Sample records for orbit source national

  1. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL Sealed Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Sealed Source Contamination Incident October 13, 2011 #12;2 Cesium (Cs-137) Source Failure On September 28th @ ~1600 contamination event discovered · Two Radiological Contamination was from a Cs-137 (265 micro-curie) "sealed source" used to test area radiation monitors. · Source

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0027 06 copy of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0025 01 of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0026 4 of this file is the one on-line in the PS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the PS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  10. NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan DRAFT NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and Aerosol EDRs DATE: 13 March 2009 No. I30008 VER. 1 REV. A PREPARED BY) 1 #12;NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan DRAFT Calibration and Validation of the NPP/NPOESS VIIRS

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

  13. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal System with Support from Recovery Act Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal...

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  15. Methods of performing downhole operations using orbital vibrator energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Jack H.; Weinberg, David M.; Wilson, Dennis R.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of performing down hole operations in a wellbore. A vibrational source is positioned within a tubular member such that an annulus is formed between the vibrational source and an interior surface of the tubular member. A fluid medium, such as high bulk modulus drilling mud, is disposed within the annulus. The vibrational source forms a fluid coupling with the tubular member through the fluid medium to transfer vibrational energy to the tubular member. The vibrational energy may be used, for example, to free a stuck tubular, consolidate a cement slurry and/or detect voids within a cement slurry prior to the curing thereof.

  16. Keynote Address National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Keynote Address National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources Prof. Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems that there is a real need for alternative energy sources. What do we understand by Alternative Energy Sources? In order Consumption 1997-98 Keynote address at Two days National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources, 27-28 Aug

  17. On the Doppler effect for light from orbiting sources in Kerr-type metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cisneros; G. Goedecke; C. Beetle; M. Engelhardt

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A formula is derived for the combined motional and gravitational Doppler effect in general stationary axisymmetric metrics for a photon emitted parallel or antiparallel to the assumed circular orbital motion of its source. The same formula is derived from eikonal approximation and Killing vector approaches to elucidate connections between observational astronomy and modern Relativity. The formula yields expected results in the limits of a moving or stationary source in the exterior Kerr and Schwarzschild metrics and a moving source in flat space.

  18. Light curve of a source orbiting around a black hole: A fitting-formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, analytical fitting-formula for a photometric light curve of a source of light orbiting around a black hole is presented. The formula is applicable for sources on a circular orbit with radius smaller than 45 gravitational radii from the black hole. This range of radii requires gravitational focusation of light rays and the Doppler effect to be taken into account with care. The fitting-formula is therefore useful for modelling the X-ray variability of inner regions in active galactic nuclei.

  19. Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to retrieve pixel-level mixed-phase cloud optical thicknesses Satellite Observations Validation Project (C3VP), were analyzed. The performance of the mixed-phase

  20. CVP_EDR_OMPS_Flynn_Oct 2009 Public Release.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CVP_EDR_OMPS_Flynn_Oct 2009 Public Release.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL NPOESS Community Collaborative Calibration/Validation Plan for the NPOESS Preparatory Project OMPS EDRs) Page 1 of 70 #12;CVP_EDR_OMPS_Flynn_Oct 2009 Public Release.doc TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. CVP EDR VIIRS VCM Kopp Public Release Oct2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CVP EDR VIIRS VCM Kopp Public Release Oct2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL) Page 1 of 1 #12;CVP EDR VIIRS VCM Kopp Public Release Oct2009.doc Table of Contents 1.0 Objectives ............................................................................. 16 8.0 Appendix B: Validation Against the System Specification .. 18 Page 2 of 2 #12;CVP EDR VIIRS

  2. CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL Project CrIS/ATMS EDRs DATE: 15 September No. I30004 VER. 1 REV. B PREPARED BY) Page 1 of 75 #12;CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc Table of Contents TABLE

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

  4. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Solar power and other sources of renewable energy can help combat global warming but they have a draw-back: they don't produce energy as predictably as generating...

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , girders and components for the vacuum system started to ramp up and substantial progress was made of the deionized cooling water systems havNational Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report March 2010 Erection of structural

  7. Sources Sought | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich SignatureProposed

  8. 2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II 1. High-energy x-ray micro- uniformity in the X-Ray and Gamma-ray Response of Large-Area/Volume Radiation Detectors (MDM) Ralph James) Konstantine Kaznatcheev, Brookhaven National Laboratory Insertion device 11. Scanning Transmission X

  9. Renormalized 2PN spin contributions to the accumulated orbital phase for LISA sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    László Á. Gergely; Balázs Mikóczi

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We give here a new third post-Newtonisn (3PN) spin-spin contribution (in the PN parameter $\\epsilon $) to the accumulated orbital phase of a compact binary, arising from the spin-orbit precessional motion of the spins. In the equal mass case this contribution vanishes, but LISA sources of merging supermassive binary black holes have typically a mass ratio of 1:10. For such non-equal masses this 3PN correction is periodic in time, with period approximately $\\epsilon ^{-1}$ times larger than the period of gravitational waves. We derive a renormalized and simpler expression of the spin-spin coefficient at 2PN, as an average over the time-scale of this period of the combined 2PN and 3PN contribution. We also find that for LISA sources the quadrupole-monopole contribution to the phase dominates over the spin-spin contribution, while the self-spin contribution is negligible even for the dominant spin. Finally we define a renormalized total spin coefficient $\\bar{\\sigma}$ to be employed in the search for gravitational waves emitted by LISA sources.

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    in September. Accelerator Systems progress continued with successful procurement and delivery of major. 25 ASD Secondary Cooling System Design Review Sept. 1­2 RF Bellows and Absorbers Review Sept. 8National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report July 2010 July 30: Roof surfacing

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II November 2013 Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    the conformance of our injector commissioning program with the requirements of the Accelerator Safety Order and effective commissioning of the NSLS-II linac and booster. Injector commissioning is expected to last EXECUTIVE SUMMARY NOVEMBER 2013 ACTIVITY 2 OVERALL ASSESSMENT The National Synchrotron Light Source II

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 2, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. [eds.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

  13. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelor, K. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  15. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Goto, A.; Hattori, T.; Hamano, T.; Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Imaseki, H.; Katagiri, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Suda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Suya, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  16. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL's public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  17. Idea-Nation: A Unique Framework for Managing Crowd-Sourced Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Joseph

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    through a management frame work for inter-organizational crowd-sourced projects called Idea-Nation....

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  19. EA-1321: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to upgrade the facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron...

  20. Abstracts of papers presented at SRI '95 Status of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstracts of papers presented at SRI '95 Status of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory David E. Moncton Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 Presented on 18 October 1995 The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a third

  1. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National by the National Academies Press, you may contact our customer service department toll- free at 888-624-8373, visit

  2. National Environmental Policy Act source guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansky, M.T.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODS, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  3. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  4. Disused Radioactive Sources Secured in Georgia | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of disused high activity sources from the Institute of Radiobiology to a more secure storage facility. As part of NNSA's broader cooperative effort to help prevent nuclear and...

  5. Environmental Assessment for the National Synchrotron Light Source...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    synchrotron light source, NSLS-II, would incorporate advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors and non-destructive tools and instruments to image the structure and...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: open source WEC modeling tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    source WEC modeling tool Sandia, NREL Release Wave Energy Converter Modeling and Simulation Code: WEC-Sim On July 29, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News,...

  7. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications.

  8. SOURCE?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

  9. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  10. NNSA conducts second seismic source physics experiment | National Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgendaSecurityAbout Us / OurEnrichedNNSA

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.544.42.4

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability

  13. NNSA Small Business Week Day 4: Government Scientific Source | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTHN N ENuclear

  14. Small Business Sourcing System | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology andAdministration

  15. Reliable fuel source | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability Technology earns award Reliability

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number of2.4

  17. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number4.4

  19. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number4.41

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number4.413

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number4.4133

  2. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4

  3. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number of

  4. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number of9

  5. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number of91

  6. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number

  7. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number3

  8. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number30.5

  9. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47 Number30.57

  10. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.47

  11. LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The LCLS's highly focused beam, which arrives in staccato bursts one-rays are scientists' best tool for probing matter on the atomic scale, and the LCLS is an x-ray source unlike any before. Shining a billion times brighter than previous X-ray sources, the LCLS probes matter in new ways

  12. National Certification Standard for Ground Source Heat Pump Personnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, John [Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium] [Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Certification Standard for the Geothermal Heat Pump Industry adds to the understanding of the barriers to rapid growth of the geothermal heat pump (GHP) industry by bringing together for the first time an analysis of the roles and responsibilities of each of the individual job tasks involved in the design and installation of GHP systems. The standard addresses applicable qualifications for all primary personnel involved in the design, installation, commissioning, operation and maintenance of GHP systems, including their knowledge, skills and abilities. The resulting standard serves as a foundation for subsequent development of curriculum, training and certification programs, which are not included in the scope of this project, but are briefly addressed in the standard to describe ways in which the standard developed in this project may form a foundation to support further progress in accomplishing those other efforts. Follow-on efforts may use the standard developed in this project to improve the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of curriculum development and training programs for GHP industry personnel, by providing a more complete and objective assessment of the individual job tasks necessary for successful implementation of GHP systems. When incorporated into future certification programs for GHP personnel, the standard will facilitate increased consumer confidence in GHP technology, reduce the potential for improperly installed GHP systems, and assure GHP system quality and performance, all of which benefit the public through improved energy efficiency and mitigated environmental impacts of the heating and cooling of homes and businesses.

  13. The Particle Accelerator Simulation Code PyORBIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorlov, Timofey V [ORNL; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Cousineau, Sarah M [ORNL; Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle accelerator simulation code PyORBIT is presented. The structure, implementation, history, parallel and simulation capabilities, and future development of the code are discussed. The PyORBIT code is a new implementation and extension of algorithms of the original ORBIT code that was developed for the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The PyORBIT code has a two level structure. The upper level uses the Python programming language to control the flow of intensive calculations performed by the lower level code implemented in the C++ language. The parallel capabilities are based on MPI communications. The PyORBIT is an open source code accessible to the public through the Google Open Source Projects Hosting service.

  14. PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BABZIEN,M.; BLUM,E.; CASEY,W.; CHANG,X.; GRAVES,W.; HASTINGS,J.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,E.; KAO,C.C.; KRAMER,S.; KRINSKY,S.; MORTAZAVI,P.; MURPHY,J.; OZAKI,S.; PJEROV,S.; PODOBEDOV,B.; RAKOWSKY,G.; ROSE,J.; SHAFTAN,T.; SHEEHY,B.; SIDDONS,D.; SMEDLEY,J.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; TOWNE,N.; WANG,J.M.; WANG,X.; WU,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; YU,L.H.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a major paradigm shift in the approach to the production of synchrotron radiation This change will considerably improve the scientific capabilities of synchrotron light sources. We introduce plans for an upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This upgrade will be based on the Photoinjected Energy Recovering Linac (PERL). This machine emerges from the union of two technologies, the laser-photocathode RF gun (photoinjector) and superconducting linear accelerators with beam energy recovery (Energy Recovering Linac). The upgrade will bring the NSLS users many new insertion device beam lines, brightness greater than 3rd generation lightsource's and ultra-short pulse capabilities, not possible with storage ring light sources.

  15. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  16. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  17. Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M. (eds.)

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  20. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class of experiments: the simultaneous investigation of a material’s electronic and structural properties.

  1. Oscillating spin-orbit interaction as a source of spin-polarized wave packets in two-terminal nanoscale devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Szaszko-Bogar; Peter Foldi; F. M. Peeters

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballistic transport through nanoscale devices with time-dependent Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction (SOI) can lead to spin-polarized wave packets that appear even for completely unpolarized input. The SOI that oscillates in a finite domain generates density and spin polarization fluctuations that leave the region as propagating waves. Particularly, spin polarization has space and time dependence even in regions without SOI. Our results are based on an analytic solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. The relevant Floquet quasi-energies that are obtained appear in the energy spectrum of both the transmitted and reflected waves.

  2. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  3. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  4. National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

  5. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  6. Structural testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container is a Type B packaging design currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to the normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this package design. This report documents the test program portion of the design verification, using several prototype packages. Four types of testing were performed: 30-foot hypothetical accident condition drop tests in three orientations, 40-inch hypothetical accident condition puncture tests in five orientations, a 21 psi external overpressure test, and a normal conditions of transport test consisting of a water spray and a 4 foot drop test. 18 refs., 104 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Certification testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping counter is a Type B packaging currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this packaging design. This report documents the testing portion of the design verification. Six tests were conducted on a prototype package: a water spray test, a 4-foot normal conditions drop test, a 30-foot drop test, a 40-inch puncture test, a 30-minute thermal test, and an 8-hour immersion test.

  8. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  9. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 1: National assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [6714 Norway Road, Dallas, TX (United States); Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

  10. Wiggler, undulator, and free-electron laser-radiation sources development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, H.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the special radiation sources development at the NSLS for incorporation in a 2.5 GeV X-ray storage ring and a 700 MeV vuv storage ring. This includes a superconducting high field multipole wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 0.5A; a permanent magnet wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 2.0A; a maximum photon energy undulator (5 to 7 keV); an undulator for a soft X-ray line or continuum spectrum and a free electron laser source tunable in the 2500 to 4500A region. Source characteristics and status of development are given. In addition, the incorporation of a backscattered Compton photon source is being studied and relevant parameters are presented.

  11. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  12. National Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Source Guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODs, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  15. NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source) X-19A beamline performance for x-ray absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C.Y.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Stefan, P.M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the X-19A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described. The beamline is designed for high resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a wide energy range. All of the beamline optical components are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) operation. This permits measurements to be made in a window-less mode, thereby facilitating lower energy (<4 KeV) studies. To upgrade the beamline performance, several possible improvements in instrumentation and practice are discussed to increase photon statistics with an optimum energy resolution, while decreasing the harmonic contamination and noise level. A special effort has been made to improve the stability and UHV compatibility of the monochromator system. Initial x-ray absorption results demonstrate the capabilities of this beamline for x-ray absorption studies of low Z elements (e.g. S) in highly dilute systems. The future use of this beamline for carrying out various x-ray absorption experiments is presented. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A test bed for a series of chemical explosives tests known as Source Physics Experiments (SPE) was constructed in granitic rock of the Climax stock, in northern Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site in 2010-2011. These tests are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's National Center for Nuclear Security. The test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves, and will provide data that will improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. Abundant geologic data are available for the area, primarily as a result of studies performed in conjunction with the three underground nuclear tests conducted in the Climax granite in the 1960s and a few later studies of various types. The SPE test bed was constructed at an elevation of approximately 1,524 meters (m), and consists of a 91.4-centimeter (cm) diameter source hole at its center, surrounded by two rings of three 20.3-cm diameter instrument holes. The inner ring of holes is positioned 10 m away from the source hole, and the outer ring of holes is positioned 20 m from the source hole. An initial 160-m deep core hole was drilled at the location of the source hole that provided information on the geology of the site and rock samples for later laboratory testing. A suite of geophysical logs was run in the core hole and all six instruments holes to obtain matrix and fracture properties. Detailed information on the character and density of fractures encountered was obtained from the borehole image logs run in the holes. A total of 2,488 fractures were identified in the seven boreholes, and these were ranked into six categories (0 through 5) on the basis of their degree of openness and continuity. The analysis presented here considered only the higher-ranked fractures (ranks 2 through 5), of which there were 1,215 (approximately 49 percent of all fractures identified from borehole image logs). The fractures were grouped into sets based on their orientation. The most ubiquitous fracture set (50 percent of all higher-ranked fractures) is a group of low-angle fractures (dips 0 to 30 degrees). Fractures with dips of 60 to 90 degrees account for 38 percent of high-ranked fractures, and the remaining 12 percent are fractures with moderate dips (30 to 60 degrees). The higher-angle fractures are further subdivided into three sets based on their dip direction: fractures of Set 1 dip to the north-northeast, fractures of Set 2 dip to the south-southwest, and Set 3 consists of high-angle fractures that dip to the southeast and strike northeast. The low-angle fractures (Set 4) dip eastward. Fracture frequency does not appear to change substantially with depth. True fracture spacing averages 0.9 to 1.2 m for high-angle Sets 1, 2, and 3, and 0.6 m for Set 4. Two significant faults were observed in the core, centered at the depths of 25.3 and 32.3 m. The upper of these two faults dips 80 degrees to the north-northeast and, thus, is related to the Set-1 fractures. The lower fault dips 79 degrees to the south-southwest and is related to SPE Set-2 fractures. Neither fault has an identifiable surface trace. Groundwater was encountered in all holes drilled on the SPE test bed, and the fluid level averaged about 15.2 to 18.3 m below ground surface. An informal study of variations in the fluid level in the holes conducted during various phases of construction of the test bed concluded that groundwater flow through the fractured granitic rocks is not uniform, and appears to be controlled by variations in the orientation and degree of interconnectedness of the fractures. It may also be possible that an aplite dike or quartz vein may be present in the test bed, which could act as a barrier to groundwater flow and, thus, could account for anisotropy seen in the groundwater recovery measurements.

  17. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    --Information services. 3. Database management. 4. Information technology. I. U.S. National Committee for CODATA Administration (under purchase order S-73093-Z), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (under0622 and 56-DKNA-7-95101), and the Department of Energy (under grant no. DE-FG02- 96ER30277). Library

  18. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.nap.edu. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials Consumption RESEARCH DIRECTIONS Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Environmentally and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according

  19. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B. [eds.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  20. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  1. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Gerardin, A.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alessi, J. [BNL, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Faircloth, D. [RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kalvas, T. [University of Jyvaskyla, P.O.Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  2. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry J.; Alessi J.; Faircloth, D.; Gerardin, A.; Kalvas, T.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S.

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  3. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  4. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency and with regard for appropriate balance. This study was supported by Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER54924 between the National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Energy. Any opinions, findings, conclusions

  5. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all books from the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources in a nation that gets 85% of its total energy from oil, coal, and gas is a formidable goal A merican society, with a standard of living unprecedented in human history, can attribute a large measure of its success to increasingly sophisticated uses of energy. The strength of industry, the speed

  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source Beamline 1.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levenson, UC student at beamline1.4. #12;3 Table of Contents ABOUT LBNL......................................................................................................................4 THE LBNL calculation Second calculation · Janis He-3 cryostat #12;4 About LBNL The LBNL The Lawrence Berkeley National

  7. Sources of Operational Flexibility, Greening the Grid (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving the Unsovlable:SourceSOURCES OF

  8. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 8, Black-liquor boiler BLB-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamgochian, C.L.; Keller, L.E.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a black-liquor recovery boiler equipped with a drybottom electrostatic precipitator for particulate emissions control. Black-liquor recovery boilers are used at kraft pulp mills to produce process steam and to reclaim inorganic chemicals from spent wood pulping liquors. The dioxin/furan emissions test was conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin and/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Black-liquor recovery boilers are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested black-liquor boiler, BLB-C, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Boiler BLB-C is considered representative of black-liquor recovery boilers with dry-bottom electrostatic precipitators. The amount of chloride present in the black-liquor circuit at this site is considered intermediate to high relative to that found at other kraft pulp mills. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  9. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 6, wire reclamation incinerator WRI-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.E.; McReynolds, J.R.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a wire-reclamation incinerator equipped with an afterburner for hydrocarbon emissions control. The wire reclamation incinerator is used for recovery of copper from coated copper wire and drained transformer cores. The test was the sixth in a series of several dioxin/furan emissions tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin and/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Wire reclamation incinerators are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested incinerator WRI-A was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Incinerator WRI-A is considered representative of the wire-reclamation incinerator population in the United States. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tetra through octa homologue + 2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue + 2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  10. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiment 1 (SPE-1), Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Margaret [NSTec] [NSTec; Mercadente, Jennifer [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-1) was conducted in May 2011. The explosive source was a ~100-kilogram TNT-equivalent chemical set at a depth of 60 meters. It was recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 meters) and far-field (more than 100 meters) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes around the shot and a set of singlecomponent vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network comprised a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 meters to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the first Source Physics Experiment and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  11. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.54 End1

  12. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.54 End12

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.544.4

  14. Visit the National Academies Press online, the authoritative source for all book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number of

  17. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.4337

  18. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.4337

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table6 End

  1. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table6

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table6

  3. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table6022468

  4. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table6022468

  5. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Coke and

  6. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS will be fielded in 2015

  7. Characterizing Walk Trips in communities by Using Data from 2009 National Household Travel Survey, American Community Survey, and Other Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys] [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL] [ORNL; Murakami, Elaine [FHWA USDOT] [FHWA USDOT

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-motorized travel (i.e. walking and bicycling) are of increasing interest to the transportation profession, especially in context with energy consumption, reducing vehicular congestion, urban development patterns, and promotion of healthier life styles. This research project aimed to identify factors impacting the amount of travel for both walk and bike trips at the Census block group or tract level, using several public and private data sources. The key survey of travel behavior is the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which had over 87,000 walk trips for persons 16 and over, and over 6000 bike trips for persons 16 and over. The NHTS, in conjunction with the Census Bureau s American Community Survey, street density measures using Census Bureau TIGER, WalkScore , Nielsen Claritas employment estimates, and several other sources were used for this study. Stepwise Logistic Regression modeling techniques as well as Discriminant Analysis were applied using the integrated data set. While the models performed reasonably well for walk trips, travel by bike was abandoned due to sparseness of data. This paper discusses data sources utilized and modeling processes conducted under this study. It also presents a summary of findings and addresses data challenges and lesson-learned from this research effort.

  8. Preparation of certified working reference material sources for the national TRU waste performance demonstration program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mecklenburg, S. L. (Sandra L.); Thronas, D. L. (Denise L.); Wong, A. S. (Amy S.); Marshall, Robert S.,; Becker, G. K.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traceable non-destructive assay (NDA) standards containing a variety of radionuclides including uranium, americium, and plutonium oxides mixed with an inert matrix were prepared and certified for use in the U .S. Department of Energy's National TRU Waste Program (NTWP) . The NTWP requires traceable nuclear material standards of the Working Reference Material (WRM) class for qualification of NDA instrumentation that is used to quantify nuclear material in DOE-generated waste before the waste is shipped for final disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico . Qualification and approval of measurement systems is accomplished in part through successful participation in the Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) and is required for DOE and EPA regulatory compliance . An overview of the PDP program highlighting the role of the certified WRMs fabricated at LANL is presented, as well as a summary of the WRM fabrication process and an overview of the inventory of over 175 WRMs fabricated and deployed to DOE measurement facilities to date .

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  10. Determining the best source of renewable electricity to power a remote site for the National Park Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azerbegl, R.; Mas, C.; Walker, A.; Morris, R.; Christensen, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies have economic and environmental advantages in many remote applications. They can provide most of the power to off-grid loads, where batteries and another power source such as a generator or a fuel cell may be required to ensure availability and feasibility. In support of the National Park Service, the Federal Energy Management Program Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has evaluated several methods for providing a renewable source of electricity to a beach campsite at Kirby Cove, Marin County, California. This site requires 2 kWh per day to power a campground host in a motor home five months power year. The existing electricity line to the site is in need of replacement and the NPS is interested in evaluating more cost-effective and environmentally sensitive alternatives. Photovoltaics, tidal current, and wind power systems in combination with a back-up electric system (standard, thermoelectric, and Stirling generator and fuel cell) and an energy storage medium (battery, flywheel, and hydrogen) were analyzed. Multi-objective optimization criteria include initial cost, operating cost, emissions, maintenance requirements, and to be consistent with the NPS requirements, the system must be clean, silent, and sustainable. The best system combination was designed according to these evaluation criteria and a demonstration system is to be constructed. This paper describes the optimization procedure and design. Results indicate that a 800 Watt photovoltaic array with a hydrogen fuel cell best serves the requirements for clean, silent power. Since fuel cells are developmental, a propane generator is recommended as an alternative.

  11. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  12. Rock-Around Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Scott K.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , and other factors to limit the orbit selections. The first step is to determine the range of RAO semi-major axes for any given target orbit by ensuring the RAO orbit does not exceed a prescribed maximum al- lowable distance, dmax from the target orbit...

  13. 1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 12/5/2012 eere.energy.gov National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cycles for certain vehicle types (including buses, light-duty cars & trucks, delivery vans, and short-haul trucks) Advantages of Batteries and Fuel Cells: · For shorter distances, batteries are more effective1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 12/5/2012 eere.energy.gov National Fuel Cell

  14. Radiological Characterization Technical Report on Californium-252 Sealed Source Transuranic Debris Waste for the Off-Site Source Recovery Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the development and approach for the radiological characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The report combines information on the nuclear material content of each individual source (mass or activity and date of manufacture) with information and data on the radionuclide distributions within the originating nuclear material. This approach allows for complete and accurate characterization of the waste container without the need to take additional measurements. The radionuclide uncertainties, developed from acceptable knowledge (AK) information regarding the source material, are applied to the summed activities in the drum. The AK information used in the characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources has been qualified by the peer review process, which has been reviewed and accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. EA-1266: Proposed Decontamination and Disassembly of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor (ATSR) At Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the decontamination and disassembly of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne Thermal Source Reactor.

  16. Identification of source contributions to visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H.; Salmon, L.G.; Winner, D.A.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfates and carbonaceous aerosols are the largest contributors to the fine particle burden in the atmosphere near Grand Canyon National Park. While the effects of sulfate particles on visibility at the Grand Canyon has been extensively studied, much less is known about the nature and origin of the carbonaceous aerosols that are present. This disparity in understanding arises from at least two causes: aerosol carbon data for the region are less plentiful and many of the sources that could contribute to that organic aerosol are both diverse and not well characterized. The objective of this present study is to examine the origin of the carbonaceous aerosol at Grand Canyon National Park during the summer season based on molecular tracer techniques applied to source and ambient samples collected specifically for this purpose.

  17. EA-1455: Enhanced Operations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to continue and enhance operation of the Advanced photon Source, including modifications, upgrades, and new facilities, at the U.S....

  18. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 10, secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace MET-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, L.E.; McReynolds, J.R.; Benson, D.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace equipped with an afterburner for hydrocarbon emissions control and two baghouses for particulate-emissions control. The cupola furnace is used for recovery of copper from telephone scrap and other copper-bearing materials. The test was No. 10 in a series of dioxin/furan emissions tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnaces are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested cupola furnace, MET-A, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Cupola furnace MET-A is a large secondary-copper-recovery cupola furnace relative to others in the United States. The furnace feed includes plastic-bearing materials of various types, some of which may contain chlorinated organic compounds. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tera through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  19. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R. W. [CompX; Petrov, Yu. V. [CompX

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker-Planck codes will advance computational modeling of plasma devices important to the USDOE magnetic fusion energy program, in particular the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, San Diego, the NSTX spherical tokamak at Princeton, New Jersey, and the MST reversed-field-pinch Madison, Wisconsin. The validation studies of the code against the experiments will improve understanding of physics important for magnetic fusion, and will increase our design capabilities for achieving the goals of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which the US is a participant and which seeks to demonstrate at least a factor of five in fusion power production divided by input power.

  20. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.5

  1. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.54 End

  2. Pre-Shot Simulations of Far-Field Ground Motions for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A J; Wagoner, J; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) will involve a series of explosions in various geologic and emplacement conditions to validate numerical simulation methods to predict behavior of seismic wave excitation and propagation for nuclear test monitoring. The first SPE's currently underway involve explosions in the Climax Stock (granitic geology) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Detailed geologic data and published material properties for the major lithologic units of the NNSS and surrounding region were used to build three-dimensional models for seismic wave propagation simulations. The geologic structure near the SPE shot point is quite varied including granitic, carbonate, tuff and alluvium lithologies. We performed preliminary ground motion simulations for a near-source domain covering 8 km x 8 km at the surface centered on the shot point to investigate various source and propagation effects using WPP, LLNL's anelastic seismic wave finite difference code. Simulations indicate that variations in wave propagation properties of the sub-surface will generate strongly path-dependent response once the energy has left the relatively small granitic geology of the near-surface Climax Stock near the SPE shot point. Rough topography to the north and west of SPE shot point causes additional complexity in the signals including energy on the transverse components. Waves propagate much faster through the granitic and carbonate formations and slower through the tuff and alluvium. Synthetic seismograms for a pure explosion source in a 3D geologic structure show large amplitudes on transverse component. For paths to the south sampling the granite, tuff and alluvium lithologies transverse component amplitudes are as high as 50% of that on the vertical and radial components.

  3. Pre-shot simulations of far-field ground motion for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site: SPE2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, R J; Rodgers, A; Walter, W; Ford, S; Xu, H; Matzel, E; Myers, S; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B; Hauk, T; Wagoner, J

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is planning a 1000 kg (TNT equivalent) shot (SPE2) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in a granite borehole at a depth (canister centroid) of 45 meters. This shot follows an earlier shot of 100 kg in the same borehole at a depth 60 m. Surrounding the shotpoint is an extensive array of seismic sensors arrayed in 5 radial lines extending out 2 km to the north and east and approximately 10-15 to the south and west. Prior to SPE1, simulations using a finite difference code and a 3D numerical model based on the geologic setting were conducted, which predicted higher amplitudes to the south and east in the alluvium of Yucca Flat along with significant energy on the transverse components caused by scattering within the 3D volume along with some contribution by topographic scattering. Observations from the SPE1 shot largely confirmed these predictions although the ratio of transverse energy relative to the vertical and radial components was in general larger than predicted. A new set of simulations has been conducted for the upcoming SPE2 shot. These include improvements to the velocity model based on SPE1 observations as well as new capabilities added to the simulation code. The most significant is the addition of a new source model within the finite difference code by using the predicted ground velocities from a hydrodynamic code (GEODYN) as driving condition on the boundaries of a cube embedded within WPP which provides a more sophisticated source modeling capability linked directly to source site materials (e.g. granite) and type and size of source. Two sets of SPE2 simulations are conducted, one with a GEODYN source and 3D complex media (no topography node spacing of 5 m) and one with a standard isotropic pre-defined time function (3D complex media with topography, node spacing of 5 m). Results were provided as time series at specific points corresponding to sensor locations for both translational (x,y,z) and rotational components. Estimates of spectral scaling for SPE2 are provided using a modified version of the Mueller-Murphy model. An estimate of expected aftershock probabilities were also provided, based on the methodology of Ford and Walter, [2010].

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - accompanying orbital grease Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exchange magntostriction... is the orbital doublet r 3, and they might exhibit some effects of Jahn Teller instability. Fe2+ in Td ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

  5. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS configurations have a resolution of 7 microns or better. The 28 m LOS with a 7 x 7 array of 100-micron mini-penumbral apertures or 50-micron square pinholes meets the design requirements and is a very good design alternative.

  6. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  7. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  8. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biri, S; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide bandwidth (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effec...

  9. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  10. Orbital motions as gradiometers for post-Newtonian tidal effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct long-term changes occurring in the orbital dynamics of a local gravitationally bound binary system $S$ due to the post-Newtonian tidal acceleration caused by an external massive source are investigated. A class of systems made of a test particle $m$ rapidly orbiting with orbital frequency $n_{\\rm b}$ an astronomical body of mass $M$ which, in turn, slowly revolves around a distant object of mass $M^{'}$ with orbital frequency $n_{\\rm b}^{'}\\ll n_{\\rm b}$ is considered. The characteristic frequencies of the non-Keplerian orbital variations of $m$ and of $M$ itself are assumed to be negligible with respect to both $n_{\\rm b}$ and $n_{\\rm b}^{'}$. General expressions for the resulting Newtonian and post-Newtonian tidal orbital shifts of $m$ are obtained. The future missions BepiColombo and JUICE to Mercury and Ganymede, respectively, are considered in view of a possible detection. The largest effects, of the order of $\\approx 0.1-0.5$ milliarcseconds per year (mas yr$^{-1}$), occur for the Ganymede orbiter of the JUICE mission. Although future improvements in spacecraft tracking and orbit determination might, perhaps, reach the required sensitivity, the systematic bias represented by the other known orbital perturbations of both Newtonian and post-Newtonian origin would be overwhelming. The realization of a dedicated artificial mini-planetary system to be carried onboard and Earth-orbiting spacecraft is considered as well. Post-Newtonian tidal precessions as large as $\\approx 1-10^2$ mas yr$^{-1}$ could be obtained, but the quite larger Newtonian tidal effects would be a major source of systematic bias because of the present-day percent uncertainty in the product of the Earth's mass times the Newtonian gravitational parameter.

  11. Orbit Spaces in Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittorino Talamini

    2006-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of Landau theory of phase transitions one is interested to describe all the possible low symmetry ``superconducting'' phases allowed for a given superconductor crystal and to determine the conditions under which this crystal undergoes a phase transition. These problems are best described and analyzed in the orbit space of the high symmetry group of the ``normal, non-superconducting'' phase of the crystal. In this article it is worked out a simple example concerning superconductivity, that shows the P-matrix method to determine the equations and inequalities defining the orbit space and its stratification. This approach is of general validity and can be used in all physical problems that make use of invariant functions, as long as the symmetry group is compact.

  12. 9/18/09 2:18 PMDark Energy's Demise? New Theory Doesn't Use the Force -National Geographic | Eureka! Science News Page 1 of 2http://esciencenews.com/sources/national.geographic/2009/08/19/dark.energys.demise.new.theory.doesnt.use.force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    9/18/09 2:18 PMDark Energy's Demise? New Theory Doesn't Use the Force - National Geographic | Eureka! Science News Page 1 of 2http://esciencenews.com/sources/national.geographic/2009/08/19/dark.energys.demise.new.theory.doesnt.use.force e! Science News Dark Energy's Demise? New Theory Doesn't Use the Force Wednesday, August 19, 2009

  13. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF A DETERMINISTIC STOCHASTIC ORBIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Allan N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINISTIC STOCHASTIC ORBIT Allan N. Kaufman, Henry O.I.a Deterministic Stochastic Orbit* Allan N. Kaufman, Henry D.

  14. ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY May 9, 1994 Light Source Note: LS234 Comparison of the APS and UGIMAG Helmholtz Coil Systems David W. Carnegie Accelerator Systems Division Advanced...

  15. HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of HELIOS B.B.Back, Argonne National Laboratory PHY Colloquium May 21, 2010 14 The Siemens Magnet MRI Scanner in Tbingen, Monday, Nov 6, 2006 Two days later onto the truck...

  16. NOAA National Climatic Data Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Program Satellite 10 Facilitating Accessibility to Climate Model a Next-Generation Quality Control System for U.S. Summary of the Day Data 21 Enhancing Data Producer Creating Regional Climate Services Steering Committees 28 Supporting the National Climate Assessment 29

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF ORBITAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM MODES IN FEL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF ORBITAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM MODES IN FEL RADIATION E. Hemsing , G. Andonian, J singularity on axis. Here we discuss current efforts to characterize the mode content of the VISA FEL through are discussed. INTRODUCTION Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been used as tun- able sources of coherent

  18. Building the World's Most Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    View this time-lapse video showing construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Construction is shown from 2009-2012.

  19. Accelerator Operations and Physics - Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Accelerator Operations & Physics Advance Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national...

  20. Quark spin-orbit correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Lorcé

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton spin puzzle issue focused the attention on the parton spin and orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin. However, a complete characterization of the proton spin structure requires also the knowledge of the parton spin-orbit correlation. We showed that this quantity can be expressed in terms of moments of measurable parton distributions. Using the available phenomenological information about the valence quarks, we concluded that this correlation is negative, meaning that the valence quark spin and kinetic orbital angular momentum are, in average, opposite. The quark spin-orbit correlation can also be expressed more intuitively in terms of relativistic phase-space distributions, which can be seen as the mother distributions of the standard generalized and transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. We present here for the first time some examples of the general multipole decomposition of these phase-space distributions.

  1. Earth and Moon orbital anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ll. Bel

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-dependent gravitational constant or mass would correctly describe the suspected increasing of both: the Astronomical unit and the eccentricity of the Lunar orbit around the Earth.

  2. Tracing meteorite source regions through asteroid spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Cristina Ana

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By virtue of their landing on Earth, meteorites reside in near-Earth object (NEO) orbits prior to their arrival. Thus the population of observable NEOs, in principle, give the best representation of meteorite source bodies. ...

  3. Orbits in a logarithmic potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooverman, R.H.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of charged particle orbits in the logarithmic electrostatic potential field surrounding a straight conducting wire at a fixed potential are investigated. The equations of motion of an electron in a logarithmic potential are derived, the limiting cases are considered, and the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion are presented along with sketches of a few representative orbits. (C.E.S.)

  4. Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

  5. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald V. Martello; Natalie J. Pekney; Richard R. Anderson (and others) [U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory particulate matter characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5 organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5 were the secondary transported material, local secondary material, diesel combustion emissions, and gasoline combustion emissions. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdenek Stuchlik; Jan Schee

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study optical phenomena related to appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by the string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by the standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by the string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with descending spin. This behavior differs substantially from appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and causes self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending of the superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin $a \\sim 1$.

  7. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martello, D.V.; Pekney, N.J.; Anderson, R.R.; Davidson, C.I. (Carnegie Mellon U., Pittsburgh, PA); Hopke, P.K. (Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY); Kim, E. (Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY); Christensen, W.F. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT); Mangelson, N.F. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT); Eatough, D.J. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5 organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5 were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from local activity emitting organic pollutants in the metropolitan area. In contrast, the major local secondary sources are dominated by organic material.

  8. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martello, DV [Martello, Donald V.; Pekney, NJ [Pekney, Natalie J.; Anderson, RR [Anderson, Richard; R,; Davidson, CI [Davidson, Cliff I.; Hopke, PK [Hopke, Philip K.; Kim, E [Kim, Eugene; Christensen, WF; (Christensen, William F.); Mangelson, NF [Mangelson, Nolan F.; Eatough, DJ [Eatough, Delbert J.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr amples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from local activity emitting organic pollutants in the metropolitan area. In contrast, the major local secondary sources are dominated by organic material.

  9. Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martello, Donald [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Pekney, Natalie [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Anderson, Richard [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Davidson, Cliff [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Hopke, Philip [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States). Center for Air Resources Engineering and Science, and Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kim, Eugene [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States). Center for Air Resources Engineering and Science, and Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Christensen, William [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Statistics; Mangelson, Nolan [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Eatough, Delbert [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from local activity emitting organic pollutants in the metropolitan area. In contrast, the major local secondary sources are dominated by organic material.

  10. NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE SYSTEM (NPOESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................... 12 Surface Albedo EDR....................................................................................................... 14 Land Surface Temperature EDR Surface Albedo EDR

  11. The pendulum dilemma of fish orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HongSheng Zhao

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape of a galaxy is constrained both by mechanisms of formation (dissipational vs. dissipationless) and by the available orbit families (the shape and amount of regular and stochastic orbits). It is shown that, despite the often very flattened shapes of banana and fish orbits, these boxlet orbits generally do not fit a triaxial galaxy in detail because, similar to loop orbits, they spend too little time at the major axis of the model density distribution. This constraint from the shape of fish orbits is relaxed at (large) radii where the density profile of a galaxy is steep.

  12. Orbits in the H2O molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Efstathiou; G. Contopoulos

    2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the forms of the orbits in a symmetric configuration of a realistic model of the H2O molecule with particular emphasis on the periodic orbits. We use an appropriate Poincar\\'e surface of section (PSS) and study the distribution of the orbits on this PSS for various energies. We find both ordered and chaotic orbits. The proportion of ordered orbits is almost 100% for small energies, but decreases abruptly beyond a critical energy. When the energy exceeds the escape energy there are still non-escaping orbits around stable periodic orbits. We study in detail the forms of the various periodic orbits, and their connections, by providing appropriate stability and bifurcation diagrams.

  13. Orbit equivalence for Cantor minimal Zd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Ian F.

    Orbit equivalence for Cantor minimal Zd -systems Thierry Giordano Department of Mathematics on the Cantor set is (topologically) orbit equivalent to an AF relation. As a consequence, this extends the classification up to orbit equivalence of minimal dynamical systems on the Cantor set to include AF relations

  14. Orbital Resonance and Solar Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Semi

    2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of planetary moves, encoded in DE406 ephemerides. We show resonance cycles between most planets in Solar System, of differing quality. The most precise resonance - between Earth and Venus, which not only stabilizes orbits of both planets, locks planet Venus rotation in tidal locking, but also affects the Sun: This resonance group (E+V) also influences Sunspot cycles - the position of syzygy between Earth and Venus, when the barycenter of the resonance group most closely approaches the Sun and stops for some time, relative to Jupiter planet, well matches the Sunspot cycle of 11 years, not only for the last 400 years of measured Sunspot cycles, but also in 1000 years of historical record of "severe winters". We show, how cycles in angular momentum of Earth and Venus planets match with the Sunspot cycle and how the main cycle in angular momentum of the whole Solar system (854-year cycle of Jupiter/Saturn) matches with climatologic data, assumed to show connection with Solar output power and insolation. We show the possible connections between E+V events and Solar global p-Mode frequency changes. We futher show angular momentum tables and charts for individual planets, as encoded in DE405 and DE406 ephemerides. We show, that inner planets orbit on heliocentric trajectories whereas outer planets orbit on barycentric trajectories.

  15. Fitting orbits to tidal streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen the discovery of many tidal streams through the Galaxy. Relatively straightforward observations of a stream allow one to deduce three phase-space coordinates of an orbit. An algorithm is presented that reconstructs the missing phase-space coordinates from these data. The reconstruction starts from assumed values of the Galactic potential and a distance to one point on the orbit, but with noise-free data the condition that energy be conserved on the orbit enables one to reject incorrect assumptions. The performance of the algorithm is investigated when errors are added to the input data that are comparable to those in published data for the streams of Pal 5. It is found that the algorithm returns distances and proper motions that are accurate to of order one percent, and enables one to reject quite reasonable but incorrect trial potentials. In practical applications it will be important to minimize errors in the input data, and there is considerable scope for doing this.

  16. On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani, E-mail: dhani@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rachman, Abdul [Space Science Center, National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Junjunan 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

  17. Inertial effect on spin–orbit coupling and spin transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, B., E-mail: sribbasu@gmail.com; Chowdhury, Debashree, E-mail: debashreephys@gmail.com

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the renormalization of inertial effects on the spin dependent transport of conduction electrons in a semiconductor by taking into account the interband mixing on the basis of k{sup ?}?p{sup ?} perturbation theory. In our analysis, for the generation of spin current we have used the extended Drude model where the spin–orbit coupling plays an important role. We predict enhancement of the spin current resulting from the renormalized spin–orbit coupling effective in our model in cubic and non-cubic crystals. Attention has been paid to clarify the importance of gauge fields in the spin transport of this inertial system. A theoretical proposition of a perfect spin filter has been done through the Aharonov–Casher like phase corresponding to this inertial system. For a time dependent acceleration, effect of k{sup ?}?p{sup ?} perturbation on the spin current and spin polarization has also been addressed. Furthermore, achievement of a tunable source of polarized spin current through the non uniformity of the inertial spin–orbit coupling strength has also been discussed. -- Highlights: •Study of the renormalization of inertial spin dependent transport of electrons. •Enhancement of the spin current due to the renormalized spin–orbit coupling. •A theoretical proposition of a perfect spin filter. •For a time dependent acceleration, spin current, spin polarization is addressed.

  18. (A-13-021-00) National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    of Inspector General ORU Orbital Replacement Units ROS Russian Orbital Segment SAW Solar Array Wings SSP SpaceIG-14-031 (A-13-021-00) National Aeronautics and Space Administration OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL Extending the Operational Life of the International Space Station Until 2024 OFFICE OF AUDITS AUDIT REPORT

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory The National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and neutron facilities, the power of the world's finest experts and facilities for fabricating and government institutions.Their myriad research programs pro- duce about 900 publications per year, with more by researchers to explain how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses ­ the electrical activity

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: domestic energy sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel and grid-scale energy applications offers several advantages over above-ground storage, says a recent Sandia study sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies...

  2. Activity Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .B. Parise, and G. Artioli, "First Structural Investigation of a Super-hydrated Zeolite," page 2-87. 4. from

  3. Microsats for On-Orbit Support Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledebuhr, A G

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I appreciate the opportunity to address this conference and describe some of our work and plans for future space missions and capabilities. My presentation will consist of a short overview of our program, some potential missions and enabling technologies, as well as, a description of some of our test vehicles and ongoing docking experiments. The Micro-Satellite Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing technologies for a new generation of a very highly capable autonomous microsats. A microsat is defined here as a vehicle that's less than 100 kilograms in mass. We're looking at a number of different microsat design configurations, between 0.5 to 1 meter in length and less than 40 kg in mass. You'll see several ground-test vehicles that we have been building that are modeled after potential future on-orbit systems. In order to have very aggressive missions, these microsats will require new integrated proximity operation sensors, advanced propulsion, avionics and guidance systems. Then to make this dream a reality a new approach to high fidelity ''hardware-in-the-loop'' ground testing, will be discussed that allows repeated tests with the same vehicle multiple times. This will enable you to ''get it right'' before going into space. I'll also show some examples of our preliminary docking work completed as of today.

  4. Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell Monitoring Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology (a) Peizotube source, as deployed...

  5. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  6. Free space laser communication experiments from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in lunar orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaoli

    Laser communication and ranging experiments were successfully conducted from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit. ...

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaluation for Drum Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation for Drum Characterization and Source Term Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaluation for Drum Characterization and Source Term Report This document was used to...

  8. Fourier-phase analysis of the orbiting bright-spot model for AGN variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier power spectra and phases of a signal from a large number of radiating sources orbiting around a black hole are investigated. It is assumed that the individual sources (bright spots) are located in an accretion disc and their lifetime exceeds the corresponding orbital period. This model is relevant for the short-time X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. Previous works on this subject were mostly concentrated on temporal characteristics and power spectra of observed light curves. In our present contribution, Fourier phases are brought into consideration and studied systematically for a broad range of input parameters. In particular, conditions for the phase coherence are discussed. It is shown that one can discriminate between the two classes of models which are currently under consideration--orbital motion of a large number of sources versus short-lived independent flares--although parameters of the model are not completely arbitrary. It is also shown that predicted power spectra depend rather strongly on the spot distribution across the disk surface. We conclude that the orbital motion of the spots cannot be the only reason for the source fluctuations, but it certainly influences observational properties of the source intrinsic variability.

  9. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayub, M. K. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  10. Gyroscope deviation from geodesic motion: quasiresonant oscillations on a circular orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Karpov

    2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    General relativistic spin-orbit interaction leads to the quasiresonant oscillation of the gyroscope mass center along the orbital normal. The beating amplitude does not include the speed of light and equals the ratio of the intrinsic momentum of the gyroscope to its orbital momentum. The modulation frequency equals the angular velocity of the geodetic precession that prevents the oscillation from resonance. The oscillation represents the precession of the gyroscope orbital momentum. Within an acceptable time the oscillation amplitude reaches the values that are amenable to being analyzed experimentally. Taking into account the source oblateness decreases the beating amplitude and increases the modulation frequency by the factor that is equal to the ratio of the quadrupole precession velocity to the geodetic precession velocity. The period of the quadrupole precession turns out to be a quite sufficient time to form a measurable amplitude of the oscillation.

  11. Science Highlights 2013 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from experiments carried out using x-rays from two U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science light sources including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory...

  12. APS News 2009 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studied at the APS June 24, 2009 Archaeologists studying trade artifacts from ancient Egypt at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National...

  13. National Forest Inventory Description of attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory Description of attributes Woodland_S: Woodland source (a) NFI base map have been mapped in accordance with the NFI mapping rules. National Forest Inventory #12;(f) 2010 AP

  14. Orbit Correction for the Newly Developed Polarization-Switching Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obina, Takashi; Honda, Tohru; Shioya, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Tsuchiya, Kimichika [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shigeru [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Photoscience, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme of undulator magnet arrangements has been proposed and developed as a polarization-switching radiation source, and its test-stand was installed in the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in order to investigate the effects on the beam orbit. The closed orbit distortion (COD) over 200 {mu}m was produced in a vertical direction when we switched the polarization of the radiation from the test-stand. In a horizontal direction, the COD was less than 50{mu}m. The results agreed well with the predictions from the magnetic-field measurement on the bench. In order to suppress the CODs and realize a stable operation of the ring with the polarization-switching, we developed an orbit correction system which consists of an encoder to detect motion of magnets, a pair of beam position monitors (BPMs), signal processing parts, and a pair of steering magnets. We succeeded in suppressing the CODs to the level below 3{mu}m using the system even when we switch the polarization at a maximum frequency of 0.8 Hz.

  15. EMPIRICALLY DETERMINED RESPONSE MATRICES FOR ON-LINE ORBIT AND ENERGY CORRECTION AT THOMAS JEFFERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerator Facility's (CEBAF) electron beam orbit and energy. Previous incarnations of these loops used digital feedback loops (less than 1 Hz update rate) to correct drifts in the Continuous Electron Beam JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY* A. Hofler, D. Bryan , L. Harwood, M. Joyce, V. Lebedev , TJNAF

  16. APS/123-QED Quantum Control of the Spin-Orbit Interaction Using the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    19122 and National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa J of mixing dependent on the strength of the spin-orbit interaction as well as the energy separation between the interacting states. It is also well known that, in the presence of strong electromagnetic fields, the energy

  17. Impact of Orbital Eccentricity on the Detection of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Burke

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    For extrasolar planets with orbital periods, P>10 days, radial velocity surveys find non-circular orbital eccentricities are common, ~0.3. Future surveys for extrasolar planets using the transit technique will also have sensitivity to detect these longer period planets. Orbital eccentricity affects the detection of extrasolar planets using the transit technique in two opposing ways: an enhancement in the probability for the planet to transit near pericenter and a reduction in the detectability of the transit due to a shorter transit duration. For an eccentricity distribution matching the currently known extrasolar planets with P>10 day, the probability for the planet to transit is ~1.25 times higher than the equivalent circular orbit and the average transit duration is ~0.88 times shorter than the equivalent circular orbit. These two opposing effects nearly cancel for an idealized field transit survey with independent photometric measurements that are dominated by Poisson noise. The net effect is a modest ~4% increase in the transiting planet yield compared to assuming all planets have circular orbits. When intrinsic variability of the star or correlated photometric measurements are the dominant source of noise, the transit detectability is independent of the transit duration. In this case the transit yield is ~25% higher than that predicted under the assumption of circular orbits. Since the Kepler search for Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone of a Solar-type star is limited by intrinsic variability, the Kepler mission is expected to have a ~25% higher planet yield than that predicted for circular orbits if the Earth-sized planets have an orbital eccentricity distribution similar to the currently known Jupiter-mass planets.

  18. Materials for Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategies in energy, environment, biology and national security. In the search for alternative energy sources, we need to make new discoveries in materials science. We need...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: thin-film battery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery Sandia Labs, Front Edge Technology, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Lab, Univ. of California-Los Angeles: Micro Power Source On March 20, 2013, in Energy Storage Systems,...

  20. alamos geostationary orbit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: PLANE CURVES WITH SMALL LINEAR ORBITS II Paolo Aluffi Carel Faber October 1999 Abstract. The linear orbit' of a plane curve of degree d is its orbit in P...

  1. Sources Sought Announcement

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 | NationalThis SOURCES SOUGHT

  2. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training NIST Handbook 150 ISO/IEC ­ September 24, 2013 2 ISO/IEC 17025:2005 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program General or electronic documentation of facts or events Sources: ISO /IEC Directives, Part 2, 2004 ISO/IEC 17000

  3. The first full orbit of Eta Carinae seen by Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitberger, K; Reimer, O; Takahashi, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The binary system eta Carinae has completed its first 5.54y orbit since the beginning of science operation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We are now able to investigate the high-energy gamma-ray source at the position of eta Carinae over its full orbital period. By this, we can address and confirm earlier predictions for temporal and spectral variability. Newer versions of the LAT datasets, instrument response functions and background models allow for a more accurate analysis. Therefore it is important to re-evaluate the previously analyzed time period along with the new data to further constrain location, spectral shape, and flux time history of the gamma-ray source. We confirm earlier predictions of increasing flux values above 10 GeV toward the next periastron passage. For the most recent part of the data sample, flux values as high as those before the first periastron passage in 2008 are recorded. A comparison of spectral energy distributions around periastron and apastron passages reveals stron...

  4. theearthobserver National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theearthobserver National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Earth Observer. July - August Once in orbit, the solar arrays successfully deployed, two-way communication with the satellite the Tanegashima Space Center in Tanegashima, Japan. To learn more about GPM read GPM Core Observatory: Advancing

  5. The orbital evolution of planets in disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm Kley

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital parameters of the observed extrasolar planets differ strongly from those of our own solar system. The differences include planets with high masses, small semi-major axis and large eccentricities. We performed numerical computations of embedded planets in disks and follow their mass growth and orbital evolution over several thousand periods. We find that planets do migrate inwards on timescales of about $10^5$ years on nearly circular orbits, during which they may grow up to about 5 Jupiter masses. The interaction of the disk with several planets may halt the migration process and lead to a system similar to the solar planetary system.

  6. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

  7. Orbital debris : drafting, negotiating, implementing a convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sénéchal, Thierry

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is time to recognize that while space may be infinite, Earth orbital space is a finite natural resource that must be managed properly. The problem we face with space pollution is complex and serious. The space treaties ...

  8. Spin-orbit interactions of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bliokh, K Y; Nori, F; Zayats, A V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light carries spin and orbital angular momentum. These dynamical properties are determined by the polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of light. Modern nano-optics, photonics, and plasmonics, tend to explore subwavelength scales and additional degrees of freedom of structured, i.e., spatially-inhomogeneous, optical fields. In such fields, spin and orbital properties become strongly coupled with each other. We overview the fundamental origins and important applications of the main spin-orbit interaction phenomena in optics. These include: spin-Hall effects in inhomogeneous media and at optical interfaces, spin-dependent effects in nonparaxial (focused or scattered) fields, spin-controlled shaping of light using anisotropic structured interfaces (metasurfaces), as well as robust spin-directional coupling via evanescent near fields. We show that spin-orbit interactions are inherent in all basic optical processes, and they play a crucial role at subwavelength scales and structures in modern optics.

  9. Delivered by Ingenta to: Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskel, Daniel

    Delivered by Ingenta to: Argonne National Laboratory IP : 164.54.84.139 Wed, 02 Sep 2009 22, 35 56126 Pisa, Italy 4 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 5 Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 6 Center

  10. Coadjoint Orbits and Conformal Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor IV

    1993-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a new approach to conformal field theory. This approach combines the method of coadjoint orbits with resolutions and chiral vertex operators to give a construction of the correlation functions of conformal field theories in terms of geometrically defined objects. Explicit formulae are given for representations of Virasoro and affine algebras in terms of a local gauge choice on the line bundle associated with geometric quantization of a given coadjoint orbit; these formulae define a new set of explicit bosonic realizations of these algebras. The coadjoint orbit realizations take the form of dual Verma modules, making it possible to avoid the technical difficulties associated with the two-sided resolutions which arise from Feigin-Fuchs and Wakimoto realizations. Formulae are given for screening and intertwining operators on the coadjoint orbit representations. Chiral vertex operators between Virasoro modules are constructed, and related directly to Virasoro algebra generators in certain cases. From the point of view taken in this thesis, vertex operators have a geometric interpretation as differential operators taking sections of one line bundle to sections of another. A suggestion is made that by connecting this description with recent work deriving field theory actions from coadjoint orbits, a deeper understanding of the geometry of conformal field theory might be achieved.

  11. Chaotic orbits for spinning particles in Schwarzschild spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaaren, Chris; Hirschmann, Eric W. [Physics Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the orbits of particles with spin in the Schwarzschild spacetime. Using the Papapetrou-Dixon equations of motion for spinning particles, we solve for the orbits and focus on those that exhibit chaos using both Poincare maps and Lyapunov exponents. In particular, we develop a method for comparing the Lyapunov exponents of chaotic orbits. We find chaotic orbits for smaller spin values than previously thought and find chaotic orbits with astrophysically relevant spin values.

  12. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY 3nd QUARTER 2009 MILESTONE REPORT: Upgrade plasma source configuration and carry out initial experiments. Characterize improvements in focal spot beam intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEPS plasma and the plasma in the final focus solenoid. TheI Final Focus Solenoid (FFS) in order to generate plasma onplasma sources (CAPS) streams from left to right into the final focus

  13. Gauge Orbit Types for Generalized Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Different versions for defining Ashtekar's generalized connections are investigated depending on the chosen smoothness category for the paths and graphs -- the label set for the projective limit. Our definition covers the analytic case as well as the case of webs. Then the orbit types of the generalized connections are determined for compact structure groups. The stabilizer of a connection is homeomorphic to the holonomy centralizer, i.e. the centralizer of its holonomy group, and the homeomorphism class of the gauge orbit is completely determined by the holonomy centralizer. Furthermore, the stabilizers of two connections are conjugate in the gauge group if and only if their holonomy centralizers are conjugate in the structure group. Finally, the gauge orbit type of a connection is defined to be the conjugacy class of its holonomy centralizer equivalently to the standard definition via stabilizers.

  14. Constraining Orbital Parameters Through Planetary Transit Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Kane; Kaspar von Braun

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital parameters of extra-solar planets have a significant impact on the probability that the planet will transit the host star. This was recently demonstrated by the transit detection of HD 17156b whose favourable eccentricity and argument of periastron dramatically increased its transit likelihood. We present a study which provides a quantitative analysis of how these two orbital parameters affect the geometric transit probability as a function of period. Further, we apply these results to known radial velocity planets and show that there are unexpectedly high transit probabilities for planets at relatively long periods. For a photometric monitoring campaign which aims to determine if the planet indeed transits, we calculate the expected transiting planet yield and the significance of a potential null result, as well as the subsequent constraints that may be applied to orbital parameters.

  15. Intrinsic Spin-Orbit Interaction in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Kandemir

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In graphene, we report the first theoretical demonstration of how the intrinsic spin orbit interaction can be deduced from the theory and how it can be controlled by tuning a uniform magnetic field, and/or by changing the strength of a long range Coulomb like impurity (adatom), as well as gap parameter. In the impurity context, we find that intrinsic spin-orbit interaction energy may be enhanced by increasing the strength of magnetic field and/or by decreasing the band gap mass term. Additionally, it may be strongly enhanced by increasing the impurity strength. Furthermore, from the proposal of Kane and Mele [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 226801 (2005)], it was discussed that the pristine graphene has a quantized spin Hall effect regime where the Rashba type spin orbit interaction term is smaller than that of intrinsic one. Our analysis suggest the nonexistence of such a regime in the ground state of flat graphene.

  16. Laser beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser power beaming to satellites and orbital transfer vehicles requires the accurate pointing of a low-divergence laser beam to its target, whether the target is in the sunlight or the earth`s shadow. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) has demonstrated reduction in the image size of stars by a factor of 10 or more by using laser beacons and adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation. This same technology is applicable to reducing the divergence of laser beams propagated from earth to space. A team of Phillips Laboratory, COMSAT Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories plans to demonstrate the state of the art in this area with laser-beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites. The demonstrations will utilize the 1.5-m diameter telescope with adaptive optics at the AFPL Starfire Optical Range (SOR) and a ruby laser provided by the Air Force and Sandia (1--50 kill and 6 ms at 694.3 nm). The first targets will be corner-cube retro-reflectors left on the moon by the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 landings. We will attempt to use adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation to demonstrate accurate and reliable beam projection with a series of shots over a span of time and shot angle. We will utilize the return signal from the retro-reflectors to help determine the beam diameter on the moon and the variations in pointing accuracy caused by atmospheric tilt. This will be especially challenging because the retro-reflectors will need to be in the lunar shadow to allow detection over background light. If the results from this experiment are encouraging, we will at a later date direct the beam at a COMSAT satellite in geosynchronous orbit as it goes into the shadow of the earth. We will utilize an onboard monitor to measure the current generated in the solar panels on the satellite while the beam is present. A threshold irradiance of about 4 W/m{sup 2} on orbit is needed for this demonstration.

  17. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  18. Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzke, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tompkin, J. Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

  19. A planet orbiting the star Gliese 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Queloz; M. Mayor; L. Weber; A. Blecha; M. Burnet; B. Confino; D. Naef; F. Pepe; N. Santos; S. Udry

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4MJ planet with a 15.8day orbital period has been detected from very precise radial velocity measurements with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph. A second remote and more massive companion has also been detected. All the planetary companions so far detected in orbit closer than 0.08 AU have a parent star with a statistically higher metal content compared to the metallicity distribution of other stars with planets. Different processes occuring during their formation may provide a possible explanation for this observation.

  20. Closed-orbit recurrences in molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. D.; DiSciacca, J. M.; Lambert, J. M.; Morgan, T. J. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using scaled-energy Stark spectroscopy, we report the observation of recurrences due to closed orbits, both geometric and diffractive, in the {nu}=0, R=1, nd Rydberg series of H{sub 2} (16orbit theory prediction of diffractive trajectories due to inelastic scattering of the excited electron on the molecular core. We have made similar measurements in He, and a comparison between the recurrence properties of H{sub 2} and its united atom equivalent is given.

  1. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  2. On Orbits of Operators on Hilbert Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lidia

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the norms is not a sufficient condition to imply hypercyclicity by constructing a weighted bilateral shift that, on one hand, satisfies the orbit-density property (in the sense defined above), but, on the other hand, fails to be hypercyclic. The second major...

  3. Potential Operating Orbits for the SAFE-400

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, Mike; Kos, Larry; Poston, David [NASA MSFC, TD40, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety must be ensured during all phases of space fission system design, development, fabrication, launch, operation, and shutdown. One potential space fission system application is fission electric propulsion (FEP), in which fission energy is converted into electricity and used to power high efficiency (Isp > 3000 s) electric thrusters. For these types of systems it is important to determine which operational scenarios ensure safety while allowing maximum mission performance and flexibility. Space fission systems are essentially non-radioactive at launch, prior to extended operation at high power. Once high power operation begins, system radiological inventory steadily increases as fission products build up. For a given fission product isotope, the maximum radiological inventory is typically achieved once the system has operated for a length of time equivalent to several half-lives. After that time, the isotope decays at the same rate it is produced, and no further inventory builds in. For an FEP mission beginning in Earth orbit, altitude and orbital lifetime increase as the propulsion system operates. Two simultaneous effects of fission propulsion system operation are thus (1) increasing fission product inventory and (2) increasing orbital lifetime. Phrased differently, as fission products build up, more time is required for the fission products to naturally convert back into non-radioactive isotopes. Simultaneously, as fission products build up, orbital lifetime increases, providing more time for the fission products to naturally convert back into nonradioactive isotopes. Operational constraints required to ensure safety can thus be quantified. (authors)

  4. Analytic orbit propagation for transiting circumbinary planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The herein presented analytical framework fully describes the motion of coplanar systems consisting of a stellar binary and a planet orbiting both stars on orbital as well as secular timescales. Perturbations of the Runge-Lenz vector are used to derive short period evolution of the system, while octupole secular theory is applied to describe its long term behaviour. A post Newtonian correction on the stellar orbit is included. The planetary orbit is initially circular and the theory developed here assumes that the planetary eccentricity remains relatively small (e_2<0.2). Our model is tested against results from numerical integrations of the full equations of motion and is then applied to investigate the dynamical history of some of the circumbinary planetary systems discovered by NASA's Kepler satellite. Our results suggest that the formation history of the systems Kepler-34 and Kepler-413 has most likely been different from the one of Kepler-16, Kepler-35, Kepler-38 and Kepler-64, since the observed plan...

  5. EPSILON AURIGAE: AN IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanik, Robert P.

    A rare eclipse of the mysterious object ? Aurigae will occur in 2009-2011. We report an updated single-lined spectroscopic solution for the orbit of the primary star based on 20 years of monitoring at the CfA, combined ...

  6. Mars Climate Orbiter Mishap Investigation Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    ) 3 List of Consultants 4 Acknowledgements 5 Executive Summary 6 1. Mars Climate Orbiter (MCO) and Mars Polar Lander (MPL) Project Descriptions 9 2. MCO Mishap 13 3. Method of Investigation 15 4. MCO Root Causes and MPL Recommendations 16 5. MCO Contributing Causes and Observations and MPL

  7. GROUP-THEORETIC ORBIT DECIDABILITY ENRIC VENTURA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventura, Enric

    GROUP-THEORETIC ORBIT DECIDABILITY ENRIC VENTURA Abstract. A recent collection of papers with the conjugacy problem made by Bogopolski­Martino­Ventura in [2]. All the consequences up to date, published Government through grant number MTM2011-25955. 1 #12;2 ENRIC VENTURA endomorphisms A = End(X, X

  8. Experimental results on the design for the APS PID global orbit control system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Y.; Kirchman, J. A.

    1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source third generation synchrotrons light source needs a stabilized particle beam position to produce high brightness and low emittance radiation. Global orbit correction control is introduced and is utilized to satisfy the demanding needs of the accelerator. This paper presents the experimental results for determining an effective and optimal controller to meet the global orbit correction requirements. These requirements include frequency/time domain demands consisting of vibrational noise attenuation, limiting of controller gains for stability and improving the system time response. Experiments were conducted with a digital signal processor implementing various PID sets to make comparisons between simulations and experiments. Measurements at these PID sets supported the results of software simulation.

  9. The Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  11. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  12. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  13. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  14. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  15. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  16. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudying thePhotoinducedPhoton Source

  17. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  18. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  19. EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

  20. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  1. Comparison of near-threshold reactivity of ground-state and spin-orbit excited chlorine atoms with methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    indicate that the Cl* CH4 reaction is unimportant in the near-threshold collision energy range of 0 at both low and high temperatures. Among other possible sources for this behavior, Ravishankara and Wine3. This postulate is based on the assump- tion that the extra spin-orbit energy 881 cm 1 of Cl* is available

  2. On-orbit serviceability of space system architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Matthew G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-orbit servicing is the process of improving a space-based capability through a combination of in-orbit activities which may include inspection; rendezvous and docking; and value-added modifications to a satellite's ...

  3. Sensitivity Methods Applied to Orbital Pursuit-Evasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafer, William Thomas

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, sensitivity methods are examined as a means to solve and analyze the problem of orbital pursuit-evasion (PE). Orbital PE is a two-sided spacecraft trajectory optimization problem characterized by high dimensionality and nonlinearity...

  4. On-Orbit Assembly of Flexible Space Structures with SWARM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Swati

    On-orbit assembly is an enabling technology for many space applications. However, current methods of human assisted assembly are high in cost and risk to the crew, motivating a desire to automate the on-orbit assembly ...

  5. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  6. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienertLift Forces in a Light

  7. Meeting National Needs, Creating Opportunities for Growth Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 2006 to 2009 $74.7 Millioninvested in new facilities and renovations 314jobs directly supported.S. looks for new sources of growth while facing major challenges in areas as diverse as health, energy in Upton, New York, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of just six

  8. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  9. Office of National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  10. Pantex receives National Weather Service recognition | National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receives National Weather Service recognition | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  11. Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule requires permits for control of sources of water pollution by providing the requirements and procedures for application and issuance of state National Pollutant Discharge Elimination...

  12. Monitoring SERC Technologies —Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Project Leader Dave Peterson about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor its installation.

  13. Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Free products, Orbit Equivalence and Measure Equivalence Rigidity Aur´elien Alvarez and Damien Gaboriau February 18, 2009 Abstract We study the analogue in orbit equivalence of free product decomposition and free indecomposability for countable groups. We introduce the (orbit equivalence invariant

  14. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, Sergey [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  15. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  16. Periodic-Orbit Theory of Level Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Heusler; Sebastian Müller; Alexander Altland; Petr Braun; Fritz Haake

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a semiclassical explanation of the so-called Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture which asserts universality of spectral fluctuations in chaotic dynamics. We work with a generating function whose semiclassical limit is determined by quadruplets of sets of periodic orbits. The asymptotic expansions of both the non-oscillatory and the oscillatory part of the universal spectral correlator are obtained. Borel summation of the series reproduces the exact correlator of random-matrix theory.

  17. Bifurcations of homoclinic orbits in bimodal maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai T. Hansen

    1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the bifurcation structure of homoclinic orbits in bimodal one dimensional maps. The universal structure of these bifurcations with singular bifurcation points and the web of bifurcation lines through the parameter space are described. The bifurcations depend on two parameters (codimension 2 bifurcations). We find the bifurcation lines exactly in a symbolic dynamics parameter plane and numerically in the parameter planes of a polynomial map and a piecewise linear map.

  18. Advanced Light Source control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    200 MeV Drift Tube Linac BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeHarold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-Power Target Experiment INTC Meeting CERN

  20. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    200 MeV Drift Tube Linac BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeHarold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-Power Target Experiment NUFACT'04 Osaka

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: self-charging battery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    self-charging battery Sandia Labs, Front Edge Technology, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Lab, Univ. of California-Los Angeles: Micro Power Source On March 20, 2013, in Energy...

  2. Orbital and Super-Orbital Periods of 1E 1740.7-2942 and GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Smith; W. A. Heindl; J. H. Swank

    2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Five years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the Galactic black-hole candidates 1E 1740.7-2942 and GRS 1758-258 show a periodic modulation with amplitude 3-4% in each source at 12.73 +/- 0.05 dy and 18.45 +/- 0.10 dy, respectively. We interpret the modulations as orbital, suggesting that the objects have red-giant companions. Combining the RXTE data with earlier data (Zhang, Harmon & Liang 1997) from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, we find a long period or quasi-period of about 600 dy in 1E 1740.7-2942, and a suggestion of a similar 600-dy period in GRS 1758-258. These timescales are longer than any yet found for either precessing systems like Her X-1 and SS 433 or binaries like LMC X-3 and Cyg X-1 with more irregular long periods.

  3. National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by the local body. #12;2 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India Out of these projects1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan The National Bio-energy Board (NBB), Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), is developing

  4. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) testimony to DOL (Department of Labor) on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's proposed rule on the control of hazardous energy sources (lockout/tagout) by R. W. Niemeier, September 8, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The testimony addressed the proposed rule on control of hazardous energy sources and was offered in support of the position of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on this issue. Provisions already in existence for cranes, derricks, and power presses require lockout provisions for electrical connections. The proposed rule will extend these protections to nonelectric power sources and add a requirement for isolating nonelectric hazards. The new rule requires a written procedure and training program. NIOSH opposed the use of tags instead of locks, as tags only provide a warning and are subject to several abuses including removal before maintenance is complete and negligence in removing the tag by the service operator when maintenance is completed. Over 20 electrically related fatalities were noted where a deenergized locked-out electrical circuit would have prevented the fatality. In a review of 160 responses concerning injuries where the equipment was turned off, six indicated the equipment was tagged out. Concern was also expressed over the simple tagout permitted for mechanical power transmission systems. NIOSH recommends that each worker should apply and remove his or her own lock.

  5. Extreme environmental testing of a rugged correlated photon source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grieve, James A; Ling, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in long distance quantum key distribution have motivated the development of ruggedised single photon sources, capable of producing useful correlations even when removed from the warm, nurturing environment found in most optics laboratories. As part of an ongoing pro- gramme to place such devices into low earth orbit (LEO), we have developed and built a number of rugged single photon sources based on spontaneous parametric downconversion. In order to evalu- ate device reliability, we have subjected our design to various thermal, mechanical and atmospheric stresses. Our results show that while such a device may tolerate launch into orbit, operation in orbit and casual mishandling by graduate students, it is probably unable to survive the forcible disassembly of a launch vehicle at the top of a ball of rapidly expanding and oxidising kerosene and liquid oxygen.

  6. National Competitiveness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNRELTechnologies

  7. National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSeeNUCLEAR SCIENCE WEEKSecurity LLNL's

  8. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamicsAspen Aerogels,AluminumApproved for

  9. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of Energy 3Services and LowersSafety andNASAand North

  10. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  11. American Heart Month National High Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart for Heart Health # P2-2 Risk Factors - High Blood Pressure # P2-3 Sodium is needed to. . . # P2-4 Sources

  12. 2006 Site Environmental Report brookhaven national laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is distributed to various U.S. Department of Energy sites, local libraries, and local regulators and stakeholders of the summary and CD, please write or call: Brookhaven National Laboratory Environmental and Waste Management constructed Center for Functional Nanomaterials, the planned National Synchrotron Light Source II project

  13. Orbital period derivative of a binary system using an exact orbital energy equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram H. Zaveri

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed that the equations of motion in periodic relativity which yielded major predictions of general relativity without utilizing Riemannian geometry and geodesic trajectories are exact in nature and can be applied to pulsars and inspiraling compact binaries for analyzing orbital period derivative and two polarization gravitational wave forms. Exactness of these equations eliminates the need for higher order xPN corrections to the orbital energy part of the balance equation. This is mainly due to the introduction of dynamic WEP which states that the gravitational mass is equal to the relativistic mass.

  14. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  15. Planck Surveyor On Its Way to Orbit

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ariane 5 rocket carried the Planck Surveyor and a companion satellite into space May 14, 2009 from the European Space Agency (ESA) base on the northwest coast of South America. Once in orbit beyond the moon, Planck will produce the most accurate measurements ever made of the relic radiation from the big bang, plus the largest set of CMB data ever recorded. Berkeley Labs long and continuing involvement with Planck began when George Smoot of the Physics Division proposed Plancks progenitor to ESA and continues with preparations for ongoing data analysis for the U.S. Planck team at NERSC, led by Julian Borrill, co-leader of the Computational Cosmology Center

  16. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  17. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

  18. Testing Chern-Simons modified gravity with orbiting superconductive gravity gradiometers --- The non-dynamical formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-E Qiang; Peng Xu

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    High precision Superconductivity Gravity Gradiometers (SGG) are powerful tools for relativistic experiments. In this paper, we work out the tidal signals in non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which could be measured by orbiting SGGs around Earth. We find that, with proper orientations of multi-axes SGGs, the tidal signals from the Chern-Simons modification can be isolated in the combined data of different axes. Furthermore, for three-axes SGGs, such combined data is the trace of the total tidal matrix, which is invariant under the rotations of SGG axes and thus free from axis pointing errors. Following nearly circular orbits, the tests of the parity-violating Chern-Simons modification and the measurements of the gravitomagnetic sector in parity-conserving metric theories can be carried out independently in the same time. A first step analysis on noise sources is also included.

  19. Testing Chern-Simons modified gravity with orbiting superconductive gravity gradiometers --- The non-dynamical formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Li-E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High precision Superconductivity Gravity Gradiometers (SGG) are powerful tools for relativistic experiments. In this paper, we work out the tidal signals in non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which could be measured by orbiting SGGs around Earth. We find that, with proper orientations of multi-axes SGGs, the tidal signals from the Chern-Simons modification can be isolated in the combined data of different axes. Furthermore, for three-axes SGGs, such combined data is the trace of the total tidal matrix, which is invariant under the rotations of SGG axes and thus free from axis pointing errors. Following nearly circular orbits, the tests of the parity-violating Chern-Simons modification and the measurements of the gravitomagnetic sector in parity-conserving metric theories can be carried out independently in the same time. A first step analysis on noise sources is also included.

  20. The On-Orbit Calibrations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ampe, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Anderson, B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Bagagli, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bartelt, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bederede, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bellardi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Belli, F.; /Frascati /Rome U.,Tor Vergata; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bisello, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Kalmar U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope began its on-orbit operations on June 23, 2008. Calibrations, defined in a generic sense, correspond to synchronization of trigger signals, optimization of delays for latching data, determination of detector thresholds, gains and responses, evaluation of the perimeter of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), measurements of live time, of absolute time, and internal and spacecraft boresight alignments. Here we describe on-orbit calibration results obtained using known astrophysical sources, galactic cosmic rays, and charge injection into the front-end electronics of each detector. Instrument response functions will be described in a separate publication. This paper demonstrates the stability of calibrations and describes minor changes observed since launch. These results have been used to calibrate the LAT datasets to be publicly released in August 2009.

  1. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable...

  2. MAPPING EARTH ANALOGS FROM PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY: SPIN-ORBIT TOMOGRAPHY FOR PLANETS IN INCLINED ORBITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Yuka [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawahara, Hajime, E-mail: yuka.fujii@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Aiming at obtaining detailed information on the surface environment of Earth analogs, Kawahara and Fujii proposed an inversion technique of annual scattered light curves named spin-orbit tomography (SOT), which enables us to sketch a two-dimensional albedo map from annual variation of the disk-integrated scattered light, and demonstrated the method with a planet in a face-on orbit. We extend it to be applicable to general geometric configurations, including low-obliquity planets like the Earth in inclined orbits. We simulate light curves of the Earth in an inclined orbit in three photometric bands (0.4-0.5 {mu}m, 0.6-0.7 {mu}m, and 0.8-0.9 {mu}m) and show that the distribution of clouds, snow, and continents is retrieved with the aid of the SOT. We also demonstrate the SOT by applying it to an upright Earth, a tidally locked Earth, and Earth analogs with ancient continental configurations. The inversion is model independent in the sense that we do not assume specific albedo models when mapping the surface, and hence applicable in principle to any kind of inhomogeneity. This method can potentially serve as a unique tool to investigate the exohabitats/exoclimes of Earth analogs.

  3. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  4. Spin-Orbit Force from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Murano; N. Ishii; S. Aoki; T. Doi; T. Hatsuda; Y. Ikeda; T. Inoue; H. Nemura; K. Sasaki

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first attempt to determine nucleon-nucleon potentials in the parity-odd sector, which appear in 1P1, 3P0, 3P1, 3P2-3F2 channels, in Nf=2 lattice QCD simulations. These potentials are constructed from the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave functions for J^P=0^-, 1^- and 2^-, which correspond to A1^-, T1^- and T2^- + E^- representation of the cubic group, respectively. We have found a large and attractive spin-orbit potential VLS(r) in the isospin-triplet channel, which is qualitatively consistent with the phenomenological determination from the experimental scattering phase shifts. The potentials obtained from lattice QCD are used to calculate the scattering phase shifts in 1P1, 3P0, 3P1 and 3P2-3F2 channels. The strong attractive spin-orbit force and a weak repulsive central force in spin-triplet P-wave channels lead to an attraction in the 3P2 channel, which is related to the P-wave neutron paring in neutron stars.

  5. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Neil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceElectron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facil- ity

  6. Orbits and Nonlocal School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasu-Kalkanlý, Ayþe

    Copernicus Tycho Brahe Johannes Kepler Issac Newton 2 #12;1.1 Conserved Vectors and Orbit ¨r + µ r3 r = 0, (1

  7. atomic orbitals calculation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and...

  8. OAK RIDGE ORNL/TM-2008/ NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    OAK RIDGE ORNL/TM-2008/ NATIONAL LABORATORY MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information) representatives, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source

  9. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L. [comps.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  10. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R Iyer; Moh'd S S Qusailah

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semi-analytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to 3PN order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (non-tail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo as well as space based detectors like LISA.

  11. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore »flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less

  12. SURFACE ORBITAL MAGNETISM Herv'e KUNZ \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE ORBITAL MAGNETISM Herv'e KUNZ \\Lambda Institut de Physique Th'eorique Ecole Polytechnique F, submitted to a magnetic field. Applying these results to orbital magnetism, we find that at high temperatures or weak magnetic fields the surface magnetisation is always paramag­ netic, but oscillations

  13. SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT FOR THE CIRCUMBINARY PLANET HOST KEPLER-16 A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cochran, William D. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fischer, Debra [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Doyle, Laurance [Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Welsh, William; Orosz, Jerome [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Shporer, Avi [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Prsa, Andrej [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kepler-16 is an eccentric low-mass eclipsing binary with a circumbinary transiting planet. Here, we investigate the angular momentum of the primary star, based on Kepler photometry and Keck spectroscopy. The primary star's rotation period is 35.1 {+-} 1.0 days, and its projected obliquity with respect to the stellar binary orbit is 1.{sup 0}6 {+-} 2.{sup 0}4. Therefore, the three largest sources of angular momentum-the stellar orbit, the planetary orbit, and the primary's rotation-are all closely aligned. This finding supports a formation scenario involving accretion from a single disk. Alternatively, tides may have realigned the stars despite their relatively wide separation (0.2 AU), a hypothesis that is supported by the agreement between the measured rotation period and the 'pseudosynchronous' period of tidal evolution theory. The rotation period, chromospheric activity level, and fractional light variations suggest a main-sequence age of 2-4 Gyr. Evolutionary models of low-mass stars can match the observed masses and radii of the primary and secondary stars to within about 3%.

  14. Classifying orbits in the classical Henon-Heiles Hamiltonian system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The H\\'{e}non-Heiles potential is undoubtedly one of the most simple, classical and characteristic Hamiltonian systems. The aim of this work is to reveal the influence of the value of the total orbital energy, which is the only parameter of the system, on the different families of orbits, by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits composing the main regular families evolve when energy varies. In particular, we conduct a thorough numerical investigation distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits, considering only bounded motion for several energy levels. The smaller alignment index (SALI) was computed by numerically integrating the equations of motion as well as the variational equations to extensive samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics that utilizes the Fourier transform of the time series of each coordinate is used to identify the various families of regular orbits and also to recognize the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our exploration takes place both in the physical $(x,y)$ and the phase $(y,\\dot{y})$ space for a better understanding of the orbital properties of the system. It was found, that for low energy levels the motion is entirely regular being the box orbits the most populated family, while as the value of the energy increases chaos and several resonant families appear. We also observed, that the vast majority of the resonant orbits belong in fact in bifurcated families of the main 1:1 resonant family. We have also compared our results with previous similar outcomes obtained using different chaos indicators.

  15. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  16. The Advanced Photon Source main control room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasky, S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation light source built in the 1990s. Like the machine itself, the Main Control Room (MCR) employs design concepts based on today`s requirements. The discussion will center on ideas used in the design of the MCR, the comfort of personnel using the design, and safety concerns integrated into the control room layout.

  17. Quantum Mutual Information Along Unitary Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sania Jevtic; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by thermodynamic considerations, we analyse the variation of the quantum mutual information on a unitary orbit of a bipartite system's state, with and without global constraints such as energy conservation. We solve the full optimisation problem for the smallest system of two qubits, and explore thoroughly the effect of unitary operations on the space of reduced-state spectra. We then provide applications of these ideas to physical processes within closed quantum systems, such as a generalized collision model approach to thermal equilibrium and a global Maxwell demon playing tricks on local observers. For higher dimensions, the maximization of correlations is relatively straightforward for equal-sized subsystems, however their minimisation displays non-trivial structures. We characterise a set of separable states in which the minimally correlated state resides: a collection of classically correlated states admitting a particular "Young tableau" form. Furthermore, a partial order exists on this set with respect to individual marginal entropies, and the presence of a "see-saw effect" for these entropies forces a finer analysis to determine the optimal tableau.

  18. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  19. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  20. Kepler-36: A Pair of Planets with Neighboring Orbits and Dissimilar Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Katherine M.

    In the solar system, the planets’ compositions vary with orbital distance, with rocky planets in close orbits and lower-density gas giants in wider orbits. The detection of close-in giant planets around other stars was the ...

  1. People | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    find APS people Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave Building - (630) 252- * email 090214...

  2. Generalized discrete orbit function transforms of affine Weyl groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Czy?ycki; Ji?í Hrivnák

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The affine Weyl groups with their corresponding four types of orbit functions are considered. Two independent admissible shifts, which preserve the symmetries of the weight and the dual weight lattices, are classified. Finite subsets of the shifted weight and the shifted dual weight lattices, which serve as a sampling grid and a set of labels of the orbit functions, respectively, are introduced. The complete sets of discretely orthogonal orbit functions over the sampling grids are found and the corresponding discrete Fourier transforms are formulated. The eight standard one-dimensional discrete cosine and sine transforms form special cases of the presented transforms.

  3. Fourier relationship between angular position and optical orbital angular momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Yao; Sonja Franke-Arnold; Johannes Courtial; Stephen Barnett; Miles Padgett

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the Fourier relationship between angular position and angular momentum for a light mode. In particular we measure the distribution of orbital angular momentum states of light that has passed through an aperture and verify that the orbital angular momentum distribution is given by the complex Fourier-transform of the aperture function. We use spatial light modulators, configured as diffractive optical components, to define the initial orbital angular momentum state of the beam, set the defining aperture, and measure the angular momentum spread of the resulting beam. These measurements clearly confirm the Fourier relationship between angular momentum and angular position, even at light intensities corresponding to the single photon level.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .............................................................................15 Energy Recovery Linac (ERL); Beamlines Beyond the Building Envelope; General Facility...........................................................................................20 5.8 Radiological Characteristics

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and no reportable safety incident in June. Construction of the ring building and central chilled water plant production components such as vacuum chambers, girders, BPM and power supply parts, injector transfer lines of the accelerator systems. Schedule floats for key elements in the accelerator systems are being closely monitored

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Mar 29 Science Advisory Committee (SAC) meeting Apr 4­5 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) training% complete with 31% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go. The DOE Independent activities, management of the construction site and site access process have been further strengthened

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Advisory Committee (SAC) meeting Apr 4­5 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) training Apr 13­14 Trends, with over 32% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go. The cumulative cost

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    EVENTS 2012 Installation Retreat Mar 13 Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Mar 15­16 Earned Value, the project was 72% complete with over 36% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining Budget Management System (EVMS) training Mar 20­21 Final Design Review (FDR) meetings, IXS and CSX Hutches Mar 20

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Commissioning Safety Assessment Document and Accelerator Safety Envelope have been completed and submitted for the linac, booster, RF transmitter, and damping wigglers continue to progress on schedule. The Linac

  10. Project Progress Report National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and released are the tungsten blade clamp design on all Day 1 slits, drift pipe support assembly, drift pipe of the storage ring (SR) and integrated testing. The monthly SPI for Accelerator Systems in September was 2

  11. 2001 NSLS ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CORWIN, M.A.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2001 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS, with over 2500 users, including 720 first time users, conducting nearly 1200 experiments in fields ranging from the life, materials, chemical, and environmental sciences to applied science and technology. An impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They include the first demonstration of a direct structural probe of the superconducting ground state in the cuprates by utilizing anomalous soft x-ray resonance effects to selectively enhance the scattering from doped holes. Another highly significant result was the determination of the structure of the potassium channel membrane protein. This is especially significant as it provides insight into how the channel functions and how it selects a particular kind of ion. In the nanoscience area, small angle x-ray scattering measurements played an essential role in determining that preferential sequestering of tailored metal nanocrystals into a self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymer can produce high quality metallodielectric photonic bandgap structures, demonstrating the potential of these nanocomposites for photonic crystal engineering. The infrared microscopy program continued to yield noteworthy results, including an important study that characterized the types and abundances of organic materials in contaminated and uncontaminated sediments from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. These results will be useful in devising improved methods for the destruction or removal of these environmental contaminants.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    continued to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and schedule indices is on budget and on schedule and activities continue to wind down. Monthly schedule performance for accelerator based on thorough analysis, and a number of weaknesses in current designs are being addressed. Hutch

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Project continued to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and schedule activities and conventional facilities project staff continue to wind down as the overall conventional for booster and storage ring are making excellent progress and enhanced radiation shielding analysis

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fewell, N.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: NSLS operations organization and administration; shift routines and operating practices; NSLS control room activities; communications; control of on-shift training; investigation of abnormal events; notifications; control of equipment and system status; lock-out tagout; independent verification; logkeeping; shift turnover; required reading; shift orders; equipment operations guides; operator aid postings; and equipment labeling.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 cost and schedule performance, completing 65% of the project by the end of October with about 32 the current status of the conventional construction, updated magnet production and accelerator installation

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance. The cumulative Schedule Perform- ance Index (SPI) improved to 0.97 from 0.96 in June and the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.02. The current month SPI is 1.17, due to excellent progress in the ring building and LOB construction, and improvements

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 and management reserve for the remaining Budget At Completion (BAC). The cumulative Schedule Performance Index.01. Construction of the ring building continues with beneficial occupancy for pentant 5, the last section

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.00. Construction of the ring building continues its excellent progress with beneficial occupancy for pentant 4 of the ring building occurring in December and rapid progress in construction of all five lab­office buildings

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .95 in previous month while the cumulative cost index remaining at 0.95. The Project was 86% complete with 48 excellent progress in January with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for overall project and concurred at the DOE mini-review held in December 2012. Conventional construction activities continue

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . The cumulative schedule index is 0.97 and the cumulative cost index is 1.02, both well within the acceptable. The project is 48% complete with 30% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go range. The current-month schedule variance is negative due to conventional construction being slowed

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    progress with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for the overall project at 1.39 (+$2.1M). The cumulative cost and schedule indices for the overall project are 0.99 and 0.96. The project was 85% (88 construction activities are nearly complete, while work to address punchlist items continues. Proposals

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    with conventional construction, the monthly schedule perfor- mance index for the overall project was 0 progress in August, maintaining its satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and management reserve for the remaining Estimate at Completion. Conventional construction continued to wind down

  3. SciTech Connect: National synchrotron light source. Activity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS...

  4. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG:Background:Bagdad Plant1 ISSUED:System

  5. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Tour Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Sandia Corporation | Questions & Comments | Privacy & Security U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia National Laboratories is a...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter On November 24, 2012 the National Solar Thermal Test...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: ACEC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACEC Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar...

  10. National Science Bowl Finals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area...

  12. Band Formation in a Molecular Quantum Well via 2D Superatom Orbital...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unoccupied molecular orbital of C&8326;F&8326; on a Cu(111) surface. In fractal islands, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy systematically stabilizes...

  13. Orbit Equivalence and Von Neumann Rigidity for Actions of Wreath Product Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizemore, James Owen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. Weiss. “An amenable equivalence relation is gen- eratedFur99] Alex Furman. “Orbit equivalence rigidity. ” Ann. ofand Yehuda Shalom. “Orbit equivalence rigidity and bounded

  14. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  15. Ion Sources - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center atdiffusivities in mesoporesSources The

  16. ARM - Sources of Atmospheric Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSA Related LinksHomeroomSiteSources

  17. Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy,Science In the LaboratorySOURCES AND

  18. NEA discovery, orbit calculation and impact probability assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    , 2013 #12;Chelyabinsk, Russia, Feb. 15, 2013 ~20-meter asteroid, 500 kt of energy released at ~30 km of Chelyabinsk Impactor #12;Kepler's Laws 1. The orbit of each planet (or asteroid) is an ellipse, with the Sun

  19. On-Orbit Results for the Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Paul S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Zachary K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caffrey, Michael P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bell, Randy [DOE

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides information regarding the use of the Xilinx Virtex-4 field-programmable gate array in a spacecraft deployed to low earth orbit. The results are compared to pre-deployment accelerated and fault injection testing.

  20. Counting of Sieber-Richter pairs of periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the semiclassical approach the universal spectral correlations in the Hamiltonian systems with classical chaotic dynamics can be attributed to the systematic correlations between actions of periodic orbits which (up to the switch in the momentum direction) pass through approximately the same points of the phase space. By considering symbolic dynamics of the system one can introduce a natural ultrametric distance between periodic orbits and organize them into clusters. Each cluster consists of orbits approaching closely each other in the phase space. We study the distribution of cluster sizes for the backer's map in the asymptotic limit of long trajectories. This problem is equivalent to the one of counting degeneracies in the length spectrum of the {\\it de Bruijn} graphs. Based on this fact, we derive the probability $\\P_k$ that $k$ randomly chosen periodic orbits belong to the same cluster. Furthermore, we find asymptotic behaviour of the largest cluster size $|\\Cll_{\\max}|$ and derive th...

  1. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in a generalized orbital compass model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Cincio; Jacek Dziarmaga; Andrzej M. Oles

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a generalized two-dimensional orbital compass model, which interpolates continuously from the classical Ising model to the orbital compass model with frustrated quantum interactions, and investigate it using the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA). The results demonstrate that increasing frustration of exchange interactions triggers a second order quantum phase transition to a degenerate symmetry broken state which minimizes one of the interactions in the orbital compass model. Using boson expansion within the spin-wave theory we unravel the physical mechanism of the symmetry breaking transition as promoted by weak quantum fluctuations and explain why this transition occurs only surprisingly close to the maximally frustrated interactions of the orbital compass model. The spin waves remain gapful at the critical point, and both the boson expansion and MERA do not find any algebraically decaying spin-spin correlations in the critical ground state.

  2. Frustration and Entanglement in Compass and Spin-Orbital Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej M. Ole?

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the consequences of intrinsic frustration of the orbital superexchange and of spin-orbital entanglement. While Heisenberg perturbing interactions remove frustration in the compass model, the lowest columnar excitations are robust in the nanoscopic compass clusters and might be used for quantum computations. Entangled spin-orbital states determine the ground states in some cases, while in others concern excited states and lead to measurable consequences, as in the $R$VO$_3$ perovskites. On-site entanglement for strong spin-orbit coupling generates the frustrated Kitaev-Heisenberg model with a rich magnetic phase diagram on the honeycomb lattice. Frustration is here reflected in hole propagation which changes from coherent in an antiferromagnet via hidden quasiparticles in zigzag and stripe phases to entirely incoherent one in the Kitaev spin liquid.

  3. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  4. Binary Black Holes in Quasi-Stationary Circular Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Baker

    2002-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method of determining solutions to the constraint equations of General Relativity approximately describing binary black holes in quasi-stationary circular orbits. Black holes with arbitrary linear momenta are constructed in the manner suggested by Brandt and Brugmann. The quasi-stationary circular orbits are determined by local minima in the ADM mass in a manner similar to Baumgarte and Cook; however, rather than fixing the area of the apparent horizon, we fix the value of the bare masses of the holes. We numerically generate an evolutionary sequence of quasi-stationary circular orbits up to and including the innermost stable circular orbit. We compare our results with post-Newtonian expectations as well as the results of Cook and Baumgarte. We also generate additional numerical results describing the dynamics of the geometry due to the emission of gravitational radiation.

  5. Census of transient orbital resonances encountered during binary inspiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruangsri, Uchupol

    Transient orbital resonances have recently been identified as potentially important to the inspiral of small bodies into large black holes. These resonances occur as the inspiral evolves through moments in which two ...

  6. Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallay, Thierry

    Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear SchrË?odinger equation Thierry Gallay Institut: Thierry Gallay, Thierry.Gallay@ujf­grenoble.fr Keywords: Nonlinear SchrË?odinger equation, periodic waves

  7. Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation Thierry Gallay Institut: Thierry Gallay, Thierry.Gallay@ujf-grenoble.fr Keywords: Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation, periodic waves

  8. Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Orbital stability of periodic waves for the nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation Thierry Gallay Institut: Thierry Gallay, Thierry.Gallay@ujf-grenoble.fr Keywords: Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation, periodic waves

  9. Charge, orbital and magnetic ordering in transition metal oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senn, Mark Stephen

    2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron and x-ray diffraction has been used to study charge, orbital and magnetic ordering in some transition metal oxides. The long standing controversy regarding the nature of the ground state (Verwey structure) of the ...

  10. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamics of

  11. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamics ofSlow

  12. Full particle orbit tracing with RIO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2: Jet Fuel8:FuelingA51 This

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  14. NRC Construction Light Source Flicker: What We

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    NRC Construction Light Source Flicker: What We Need to Know, and Why You Should Care NRC Construction Jennifer A. Veitch, Ph.D. (c) 2013, National Research Council Canada #12;NRC Construction Handbook: Reference & Application (9th Ed.), 2000, p. 3-20 #12;NRC Construction Flicker Effects 1

  15. Decontamination of the Curium Source Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Curium Source Fabrication Facility (CSFF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was decontaminated to acceptable contamination levels for maintenance activities, using standard decontamination techniques. Solid- and liquid-waste volumes were controlled to minimize discharge to the ORNL Waste Systems. This program required two years of decontamination effort at a total cost of $580K.

  16. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Science and Technology of Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared by scientists from ANL Berkeley, CA 94720 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 Editors. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U

  17. Ionization by few-cycle pulses: Tracing the electron orbits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Paulus, G.G. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order above-threshold ionization by few-cycle laser pulses is analyzed in terms of quantum orbits. For a given carrier-envelope phase, the number of contributing orbits and their ionization and rescattering times determine the shape of the angle-resolved spectrum in all detail. Conversely, analysis of a given spectrum reveals the carrier-envelope phase and the various interfering pathways from which the electron could choose.

  18. 10 years and 20,000 sources: the offsite source recovery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources. This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Sealed source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity, as evidenced by its initial organization under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program. After the terrorist attacks of 2001, however, the interagency community began to recognize the threat posed by excess and unwanted radiological material, particularly those that could not be disposed at the end of their useful life. After being transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) when it became waste, but also any other materials that might be a 'national security consideration.' This paper discusses OSRP's history, recovery operations, expansion to accept high-activity beta-gamma-emitting sealed sources and devices and foreign-possessed sources, and more recent efforts such as cooperative projects with the Council on Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and involvement in GTRI's Search and Secure project. Current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

  19. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  20. Page 1 of 1 An Equal Opportunity Employer / Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    .S. Department of Energy's NNSA Ref: Requisition 323594 Date: December 9, 2013 Subject: Sources Sought to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is actively seeking sources for architectural

  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  2. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: National Rotor Testbed Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the National Rotor Testbed: An Aeroelastically Relevant Research-Scale Wind Turbine Rotor." Approximately 60 researchers from various institutions and countries attended...

  5. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for deficiencies associated with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program On October 29, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Jawaharlal Nehru Solar National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jawaharlal Nehru Solar National Solar Energy Mission Solar Energy Research Institute for India and the United States Kick-Off On November 27, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power,...

  7. National Security Photo Gallery | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Photo Gallery Richard Cirillo 1 of 10 Richard Cirillo RICHARD R. CIRILLO Dr. Richard R. Cirillo serves as Director of the Decision and Information Sciences...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: national reliability database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    national reliability database Third Annual Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) Database Report Now Available On October 17, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events,...

  9. Argonne National Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Slip sliding away Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination Read More ACT-SO winners Argonne mentors students for the next generation of...

  10. Integration of renewable energy sources: reliability-constrained power system planning and operations using computational intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable sources of energy such as wind turbine generators and solar panels have attracted much attention because they are environmentally friendly, do not consume fossil fuels, and can enhance a nation’s energy security. As a result, recently more...

  11. Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

  12. The Corrosion of Materials in Spallation Neutron Sources R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos New Mexico 87545 Summary This paper presents a summary of our neutron source is the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory

  13. Spin-orbit and tensor mean-field effects on spin-orbit splitting including self-consistent core polarizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zalewski; J. Dobaczewski; W. Satula; T. R. Werner

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new strategy of fitting the coupling constants of the nuclear energy density functional is proposed, which shifts attention from ground-state bulk to single-particle properties. The latter are analyzed in terms of the bare single-particle energies and mass, shape, and spin core-polarization effects. Fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants directly to the f5/2-f7/2 spin-orbit splittings in 40Ca, 56Ni, and 48Ca is proposed as a practical realization of this new programme. It is shown that this fit requires drastic changes in the isoscalar spin-orbit strength and the tensor coupling constants as compared to the commonly accepted values but it considerably and systematically improves basic single-particle properties including spin-orbit splittings and magic-gap energies. Impact of these changes on nuclear binding energies is also discussed.

  14. LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY About Berkeley Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    energy...explained photosynthesis...exposed the risk of radon... redefined the causes of breast cancer of Energy (DOE) national laboratory that conducts a wide variety of unclassified scientific research for DOE renewable energy sources such as biofuels and artificial photosynthesis n energy efficiency at home, at work

  15. Orbit Response Measurements in the Commissioning of the BESSY II Booster Synchrotron and Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakker, R J; Kuske, P; Müller, R; Weihreter, E; Krämer, Dietrich

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbit Response Measurements in the Commissioning of the BESSY II Booster Synchrotron and Storage Ring

  16. The Efficacy of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Pseudotumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Bogardus, Carl; Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Syzek, Elizabeth; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for orbital pseudotumor. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 20 orbits in 16 patients diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor that received EBRT at the University of Oklahoma, Department of Radiation Oncology. Treated patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months. Results: Fifteen patients (93.7%) were initially treated with corticosteroids. Eight had recurrence after steroid cessation, six were unable to taper corticosteroids completely or partially, and one experienced progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid therapy. Fourteen patients (87.5%) initially responded to radiotherapy indicated by clinical improvement of preradiation symptoms and/or tapering of corticosteroid dose. Mean EBRT dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy). Thirteen patients (81.2%) continued to improve after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were complete cessation of corticosteroid therapy in nine patients (56.3%) and reduced corticosteroid dose in four patients (25%). Radiotherapy did not achieve long-term control for three patients (18.7%), who still required preradiation corticosteroid dosages. Three patients received retreatment(s) of four orbits, of which two patients achieved long-term symptom control without corticosteroid dependence. One patient received retreatment to an orbit three times, achieving long-term control without corticosteroid dependence. No significant late effects have been observed in retreated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for acute symptomatic improvement and long-term control of orbital pseudotumor. Orbital retreatment can be of clinical benefit, without apparent increase in morbidity, when initial irradiation fails to achieve complete response.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion-based solid electrolyte battery Sandia Labs, Front Edge Technology, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Lab, Univ. of California-Los Angeles: Micro Power Source On March 20, 2013,...

  18. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

  19. Advanced light source, User`s Handbook, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a national facility for scientific research and development located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) of the University of California. Its purpose is to generate beams of very bright light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The facility is open to researchers from industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  20. Simultaneous laser ranging and communication from an Earth-based satellite laser ranging station to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in lunar orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaoli

    We report a free space laser communication experiment from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit through the on board ...

  1. Management of disused plutonium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources since 1999, including more than 2,400 Plutonium (Pu)-238 sealed sources and 653 Pu-239-bearing sources that represent more than 10% of the total sources recovered by GTRI/OSRP to date. These sources have been recovered from hundreds of sites within the United States (US) and around the world. OSRP grew out of early efforts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program, a loan-lease program that serviced 31 countries, as well as domestic users. In the conduct of these recovery operations, GTRI/OSRP has been required to solve problems related to knowledge-of-inventory, packaging and transportation of fissile and heat-source materials, transfer of ownership, storage of special nuclear material (SNM) both at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and commercially, and disposal. Unique issues associated with repatriation from foreign countries, including end user agreements required by some European countries and denials of shipment, will also be discussed.

  2. Stable retrograde orbits around the triple system 2001 SN263

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, R A N; Prado, A F B A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEA 2001 SN263 is the target of the ASTER MISSION - First Brazilian Deep Space Mission. Araujo et al. (2012), characterized the stable regions around the components of the triple system for the planar and prograde cases. Knowing that the retrograde orbits are expected to be more stable, here we present a complementary study. We now considered particles orbiting the components of the system, in the internal and external regions, with relative inclinations between $90^{\\circ}< I \\leqslant180^{\\circ}$, i.e., particles with retrograde orbits. Our goal is to characterize the stable regions of the system for retrograde orbits, and then detach a preferred region to place the space probe. For a space mission, the most interesting regions would be those that are unstable for the prograde cases, but stable for the retrograde cases. Such configuration provide a stable region to place the mission probe with a relative retrograde orbit, and, at the same time, guarantees a region free of debris since they are expect...

  3. SECULAR ORBITAL DYNAMICS OF HIERARCHICAL TWO-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B., E-mail: veras@astro.ufl.ed [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of multi-planet extrasolar systems has kindled interest in using their orbital evolution as a probe of planet formation. Accurate descriptions of planetary orbits identify systems that could hide additional planets or be in a special dynamical state, and inform targeted follow-up observations. We combine published radial velocity data with Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses in order to obtain an ensemble of masses, semimajor axes, eccentricities, and orbital angles for each of the five dynamically active multi-planet systems: HD 11964, HD 38529, HD 108874, HD 168443, and HD 190360. We dynamically evolve these systems using 52,000 long-term N-body integrations that sample the full range of possible line-of-sight and relative inclinations, and we report on the system stability, secular evolution, and the extent of the resonant interactions. We find that planetary orbits in hierarchical systems exhibit complex dynamics and can become highly eccentric and maybe significantly inclined. Additionally, we incorporate the effects of general relativity in the long-term simulations and demonstrate that it can qualitatively affect the dynamics of some systems with high relative inclinations. The simulations quantify the likelihood of different dynamical regimes for each system and highlight the dangers of restricting simulation phase space to a single set of initial conditions or coplanar orbits.

  4. Source: http://www.ftc.gov/debtcollection ost accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Source: http://www.ftc.gov/debtcollection M ost accidents on the job are caused by un- safe actions-852-4392 #12;Source: Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health F requently the missing piece to finding work-life balance is "mindset." This is a psycho- logical leap to rock-solid commit- ment

  5. Large source test stand for H/sup -/(D/sup -/) ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, R.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Neutral Beam Group has constructed a large source test stand for testing of the various source modules under development. The first objective of the BNL program is to develop a source module capable of delivering 10A of H/sup -/(D/sup -/) at 25 kV operating in the steady state mode with satisfactory gas and power efficiency. The large source test stand contains gas supply and vacuum pumping systems, source cooling systems, magnet power supplies and magnet cooling systems, two arc power supplies rated at 25 kW and 50 kW, a large battery driven power supply and an extractor electrode power supply. Figure 1 is a front view of the vacuum vessel showing the control racks with the 36'' vacuum valves and refrigerated baffles mounted behind. Figure 2 shows the rear view of the vessel with a BNL Mk V magnetron source mounted in the source aperture and also shows the cooled magnet coils. Currently two types of sources are under test: a large magnetron source and a hollow cathode discharge source.

  6. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle has a unique contract

  8. Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies NDE #12;Over45yearsexperienceinNondestructiveEvaluation... Argonne National Laboratory's world-renowned researchers have a proven the safe operationof advanced nuclear reactors. Argonne's World-Class Nondestructive Evaluation

  9. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As one of the largest laboratories in the nation for science and engineering research, Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the most prolific and well-renowned scientists...

  10. National Energy Education Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Education Summit is organized by the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL) and will serve as a first-of-its-kind national forum for energy educators, subject...

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory/National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: Devalving of compressed gas cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    gas cylinders Number: LS-ESH-0052 Revision: 2 Effective: 08/05/2008 Page 1 of 1 Prepared By: Keith, retighten the valve, immediately stop the process, and contact NSLS ESH staff to investigate. The only official copy of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (PSEL) National Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory...

  13. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  14. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM: SUBJECT: USIUK Memorandum of Understanding between National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (AADNS)...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: AREVA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research &...

  16. High spin spectroscopy of near spherical nuclei: Role of intruder orbitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Mukherjee, G. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata - 700064 (India); Chanda, S. [Fakir Chand College, Diamond Herbour, West Bengal (India); Banerjee, D.; Das, S. K.; Guin, R. [Radiochemistry Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, BARC, Kolkata - 700064 (India); Gupta, S. Das [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata - 700064, India and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India); Pai, H. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata - 700064, India and Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states of nuclei in the vicinity of neutron shell closure N = 82 and proton shell closure Z = 82 have been studied using the Clovere Ge detectors of Indian National Gamma Array. The shape driving effects of proton and neutron unique parity intruder orbitals for the structure of nuclei around the above shell closures have been investigated using light and heavy ion beams. Lifetime measurements of excited states in {sup 139}Pr have been done using pulsed-beam-? coincidence technique. The prompt spectroscopy of {sup 207}Rn has been extended beyond the 181?s 13/2{sup +} isomer. Neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 132}Sn have been produced from proton induced fission of {sup 235}U and lifetime measurement of low-lying states of odd-odd {sup 132}I have been performed from offline decay.

  17. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: National Rotor Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy The National Rotor Testbed (NRT) team is examining the effect of airfoil choice on the final design of the new rotor for the Scaled...

  19. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  20. NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop to make it a reality. This Roadmap provides a framework that can make a hydrogen economy a reality

  1. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    and collaborators. P. K. Roy et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. A 606 22, (2009). The four CAPS produce current through each of the four sources. P. K. Roy #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National P. Gilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National

  2. users meeting Argonne National Laboratory May 12-15, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    2014 users meeting Argonne National Laboratory May 12-15, 2014 Advanced Photon Source · Center for Nanoscale Materials · Electron Microscopy Center http://usersmeeting2014.conference.anl.gov/ Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC User Science

  3. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series June, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #0623 June, 2006 Can Ethnicity Transcend Race and Poverty? Insights from Source Country Variation in Immigrant Student Achievement Dylan Conger This paper is available online at the National Poverty Center Working Paper Series index at: http

  4. A development and comparison of two methods of orbit determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Harry Louis

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . C H A P T E R I V THE METHOD OF GAUSS3 Consider three heliocentric position vectors lying in a plane which corresponds to the orbit plane. The terminal points of the position vector correspond to three positions of an asteroid at three different... and o3. C H A P T E R V CORRECTION PROCEDURES ON POSITION Before we discuss the procedures for improving the two methods of orbit determination there are two factors which must be considered after a prelim1nary topocentric distance has been...

  5. A map for eccentric orbits in triaxial potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Touma; S. Tremaine

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a simple symplectic map to study the dynamics of eccentric orbits in non-spherical potentials. The map offers a dramatic improvement in speed over traditional integration methods, while accurately representing the qualitative details of the dynamics. We focus attention on planar, non-axisymmetric power-law potentials, in particular the logarithmic potential. We confirm the presence of resonant orbit families (``boxlets'') in this potential and uncover new dynamics such as the emergence of a stochastic web in nearly axisymmetric logarithmic potentials. The map can also be applied to triaxial, lopsided, non-power-law and rotating potentials.

  6. Dissipation-induced heteroclinic orbits in tippe tops.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, Jerrold E. (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Bou-Rabee, Nawaf M. (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Romero, Louis Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates that the conditions for the existence of a dissipation-induced heteroclinic orbit between the inverted and noninverted states of a tippe top are determined by a complex version of the equations for a simple harmonic oscillator: the modified Maxwell-Bloch equations. A standard linear analysis reveals that the modified Maxwell-Bloch equations describe the spectral instability of the noninverted state and Lyapunov stability of the inverted state. Standard nonlinear analysis based on the energy momentum method gives necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a dissipation-induced connecting orbit between these relative equilibria.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration A Journey to the Beginning of the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    impossible--with a more conventional propulsion system. Two large solar panels, stretching approximately 19National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dawn A Journey to the Beginning of the Solar System of our Solar System. How is this "time travel" possible? Many thousands of small bodies orbit the Sun

  8. Sources Sought Announcement

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for information solicited. The information from this notice will help the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) develop their acquisition...

  9. Energy Bill Literature Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Of the "PURPA Standards" in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 March 22, 2006 Sponsored by American Public Power Association (APPA) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) National Association...

  10. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project Preliminary Design Report Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    .......................................................................................................1­8 1.3.3 Work Breakdown Structure Upgrade Project · Preliminary Design Report The Advanced Photon Source, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Solar power and other sources of renewable energy can help combat global warming but they have a draw-back: they don't produce energy as predictably as generating...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: national electricity grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid relies on power transmission from the production source-be it a coal-fired plant, solar array, or wind farm-to the consumer. Long-distance transmission results in...

  13. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Based on the request of Pawnee Nation’s Energy Task Force the research team, consisting Tribal personnel and Summit Blue Consulting, focused on a review of renewable energy resource development potential, funding sources and utility organizational along with energy savings options. Elements of the energy demand forecasting and characterization and demand side options review remained in the scope of work, but were only addressed at a high level. Description of Activities Performed Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Energy Efficiency Options While this was not a major focus of the project, the research team highlighted common strategies for reducing energy use in buildings. The team also discussed the benefits of adopting a building energy code and introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

  14. Interaction of the 4-rotational gauge field with orbital momentum, gravidiamagnetic effect, and orbital experiment ''Gravity Probe B''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babourova, O. V.; Frolov, B. N. [Moscow State Pedagogical University, Department of Physics for Nature Sciences, Krasnoprudnaya 14, Moscow 107140 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincare gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbit precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravidiamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment Gravity Probe B on the satellite orbit.

  15. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  16. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander Ranking Member SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION...

  17. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR)...

  18. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR) 2.101 AND 3.104 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 (enter date here, centered revised template...

  19. Publications | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers, dissertations, books, book chapters, technical reports,...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, Renewable Energy Dr. David Danielson visited Sandia National Laboratories and toured the National...

  1. Author's Accepted Manuscript ORBIT-CENTERED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    density measurements or estimates on a given orbit and a set of proxies for solar and geomagnetic solar and geomagnetic activities and different prediction windows. Compar- ison with previously (LEO) contain the majority of artificial sa- tellites currently in operation. At LEO below 700 km

  2. Relativistic Perihelion Precession of Orbits of Venus and the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Biswas; Krishnan R. S. Mani

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among all the theories proposed to explain the 'anomalous' perihelion precession of Mercury's orbit announced in 1859 by Le Verrier, the general theory of relativity proposed by Einstein in November 1915, alone could calculate Mercury's 'anomalous' precession with a precision demanded by observational accuracy. Since Mercury's precession was a directly derived result of the full general theory, it was viewed by Einstein as the most critical test of general relativity, amongst the three tests proposed by him. With the advent of the space age, the observational accuracy level has improved further and it became possible to detect this precession for other planetary orbits of the solar system -- viz., Venus and the Earth. This conclusively proved that the phenomenon of 'anomalous' perihelion precession of planetary orbits is really a relativistic effect. Our previous papers presented the mathematical model and the computed value of the relativistic perihelion precession of Mercury's orbit using an alternate relativistic gravitational model, which is a remodeled form of Einstein's relativity theories, and which retained only experimentally proven principles and has been enriched by the benefits of almost a century-long relativity experimentation including the space age experiments. Using this model, we present in this paper the computed values of the relativistic precession of Venus and the Earth, which compare well with the predictions of general relativity and also are in agreement with the observed values within the range of uncertainty.

  3. Translation and integration of numerical atomic orbitals in linear molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinäsmäki, Sami, E-mail: sami.heinasmaki@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, FIN-90014, Oulu (Finland)] [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, FIN-90014, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present algorithms for translation and integration of atomic orbitals for LCAO calculations in linear molecules. The method applies to arbitrary radial functions given on a numerical mesh. The algorithms are based on pseudospectral differentiation matrices in two dimensions and the corresponding two-dimensional Gaussian quadratures. As a result, multicenter overlap and Coulomb integrals can be evaluated effectively.

  4. Mode counting in high-dimensional orbital angular momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exter, Martin van

    2007 / Vol. 15, No. 10 / OPTICS EXPRESS 6431 #12;16. M. Segev, R. Solomon, and A. Yariv, "Manifestation. Lett. 61, 50-53 (1988). 2. P.G. Kwiat, K. Mattle, H. Weinfurter, A. Zeilinger, A.V. Sergienko, and Y (2004). 5. A. Mair, A. Vaziri, G. Weihs, and A. Zeilinger, "Entangelement of the orbital angular

  5. Model Reduction Near Periodic Orbits of Hybrid Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    manipulation in manufacturing [2], gene regulation in cells [3], and power generation in electrical systems [41 Model Reduction Near Periodic Orbits of Hybrid Dynamical Systems Samuel A. Burden, Shai Revzen system. We demonstrate reduction of a high­dimensional underactuated mechanical model for terrestrial

  6. Helium in Near Earth Orbit The AMS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Helium in Near Earth Orbit The AMS Collaboration Abstract The helium spectrum from 0.1 to 100 Ge the geomagnetic cutoff a second helium spectrum was observed. In the second he- lium spectra over the energy range ninety percent of the helium was deter- mined to be 3 He (at the 90 % CL). Tracing helium from the second

  7. Axisymmmetric empty space: light propagation, orbits and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Giardino

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a axisymmetric solution of the Einstein equations for empty space. The geometry is studied by determining its Petrov classification and Killing vectors. Light propagation, orbital motion and asymptotic and Newtonian limits are also studied. Additionally, cosmological applications of the geometry as an alternative model for the inflationary universe and as a substitute for dark matter and quintessence are also outlined.

  8. 7 Orbital Elements 1. Semimajor axis of the ellipse (a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Robert R.

    · Force = (Mass) x (acceleration) · Newton's Law of Gravitation F = GMm/r2 Proportional to Distance!! G = Gravitational Constant G = 6.67 x 10-11 m3/kgs2 #12;Kepler's Laws · Describe motions of a small body revolving around a massive body ­ Planets ­ Comets #12;Kepler's 1st Law · The orbit of a planet/comet about the sun

  9. Interplay of Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum in the Proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Thomas

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the consequences of the Myhrer-Thomas explanation of the proton spin problem for the distribution of orbital angular momentum on the valence and sea quarks. After QCD evolution these results are found to be in very good agreement with both recent lattice QCD calculations and the experimental constraints from Hermes and JLab.

  10. Periodic Orbits in Triaxial Galaxies with Weak Cusps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tema Fridman; David Merritt

    1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital structure of triaxial models with weak central density cusps, $\\rho\\propto r^{-\\gamma}, gamma fish boxlets in the $x-z$ (long axis-short axis) plane are stable over a wide range of model parameters. The boxlets in the $x-y$ and $y-z$ planes are generally vertically unstable.

  11. SEMIEMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    SEMI­EMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS Tahir Cagin Research and Development Center, Materials Labarotory, Polymer Branch, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 geometries and energy band gaps of conjugated polymers. In this study, we used a modified version of semi

  12. Control of Spacecraft in Proximity Orbits Louis Scott Breger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How, Jonathan P.

    Control of Spacecraft in Proximity Orbits by Louis Scott Breger Bachelor of Science Aeronautics INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2007 c Louis Scott Breger, MMVII. All rights reserved. The author hereby grants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan P. How Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics Thesis Supervisor Accepted

  13. Canonical Modelling of Relative Spacecraft Motion via Epicyclic Orbital Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canonical Modelling of Relative Spacecraft Motion via Epicyclic Orbital Elements N. Jeremy Kasdin of canonical coordinates for the relative state-space dynamics. The Hamiltonian formulation facilitates to be examined via variational equations such as Lagrange's planetary equations (LPEs) or Gauss's variational

  14. Bounded, Periodic Relative Motion using Canonical Epicyclic Orbital Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Bounded, Periodic Relative Motion using Canonical Epicyclic Orbital Elements N. Jeremy Kasdin using canonical perturbation theory for studying relative motion trajectories and for finding simple motion [2, 3, 4, 5]. This has the advantage that Lagrange's planetary equations (LPEs) or Gauss

  15. Automorphisms of Free Groups Orbit decidability, applications and variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventura, Enric

    Automorphisms of Free Groups Orbit decidability, applications and variations Enric Ventura Universitat Polit`ecnica de Catalunya enric.ventura@upc.edu The author thanks the CRM hospitality during decidability. A recent result by Bogopolski-Martino-Ventura [2] gave a renovated protagonism to the notion

  16. APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;s Near ride #12;APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit #12;#12;NASA SP-362 APOLLO OVER THE MOO Catalogingin Publication Data Main entry under title: Apollo over the moon. (NASA SP ;362) Bibliography: p. 251. 1. Moon-Photographs from space. 2. Project Apollo. I. Masursky, Harold, 1922- 11. Colton, George

  17. ROI_PAC Documentation Repeat Orbit Interferometry Package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matt

    1 ROI_PAC Documentation Repeat Orbit Interferometry Package Abridged version of Chapter 3 of a Ph Version 1.1 This document describes the algorithms and procedures implemented in ROI_PAC, the JPL" documentation system. The calling sequence and the available intermediate processing stages are described

  18. Cognitive Informatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of theNuclearNanotechnologies | NationalNuclear

  19. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTART Signed | National|Operations /

  20. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTART Signed | National|Operations /Allison

  1. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTART Signed | National|Operations

  2. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTART Signed | National|OperationsSandia

  3. Sandia National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTubeCenters:FacebookContractor/Bidder| National Nuclear

  4. An ideal sealed source life-cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompkins, Joseph Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last 40 years, barriers to compliant and timely disposition of radioactive sealed sources have become apparent. The story starts with the explosive growth of nuclear gauging technologies in the 1960s. Dozens of companies in the US manufactured sources and many more created nuclear solutions to industrial gauging problems. Today they do not yet know how many Cat 1, 2, or 3 sources there are in the US. There are, at minimum, tens of thousands of sources, perhaps hundreds of thousands of sources. Affordable transportation solutions to consolidate all of these sources and disposition pathways for these sources do not exist. The root problem seems to be a lack of necessary regulatory framework that has allowed all of these problems to accumulate with no national plan for solving the problem. In the 1960s, Pu-238 displaced Pu-239 for most neutron and alpha source applications. In the 1970s, the availability of inexpensive Am-241 resulted in a proliferation of low energy gamma sources used in nuclear gauging, well logging, pacemakers, and X-ray fluorescence applications for example. In the 1980s, rapid expansion of worldwide petroleum exploration resulted in the expansion of Am-241 sources into international locations. Improvements of technology and regulation resulted in a change in isotopic distribution as Am-241 made Pu-239 and Pu-238 obsolete. Many early nuclear gauge technologies have been made obsolete as they were replaced by non-nuclear technoogies. With uncertainties in source end of life disposition and increased requirements for sealed source security, nuclear gauging technology is the last choice for modern process engineering gauging solutions. Over the same period, much was learned about licensing LLW disposition facilities as evident by the closure of early disposition facilities like Maxey Flats. The current difficulties in sealed source disposition start with adoption of the NLLW policy act of 1985, which created the state LLW compact system they we have today. This regulation created a new regulatory framework seen as promising at the time. However, now they recognize that, despite the good intentions, the NIJWP/85 has not solved any source disposition problems. The answer to these sealed source disposition problems is to adopt a philosophy to correct these regulatory issues, determine an interim solution, execute that solution until there is a minimal backlog of sources to deal with, and then let the mechanisms they have created solve this problem into the foreseeable future. The primary philosophical tenet of the ideal sealed source life cycle follows. You do not allow the creation (or importation) of any source whose use cannot be justified, which cannot be affordably shipped, or that does not have a well-delinated and affordable disposition pathway. The path forward dictates that we fix the problem by embracing the Ideal Source Life cycle. In figure 1, we can see some of the elements of the ideal source life cycle. The life cycle is broken down into four portions, manufacture, use, consolidation, and disposition. These four arbitrary elements allow them to focus on the ideal life cycle phases that every source should go through between manufacture and final disposition. As we examine the various phases of the sealed source life cycle, they pick specific examples and explore the adoption of the ideal life cycle model.

  5. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  6. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  7. Employment at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

  8. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  9. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  10. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: AMI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Initiative (AMI) is a multiple-year, 3-way collaboration among TPI Composites, Iowa State University, and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Microgrid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to solve many of the nation's most complex challenges in satisfying its electric energy needs. Initial focus has been on enabling resilient and reliable performance when...

  13. National Day of Remembrance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Nuclear Energy photovoltaic Photovoltaics PV Renewable Energy solar Solar Energy solar power Solar Research Solid-State...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013 Inverter Reliability Workshop On May 31, 2013, in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photovoltaic Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics (MEPV) On April 14, 2011, in About MEPV Flexible MEPV MEPV Publications MEPV Awards Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are...

  17. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory modeled several scenarios to add more solar power to the electric grid, using real-world data from the southwestern power...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: SPI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Instisute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, ... Last Updated: September 10, 2012 Go To Top ...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: IRED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SMART Grid, Solar Sandia National Laboratories, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and European Distributed Energies Research Laboratories (DERlab) have organized a...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: PV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Photovoltaic Technology and Tour of PV Test Facilities On February 12, 2013, in The Photovoltaics and Distributed Systems Integration Department at Sandia National...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summit and Technology Forum will convene the ... A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate,...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quallion Eaton Corp. Air Products ExxonTonen ... A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate,...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: CETI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CETI A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Vermont

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vermont A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Energy, Energy Surety,...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This public benchmark represents analysis ... A Model for the Nation: Promoting Education and Innovation in Vermont's Electricity Sector On May 8, 2012, in Climate,...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoscience, Climate and Consequence Effect at Sandia National Laboratories presented on "Hydraulic Fracturing: Role of Government-Sponsored R&D." Marianne's presentation was part...

  8. The National Mission | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    place huge demand on the nation's electrical grid, while the increased use of wind and solar energy will challenge the grid's ability to provide a stable electrical supply...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories, August 2010. 2009 Adrian R. Chavez, Position Paper: Protecting Process Control Systems against Lifecycle Attacks Using Trust Anchors Sandia National ... Page 1...

  10. National Day of Remembrance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  11. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patented technologies created by Argonne - which includes solutions for the smart grid, electric vehicles, emissions control and more - will help our nation conserve energy and...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance Photovoltaic (PV) Regional Test Center (RTC) Website Goes Live On February 26, 2013, in Energy, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the first results of joint work by scientists from Lawrence Berkeley, Pacific Northwest, Savannah River, and Los Alamos national laboratories at the Savannah River Site to model...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    security and economic prosperity. Energy security research at Sandia seeks to address key challenges facing our nation and the world. We work ... Page 2 of 212 Last...

  15. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  16. Discoveries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nation's pressing scientific and technological challenges. Robert Fischetti and Janet Smith developed the first micro X-ray beam for structural biology at Argonne's Advanced...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic (PV) Regional Test Center (RTC) Website Goes Live On February 26, 2013, in Energy, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: photostability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated: May 23, 2013 Go To Top Exceptional service in the national interest EC About Energy and Climate (EC) Energy Security Climate Security Infrastructure Security Energy...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: CCT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated: May 23, 2013 Go To Top Exceptional service in the national interest EC About Energy and Climate (EC) Energy Security Climate Security Infrastructure Security Energy...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: QY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated: May 23, 2013 Go To Top Exceptional service in the national interest EC About Energy and Climate (EC) Energy Security Climate Security Infrastructure Security Energy...

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23, 2013-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 47 teams received Pollution Prevention awards for protecting the environment and saving taxpayers more than 8...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: HRSAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announce the publication of two new Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) reports on...

  3. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: NASA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratories (partnering with Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems and the University of Michigan) has developed a solar electric propulsion concept capable of a wide...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at a critical juncture where pressing issues in energy security, climate change, and economic competitiveness are converging. Aggressive national goals for reducing petroleum use...

  6. Licensing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TDC) Division negotiates and manages license agreements on behalf of UChicago Argonne, LLC, which operates Argonne National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy....

  7. Procurement | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement More than 150 attend second joint Argonne-Fermilab small business fairSeptember 2, 2014 On Thursday, Aug. 28, Illinois' two national laboratories - Argonne and Fermi...

  8. Procurement | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video "Doing business with Argonne and Fermi national labs" - Aug. 21, 2013 Procurement Argonne spends approximately 300,000,000 annually through procurements to a diverse group...

  9. Research | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our dependence on imported energy and to enhance our national security. In addition, Argonne provides many ways for researchers from academia, industry and other government...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: NSTTF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter SolarReserve is testing engineering units at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) operated by Sandia....

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for national defense and homeland security programs; and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste management activities. The Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55 (TA-55) is...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics Concentrating Solar Power CRF CSP EFRC Energy Energy Efficiency Energy Security National Solar Thermal...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Partnership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Armstrong using deep level optical spectroscopy to investigate defects in the m-plane GaN. Jim is a professor ... Vermont and Sandia National Laboratories Announce Energy...

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this tenth member of our National Centers for Systems Biology program," said James Anderson, who oversees systems biology awards at NIGMS. "The new center will apply...

  15. National Park Service- Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are currently being used by the Yellowstone Association Institute for ecology classes.

  16. Sandia Energy - National SCADA Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National SCADA Testbed Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure National...

  17. Source Recertification, Refurbishment, and Transfer Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Duckworth, Leesa L.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Doll, Stephanie R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 Gap Analysis of Department of Energy Radiological Sealed Sources, Standards, and Materials for Safeguards Technology Development [1] report, and the subsequent Reconciliation of Source Needs and Surpluses across the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Complex [2] report, resulted in the identification of 33 requests for nuclear or radiological sealed sources for which there was potentially available, suitable material from within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to fill the source need. Available, suitable material was defined by DOE laboratories as material slated for excess, or that required recertification or refurbishment before being used for safeguards technology development. This report begins by outlining the logistical considerations required for the shipment of nuclear and radiological materials between DOE laboratories. Then, because of the limited need for transfer of matching sources, the report also offers considerations for an alternative approach – the shipment of safeguards equipment between DOE laboratories or technology testing centers. Finally, this report addresses repackaging needs for the two source requests for which there was available, suitable material within the DOE complex.

  18. DERIVATION AND OBSERVABILITY OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY VARIATIONS UTILIZING PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Travis Francis

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Several models of atmospheric density exist in today's world, yet most possess significant errors when compared to data determined from actual satellite measurements. This research utilizes precision orbit ephemerides (POE) in an optimal orbit...

  19. MASSES, RADII, AND ORBITS OF SMALL KEPLER PLANETS: THE TRANSITION FROM GASEOUS TO ROCKY PLANETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    We report on the masses, sizes, and orbits of the planets orbiting 22 Kepler stars. There are 49 planet candidates around these stars, including 42 detected through transits and 7 revealed by precise Doppler measurements ...

  20. Environmental Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrode, Flora

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nations and Chernobyl http://chernobyl.undp.org/region affected" by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in AprilUN official documents on Chernobyl nuclear accident as well