizations and Networks Organizations and Networks (Redirected from Gateway:International/Networks) Jump to: navigation, search Registered Technical and Research Organizations Networks Climate Eval "The website promotes active debate on areas relevant to evaluation of climate change and development evaluation by bringing relevant topics to a peer to peer discussion forum." Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) CLEAN aims to improve communication and coordination by bringing together national and international organizations that are assisting developing countries with preparation and implementation of low greenhouse gas emission plans and strategies. This includes support for technology needs assessments, for low carbon and clean energy development plans, and

438

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Property:Event/Organizer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organizer Organizer Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Organizer Property Type String Description The entity or entities responsible for organizing the event. This is typically a person or organization. More than one organizer can be attributed to each event. Pages using the property "Event/Organizer" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading + International Energy Agency (IEA) + 11th Annual Workshop on Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Day 2 + International Energy Agency (IEA) + 15th International Business Forum: Low Carbon High Growth - Business Models for a Changing Climate + German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) + 18th Africa Partnership Forum + African Partnership Forum +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Overview of Carbon Storage Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Overview of Carbon Storage Research Overview of Carbon Storage Research The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage and/or utilization of CO2 captured from point sources. The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage and/or utilization of CO2 captured from point sources. Roughly one third of the United States' carbon emissions come from power plants and other large point sources, such as industrial facilities. The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage and/or utilization of CO2 captured from point sources. This effort is organized into two broad areas: Cooperative Advancement, which involves working with other organizations and governments to advance CCS worldwide, and

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric carbon isotope Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of terrestrial ecosystems to rising Summary: to rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and the resulting global changes,are still... from the...

443

Carbon sequestration in soils of cool temperate regions (introductory and editorial)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cool temperate climate, dominance of perennial land use, and relatively large proportion of peat and organically rich soils, make the northern European regions to have a large potential of soil organic carbon

Bal Ram Singh

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

445

Energy Carrier Transport In Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic molecules or inorganic nanoparticles, debundling of nanotubes by dispersing agents, and microwave irradiation. Because carbon nanotubes have unique carrier transport characteristics along a sheet of graphite in a cylindrical shape, the properties...

Ryu, Yeontack

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/westpost2002/westpost2002.html). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Depa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak 41 27 32 24 1968 Arg01 Cordoba Argentina -32.42 -62.05 900 17 Marcos Juarez silty loam 10 65 25 17 1975 Arg02 Balcarce Argentina -37.45 -58.18 870 13.7 #10 #65 #25 1984 Arg03 Buenos Aires Argentina -37

449

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Effect of seawater carbonate concentration on foraminiferal carbon and oxygen isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and G. bulloides were collected by scuba divers from surface waters of the San Pedro Basin, Southern California ... , Southern California Bight, USA, and were maintained in laboratory culture at 22 ± 0.2?°C ...

Howard J. Spero; Jelle Bijma; David W. Lea; Bryan E. Bemis

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations in Santiago de Chile associated with traffic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO/CO2 ratios have been measured in different locations of Santiago de Chile city. Measurements were carried out in a tunnel (prevailing emissions from cars with catalytic converter) and close to heavy traffic st...

María A. Rubio; Irene Fuenzalida…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Dimethyl carbonate as a modern green reagent and solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Published data on dimethyl carbonate as a safe reagent and solvent in organic synthesis are generalized and analyzed. The methods of dimethyl carbonate preparation and its use as methylating and carboxymethylating reagent are considered. The attention is focused on the environmentally safe processes corresponding to the green chemistry principles.

F Aricò; Pietro Tundo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade there has been an overall decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice cover. Changes to the ice cover have important consequences for organic carbon cycling, especially over the continental shelves. When sea ice is formed, dissolved organic...

Smith, Stephanie 1990-

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

If Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions Cease, Will Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Continue to Increase?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that the overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria  

SciTech Connect

The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Linear concentrating solar collector  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates to a segment of a linear concentrating solar collector which includes two plates distanced from each other and extending parallel to each other; a member connects the plates to each other and holes are bored in each of the plates in a parallel manner along a parabolic curve. A member passes through the holes each holding a small strip made of a reflecting material all strips together forming a parabolic surface. The invention relates also to a collector comprising at least two of each segments and an absorber extending along the focus line of the entire collector. The collector is advantageously provided with horizontal and/or vertical members which ascertains that the collector can follow the position of the sun.

Aharon, N. B.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

Concentrating Solar Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas?fired systems during peak?demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50% and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

Mark Mehos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Metal-Organic Frameworks as Adsorbents for Hydrogen Purification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal-Organic Frameworks as Adsorbents for Hydrogen Purification and Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Previous Next List Z. R. Herm, J. A. Swisher, B. Smit, R. Krishna, and J....

460

non living organic particle formation from bubble dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 8, 1975 ... 446. iVOteS. Table 1. Particulate organic carbon retained by 0.8-p Flotronics silver filters before and after many small bubbles were dissolved in ...

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

462

Carbon dioxide capture under ambient conditions using 2-chloroethylamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the first case applying 2-haloethylamine to CO2 capture. The prospect of global warming and the urgent need to reduce atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has prompted actions at many levels. The c...

Junhua Wang; Xiqin Zhang; Yun Zhou

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Segregated Network Polymer-Carbon Nanotubes Composites For Thermoelectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanocomposites were measured for carbon nanotubes and the thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, was calculated at room temperature. The influence on thermoelectric properties from filler concentration, stabilizer materials and drying condition are also discussed....

Kim, Dasaroyong

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

464

Metal catalyzed copolymerization processes involving carbon oxides as substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

backbone and electron donating tert-butyl groups in the phenolate rings. This catalyst was used to investigate the effect of altering the nature of the cocatalyst and its concentration. The coupling of carbon monoxide and aziridines has been shown...

Phelps, Andrea Lee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect

We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

Chen, P. S. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory and Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, X. H., E-mail: iraspsc@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: yangxh@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Event:IETA Carbon Forum North America | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IETA Carbon Forum North America IETA Carbon Forum North America Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png IETA Carbon Forum North America: on 2012/10/01 "Carbon Forum North America -IETA's flagship North American event-will be one of the best opportunities of the year to network with the North American and global carbon markets, browse exhibits showcasing the work of leading companies, and learn what you need to know about this rapidly evolving space." Event Details Name IETA Carbon Forum North America Date 2012/10/01 Location District of Columbia Organizer International Emissions Trading Association Tags LEDS, training, CLEAN Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Event:IETA_Carbon_Forum_North_America&oldid=472

469

Nepal-Climate and Carbon Unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Climate and Carbon Unit Nepal-Climate and Carbon Unit (Redirected from SNV-Climate and Carbon Unit) Jump to: navigation, search Name SNV-Climate and Carbon Unit Agency/Company /Organization Netherlands Development Organisation, United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Energy, Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning Website http://www.aepc.gov.np/index.p Country Nepal UN Region Eastern Asia References CCU[1] SNV-Climate and Carbon Unit Screenshot "In order to connect to this potential, SNV (Netherlands Development Organisation), the UK's Department for International Development (DFID/UKAID) and Government of Nepal have launched a Climate and Carbon Unit (CCU) within the Nepal Ministry of Environment's Alternative Energy Promotion Centre (AEPC). The CCU establishes climate change and carbon

470

A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Jump to: navigation, search Name A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland Agency/Company /Organization Government of Scotland Sector Energy, Land Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Res Country United Kingdom UN Region Western Europe References A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland[1] Abstract The Low Carbon Economic Strategy is an integral part of the Government's Economic Strategy (GES) to secure sustainable economic growth, and is a key component of our broader approach to meeting Scotland's climate change targets and securing the transition to a low carbon economy in Scotland "The Low Carbon Economic Strategy is an integral part of the Government's

471

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Name Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Biomass, Industry, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country Mexico Central America References Low Carbon Development for Mexico[1] Abstract The Mexico study involves the preparation of a comprehensive package comprising: a low carbon strategy; the identification of priority sectors for carbon abatement; pre-feasibility level analysis of specific investment options; a country specific Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve; identification of implementation barriers and necessary policy responses; and a prioritized list of potent...

472

International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects have been identified by an international carbon storage organization as an important advancement toward commercialization and large-scale deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies. The projects were officially recognized by the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) at its recent meeting in Perth, Australia for making significant contributions to the development of global carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation technologies. All three projects will appear in a yearly project portfolio on the CSLF website to keep the global community

473

Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/westpost2002/westpost2002.html). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Depa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak/a 1989 15-30 15 1.11 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 0-5 5 1.33 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 5-15 10 1.24 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 15-30 15 0.68 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 0-5 5 1.25 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 5-15 10 1.38 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 15

477

Lithium Methyl Carbonate as a Reaction Product of Metallic Lithiumand Dimethyl Carbonate  

SciTech Connect

To improve the understanding of passive film formation on metallic lithium in organic electrolyte, we synthesized and characterized lithium methyl carbonate (LiOCO{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), a prototypical component of the film. The chemical structure of this compound was characterized with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and its thermal stability and decomposition pathway was studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The FTIR spectrum of chemically synthesized compound enabled us to resolve multiple products in the passive film on lithium in dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Lithium methyl carbonate is only one of the components, the others being lithium oxalate and lithium methoxide.

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Ross Jr., Philip N.; Xu, Kang; Jow, T. Richard

2005-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

478

Photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

SciTech Connect

This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, C.J.

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

479

Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

480

19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 19 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the oceans are gaining sequestration programs emphasize storing carbon in soil organic matter in agri- cultural fields,in woody sequestration and management include the feasibil- ity and permanence of the carbon sequestered, the scale

Jackson, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "organic carbon concentrations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

482

Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal Burke Hales,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin Burke Hales,1 Lee Karp), Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 20 of particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved O2 during the upwelling season off the Oregon coast. Oxygen

Pierce, Stephen

483

Comprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metalorganic frameworks M2(dobdc)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are historically slow, the need for mitigation of current CO2 emissions using carbon capture and sequestration (CCSComprehensive study of carbon dioxide adsorption in the metal­organic frameworks M2(dobdc) (M ¼ Mg of adsorption in the M2(dobdc)­CO2 adducts. Introduction Currently, 80% of global energy is supplied by carbon

484

Nanocomposite fibers and film containing polyolefin and surface-modified carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for modifying carbon nanotubes with organic compounds are disclosed. The modified carbon nanotubes have enhanced compatibility with polyolefins. Nanocomposites of the organo-modified carbon nanotubes and polyolefins can be used to produce both fibers and films having enhanced mechanical and electrical properties, especially the elongation-to-break ratio and the toughness of the fibers and/or films.

Chu,Benjamin (Setauket, NY); Hsiao, Benjamin S. (Setauket, NY)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

485

Apparatus and method for oxidizing organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus using high cerium concentration in the anolyte of an electrochemical cell to oxidize organic materials. The method and apparatus further use an ultrasonic mixer to enhance the oxidation rate of the organic material in the electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

Surma, J.E.; Bryan, G.H.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Butner, R.S.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

486

Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the College's energy efficiency and use of resources by integrating sustainability with corporate strategiesCarbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background Energy security and the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases which contribute to climate change are one of the biggest challenges facing us

Chittka, Lars

487

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY AND SCIENCE (TECS) Biological Engineering (BE) Biomedical Engineering (BME) ChemicalENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS DEPARTMENT DEGREE CONCENTRATION (optional) BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (BAE) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (BME) CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR

488

Concentration and distribution of copper in effluents from three freshwater nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The concentrations and physicochemical forms of copper were determined in samples from the water column and bedload sediments in the intake and discharge zones of the Vermont Yankee, Kewaunee, and Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Power Stations. These stations differ in their mode of operation and in the composition of water circulated in their cooling systems. In addition, at Vermont Yankee, water samples were collected during changeover from open- to closed-cycle operation, and water and sediment samples were collected from the base of the cooling tower during closed-cycle operation. Copper concentrations were obtained for the soluble, including labile and bound, and particulate fractions of water samples and for bedload sediments collected in discharge and intake areas during the winter, spring, and summer months of 1978. The apparent copper complexing capacity (ACC), the dissolved organic carbon content (DOC), and the percentages of copper in different molecular-weight fractions were also determined for the soluble fraction of water samples. In addition, copper distribution coefficients (K/sub d/s of particles suspended in the water column and present in the bedload sediment were determined. 41 references, 10 figures, 20 tables.

Harrison, F.L.; Bishop, D.J.; Rice, D.W. Jr.; Emerson, R.; Smith, B.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The impacts of the AOC concentration on biofilm formation under higher shear force condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The logistic growth model was applied in the study to evaluate the impacts of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration on the growth characteristics of biofilm and bulk bacteria under high flow velocity condition. The experimental results showed that there existed a growth and decline relation between biofilm and bulk bacteria at the low (0.05 mg/L) and medium (0.5 mg/L) AOC levels. Increasing the AOC concentration up to 1.0 mg/L, it resulted in high amounts of biofilm and bulk bacteria simultaneously. Although the carrying capacity of biofilm bacteria at the medium condition of AOC level was substantially reduced, the specific growth rate (GR) of biofilm bacteria was largest at this condition. It showed that the reduction of biofilm bacteria quantity did not represent the suppression of bacterial growth. The quantity of bulk water bacteria was obviously dependent with the quantity of biofilm bacteria and the increase of free bacteria with time in networks was mainly due to the growth and detachment of biofilm bacteria, not due to the growth of free bacteria themselves. The maximum growth rate of biofilm bacteria was increased upon increasing the AOC level. It indicated that the AOC level was an important factor affecting the growth of biofilm bacteria.

Y.P Tsai; T.Y Pai; J.M Qiu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Southwest Concentrating Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Photos of various concentrating solar power systems. NREL, working through SunLab, supports the U.S. Department of Energy's goal to install 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new concentrating solar power systems in the southwestern United States by 2010. This level of deployment, combined with research and development to reduce technology component costs, could help reduce concentrating solar power electricity costs to $0.07/kilowatt-hour. At this cost, concentrating solar power can compete effectively in the Southwest's energy markets. To achieve the Initiative's goal, the U.S. Department of Energy is partnering with the Western Governors' Association to encourage concentrating solar power installations in Arizona, California, Colorado,

491

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Photo of numerous parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors tracking the sun. Cooling towers and other generator equipment are in the midst of the troughs, and two water tanks are in the background. The Solar Electric Generating Station IV power plant in California consists of many parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors that track the sun. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air, and white water tanks are in the background. Credit: Sandia National Laboratory / PIX 14955 Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear

492

Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy that can contribute to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide to maintain adsorbed methane in the coalbed formation. But now carbon dioxide will replace the methane

Mohaghegh, Shahab