Sample records for oracle critical patch

  1. T-605: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2011 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 19 2011. PLATFORM: Oracle Database, Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control, Oracle E-Business Suite...

  2. T-537: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2011 ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2011. PLATFORM: Oracle Database, Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control, Oracle E-Business Suite...

  3. V-004: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory- October 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    October 2012 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates.

  4. U-019: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory- October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    October 2011 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates.

  5. T-672: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts Security Alerts reference LINKS: Oracle Fusion Middleware Risk Matrix Oracle Database Server Risk Matrix Oracle Enterprise Manager...

  6. U-215: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory- July 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical Patch Updates are the primary means of releasing security fixes for Oracle products to customers with valid support contracts. They are released on the Tuesday closest to the 17th day of January, April, July and October.

  7. U-150: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2012 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    products has been released for April 17, 2012 PLATFORM: The Oracle Database, Oracle Fusion Middleware Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control, Oracle E-Business Suite...

  8. U-083:Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2012 |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10.2.0.3, 10.2.0.4, 10.2.0.5 Oracle Database 10g Release 1, version 10.1.0.5 Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Release 1, versions 11.1.1.3.0, 11.1.1.4.0, 11.1.1.5.0 Oracle...

  9. ORACLE CERTIFICATION Oracle Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    ORACLE CERTIFICATION Oracle Database Administration Certificate Program Train with the best. Get your Oracle Database Administration education from the number-one provider* of Oracle training-on, lab-based understanding of Oracle, the world's leading database platform, and long the product

  10. V-136: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale WindDepartment

  11. T-641: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClient update resolve multiple | Department ofDepartment

  12. V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartmentScripting AttacksThere is aDepartment

  13. U-105:Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energy Storage6 (07/03)Arbitrary Code |Energy

  14. Oracle and Corporate Citizenship Paul Salinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    ­ Eastern Europe Oracle OpenWorld Asia 1 Event China Oracle OpenWorld Latin America 1 Event Brazil Federal practices · Environment Management System as part of ISO 14001 · Oracle U.K. uses 100% renewable power ­ Australia/New Zealand OBI 11g Launch 15 Events ­ Western Europe 1 Event ­ North America Oracle Day 11 Events

  15. CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmagarmid, Ahmed K.

    CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project Due Date: 2/12/2009 You are going to use Oracle to design a simple; if nothing else, mark each query with its number. Turnin You may turn in the project for grading using the procedure described below. Run the following shell command (see 'man turnin' for details): turnin -c cs348

  16. Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang

    ; ---- Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial Datablade Oracle Oracle8i Spatial Oracle Spatial ----SDO_GEOMETRY SDO_GEOMETRY OracleWeb-Based Three-Dimensional Geo-Referenced Visualization, in Proceedings of International Conference of Spatial

  17. Oracle accrual plans from requirements to implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, Christine K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementing any new business software can be an intimidating prospect and this paper is intended to offer some insight in to how to approach this challenge with some fundamental rules for success. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had undergone an original ERP implementation of HRMS, Oracle Advanced Benefits, Worker Self Service, Manager Self Service, Project Accounting, Financials and PO, and recently completed a project to implement Oracle Payroll, Time and Labor and Accrual Plans. This paper will describe some of the important lessons that can be applied to any implementation as a whole, and then specifically how this knowledge was applied to the design and deployment of Oracle Accrual Plans for LANL. Finally, detail on the functionality available in Oracle Accrual Plans will be described, as well as the detailed setups.that were utilized at LANL.

  18. The Patch Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avidan, Shai

    The patch transform represents an image as a bag of overlapping patches sampled on a regular grid. This representation allows users to manipulate images in the patch domain, which then seeds the inverse patch transform to ...

  19. Oracle, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarter JumpOppenheim,Oracle, Arizona: Energy

  20. Oracle Database DBFS Hierarchical Storage Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivenes, A

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory creates large numbers of images during each shot cycle for the analysis of optics, target inspection and target diagnostics. These images must be readily accessible once they are created and available for the 30 year lifetime of the facility. The Livermore Computing Center (LC) runs a High Performance Storage System (HPSS) that is capable of storing NIF's estimated 1 petabyte of diagnostic images at a fraction of what it would cost NIF to operate its own automated tape library. With Oracle 11g Release 2 database, it is now possible to create an application transparent, hierarchical storage system using the LC's HPSS. Using the Oracle DBMS-LOB and DBMS-DBFS-HS packages a SecureFile LOB can now be archived to storage outside of the database and accessed seamlessly through a DBFS 'link'. NIF has chosen to use this technology to implement a hierarchical store for its image based SecureFile LOBs. Using a modified external store and DBFS links, files are written to and read from a disk 'staging area' using Oracle's backup utility. Database external procedure calls invoke OS based scripts to manage a staging area and the transfer of the backup files between the staging area and the Lab's HPSS.

  1. V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oracle Java. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028466 Oracle IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create a specially crafted Java application that,...

  2. U-233: Oracle Database INDEXTYPE CTXSYS.CONTEXT Bug Lets Remote...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Oracle Database INDEXTYPE CTXSYS.CONTEXT Bug Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-233: Oracle Database INDEXTYPE CTXSYS.CONTEXT Bug Lets Remote...

  3. Automated Black-Box Testing with Abstract VDM Oracles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as test oracles for concrete software. The automation of the resulting testing frame-work is based of a target system. For that reason, a mapping between abstract and concrete test data is requiredAutomated Black-Box Testing with Abstract VDM Oracles Bernhard K. Aichernig Technical University

  4. V-104: Oracle Java Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Code V-104: Oracle Java Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code March 5, 2013 - 12:53am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Java Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

  5. Independence and Port Oracles for Matroids, with an Application to Computational Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellerstein, Lisa

    Independence and Port Oracles for Matroids, with an Application to Computational Learning Theory. Abstract Given a matroid M with distinguished element e, a port oracle with respect to e reports whether element e) of a matroid using only a polynomial number of ele­ mentary operations and port oracle calls

  6. A Comprehensive Survey of Trends in Oracles for Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Phil

    therefore find ourselves in a position where the automated generation of test inputs is increasingly being. Of course, one might hope that the software under test has been developed with respect to excellent design-for-test1 A Comprehensive Survey of Trends in Oracles for Software Testing Mark Harman, Phil Mc

  7. Ecient Blind and Partially Blind Signatures Without Random Oracles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecient Blind and Partially Blind Signatures Without Random Oracles Tatsuaki Okamoto NTT eective in many applications (e.g., blind signatures, group signatures, anonymous credentials etc.) than, this paper presents ecient blind signatures and par- tially blind signatures that are secure in the standard

  8. Efficient Blind and Partially Blind Signatures Without Random Oracles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient Blind and Partially Blind Signatures Without Random Oracles Tatsuaki Okamoto NTT effective in many applications (e.g., blind signatures, group signatures, anonymous credentials etc.) than, this paper presents efficient blind signatures and par tially blind signatures that are secure

  9. Automated Requirements Testing with Abstract Oracles Bernhard K. Aichernig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a mapping between abstract and concrete test data is required. The presented framework focuses on the usage of formal requirements specifications as test ora­ cles for concrete implementations. The approach is based, then the model may serve as a test oracle and specification as well. In Fig­ A A op abstract C C op concrete r r

  10. Fully Anonymous Group Signatures without Random Oracles Jens Groth #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signature schemes that avoid the random oracle model. Bellare, Micciancio and Warinschi [BMW03] suggested their scheme is not secure in the BMW/BSZ­models. Boyen and Waters [BW06, BW07] suggest group signatures that are secure against key exposure attacks. Their constructions are secure in a restricted version of the BMW

  11. Recommended Practice for Patch Management of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Tom; Dale Christiansen; Dan Berrett

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component in protecting a nations critical infrastructure and key resources is the security of control systems. The term industrial control system refers to supervisory control and data acquisition, process control, distributed control, and any other systems that control, monitor, and manage the nations critical infrastructure. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) consists of electric power generators, transmission systems, transportation systems, dam and water systems, communication systems, chemical and petroleum systems, and other critical systems that cannot tolerate sudden interruptions in service. Simply stated, a control system gathers information and then performs a function based on its established parameters and the information it receives. The patch management of industrial control systems software used in CIKR is inconsistent at best and nonexistent at worst. Patches are important to resolve security vulnerabilities and functional issues. This report recommends patch management practices for consideration and deployment by industrial control systems owners.

  12. The Oracle Problem in Software Testing: Earl T. Barr, Mark Harman, Phil McMinn, Muzammil Shahbaz and Shin Yoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Phil

    1 The Oracle Problem in Software Testing: A Survey Earl T. Barr, Mark Harman, Phil McMinn, Muzammil Shahbaz and Shin Yoo Abstract--Testing involves examining the behaviour of a system in order to discover, correct behaviour from potentially incorrect behavior is called the "test oracle problem". Test oracle

  13. V-051: Oracle Solaris Java Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale Wind & Solar PowerDepartmentOracle

  14. Oracle Financials PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergy General Law (GC-56)The U.S.DepartmentDepartmentOracle

  15. U-191: Oracle Java Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of1: Oracle Java Multiple

  16. Critically damped quantum search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we have found that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum $O(\\sqrt{N})$ and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  17. Micromachined patch-clamp apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A micromachined patch-clamp apparatus is disclosed for holding one or more cells and providing electrical, chemical, or mechanical stimulation to the cells during analysis with the patch-clamp technique for studying ion channels in cell membranes. The apparatus formed on a silicon substrate utilizes a lower chamber formed from silicon nitride using surface micromachining and an upper chamber formed from a molded polymer material. An opening in a common wall between the chambers is used to trap and hold a cell for analysis using the patch-clamp technique with sensing electrodes on each side of the cell. Some embodiments of the present invention utilize one or more electrostatic actuators formed on the substrate to provide mechanical stimulation to the cell being analyzed, or to provide information about mechanical movement of the cell in response to electrical or chemical stimulation.

  18. Supplement IV.C: Tutorial for Oracle For Introduction to Java Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Y. Daniel

    Enterprise database has been installed on the host liang.armstrong.edu with HTTP server enabled, the user can access it from a Web browser using the URL http://liang.armstrong.edu:5560/isqlplus, as shown in Figure 1 the oracle database on the host liang.armstrong.edu. The alias name for the database is liangorcl

  19. Fair Blind Signatures without Random Oracles Georg Fuchsbauer and Damien Vergnaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Fair Blind Signatures without Random Oracles Georg Fuchsbauer and Damien Vergnaud Ecole normale. A fair blind signature is a blind signature with revocable anonymity and unlinkability, i requested it. In this paper we first revisit the security model for fair blind signatures given

  20. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U.(DOE-Molecular Biology Institute)

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  1. An Analysis of Patch Plausibility and Correctness for Generate-And-Validate Patch Generation Systems (Supplementary Material)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Zichao

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze reported patches for three prior generate-and-validate patch generation systems (GenProg, RSRepair, and AE). Because of experimental error, the majority of the reported patches violate the basic principle behind ...

  2. Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area, Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Dissertation: Geophysical...

  3. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir, Tal

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds1, 2, 3. These biomaterials, which are ...

  4. OGA Project Information Collection via Oracle System Workflow SPA has developed a new way to collect essential project information directly from OHSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    OGA Project Information Collection via Oracle System Workflow SPA has developed a new way to collect essential project information directly from OHSU departments using the Oracle System Workflow, and Project Short Name for a specific OGA Project. Steps of the process: 1. The morning after a Project

  5. Wideband dual-linear polarized microstrip patch antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christopher Brian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    : the type and thickness of the antenna substrate, the method for feeding the antenna, size of patch antenna, polarization of antenna, the presence of slots in the patch and the use of fractal antennas. II.1 IMPORTANT BROADBAND DESIGN PARAMETERS Antenna... for an aperture coupled stacked patch antenna???????????????.. 24 10 Geometry of the final aperture coupled stacked patch antenna with bowtie apertures and dual offset microstrip feed lines??????.. 25 11 VSWR comparison for various sized patches, apertures...

  6. Radiation dosimetry data management using VAX C, FMS, RMS, DCL, and Oracle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voltin, M.J. Jr.; Martin, A.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Dosimetry Badge System was developed to support the radiation protection program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The radiation protection program is responsible for monitoring external radiation exposures to approximately 7,500 Laboratory employees, visitors and contractors each month. External radiation exposure is measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The system is used to control the assembly and distribution of TLD badges. The system monitors badge return and disassembly at the end of each month, and analyzes the TLDs to determine individual radiation exposure levels. Results are reported and stored in a database designed to maintain detailed individual exposure records. The system maintains a complete history of annual summaries for external exposures. The system is user-friendly with user prompts, menus, and extensive help functions. The completely menu-driven system uses VAX C, VAX Forms Management System, VMS Record Management Services, VMS Digital Command Language, and the Oracle Relational Database Management System. Design and development issues faced, and methods and techniques used in developing the system will be described. Topics discussed include consistent user interface design approaches, considerations for using VAX/VMS programming tools versus Oracle development tools to develop and implement the application, and overall system benefits. 3 refs.

  7. Submitting a Vendor Request 1. Click on `Vendor Request' in the Oracle E-Business Suite screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submitting a Vendor Request 1. Click on `Vendor Request' in the Oracle E-Business Suite screen 2. Search for the vendor to make sure they're not already in the system (remember to use the wildcard % symbol to make your search more thorough). 3. If the vendor you're trying to set up does not come up

  8. A spatially structured metapopulation model with patch dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 30, 2005 ... creation) and metapopulation dynamics (patch colonization and extinction). ... genetic structure (Gaines and Lyons, 1997), and commu-.

  9. Rye Patch geothermal development, hydro-chemistry of thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    development, hydro-chemistry of thermal water applied to resource definition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Rye Patch geothermal...

  10. A. Szilagyi G. Meszena: Two-patch model of spatial niche segregation Two-patch model of spatial niche segregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meszéna, Géza

    A. Szil´agyi ­ G. Mesz´ena: Two-patch model of spatial niche segregation . Two-patch model of spatial niche segregation Evolutionary Ecology, in press Andr´as Szil´agyi ­ G´eza Mesz´ena Department to adaptive (or competitive) speciation 1 #12;A. Szil´agyi ­ G. Mesz´ena: Two-patch model of spatial niche

  11. Pharmacokinetics of albuterol and butorphanol administered intravenously and via a buccal patch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughan, Deirdre Faye

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and butorphanol. Further studies are needed to determine if therapeutic drug concentrations can be achieved with the buccal patch and if the patch can result in clinical efficacy....

  12. Vaccine delivery with microneedle skin patches in nonhuman primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Adrienne V

    Transcutaneous drug delivery from planar skin patches is effective for small-molecule drugs and skin-permeable vaccine adjuvants. However, to achieve efficient delivery of vaccines and other macromolecular therapeutics ...

  13. Role of collector alternating charged patches on transport of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microsphere in 2-dimensional micromodels was studied. The cylindrical silica collectors within the micromodels were coated with 0, 10, 20, 50 and 100% Fe2O3 patches. The...

  14. Minimum patch size thresholds of reproductive success of songbirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butcher, Jerrod Anthony

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -oak forests ............................................................................. 9 Figure 2 The number of white-eyed vireo pairs that fledged young was linearly related to patch size (r2 = 0.63) ..................................... 20...). ............................................................ 19 Table 3 Arthropod biomass (mg/g of leaves) collected from branch clippings taken in 12 patches of juniper-oak (Juniperus-Quercus) forest in east-central Texas. ............................ 22 1 1 INTRODUCTION It is often...

  15. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  16. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  17. Temporary patching of damaged UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardenas, A.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Patching techniques based on application of epoxy resins have been developed for temporarily repairing UF{sub 6} cylinders which have sustained relatively minor damage and must be safely emptied. The method is considerably faster and simpler than metallurgical weld repairs. Laboratory tests, detailed operational procedures, and case histories of experience at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described.

  18. atopy patch test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atopy patch test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 TACHYON: Tandem Execution for...

  19. Geometric phases for corotating elliptical vortex patches B. N. Shashikantha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    ) Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Department of Mathematics, University of Southern. Using the Hamiltonian moment model of Melander, Zabusky, and Styczek J. Fluid Mech. 167, 95­115 1986 we in Lamb section 159 a fluid particle on the patch moves in a circular orbit with twice this frequency

  20. Real-Time Texture Synthesis by Patch-Based Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    well for a wide variety of textures ranging from regular to stochastic. By sampling patches according. Given an input sam- ple texture Iin, synthesize a texture Iout that is sufficiently different from the given sample texture, yet appears perceptually to be generated by the same underlying stochastic process

  1. The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhengbing

    This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

  2. Cooperative Patching: A client based P2P architecture for supporting continuous live video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Mostafa

    a list of patching parents, and retrieves lost data from one of its patching parents. Any end host that has the requested video content can be a patching parent. Several parent selection algorithms. An end host in the application layer multicast tree receives data from its parent then duplicates

  3. Nested Patch PCR enables highly multiplexed mutation discovery in candidate genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Rob

    Nested Patch PCR enables highly multiplexed mutation discovery in candidate genes Katherine Elena introduce Nested Patch PCR, a novel method for highly multiplexed PCR that is very specific, can sensitively from targeted exons, demonstrating that Nested Patch PCR is highly specific. We found

  4. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Youngwoo, E-mail: youngwoo.nam@chalmers.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sun, Jie, E-mail: jie.sun@chalmers.se; Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Woo Park, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup ?1}s{sup ?1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  5. Rye Patch, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRoosevelt GardensUK-basedRutherford is aEnergyto resourcePatch,

  6. A restated conceptual model for the Humboldt House-Rye Patch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Rye Patch and antithetic systems along a newly-identified, parallel transform, again with sinistral-slip motion. This 'subbasin' extends eight miles...

  7. Welcome to the Oracle chart of accounts class for GL and OGA chart strings. My name is Susan Wells and I will be one of two instructors for this class. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Welcome to the Oracle chart of accounts class for GL and OGA chart strings. My name is Susan we do. This class will be split into two sessions ­ Session 1 for GL chart strings and Session 2 transactions and reports. #12;2 Session 1 will include a general overview of the GL chart of accounts - what

  8. Oracle BI Answers

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy","MO-MISSOURI","Transportation Electrification","SMITH ELECTRIC VEHICLES US CORP.","KANSAS CITY",32000000,27390811.02,40270 "Energy...

  9. Oracle BI Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy","MO-MISSOURI","Transportation Electrification","SMITH ELECTRIC VEHICLES US CORP.","KANSAS CITY",32000000,13393945,"application...

  10. Design of Stripline-Fed Dual Polarization Aperture-Coupled Stacked Microstrip Patch Phased Array Antenna for Wideband Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David G.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    solution for various systems such as traffic control and collision avoidance radar systems. The goal of this work is to design and implement a dual-linear polarization stacked microstrip patch phased array antenna. Single stacked microstrip patch antenna...

  11. Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Alejandra C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

  12. IMPACT OF THE SUN PATCH ON HEATING AND COOLING POWER EVALUATION: APPLIED TO A LOW ENERGY CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMPACT OF THE SUN PATCH ON HEATING AND COOLING POWER EVALUATION: APPLIED TO A LOW ENERGY CELL A-step. Heating or cooling power is compared to the power calculated with no sun patch incorporation (solar loads impact on the observed results. Keywords: sun patch, fast climatic variations, heating and cooling power

  13. Mobile linkers on DNA-coated colloids: valency without patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Angioletti-Uberti; Patrick Varilly; Bortolo M. Mognetti; Daan Frenkel

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloids coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) can bind selectively to other colloids coated with complementary ssDNA. The fact that DNA-coated colloids (DNACCs) can bind to specific partners opens the prospect of making colloidal `molecules'. However, in order to design DNACC-based molecules, we must be able to control the valency of the colloids, i.e. the number of partners to which a given DNACC can bind. One obvious, but not very simple approach is to decorate the colloidal surface with patches of single-stranded DNA that selectively bind those on other colloids. Here we propose a design principle that exploits many-body effects to control the valency of otherwise isotropic colloids. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that we can tune the valency of colloids coated with mobile ssDNA, simply by tuning the non-specific repulsion between the particles. Our simulations show that the resulting effective interactions lead to low-valency colloids self-assembling in peculiar open structures, very different from those observed in DNACCs with immobile DNA linkers.

  14. A compact broadband multilayer patch antenna and its applications for phased arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidder, Charles Crandall

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complexity of the antenna. This thesis details the work done on developing a broadband patch antenna that is compact and easily manufactured. Three antenna designs are detailed herein. Simulation and measured results indicate that the double II-shaped u...

  15. A model of the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir based on surface-to-borehole seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  16. The Interactive Effects of Pulsed Grazing Disturbance and Patch Size Vary among Wetland Arthropod Guilds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Anna R.; Ho, Chuan-Kai; Quigg, Antonietta

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cormick MK, Baron HM, Whigham DF (2010) Phragmites australis (common reed) invasion in the Rhode River subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay: disentangling the effects of foliar nutrients, genetic diversity, patch size, and seed viability. Est Coasts 33: 118...

  17. Boolean operations between solids and surfaces by triangles and triangular patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Fuu-Diing

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    BOOLEAN OPERATIONS BETWEEN SOLIDS AND SURFACES BY TRIANGLES AND TRIANGULAR PATCHES A Thesis by FUU-DIING CHEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering BOOLEAN OPERATIONS BETWEEN SOLIDS AND SURFACES BY TRIANGLES AND ~GULAR PATCHES A Thesis by FUU-DIING CHEN Approved as to style and content by: j I , ; ". . ?. ', ) I...

  18. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  19. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  20. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J.D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H.E.; Ritchie, D.A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1?xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a... mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realised in quantum critical superconductors. Quantum critical points (QCPs) can be associated with a variety of different order-disorder phenomena...

  1. Management of Control System Information SecurityI: Control System Patch Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quanyan Zhu; Miles McQueen; Craig Rieger; Tamer Basar

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of information technologies in control systems poses additional potential threats due to the frequent disclosure of software vulnerabilities. The management of information security involves a series of policy-making on the vulnerability discovery, disclosure, patch development and patching. In this paper, we use a system approach to devise a model to understand the interdependencies of these decision processes. In more details, we establish a theoretical framework for making patching decision for control systems, taking into account the requirement of functionability of control systems. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations and show that the optimal operation period of control systems given the currently estimated attack rate is roughly around a half a month.

  2. Patch-clamp array with on-chip electronics, optics, flow control and mechanical actuation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Conrad D.; Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast and quantitative analysis of cellular activity, signaling and responses to external stimuli is a crucial capability and it has been the goal of several projects focusing on patch clamp measurements. To provide the maximum functionality and measurement options, we have developed a patch clamp array device that incorporates on-chip electronics, mechanical, optical and microfluidic coupling as well as cell localization through fluid flow. The preliminary design, which integrated microfluidics, electrodes and optical access, was fabricated and tested. In addition, new designs which further combine mechanical actuation, on-chip electronics and various electrode materials with the previous designs are currently being fabricated.

  3. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  4. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  5. Patch use under predation hazard: effects of the red imported fire ant on deer mice foraging behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtcamp, Wendee Nicole

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I compared patch use patterns of deer mice foraging in the presence and absence of a non-conventional predation hazard, red imported fire ants. Deer mice foraged for 60 min in an experimental arena containing two rich and two poor resource patches...

  6. The Secret Life of Patches: A Firefox Case Study Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid Holmes, and Michael W. Godfrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    The Secret Life of Patches: A Firefox Case Study Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid Holmes future community contri- butions. Keywords-Open source software, code review, patch lifecycle. I. INTRODUCTION Code review is a key element of any mature software development process. It is particularly

  7. The University of Texas at Austin July 30, 2014 Communications Termination Blocks and Patch Panels 27 11 19-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Clint N.

    panel), cable and patch cords (be manufacturer and product specific). c) All product information shall and patch panels for copper twisted-pair and optical fiber cables. B. The product performance (e, guidelines or specifications. B. The following codes, as required by law 1. ANSI/NFPA-70, National Electrical

  8. Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services -Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services - Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet to multime- dia steams by a large number of clients. Current research in this area has focussed primarily these algorithms. We present measurements detailing the overheads associated with the various server compo- nents

  9. Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services ­ Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet time al- lowing asynchronous access to multimedia steams by a large number of clients. Current research, and explore the issues that arise when implementing these algorithms. We present measurements detailing

  10. Recruitment and community structure of fishes in seagrass beds of varying patch structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojcik, Patricia Lavonne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would endevor on their "vacation" and for making these two years forever memorable. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . TABLE OF CONTENTS. . CHAPTER V Vl I INTRODUCTION. 11 DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSES INTRODUCTION . . METHODS... Structure on Abundance. . . . 21 III EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSES 26 INTRODUCTION . . METHODS 26 28 RESULTS Seagrass Experiment. . Patch Size. . 31 31 31 CHAPTER Grass Density. . . . . . . . . Leaves per Shoot. DISCUSSION. . Page 33 33 34 IV...

  11. Analysis of a Plate with a Localized Piezoelectric Patch Scott Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of a Plate with a Localized Piezoelectric Patch Scott Hansen Department of Mathematics detected the so called \\direct" piezoelectric e#11;ect and Lippman who soon after pre- dicted the \\converse" peizoelectric e#11;ect. Since then various mathematical models for piezoelectric materi- als have been proposed

  12. Ultrasonic measurement of the residual stresses in patch welded steel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junghans, Paul Gerard

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structural steel plates. The two 1.2 in (48 in.) square plates were patch welded in the center to create a residual stress field; and subsequently, one of the plates was stress relieved. The LCR travel-time measurements on the plates not only differentiated...

  13. Patch connectivity and genetic diversity conservation in the federally endangered and narrowly endemic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neel, Maile

    Patch connectivity and genetic diversity conservation in the federally endangered and narrowly and Landscape Architecture, and Entomology, 2116 Plant Sciences Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 5 September 2007 Received in revised

  14. 2003. The Journal of Arachnology 31:344349 SPIDER WEBS AS HABITAT PATCHES--THE DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    344 2003. The Journal of Arachnology 31:344­349 SPIDER WEBS AS HABITAT PATCHES--THE DISTRIBUTION OF KLEPTOPARASITES (ARGYRODES, THERIDIIDAE) AMONG HOST WEBS (NEPHILA, TETRAGNATHIDAE) Ingi Agnarsson: Systematic adult golden orb weavers (Nephila clavipes) have kleptoparasites of the genus Ar- gyrodes in their webs

  15. Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Pope

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

  16. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  17. Inverse patchy colloids with small patches: fluid structure and dynamical slowing down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvano Ferrari; Emanuela Bianchi; Yura V. Kalyuzhnyi; Gerhard Kahl

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse Patchy Colloids (IPCs) differ from conventional patchy particles because their patches repel (rather than attract) each other and attract (rather than repel) the part of the colloidal surface that is free of patches. These particular features occur, .e.g., in heterogeneously charged colloidal systems. Here we consider overall neutral IPCs carrying two, relatively small, polar patches. Previous studies of the same model under planar confinement have evidenced the formation of branched, disordered aggregates composed of ring-like structures. We investigate here the bulk behavior of the system via molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on both the structure and the dynamics of the fluid phase in a wide region of the phase diagram. Additionally, the simulation results for the static observables are compared to the Associative Percus Yevick solution of an integral equation approach based on the multi-density Ornstein-Zernike theory. A good agreement between theoretical and numerical quantities is observed even in the region of the phase diagram where the slowing down of the dynamics occurs.

  18. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metalsdysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttriumcould affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  19. Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. Gurney and Clive G. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. We use data collected on the population dynamics of a model engineer, the beaver, to estimate the per

  20. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Burst BufferFluoriteSedimentsThe Critical

  1. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL Recovery of Critical Materials from Consumer Devices 3 3-2 3.2.6 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 McGuire, Michael ORNL...

  2. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Payne, Steve LLNL New Efficient...

  3. U-245: Critical Java 0-day flaw exploited | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the unsuspecting victims' machines REFERENCE LINKS: http:www.net-security.orgsecworld.php?id13484 zero-day CVE-2012-4681 DeepEnd Research http:www.oracle.comtechnetwork...

  4. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison UraniumCredit-Based Interest RateCriticalCritical

  5. Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent6894093° Loading69. ItLewickiMauiSL JumpRye Patch Area

  6. Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

  7. Critical QCD in Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Antoniou; Y. F. Contoyiannis; F. K. Diakonos; G. Mavromanolakis

    2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\\delta \\sigma)^2= $, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.

  8. Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems Criticality Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems 5100 EX.A Criticality Designation 1. Primary source of PHI for pre-research; or secondary source of PHI for research/pre-research; secondary source of PHI for treatment, payment or healthcare operations; or teaching Criticality mapped to Recovery

  9. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

  10. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAYCareers The Critical Materials Institute

  11. Critical Materials Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartners with Siemens onSite | Department ofServicesCritical

  12. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kevin R; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complexity of an active region is related to its flare-productivity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from the magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region fr...

  13. When Nonlocal Coupling Between Oscillators Becomes Stronger: Patched Synchrony or Multi-Chimera States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iryna Omelchenko; Oleh E. Omel'chenko; Philipp Hvel; Eckehard Schll

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems of nonlocally coupled oscillators can exhibit complex spatio-temporal patterns, called chimera states, which consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent (synchronized) and incoherent dynamics. We report on a novel form of these states, found in a widely used model of a limit-cycle oscillator if one goes beyond the limit of weak coupling typical for phase oscillators. Then patches of synchronized dynamics appear within the incoherent domain giving rise to a multi-chimera state. We find that, depending on the coupling strength and range, different multi-chimeras arise in a transition from classical chimera states. The additional spatial modulation is due to strong coupling interaction and thus cannot be observed in simple phase-oscillator models.

  14. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chen, Ken Chung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Stomatology, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan 70403 (China)] [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Stomatology, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan 70403 (China); Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin [Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery and Science, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University College of Medicine, Shanghai, China 200011 (China)] [Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery and Science, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University College of Medicine, Shanghai, China 200011 (China); Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben [Hong Kong Dental Implant and Maxillofacial Centre, Hong Kong, China 999077 (China)] [Hong Kong Dental Implant and Maxillofacial Centre, Hong Kong, China 999077 (China); Liu, Nancy X. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China 100050 (China)] [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China 100050 (China); Xia, James J. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Surgery (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery and Science, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University College of Medicine, Shanghai, China 200011 (China); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into amaximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT segmentation based on 15 patients.

  15. Design, Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Microwave and Optical Devices: The Multi-band Patch Antenna, Ultra Wideband Ring Filter and Plasmonic Waveguide Coupler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ya-Chi

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Multiband Patch Antenna, (2) Ultra- Wideband Band Pass Ring Filter and (3) Plasmonic Waveguide Coupler with High Coupling Efficiency. First, the idea of a simple frequency reconfigurable patch antenna that operates at multiband from 2 GHz to 4.5 GHz... .................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ............................................................................................................... 3 Microstrip Antenna Fundamentals.............................................................................. 4 Feed...

  16. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

  17. Preprint -Proc. of MMM 07-09/01/2009, Sophia-Antipolis, France. Sparse Multiscale Patches (SMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthone, Sandrine

    Preprint - Proc. of MMM 07-09/01/2009, Sophia-Antipolis, France. Sparse Multiscale Patches (SMP) for image categorization Paolo Piro, Sandrine Anthoine, Eric Debreuve, and Michel Barlaud University of Nice-Sophia-09/01/2009, Sophia-Antipolis, France. image locations that are relevant to characterize the visual content. Local ap

  18. Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    369 Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard Josabel Belliure* Luis M. Carrascal Department of Evolutionary Ecology´ Gutie´rrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain Accepted 6/6/02 ABSTRACT Heliothermy (heat gain by radiation

  19. The University of Texas at Austin September 30, 2011 Communications Termination Blocks and Patch Panels 27 11 19-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Clint N.

    and patch panels for copper, fiber, and coaxial backbone cables. 1.2 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. The latest, guidelines and specifications. B. The following codes, as required by law: 1. ANSI/NFPA-70, National Electric in Section 27 00 00 Communications: 1. Product Information a) Provide manufacturer's product information

  20. Cooperative polymerization of one-patch colloids Teun Vissers, Frank Smallenburg, Gianmarco Muna, Zdenk Preisler, and Francesco Sciortino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    Cooperative polymerization of one-patch colloids Teun Vissers, Frank Smallenburg, Gianmarco Munaò model for the polymerization of clathrin baskets J. Chem. Phys. 139, 121928 (2013); 10 polymerization. VII. Understanding the role of "cooperativity" in self-assembly J. Chem. Phys. 128, 224901 (2008

  1. CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large, and environmental pressures of the heated Pipeline controversy. #12;

  2. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

  3. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  4. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  5. Derivation of criticality safety benchmarks from ZPR fast critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scores of critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9, and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. Most of the assemblies were mockups of various liquid-metal fast breeder reactor designs. These tended to be complex, containing, for example, mockups of control rods and control rod positions. Some assemblies, however, were `physics benchmarks`. These relatively `clean` assemblies had uniform compositions and simple geometry and were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods. Assemblies in this last category are well suited to form the basis for new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of some of these benchmark candidates and to describe the strategy being used to create the benchmarks.

  6. Rhizoctonia spp. associated with brown patch of St. Augustinegrass: isolate characterization, host range, and screening for resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Bernadette Murphy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistance CONCLUSION LITERATURE CITED 13 13 18 18 25 27 34 41 45 VITA 50 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1. Dates St. Augustinegrsss displaying brown patch symptoms was collected, location of the collection sites, and type of host tissue from..., drained, and placed under a laminar- flow hood on paper towels for 10 min to remove excess water. The cut end of each tip was dipped in molten Paraplast (Lancer Co. , St. Louis, NO. , 63103) to seal the wound. One tip was placed in each of the WA...

  7. Integrating agile practices into critical software development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Integrating agile practices into critical software development Katarzyna Lukasiewicz, Janusz Górski. In this text we describe our research towards introducing agile practices into critical software development processes Keywords-- safety-critical software; agile practices; software development; process improvement

  8. Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls...

  9. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  10. Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Welcome and Overview of Workshop and Energy Innovation Hubs Speakers * Dr. Leo...

  11. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to...

  12. DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  13. PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Danise

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

  14. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  16. A practical oracle for sequential code parallelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Saturnino; Garcia, Saturnino

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bruening, and S. Amarasinghe. Umbra: Efficient and scalablesimilar to that of Umbra [ZBA10a], Kremlins overall

  17. A practical oracle for sequential code parallelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Saturnino; Garcia, Saturnino

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on High Performance Computer Architecture, pages 121Symposium on Computer Architecture, pages 342351, 1992. [OpenMP 2.0. SIGARCH Computer Architecture News, 29:4148,

  18. Distance Oracles A compact data structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    ,pi(v)), 1i(k-1) 1 1 k O kn space #12;27 Query answering algorithm w0=u v w1=p1(v)A1 w2=p2(u)A2 w3=p3(v(u) } return (u,w)+ (w,v) Takes O(k) time #12;29 Bound the strech w0=u v w1=p1(v)A1 w2=p2(u)A2 w3=p3(v)A3 2 2

  19. A practical oracle for sequential code parallelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Saturnino; Garcia, Saturnino

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first screen in digital media. Copyrights for componentsor the first screen in digital media. Copyrights for com-the first screen in digital media. Copyrights for components

  20. Degenerate and critical Bloch branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dutra, A. de [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, I-34100 Italy (Italy); UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil); Amaro de Faria, A. C. Jr.; Hott, M. [UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years a number of works reported the appearance of thick branes with internal structure, induced by the parameter which controls the interaction between two scalar fields coupled to gravity in (4,1) dimensions in warped space-time with one extra dimension. Here we show that one can implement the control over the brane thickness without needing to change the potential parameter. On the contrary, this is going to be done by means of the variation of a parameter associated with the domain wall degeneracy. We also report the existence of novel and qualitatively different solutions for a critical value of the degeneracy parameter, which could be called critical Bloch branes.

  1. Tank farms criticality safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORT, L.A.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

  2. Dealloying below the critical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, K.; Brankovic, S.R.; Dimitrov, N.; Sieradzki, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventionally, the critical potential represents the potential marking the onset of bulk dealloying. The current density below the critical potential is only weakly dependent on potential, and the physical processes responsible for this passive-like behavior are poorly understood. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the nature of the surface morphology which develops at potentials less than the critical potential. At fixed potential, the time-dependent evolution of the surface morphology was correlated with the observed current decay. This allowed the authors to identify and model the physical processes which control the current decay. They find two general regimes of power law behavior in the current decay corresponding to exhaustion of an activation-controlled dissolution process (t{sup {minus}1}) and the operation of one of three mechanisms of surface mass-transport control (t{sup {minus}5/8}, t{sup {minus}1/2}, and t{sup {minus}1/4}). Potential-pulsing experiments were performed in order to examine the effect of a blocking noble-metal layer on the nucleation and growth of the porous structure associated with bulk dealloying. These results were analyzed using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami analysis. The Avrami exponents found were fractional and in the range of 1.25 to 1.8. The fractional exponents were interpreted in terms of the fractal dimension characterizing the initial stages of porosity formation during bulk dealloying.

  3. High Critical Current Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOEs coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

  4. Critical Materials Institute List of Projects | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNaturalInstitute Critical Materials

  5. Fluidic patch antenna based on liquid metal alloy/single-wall carbon-nanotubes operating at the S-band frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fluidic patch antenna based on liquid metal alloy/single-wall carbon-nanotubes operating at the S (eutectic gallium indium) blended with single-wall carbon-nanotube (SWNTs). The nanocomposite­24 For instance, Cheng et al.15 and So and coworkers14 reported an unbalanced loop antenna and a half- wave dipole

  6. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarterinto PARSCriteria ReviewCriticality

  7. Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

  8. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  9. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  10. Counterterms, critical gravity and holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha; Nemani V. Suryanarayana

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider counterterms for odd dimensional holographic CFTs. These counterterms are derived by demanding cut-off independence of the CFT partition function on $S^d$ and $S^1 \\times S^{d-1}$. The same choice of counterterms leads to a cut-off independent Schwarzschild black hole entropy. When treated as independent actions, these counterterm actions resemble critical theories of gravity, i.e., higher curvature gravity theories where the additional massive spin-2 modes become massless. Equivalently, in the context of AdS/CFT, these are theories where at least one of the central charges associated with the trace anomaly vanishes. Connections between these theories and logarithmic CFTs are discussed. For a specific choice of parameters, the theories arising from counterterms are non-dynamical and resemble a DBI generalization of gravity. For even dimensional CFTs, analogous counterterms cancel log-independent cut-off dependence.

  11. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  12. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  13. Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance.

  14. January 2011Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for Oracle Directory Integration Platform, 11g Release 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    This software and related documentation are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and are protected by intellectual property laws. Except as expressly permitted in your license agreement or allowed by law, you may not use, copy, reproduce, translate, broadcast, modify, license, transmit, distribute, exhibit, perform, publish, or display any part, in any form, or by any means. Reverse engineering, disassembly, or decompilation of this software, unless required by law for interoperability, is prohibited. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice and is not warranted to be error-free. If you find any errors, please report them to us in writing. If this software or related documentation is delivered to the U.S. Government or anyone licensing it on behalf of the U.S. Government, the following notice is applicable:

  15. March 2013Oracle Fusion Middleware Administrator's Guide for Oracle Directory Integration Platform, 11g Release 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    This software and related documentation are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and are protected by intellectual property laws. Except as expressly permitted in your license agreement or allowed by law, you may not use, copy, reproduce, translate, broadcast, modify, license, transmit, distribute, exhibit, perform, publish, or display any part, in any form, or by any means. Reverse engineering, disassembly, or decompilation of this software, unless required by law for interoperability, is prohibited. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice and is not warranted to be error-free. If you find any errors, please report them to us in writing. If this is software or related documentation that is delivered to the U.S. Government or anyone licensing it on behalf of the U.S. Government, the following notice is applicable:

  16. Critical shear stresses in cohesive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rektorik, Robert James

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRITICAL SHEAR STRESSES IN COHESIVE SOILS A Thesis By ROBERT JAMES REKTORIK Approved as to style and content by: (Committee hairm g- c& ( ead of epartm ( mber) (Member) January 1964 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to acknowledge the guidance..., and Dummy Soil Sample 17 Typical Soil Samples after Scour Test, San Saba Clay 25 Typical Soil Samples after Scour Test, Houston Black Clay, K177 Regression of Critical Shearing Force on Per Cent Moisture . 31 10. Regression of Critical Shearing Force...

  17. Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrichs, D P

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  18. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and...

  19. 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and controlled. Criticality experiments, where a nuclear chain reaction becomes self-sustaining, were also conducted. In addition, 209-E was a research facility where methods of...

  20. Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the critical mission support through energy security and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  1. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for...

  2. Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications September 2011 Resnick Institute Report C in the generation, storage, transmission, conversion and conservation of energy. + Institute Leadership Harry://resnick.caltech.edu Pasadena, CA. USA + #12;Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications California Institute

  3. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  4. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  5. Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

  6. Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Ralston Road Arvada, CO 80002 Great Outdoors Colorado 1600 Broadway, Suite 1650 Denver, CO 80202 Colorado

  7. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  8. Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

    2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

  9. Critical configurations of planar robot arms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khimshiashvili, G; Siersma, D; Zhukova, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that a closed polygon P is a critical point of the oriented area function if and only if P is a cyclic polygon, that is, $P$ can be inscribed in a circle. Moreover, there is a short formula for the Morse index. Going further in this direction, we extend these results to the case of open polygonal chains, or robot arms. We introduce the notion of the oriented area for an open polygonal chain, prove that critical points are exactly the cyclic configurations with antipodal endpoints and derive a formula for the Morse index of a critical configuration.

  10. Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

  11. Critical eigenvalue in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.; Olsen, D.N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes recent work to put the analysis of past critical eigenvalue measurements from the US critical experiments program on a consistent basis. The integral data base includes 53 configurations built in 11 ZPPR assemblies which simulate mixed oxide LMFBRs. Both conventional and heterogeneous designs representing 350, 700, and 900 MWe sizes and with and without simulated control rods and/or control rod positions have been studied. The review of the integral data base includes quantitative assessment of experimental uncertainties in the measured excess reactivity. Analyses have been done with design level and higher-order methods using ENDF/B-IV data. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments are used to generate recommended bias factors for criticality predictions. Recommended methods for analysis of LMFBR fast critical assemblies and LMFBR design calculations are presented. Unresolved issues and areas which require additional experimental or analytical study are identified.

  12. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  13. Critical frequency in nuclear chiral rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Olbratowski; J. Dobaczewski; J. Dudek

    2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach the self-consistent solutions have been obtained for planar and chiral rotational bands in 132La. It turns out that the chiral band cannot exist below some critical rotational frequency which in the present case equals omega=0.6MeV. The appearance of the critical frequency is explained in terms of a simple classical model of two gyroscopes coupled to a triaxial rigid body.

  14. Quantum critical benchmark for density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two electrons at the threshold of ionization represent a severe test case for electronic structure theory. A pseudospectral method yields a very accurate density of the two-electron ion with nuclear charge close to the critical value. Highly accurate energy components and potentials of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are given, as well as a useful parametrization of the critical density. The challenges for density functional approximations and the strength of correlation are also discussed.

  15. CRITICAL MESSAGE INTEGRITY OVER A SHARED NETWORK 1 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    , the simplest way to assure system safety is to isolate critical and non-critical components to prevent defects often contain a mixture of critical and non-critical software processes that need to communicate with each other. Critical software is "software whose failure could have an impact on safety, or could cause

  16. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  17. WIPP-016, Rev. 0 Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIPP-016, Rev. 0 Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste/2008 Guidance (if applicable): _______________________ #12;NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATION FOR CONTACT, directors, employees, agents, consultants or personal services contractors. #12;NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY

  18. Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  19. On the Critical Coupling for Kuramoto Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorfler, Florian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The celebrated Kuramoto model captures various synchronization phenomena in biological and man-made dynamical systems of coupled oscillators. It is well-known that there exists a critical coupling strength among the oscillators at which a phase transition from incoherency to synchronization occurs. This paper features three contributions. First, we characterize and distinguish the different notions of synchronization used throughout the literature and formally introduce the concept of phase cohesiveness as an analysis tool and performance index for synchronization. Second, we review the vast literature providing necessary, sufficient, implicit, and explicit estimates of the critical coupling strength in the finite and infinite-dimensional case. Finally, we present the first explicit necessary and sufficient condition on the critical coupling strength to achieve synchronization in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model for an arbitrary distribution of the natural frequencies. The multiplicative gap in the synch...

  20. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  1. Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  2. EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report Presentation given at the EV...

  3. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

  4. National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  5. Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical to Steel Industry Steel Success Story - Ironmaking: Quality and Supply Critical to Steel Industry This factsheet...

  6. SciTech Connect: Relationship between critical tensile stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relationship between critical tensile stress and fracture toughness in mild steel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Relationship between critical tensile stress and...

  7. CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    policies designed to promote CHP in critical infrastructure applications. Combined Heat and Power: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities (March...

  8. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  9. antiferromagnetic quantum critical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quasiparticles are strongly coupled and acquire spectral functions with a common dynamic critical exponent. We obtain results for critical exponents and for the variation in...

  10. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  11. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned.

  12. QCD Critical Point: The Race is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajiv V. Gavai

    2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical point in the phase diagram of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), if established either theoretically or experimentally, would be as profound a discovery as the good-old gas-liquid critical point. Unlike the latter, however, first-principles based approaches are being employed to locate it theoretically. Due to the short lived nature of the concerned phases, novel experimental techniques are needed to search for it. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in USA has an experimental program to do so. This short review is an attempt to provide a glimpse of the race between the theorists and the experimentalists as well as that of the synergy between them.

  13. CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON DM

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

  14. Designing A Critical LinkDesigning A Critical Link PSU Transportation Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Designing A Critical LinkDesigning A Critical Link PSU Transportation Seminar May 19, 2006 #12;2PSU Transportation Seminar ­ May 19, 2006 Presentation Outline · Project History · Function and Role of the I-5 · Process and Schedule #12;Project HistoryProject History #12;4PSU Transportation Seminar ­ May 19, 2006 I-5

  15. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  16. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  17. Reliability Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Reliability Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis Addendum 1; HFE ~ ATM501 PAGE I I. Hiebert Reliability Engineer HFE · B-1 f #12;~~.~-~ -_ ~ ~ Reliability Failure Mode, Effects were slight adjustment in the linearizing resistors. The reliability is effected upward by the deletion

  18. Determination of Critical Exponents in Nuclear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. J. Mueller; ALADIN collaboration

    1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of critical behaviour in nuclear fragmentation are often based on arguments from percolation theory. We demonstrate with general thermodynamic considerations and studies of the Ising model that the reliance on percolation as a reference model bears the risk of missing parts of the essential physics.

  19. Robust Critical Node Selection by Benders Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    critical node selection problem, we define the following decision variables ..... method to generate Pareto-optimal cuts thus achieving very good speed-ups compared to ... Barabsi-Albert graphs generated using the Barabsi graph generator (Dreier, 2006). ...... Computers & Operations Research, 38(12):1766 1774, 2011.

  20. Critical Electric Power Issues in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Electric Power Issues in Pennsylvania: Transmission, Distributed Generation and Continuing Services when the Grid Fails Produced by the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center for the Pa-268-3003, apt@cmu.edu. Executive Director of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center at Carnegie Mellon

  1. Intrusion-Tolerant Protection for Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    of an organization in the face of accidents and attacks. How- ever, they are not simple firewalls but distributed]. In recent years these systems evolved in several aspects that greatly increased their exposure to cyber-attacks, a critical information infrastructure is formed by facilities, like power transformation substations or cor

  2. Arthur Fine Bohrs Response to EPR: Criticism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fine, Arthur

    Arthur Fine Bohrs Response to EPR: Criticism and Defense If a specific question has meaning of focus that Niels Bohr makes in responding to EPR.1 EPR appeal to measurement as sometimes sufficient ("elements of reality"). In his response, Bohr, while paraphrasing thewordsofEPR

  3. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R. [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Kusdiantara, Rudy, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Puspita, Dila, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Sidarto, Kuntjoro A., E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y. [Department of Mathematics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  4. VLA HYBRID CONFIGURATIONS A Critical Look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    VLA HYBRID CONFIGURATIONS A Critical Look Barry Clark EVLA Memo 180 July 2014 The VLA hybrid weeks (plus the two week hybrid), whereas going directly from one main configuration to another could 4.5%. 2. The time requests in the hybrid configuration are heavily weighted to the galactic center

  5. Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Version 1.0 National Institute of Standards and Technology February 12, 2014 #12;February 12, 2014 Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.0 Table............................................................................................................. 20 ii #12;February 12, 2014 Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.0 Executive Summary The national

  6. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  7. Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

  8. Critical Nuclear Charges for N-Electron Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    Critical Nuclear Charges for N-Electron Atoms ALEXEI V. SERGEEV, SABRE KAIS Department of Chemistry, which is treated as a continuous parameter, approaches its critical value. The critical nuclear charge: critical nuclear charges; N-electron atoms; stability of atomic dianions Introduction he question

  9. The Zeus Copper/Uranium Critical Experiment at NCERC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Rene G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bounds, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackman, Kevin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goda, Joetta M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical experiment was performed to provide nuclear data in a non-thermal neutron spectrum and to reestablish experimental capability relevant to Stockpile Stewardship and Technical Nuclear Forensic programs. Irradiation foils were placed at specific locations in the Zeus all oralloy critical experiment to obtain fission ratios. These ratios were compared with others from other critical assemblies to assess the degree of softness in the neutron spectrum. This critical experiment was performed at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) in Nevada.

  10. Refined Critical Balance in Strong Alfvnic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mallet; A. A. Schekochihin; B. D. G. Chandran

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical evidence that in strong Alfv\\'enic turbulence, the critical balance principle---equality of the nonlinear decorrelation and linear propagation times---is scale invariant, in the sense that the probability distribution of the ratio of these times is independent of scale. This result only holds if the local alignment of the Elsasser fields is taken into account in calculating the nonlinear time. At any given scale, the degree of alignment is found to increase with fluctuation amplitude, supporting the idea that the cause of alignment is mutual dynamical shearing of Elsasser fields. The scale-invariance of critical balance (while all other quantities of interest are strongly intermittent, i.e., have scale-dependent distributions) suggests that it is the most robust of the scaling principles used to describe Alfv\\'enic turbulence.

  11. Bekenstein-Hawking entropy from Criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swastik Bhattacharya; S. Shankaranarayanan

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum Einstein equations when projected on to a black hole horizon is analogous to the dynamics of fluids. In this work we address the question, whether certain properties of semi-classical black holes could be holographically mapped into properties of (2 + 1)-dimensional fluid living on the horizon. In particular, we focus on the statistical mechanical description of the horizon-fluid that leads to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Within the paradigm of Landau mean field theory and existence of a condensate at a critical temperature, we explicitly show that Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and other features of black hole thermodynamics can be recovered from the statistical modelling of the fluid. We also show that a negative cosmological constant acts like an external magnetic field that induces order in the system leading to the appearance of a tri-critical point in the phase diagram.

  12. EPR and Bell's theorem: A critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The argument of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is reviewed with attention to logical structure and character of assumptions. Bohr's reply is discussed. Bell's contribution is formulated without use of hidden variables, and efforts to equate hidden variables to realism are critically examined. An alternative derivation of nonlocality that makes no use of hidden variables, microrealism, counterfactual definiteness, or any other assumption alien to orthodox quantum thinking is described in detail, with particular attention to the quartet or broken-square question.

  13. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  14. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  16. On the Critical Coupling for Kuramoto Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Dorfler; Francesco Bullo

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kuramoto model captures various synchronization phenomena in biological and man-made systems of coupled oscillators. It is well-known that there exists a critical coupling strength among the oscillators at which a phase transition from incoherency to synchronization occurs. This paper features four contributions. First, we characterize and distinguish the different notions of synchronization used throughout the literature and formally introduce the concept of phase cohesiveness as an analysis tool and performance index for synchronization. Second, we review the vast literature providing necessary, sufficient, implicit, and explicit estimates of the critical coupling strength for finite and infinite-dimensional, and for first and second-order Kuramoto models. Third, we present the first explicit necessary and sufficient condition on the critical coupling to achieve synchronization in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model for an arbitrary distribution of the natural frequencies. The multiplicative gap in the synchronization condition yields a practical stability result determining the admissible initial and the guaranteed ultimate phase cohesiveness as well as the guaranteed asymptotic magnitude of the order parameter. Fourth and finally, we extend our analysis to multi-rate Kuramoto models consisting of second-order Kuramoto oscillators with inertia and viscous damping together with first-order Kuramoto oscillators with multiple time constants. We prove that the multi-rate Kuramoto model is locally topologically conjugate to a first-order Kuramoto model with scaled natural frequencies, and we present necessary and sufficient conditions for almost global phase synchronization and local frequency synchronization. Interestingly, these conditions do not depend on the inertiae which contradicts prior observations on the role of inertiae in synchronization of second-order Kuramoto models.

  17. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-Es REACT Project, short for Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  18. Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy FrozenNovember 10, 2014 2014for Critical

  19. Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos April 7,Criticality

  20. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  1. Critical phenomena in N=4 SYM plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma at finite temperature and chemical potential for an R-symmetry charge undergoes a second order phase transition. We demonstrate that this phase transition is of the mean field theory type. We explicitly show that the model is in the dynamical universality class of 'model B' according to the classification of Hohenberg and Halperine, with dynamical critical exponent z=4. We study bulk viscosity in the mass deformed version of this theory in the vicinity of the phase transition. We point out that all available models of bulk viscosity at continuous phase transition are in conflict with our explicit holographic computations.

  2. Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison UraniumCredit-Based Interest RateCritical

  3. Total absorption by degenerate critical coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piper, Jessica R., E-mail: jrylan@stanford.edu; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui, E-mail: shanhui@stanford.edu [Ginzton Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a mirror-symmetric resonator with two ports. We show that, when excited from a single port, complete absorption can be achieved through critical coupling to degenerate resonances with opposite symmetry. Moreover, any time two resonances with opposite symmetry are degenerate in frequency and absorption is always significantly enhanced. In contrast, when two resonances with the same symmetry are nearly degenerate, there is no absorption enhancement. We numerically demonstrate these effects using a graphene monolayer on top of a photonic crystal slab, illuminated from a single side in the near-infrared.

  4. Documentation Integrity for Safety-Critical Applications: The COHERE Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novick, David G.

    . Keywords Authoring interface, documentation integrity, consistency 1. INTRODUCTION This paper reportsDocumentation Integrity for Safety-Critical Applications: The COHERE Project David G. Novick-critical systems. Following a set of documentation integrity maxims, the project developed two generations

  5. NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014 1. Introduction This companion Roadmap to the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity ("the Framework, which has been moved to this document. 2. Evolution of the Cybersecurity Framework Since

  6. Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power April 9, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Customers of AT&T Wireless and Pacific Gas & Electric...

  7. Critical length limiting super-low friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Ma; Andrea Benassi; Andrea Vanossi; Michael Urbakh

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the demonstration of super-low friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micro-mechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nano-manipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nano-devices with super-low friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  8. Teaching Against Tradition: Historical Preludes to Critical Pedagogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brad 1974-

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Page IV DISSENT FROM DIDACTICISM: CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH DISSENTING ACADEMIES ............................................................................. 119 A History...

  9. Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly. There are many techniques that aim to improve the performance of neural networks for safety-critical systems. Consequently, their role in safety-critical applications, if any, is typically restricted to advisory systems

  10. FSC has 'failed the world's forests' say critics FSC has 'failed the world's forests' say critics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a variety of environmental organizations. The FSC is an international not-for-profit organization for slipping standards The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) has come under increasingly harsh criticisms from environmental organizations like World Rainforest Movement and Ecological Internet are putting the organization

  11. Bayesian Policy Gradient and Actor-Critic Algorithms Bayesian Policy Gradient and Actor-Critic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian Policy Gradient and Actor-Critic Algorithms Bayesian Policy Gradient and Actor Yaakov Engel yakiengel@gmail.com Editor: Abstract Policy gradient methods are reinforcement learning algorithms that adapt a param- eterized policy by following a performance gradient estimate. Many

  12. Sensitive Chemical Compass Assisted by Quantum Criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Y. Cai; Qing Ai; H. T. Quan; C. P. Sun

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The radical-pair-based chemical reaction could be used by birds for the navigation via the geomagnetic direction. An inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could response to the weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field and then results in different photopigments in the avian eyes to be sensed. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup for the ultra-sensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via the recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the weak magnetic field.

  13. Electron stars for holographic metallic criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Tavanfar, Alireza [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We refer to the ground state of a gravitating, charged ideal fluid of fermions held at a finite chemical potential as an ''electron star.'' In a holographic setting, electron stars are candidate gravity duals for strongly interacting finite fermion density systems. We show how electron stars develop an emergent Lifshitz scaling at low energies. This IR scaling region is a consequence of the two-way interaction between emergent quantum critical bosonic modes and the finite density of fermions. By integrating from the IR region to an asymptotically AdS{sub 4} spacetime, we compute basic properties of the electron stars, including their electrical conductivity. We emphasize the challenge of connecting UV and IR physics in strongly interacting finite density systems.

  14. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima; Vincenzo Vitagliano

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect and the catalysis is deactivated by effect of the curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity may reappear from higher-order terms in the heat kernel expansion leading to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis (absent in flat space). The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$ where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behaviour of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  15. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachi, Antonino; Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect and the catalysis is deactivated by effect of the curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity may reappear from higher-order terms in the heat kernel expansion leading to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis (absent in flat space). The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$ where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behaviour of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  16. Electron stars for holographic metallic criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hartnoll; Alireza Tavanfar

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We refer to the ground state of a gravitating, charged ideal fluid of fermions held at a finite chemical potential as an `electron star'. In a holographic setting, electron stars are candidate gravity duals for strongly interacting finite fermion density systems. We show how electron stars develop an emergent Lifshitz scaling at low energies. This IR scaling region is a consequence of the two way interaction between emergent quantum critical bosonic modes and the finite density of fermions. By integrating from the IR region to an asymptotically AdS_4 spacetime, we compute basic properties of the electron stars, including their electrical conductivity. We emphasize the challenge of connecting UV and IR physics in strongly interacting finite density systems.

  17. Critical review of naphthenic acid corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tebbal, S. [SET Labs., Inc., Stafford, TX (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphthenic acid corrosion continues to be a reliability issue in refinery distillation units. A review of the subject is presented herein with special focus on field and laboratory data and on areas where research is needed. The review shows that several parameters are known to affect the corrosion process and their individual effect on crude corrosivity are somewhat understood. However, their combined effect is still subject to much controversy. The determination of a critical factor--naphthenic acid content--is still not standardized. It is shown herein that, by arranging the literature findings into three groups (1) furnace tubes and transfer lines, (2) vacuum column and (3) side cut piping, a better agreement of the literature data is achieved.

  18. A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

  19. Thermal criticality in a repository environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, E.E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explores a scenario in which burial containers fail and fissile material is transported through the tuff by water to some location, away from the burial site, where an over-moderated critical mass gradually accumulates. Because of the low solubilities of plutonium and uranium, and the low ground water velocities, the analysis shows that such a scenario with {sup 239}Pu is probably impossible because the time required to accumulate a critical mass is large compared with the half-life of the {sup 239}Pu. In the case of {sup 235}U, the analysis indicates that the accumulation rates are so low that relatively small fission power levels would consume the {sup 235}U as fast as it accumulates, and that the thermal conductivity of the tuff is large enough to prevent a significant increase in temperature. Thus, the conditions for the removal of water by boiling and the associated autocatalytic increase in reactivity are not met in the case of {sup 235}U. An explosive release of energy does not appear to be possible. A simple water voiding model, which allows water removal at about the fastest possible rate, was used to explore a scenario in which the fuel accumulation rate was arbitrarily increased enough to cause water boiling and the associated dryout of the tuff. Calculations for this case indicate that disruption of the tuff, leading to a neutronic shutdown, would probably occur before an explosive energy release could be generated. Additional scenarios, which should be investigated in future work are identified.

  20. Florence & Oracle Junction, Pinal County, AZ, RECORD OF CATEGORICAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Field Office) and Western. Westem's right-of-way measures 100 feet wide and is centered on the transmission line. Western plans to begin this maintenance project on November...

  1. Approximating Convex Functions Via Non-Convex Oracles Under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 12, 2014 ... Finally, we give positive and negative results for multivariate convex functions. ... A broadly successful approach to massive datasets analysis in- ... By succinct we mean that the space used for the representa- ... functions, as well as of monotone convex functions in the sense of Miller is given in Section 3.).

  2. Mathematical Theories of Interaction with Oracles PhD Candidate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    Mansour (Tel Aviv University) Joel Spencer (NYU) Thesis Defense Date: April 12, 2013 Time: 9:00am Location of Machine Learning Theory to problems in Algorithmic Economics.We consider the problem of online pricing and allocating multiple goods of economics of scale or decreasing marginal costs to the seller. In particular

  3. LEVEL BUNDLE METHODS FOR ORACLES WITH ON-DEMAND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    convergence of exact level variants known in the literature. A numerical benchmark on a battery of two-stage stochastic linear programs assesses the interest of...

  4. Level Bundle Methods for oracles with on-demand accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welington Oliveira

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 15, 2012 ... A numerical benchmark on a battery of two-stage stochastic linear programs assesses the interest of the approach, substantially faster than the...

  5. U-014: Oracle Java Runtime Environment (JRE) Multiple Flaws Let...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SDK and JRE 1.4.233 and prior ABSTRACT: A remote user can create a Java applet or Java Web Start application that, when loaded by the target user, will access or modify data or...

  6. Deema A. Al-Saleh ORACLE Developer & DBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project: Educational Program for intermediate kids school / web-based on 3D using VRML and HTML. Petra Salaries. Registration. QA. Documentation. Online Exams. Inventory. Others. #12;2/3 3/2006 ­ 2008- Report Manager Module. Implementation of the INTEGRA ERP system. Responsible of the quality assurance

  7. V-083: Oracle Java Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New12.'6/0.2Contract (UESC)Department ofDepartment

  8. Proximal-ACCPM: a versatile oracle based optimization method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 26, 2004 ... problem (TSP) library [28] is solved. Instances of the ..... computing time (SUN Ultra-80, Ultrasparc driver) whereas an optimality cut. (call to the...

  9. National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

  10. A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH RJ

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

  11. Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C.F. [Martin Marietta Utility Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

  12. Critical infrastructure systems of systems assessment methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholander, Peter E.; Darby, John L.; Phelan, James M.; Smith, Bryan; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Walter, Andrew; Varnado, G. Bruce; Depoy, Jennifer Mae

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the risk of malevolent attacks against large-scale critical infrastructures requires modifications to existing methodologies that separately consider physical security and cyber security. This research has developed a risk assessment methodology that explicitly accounts for both physical and cyber security, while preserving the traditional security paradigm of detect, delay, and respond. This methodology also accounts for the condition that a facility may be able to recover from or mitigate the impact of a successful attack before serious consequences occur. The methodology uses evidence-based techniques (which are a generalization of probability theory) to evaluate the security posture of the cyber protection systems. Cyber threats are compared against cyber security posture using a category-based approach nested within a path-based analysis to determine the most vulnerable cyber attack path. The methodology summarizes the impact of a blended cyber/physical adversary attack in a conditional risk estimate where the consequence term is scaled by a ''willingness to pay'' avoidance approach.

  13. The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowdy, E.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical assemblies of precisely known materials and reproducible and easily calculated geometries have been constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the 1940s. Initially, these assemblies were built to provide information necessary for the nuclear weapons development effort. Subsequently, intensive studies of the assemblies themselves were undertaken to provide a better understanding of the physics of the fission process and other nuclear reactions in the nuclear materials from which these machine were constructed and in other materials irradiated in these assemblies. Some of these assemblies (notably Jezebel, Flattop, Big Ten, and Godiva) have been used as benchmark assemblies to compare the results of experimental measurements and computations of certain nuclear reaction parameters. These comparisons are used to validate both the input nuclear data and the computational methods. In addition to these normally fueled benchmark assemblies, other assembly machines are fueled periodically to provide specific and detailed results for parameter sensitivity studies for a large number of applications. Some of these machines and their applications are described.

  14. Generalized mutual informations of quantum critical chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcaraz, F C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the R\\'enyi mutual information $\\tilde{I}_n$ of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The R\\'enyi mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the R\\'enyi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete $Z(Q)$ symmetries (Q-state Potts model with $Q=2,3,4$ and $Z(Q)$ parafermionic models with $Q=5,6,7,8$ and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the $U(1)$ continuous symmetries(Klein-Gordon field theory, XXZ and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wavefunctions in two special basis. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter $n$ that defines $\\tilde{I}_n$. For a system, with total size $L$ and subsystem sizes $\\ell$ and $L-\\ell$, the$\\tilde{I}_n$ has a logarithmic leading behavior given by $\\frac{\\til...

  15. Critical Dynamics in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and concepts for the study of phase transitions mediated by a time-dependent order-parameter field in curved spacetimes are discussed. A practical example is the derivation of an effective (quasi-)potential for the description of `slow-roll' inflation in the early universe. We first summarize our early results on viewing the symmetry behavior of constant background fields in curved but static spacetimes as finite size effect, and the use of derivative expansions for constructing effective actions for slowly-varying background fields. We then introduce the notion of dynamical finite size effect to explain how an exponential expansion of the scale factor imparts a finite size to the system and how the symmetry behavior in de Sitter space can be understood qualitatively in this light. We reason why the exponential inflation can be described equivalently by a scale transformation, thus rendering this special class of dynamics as effectively static. Finally we show how, in this view, one can treat the class of `slow-roll' inflation as a dynamic perturbation off the effectively static class of exponential inflation and understand it as a dynamical critical phenomenon in cosmology.

  16. A Critical Review of Classical Bouncing Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Battefeld; Patrick Peter

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the proliferation of bouncing models in recent years, we gather and critically assess these proposals in a comprehensive review. The Planck data shows an unmistakably red, quasi scale-invariant, purely adiabatic primordial power spectrum and no primary non-Gaussianities. While these observations are consistent with inflationary predictions, bouncing cosmologies aspire to provide an alternative framework to explain them. Such models face many problems, both of the purely theoretical kind, such as the necessity of violating the NEC and instabilities, and at the cosmological application level, as exemplified by the possible presence of shear. We provide a pedagogical introduction to these problems and also assess the fitness of different proposals with respect to the data. For example, many models predict a slightly blue spectrum and must be fine-tuned to generate a red spectral index; as a side effect, large non-Gaussianities often result. We highlight several promising attempts to violate the NEC without introducing dangerous instabilities at the classical and/or quantum level. If primordial gravitational waves are observed, certain bouncing cosmologies, such as the cyclic scenario, are in trouble, while others remain valid. We conclude that, while most bouncing cosmologies are far from providing an alternative to the inflationary paradigm, a handful of interesting proposals have surfaced, which warrant further research. The constraints and lessons learned as laid out in this review might guide future research.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - additional critical experiments Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in design process 15 additional CEF critical... Experiments - Critical and Subcritical Experiments at the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) Now Being ... Source: Danon,...

  18. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  19. Geometric Critical Exponents in Classical and Quantum Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant Kumar; Tapobrata Sarkar

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We define geometric critical exponents for systems that undergo continuous second order classical and quantum phase transitions. These relate scalar quantities on the information theoretic parameter manifolds of such systems, near criticality. We calculate these exponents by approximating the metric and thereby solving geodesic equations analytically, near curvature singularities of two dimensional parameter manifolds. The critical exponents are seen to be the same for both classical and quantum systems that we consider, and we provide evidence about the possible universality of our results.

  20. Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design, Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  1. Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Durability Parameters of an Integrated Aftertreatment System used to Meet Tier II Emission Standards Critical Performance and Durability Parameters of an Integrated...

  2. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    comprehensive risk management framework that defines critical infrastructure protection (CIP) roles and responsibilities for all levels of government, private industry, and other...

  3. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rene G. Sanchez

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summaries of most of the papers presented at the 1995 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 16 and 17 at San Diego, Ca. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Criticality Safety of Project Sapphire; (2) Relevant Experiments For Criticality Safety; (3) Interactions with the Former Soviet Union; (4) Misapplications and Limitations of Monte Carlo Methods Directed Toward Criticality Safety Analyses; (5) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Execution and Interpretation; (6) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Representation; and (7) Benchmark Comparisons.

  4. Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality Safety Assessments at the Criticality Experiments Facility and Training Assembly for Criticality Safety and Appraisal of the Criticality Experiments Facility Startup Plan, October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of criticality safety assessment activities conducted by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada Site Office

  5. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

  6. NNSA Completes its Critical Radar Arming and Fuzing Test for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    its Critical Radar Arming and Fuzing Test for the W88 ALT 370 | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  7. Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  8. Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show...

  9. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  10. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the President under Executive Order (EO) 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" of February 2013 directed the National Institute of Standards and Technology...

  11. The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 The Future of Absorption...

  12. Fetch Halting on Critical Load Misses Nikil Mehta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHon, André

    Fetch Halting on Critical Load Misses Nikil Mehta, Brian Singer, R. Iris Bahar Division, such as loads that miss to main memory and floating point arithmetic operations, are primarily responsible to characterize critical instructions, our approach com- bines software profiling and hardware monitoring

  13. Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K nuclear matter produced by heavy-ion reactions is isospin asymmetric. Although the critical exponents. Miyazaki Abstract We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter

  14. COG - Special Features of Interest to Criticality Safety Practitioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, R M; Heinrichs, D P; Krass, A W; Lent, E M

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    COG is a modern, general-purpose, high fidelity, multi-particle transport code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory specifically for use in deep penetration (shielding) and criticality safety calculations. This paper describes some features in COG of special interest to criticality safety practitioners.

  15. Homogenization of the criticality spectral equation in neutron transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume

    for the neutron transport equation in a periodic heterogeneous domain, modeling the criticality study of nuclearHomogenization of the criticality spectral equation in neutron transport Gr'egoire Allaire \\Lambda problem. This result justifies and improves the engineering procedure used in practice for nuclear reactor

  16. The brain: What is critical about it? Dante R. Chialvo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chialvo, Dante R.

    The brain: What is critical about it? Dante R. Chialvo , Pablo Balenzuela and Daniel Fraiman the recent proposal that the most fascinating brain properties are related to the fact that it always stays results, as well as further implications of this view of the functioning brain. Keywords: Brain, critical

  17. Attack Containment Framework for Large-Scale Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    Attack Containment Framework for Large-Scale Critical Infrastructures Hoang Nguyen Department-- We present an attack containment framework against value-changing attacks in large-scale critical structure, called attack container, which captures the trust behavior of a group of nodes and assists

  18. Cryptanalysing the Critical Group: Efficiently Solving Biggs's Discrete Logarithm Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryptanalysing the Critical Group: Efficiently Solving Biggs's Discrete Logarithm Problem Simon R Kingdom s.blackburn@rhul.ac.uk November 7, 2008 Abstract Biggs has recently proposed the critical group that the discrete log problem can be efficiently solved in Biggs's groups. Thus this class of groups is not suitable

  19. Statistical Model Criticism using Kernel Two Sample Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    Statistical Model Criticism using Kernel Two Sample Tests James Robert Lloyd Department Abstract We propose an exploratory approach to statistical model criticism using maximum mean discrepancy a statistic by which to measure discrepancies between data and a statistical model. MMD two sample tests

  20. 1998 technology roadmap for integrated circuits used in critical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellin, T.A.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Circuits (ICs) are being extensively used in commercial and government applications that have extreme consequences of failure. The rapid evolution of the commercial microelectronics industry presents serious technical and supplier challenges to this niche critical IC marketplace. This Roadmap was developed in conjunction with the Using ICs in Critical Applications Workshop which was held in Albuquerque, NM, November 11--12, 1997.

  1. SPECTRA OF CRITICAL EXPONENTS IN NONLINEAR HEAT EQUATIONS WITH ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    SPECTRA OF CRITICAL EXPONENTS IN NONLINEAR HEAT EQUATIONS WITH ABSORPTION V.A. GALAKTIONOV AND P of the classical porous medium equation with absorption u t = #1;u m u p in R N #2; R+ change their large-time behaviour at the critical absorption exponent p 0 = m+2=N . We show that, actually, there exists an in#12

  2. Ideas for Security Assurance in Security Critical Software using Modelica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Ideas for Security Assurance in Security Critical Software using Modelica David Broman, Peter critical software. Modelica is a modern, strongly typed, de- clarative, and object-oriented language assurance, by expanding the scope of Modelica into also becoming a declarative modeling language for other

  3. CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraway, Julian

    CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin of choice for assessments of the physical ergonomics of products and workplaces. Software representations important for ergonomic analysis. This paper identifies and justifies a set of these critical features

  4. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvatores, Massimo [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-Dir, Bat. 101, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  5. WIPP-025, Rev. 0 Summary of Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant #12;SUMMARY OF NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATION FOR SHIELDED CONTAINERS PLANT WIPP-025, REV. 0 AUGUST 2009 Summary of Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for Shielded ISOLATION PILOT PLANT WIPP-025, REV. 0 AUGUST 2009 ES-1 Executive Summary This report summarizes the nuclear

  6. Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P o l i c y m a k e r G u i d e #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

  7. Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P O L I C Y M A K E R G U I D E #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

  8. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

  9. Inspection Procedures for Critical Programs that Model Physical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Sanzheng

    is software critical? The software that controls a nuclear plant, chemical plant, automobile, or airplane-of-life and/or environmental damage. Software that controls systems in "real-time" has long been a concern used in many critical analyses, such as · to predict the effect of explosions, · to estimate

  10. Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife, Wetlands Program 6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80203

  11. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

  12. The effective delayed neutron fraction for bare-metal criticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given sufficient material, a large number of actinides could be used to form bare-metal criticals. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical comprised of a fissile material is comparable with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical composed of a fissionable material is reduced by factors of 2 to 10 when compared with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. When the effective delayed neutron fraction is small, the difference between delayed and prompt criticality is small, and extreme caution must be used in critical assemblies of these materials. This study uses an approximate but realistic model to survey the actinide region to compare effective delayed neutron fractions with absolute delayed neutron fractions.

  13. Self limiting features of accidental criticality in a solution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with the SHEBA solution critical assembly during validation testing of accidental criticality alarm detectors provided several insights into the character of potential accidental excursions. Two observations were of particular interest. First, it is nearly impossible to maintain a solution system, particularly one employing low-enrichment material, in a constant state. If super-critical, the system will heat up, expand (or form bubbles), return to a sub-critical state, and shut down of its own accord without going into short period oscillations. Second, a very slow change in the system could produce a long ''pulse'' resulting in lengthy exposures, a high dose, but a low dose rate. The experiments dramatically contradicted the popular contention that accidental criticality is characterized by a blue flash, a clap of thunder, and violet expulsion of material. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Information-Entropic Signature of the Critical Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowinski, Damian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the critical behavior of continuous phase transitions in the context of Ginzburg Landau models with a double well effective potential. In particular, we show that the recently proposed configurational entropy, a measure of spatial complexity of the order parameter based on its Fourier mode decomposition, can be used to identify the critical point. We compute the CE for different temperatures and show that large spatial fluctuations near the critical point lead to a sharp decrease in the CE. We further show that the CE density has a marked scaling behavior near criticality, with the same power law as Kolmogorov turbulence. We reproduce the behavior of the CE at criticality with a percolating many bubble model.

  15. Critical speed measurements in the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  16. Critical temperature of antikaon condensation in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmistha Banik; Walter Greiner; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of $K^-$ mesons in neutron star matter. This is studied within the framework of relativistic field theoretical models at finite temperature where nucleon-nucleon and (anti)kaon-nucleon interactions are mediated by the exchange of mesons. The melting of the antikaon condensate is studied for different values of antikaon optical potential depths. We find that the critical temperature of antikaon condensation increases with baryon number density. Further it is noted that the critical temperature is lowered as antikaon optical potential becomes less attractive. We also construct the phase diagram of neutron star matter with $K^-$ condensate.

  17. Gluon condensation and deconfinement critical density in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Baldo; P. Castorina; D. Zappala'

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit to the critical density for the transition to the deconfined phase, at zero temperature, has been evaluated by analyzing the behavior of the gluon condensate in nuclear matter. Due to the non linear baryon density effects, the upper limit to the critical density, \\rho_c turns out about nine times the saturation density, rho_0 for the value of the gluon condensate in vacuum =0.012 GeV^4. For neutron matter \\rho_c \\simeq 8.5 \\rho_0. The dependence of the critical density on the value of the gluon condensate in vacuum is studied.

  18. Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

  19. Universality of critical magnetic field in holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Momeni; R. Myrzakulov

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we study aspects of the holographic superconductors analytically in the presence of a constant external magnetic field. We show that the critical temperature and critical magnetic field can be calculated at nonzero temperature. We detect the Meissner effect in such superconductors. A universal relation between black hole mass $ M$ and critical magnetic field $H_c$ is proposed as $\\frac{H_c}{M^{2/3}}\\leq 0.687365$. We discuss some aspects of phase transition in terms of black hole entropy and the Bekenstein's entropy to energy upper bound.

  20. Criticality safety assessment of tank 241-C-106 remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltar, A.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A criticality safety assessment was performed in support of Project 320 for the retrieval of waste from tank 241-C-106 to tank 241-AY-102. The assessment was performed by a multi-disciplined team consisting of expertise covering the range of nuclear engineering, plutonium and nuclear waste chemistry,and physical mixing hydraulics. Technical analysis was performed to evaluate the physical and chemical behavior of fissile material in neutralized Hanford waste as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics for the retrieval activity. The team has not found evidence of any credible mechanism to attain neutronic criticality in either tank and has concluded that a criticality accident is incredible.

  1. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

  2. Rocky Flats CAAS System Recalibrated, Retested, and Analyzed to Install in the Criticality Experiments Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sponsorship of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.Improved Criticality Alarm System, Proceedings of Nuclear

  3. Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is evaluated. The waste consists of a homogenous mixture of plutonium 49, beryllium, and air contained in a 35 gallon carbon steel drum. Possible consequences are investigated.

  4. Quantum superconducting criticality in graphene and topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitan Roy; Vladimir Juricic; Igor F. Herbut

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The field theory of the semimetal-superconductor quantum phase transition for graphene and surface states of topological insulators is presented. The Lagrangian possesses the global U(1) symmetry, with the self-interacting complex bosonic order-parameter and the massless Dirac fermions coupled through a Yukawa term. The same theory also governs the quantum critical behavior of graphene near the transition towards the bond-density-wave (Kekule) insulator. The local U(1) gauged version of the theory which describes the quantum semimetal-superconductor transition in the ultimate critical regime is also considered. Due to the Yukawa coupling the transitions are found to be always continuous, both with and without the fluctuating gauge field. The critical behavior is addressed within the dimensional regularization near four space-time dimensions, and the calculation of various universal quantities, including critical exponents and the universal mass-ratio, is reported.

  5. 3 LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . LANSCE is a mission-critical facility for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). In 2011, the NNSA renewed the memorandum of understanding that affirms

  6. Criticality Safety Controls Implementation, May 31, 2013 (HSS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementation, May 31, 2013 (HSS CRAD 45-18, Rev. 1) More Documents & Publications CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 DOE-STD-1158-2010 Application of...

  7. NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety 5/26/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that effective programs have been developed and implemented to protect the public and DOE's workers from unplanned criticality. The programs should...

  8. Effective critical electric field for runaway electron generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Adam; Decker, Joan; Embrus, Ola; Flp, Tnde

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we investigate factors that influence the effective critical electric field for runaway electron generation in plasmas. We present numerical solutions of the kinetic equation, and discuss the implications for the threshold electric field. We show that the effective electric field necessary for significant runaway formation often is higher than previously calculated due to both (1) extremely strong dependence of primary generation on temperature, and (2) synchrotron radiation losses. We also address the effective critical field in the context of a transition from runaway growth to decay. We find agreement with recent experiments, but show that the observation of an elevated effective critical field can mainly be attributed to changes in the momentum-space distribution of runaways, and only to a lesser extent to a de facto change in the critical field.

  9. albicans critical role: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    240 kilograms of plutonium oxide 5 Standards for Quality and the Coordinating Role of Wine Critics CiteSeer Summary: When product quality matters but is not observable before...

  10. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  11. Experimental bond critical point and local energy density properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mn-O, Fe-O and Co-O bonded interactions for Abstract: Bond critical point, bcp, and local energy density properties for the electron density, ED, distributions, calculated with...

  12. Criticality experiments with fast flux test facility fuel pins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A United States Department of Energy program was initiated during the early seventies at the Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory to obtain experimental criticality data in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The criticality experiments program was to provide basic physics data for clean well defined conditions expected to be encountered in the handling of plutonium-uranium fuel mixtures outside reactors. One task of this criticality experiments program was concerned with obtaining data on PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel rods containing 20--30 wt % plutonium. To obtain this data a series of experiments were performed over a period of about twelve years. The experimental data obtained during this time are summarized and the associated experimental assemblies are described. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Globalization and the sociology of Immanuel Wallerstein: A critical appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Globalization and the Postcolonial World: The New Political Economyglobalization, including rampant financial speculation in the world-economy,economy, and assess these con- tributions from what I have termed a critical globalization

  14. Jefferson Lab News - Jefferson Lab Achieves Critical Milestone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Achieves Critical Milestone Toward Construction of 310-Million Upgrade Project Pion This architectural rendering shows the Hall D complex to be built as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV...

  15. Critical Writing Assessment Rubric (Blind Review) Revised 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mark A.

    W Critical Writing Assessment Rubric (Blind Review) Revised 2010 Paper Code: ___________ Date Reviewed: ___________ Reader: ___________ (Initials) 1. Thesis The essay contains a clear and relevant thesis. 0 ___ 1 ___ 2 ___ 3 ___ 4 ___ 2. Organization The paragraphs are logically ordered within

  16. Towards verifiable adaptive control for safety critical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwager, Mac

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be implementable in safety critical applications, adaptive controllers must be shown to behave strictly according to predetermined specifications. This thesis presents two tools for verifying specifications relevant to ...

  17. Critically Evaluated Thermochemical Properties of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    , Spain James S. Chickos Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, One with sublimation, vaporization, and fusion enthalpies, are critically evaluated. Whenever possible, recommended. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1867 3.2. Sublimation enthalpies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1867 3.3. Fusion Enthalpies

  18. Terra-Gen Powers Coso Geothermal Facility Obtains Critical Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Obtains Critical Federal Permit to Increase Its Renewable Energy Generation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Terra-Gen Powers Coso...

  19. Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

  20. Bazaar [+] : addressing critical adjacencies in Mumbai's urban farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Arjun (Arjun Devadas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the city of Mumbai, and evolves the notion of how "critical adjacency" has been instrumental in guiding the city's urban transformations into modernity. Presently, Mumbai experiences some of the ...

  1. Model of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiori, Mario P.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical phenomenon occurring before and at the critical heat flux (CHF) for subcooled flow boiling has been investigated. The first phase of this study established the basic nature of the flow structure at CHF. A ...

  2. Influence of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Six, D E

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several positive influences of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety. Experts in each discipline must be aware of regulations and requirements of the others and work together to ensure a fault-tree design. EG and G Idaho, Inc., routinely uses an Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual to consider all aspects of criticality safety, fire protection, and safeguards. The use of the analytical tree is described.

  3. Effect of topology on the critical charge in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baishali Chakraborty; Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical charge for the Dirac excitations in gapless graphene depends on the spatial topology of the sample. In particular, for graphene cones, the effective value of the critical charge can tend towards zero for a suitable angle of the conical sample. We discuss the nature of the scattering phase shifts, quasi-bound state energies and local density of states for a gapless graphene cone and determine the dependence of these physical quantities on the sample topology.

  4. An evaluation of the critical mechanical properties of filled elastomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Patrick Arthur

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVALUATION OF THE CRITICAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FILLED ELASTOMERS A Thesis By PATRICK ARTHUR GIBSON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... possible. ABSTRACT An Evaluation of the Critical Mechanical Properties of Filled Elastomers Patrick A. Gibson, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. William B. Ledbetter A test procedure is developed for the uniaxial tensile testing...

  5. Salmonella detection and critical control point determination during poultry processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SALMONELLA DETECTION AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT DETERMINATION DURING POULTRY PROCESSING A Thesis by SUZANNE D. Y O U N G Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of M A S T E R OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Poultry Science SALMONELLA DETECTION AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT DETERMINATION DURING POULTRY PROCESSING A Thesis by SUZANNE D. Y O U N G Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  6. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hirano, Fumio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  7. Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBRs SB Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putman, Valerie Lee

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

  8. Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission-Critical Platform for OLTP Data Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    Mission-Critical Platform for Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) SQL Server 2008 Mission Data Collector to troubleshoot and tune SQL Server 2008 instances. Help ensure compliance 2008 high- performance query processing engine for industry leading performance and scalability. Define

  9. The Relationships of Media, Task, Spatial Presence, and Critical Thinking, in an Online Tutorial Designed to Teach Art Criticism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Nancy O

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    THE RELATIONSHIPS OF MEDIA, TASK, SPATIAL PRESENCE, AND CRITICAL THINKING, IN AN ONLINE TUTORIAL DESIGNED TO TEACH ART CRITICISM A Dissertation by NANCY OSTERBERG WOOD Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A... in an online research tutorial. The four conditions comprised two levels of two factors: Media and Task. The two Media were Static, represented by a linked jpeg image of the artwork; and Dynamic Manipulation represented by an interactive Adobe Flash version...

  10. Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

  11. Analytical Computation of Critical Exponents in Several Holographic Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Bi Zeng; Xin Gao; Yu Jiang; Hong-Shi Zong

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is very interesting that all holographic superconductors, such as s-wave, p-wave and d-wave holographic superconductors, show the universal mean-field critical exponent 1/2 at the critical temperature, just like Gindzburg-Landau (G-L) theory for second order phase transitions. Now it is believed that the universal critical exponents appear because the dual gravity theory is classic in the large $N$ limit. However, even in the large $N$ limit there is an exception called "non-mean-field theory": an extension of the s-wave model with a cubic term of the charged scalar field shows a different critical exponent 1. In this paper, we try to use analytical methods to obtain the critical exponents for these models to see how the properties of the gravity action decides the appearance of the mean-field behaviors. It will be seen that just like the G-L theory, it is the fundamental symmetries rather than the detailed parameters of the bulk theory that lead to the universal properties of the holographic superconducting phase transition. The feasibility of the called "non-mean-field theory" is also discussed.

  12. Integrated Approach to Documenting Readiness for a Potential Criticality Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Bruce S.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Jones, Robert A.

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been 60 highly publicized criticality accidents1 over the last 60 years and the nature of the hazard is unique. Recent studies2 discuss the benefits of knowing what to expect during and immediately following these events. Emergency planning and response standards2 provide an effective tool for establishing an adequate level of readiness to a criticality accident. While these planning requirements cover a broad spectrum of activities to establish readiness, a concise and routinely reviewed criticality accident scenario may be the most valuable tool in developing a cohesive understanding and response to these challenging events. Using a guideline3 for criticality safety evaluations the analytical work and emergency planning to mitigate a criticality accident at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was developed. Using a single document the analysis that established the accident characteristics, response scenario based on emergency staffing and planning, and anticipated dose consequences were integrated. This single document approach provides a useful platform to integrate the initial planning and guide the review of proposed changes to emergency response plans.

  13. Critical behaviour in the elastic response of hydrogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dennison; M. Jaspers; P. H. J. Kouwer; C. Storm; A. E. Rowan; F. C. MacKintosh

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly responsive, or 'smart' materials are abundant in Nature; individual cells, for instance, can adapt their mechanical properties to the local surroundings through small changes in their internal structure. An effective method to enhance the responsiveness of synthetic materials is to operate near a critical point, where small variations lead to large changes in material properties. Recent theories have suggested that fibre/polymer networks can show critical behaviour near and below the point of marginal connectivity that separates rigid and floppy states [1-4]. To date, however, experimental evidence for criticality in such networks has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate critical behaviour in the stress response of synthetic hydrogels at low concentrations of order 0.1% volume fraction. We show, using computer simulations, that the observed response to stress can be understood by considering the influence of a zero-temperature critical point, i.e. the Maxwell isostatic point [5], together with the intrinsically nonlinear stretch response of semi-flexible polymer strands in the gel.

  14. ITL BULLETIN FOR MARCH 2013 NIST TO DEVELOP A CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK TO PROTECT CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITL BULLETIN FOR MARCH 2013 NIST TO DEVELOP A CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK TO PROTECT CRITICAL, "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity," the President has directed NIST to develop a voluntary framework for reducing cyber risks to our nation's critical infrastructure. The Cybersecurity Framework

  15. Computational Methods for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Rearden, B.T.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the sensitivity methods that were developed and widely used in the 1970s (the FORSS methodology at ORNL among others) has increased recently as a result of potential use in the area of criticality safety data validation procedures to define computational bias, uncertainties and area(s) of applicability. Functional forms of the resulting sensitivity coefficients can be used as formal parameters in the determination of applicability of benchmark experiments to their corresponding industrial application areas. In order for these techniques to be generally useful to the criticality safety practitioner, the procedures governing their use had to be updated and simplified. This paper will describe the resulting sensitivity analysis tools that have been generated for potential use by the criticality safety community.

  16. Critical interfaces and duality in the Ashkin-Teller model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picco, Marco [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7589, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Santachiara, Raoul [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS, Batiment 100, Universite Paris-Sud, UMR 8626, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the numerical measures on different spin interfaces and Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) cluster boundaries in the Askhin-Teller (AT) model. For a general point on the AT critical line, we find that the fractal dimension of a generic spin cluster interface can take one of four different possible values. In particular we found spin interfaces whose fractal dimension is d{sub f}=3/2 all along the critical line. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the boundaries of FK clusters was found to satisfy all along the AT critical line a duality relation with the fractal dimension of their outer boundaries. This result provides clear numerical evidence that such duality, which is well known in the case of the O(n) model, exists in an extended conformal field theory.

  17. Sharp critical behavior for pinning model in random correlated environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Hubert Lacoin

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates the effect for random pinning models of long range power-law decaying correlations in the environment. For a particular type of environment based on a renewal construction, we are able to sharply describe the phase transition from the delocalized phase to the localized one, giving the critical exponent for the (quenched) free-energy, and proving that at the critical point the trajectories are fully delocalized. These results contrast with what happens both for the pure model (i.e. without disorder) and for the widely studied case of i.i.d. disorder, where the relevance or irrelevance of disorder on the critical properties is decided via the so-called Harris Criterion.

  18. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Simon J. (Pleasanton, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical illumination condenser system, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 .mu.m source and requires a magnification of 26.times.. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth.

  19. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  20. Evaluation of Cask Drop Criticality Issues at K Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of ability of Multi-canister Overpack (MCO) to withstand drops at K Basin without exceeding the criticality design requirements. Report concludes the MCO will function acceptably. The spent fuel currently residing in the 105 KE and 105 KW storage basins will be placed in fuel storage baskets which will be loaded into the MCO cask assembly. During the basket loading operations the MCO cask assembly will be positioned near the bottom of the south load out pit (SLOP). The loaded MCO cask will be lifted from the SLOP transferred to the transport trailer and delivered to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). In the wet condition there is a potential for criticality problems if significant changes in the designed fuel configurations occur. The purpose of this report is to address structural issues associated with criticality design features for MCO cask drop accidents in the 105 KE and 105 KW facilities.

  1. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

  2. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  3. Experimental Criticality Benchmarks for SNAP 10A/2 Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krass, A.W.

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes computational benchmark models for nuclear criticality derived from descriptions of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Critical Assembly (SCA)-4B experimental criticality program conducted by Atomics International during the early 1960's. The selected experimental configurations consist of fueled SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores subject to varied conditions of water immersion and reflection under experimental control to measure neutron multiplication. SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores are compact volumes fueled and moderated with the hydride of highly enriched uranium-zirconium alloy. Specifications for the materials and geometry needed to describe a given experimental configuration for a model using MCNP5 are provided. The material and geometry specifications are adequate to permit user development of input for alternative nuclear safety codes, such as KENO. A total of 73 distinct experimental configurations are described.

  4. Gas-liquid critical point in ionic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Patsahan; I. Mryglod; T. Patsahan

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the method of collective variables we develop the statistical field theory for the study of a simple charge-asymmetric $1:z$ primitive model (SPM). It is shown that the well-known approximations for the free energy, in particular DHLL and ORPA, can be obtained within the framework of this theory. In order to study the gas-liquid critical point of SPM we propose the method for the calculation of chemical potential conjugate to the total number density which allows us to take into account the higher order fluctuation effects. As a result, the gas-liquid phase diagrams are calculated for $z=2-4$. The results demonstrate the qualitative agreement with MC simulation data: critical temperature decreases when $z$ increases and critical density increases rapidly with $z$.

  5. Criticality safety evaluation report for the multi-canister overpack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially built baskets containing a maximum of either 54 Mark 1V or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the cask-MCO, operations at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and storage in the Canister Storage Building. Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the k{sub eff} = 0.95 criticality safety limit. Additional analyses in this revision include partial fuel basket loadings, loading 26.1 inch Mark IA fuel assemblies into Mark IV fuel baskets, and the revised fuel and scrap basket designs. The MCO MCNP model was revised to include the shield plug assembly.

  6. Russia's Foreign Policy Toward Iran: A Critical Geopolitics Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omelicheva, Mariya Y.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    document contains the authors accepted manuscript. For the publishers version, see the link in the header of this document.] Russias Foreign Policy Toward Iran: A Critical Geopolitics Perspective Mariya Y. Omelicheva Paper citation: Omelicheva..., Mariya Y. Russias Foreign Policy Toward Iran: A Critical Geopolitics Perspective, forthcoming in Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies, 14(3): 331-344, 2012. Abstract: Russias foreign policy stance on nuclear Iran has been a subject of debate...

  7. Risk Assessment Methodology for Protecting Our Critical Physical Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BIRINGER,BETTY E.; DANNEELS,JEFFREY J.

    2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructures are central to our national defense and our economic well-being, but many are taken for granted. Presidential Decision Directive (PDD) 63 highlights the importance of eight of our critical infrastructures and outlines a plan for action. Greatly enhanced physical security systems will be required to protect these national assets from new and emerging threats. Sandia National Laboratories has been the lead laboratory for the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and deploying physical security systems for the past twenty-five years. Many of the tools, processes, and systems employed in the protection of high consequence facilities can be adapted to the civilian infrastructure.

  8. Electromigration kinetics and critical current of Pb-free interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Minhua; Rosenberg, Robert [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromigration kinetics of Pb-free solder bump interconnects have been studied using a single bump parameter sweep technique. By removing bump to bump variations in structure, texture, and composition, the single bump sweep technique has provided both activation energy and power exponents that reflect atomic migration and interface reactions with fewer samples, shorter stress time, and better statistics than standard failure testing procedures. Contact metallurgies based on Cu and Ni have been studied. Critical current, which corresponds to the Blech limit, was found to exist in the Ni metallurgy, but not in the Cu metallurgy. A temperature dependence of critical current was also observed.

  9. Critical points of D-dimensional extended gravities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deser, S.; Liu Haishan; Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram [Physics Department, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02454 (United States) and Lauritsen Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Zheijiang Institute of Modern Physics, Department of Physics, Zheijiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 and Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Ave 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) and DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the parameter space of D-dimensional cosmological Einstein gravity together with quadratic curvature terms. In D>4 there are in general two distinct (anti)-de Sitter vacua. We show that, for an appropriate choice of the parameters, there exists a critical point for one of the vacua, with only massless tensor, but neither massive tensor nor scalar, gravitons. At criticality, the linearized excitations have formally vanishing energy (as do black hole solutions). A further restriction of the parameters gives a one-parameter cosmological Einstein plus Weyl{sup 2} model with a unique vacuum, whose {Lambda} is determined.

  10. Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance: The repair alert model, or a preventive maintenance (PM) action, where the latter will prevent the failure. It is reasonable to expect that the failure can be avoided by a possible preventive maintenance (PM) at some random time Z. If Z

  11. Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Modelling of dependence between critical failure and preventive maintenance: The repair alert model, or a preventive maintenance (PM) action, where the latter will prevent the failure. It is reasonable to expect be avoided by a possible preventive maintenance (PM) at some random time Z. If Z

  12. I. INTRODUCTION Civil and critical infrastructure systems such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    System Engineering Research Center (PSERC) and by the Center for Electric Reliability Technology of scientific principles to the design, maintenance and improvement of the critical infrastructures in our triggered a process that is revolutionizing the concepts of reliability and risk. For example

  13. Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1, Sergio Guardiano control in in- dustrial plants and oil/gas refineries. In contrast to wireline communication, wireless of an oil refinery is illustrated in Fig. 1: typical locations of wireless devices used for re- mote control

  14. The Casimir effect: from quantum to critical fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Gambassi

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir effect in quantum electrodynamics (QED) is perhaps the best-known example of fluctuation-induced long-ranged force acting on objects (conducting plates) immersed in a fluctuating medium (quantum electromagnetic field in vacuum). A similar effect emerges in statistical physics, where the force acting, e.g., on colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture is affected by the classical thermal fluctuations occurring in the surrounding medium. The resulting Casimir-like force acquires universal features upon approaching a critical point of the medium and becomes long-ranged at criticality. In turn, this universality allows one to investigate theoretically the temperature dependence of the force via representative models and to stringently test the corresponding predictions in experiments. In contrast to QED, the Casimir force resulting from critical fluctuations can be easily tuned with respect to strength and sign by surface treatments and temperature control. We present some recent advances in the theoretical study of the universal properties of the critical Casimir force arising in thin films. The corresponding predictions compare very well with the experimental results obtained for wetting layers of various fluids. We discuss how the Casimir force between a colloidal particle and a planar wall immersed in a binary liquid mixture has been measured with femto-Newton accuracy, comparing these experimental results with the corresponding theoretical predictions.

  15. CRAD, Criticality Safety- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  16. Critical Temperature for the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; E. V. Duginova; V. K. Rodionov; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; O. V. Bochkarev; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge distribution of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p (8.1 GeV) + Au collisions is analyzed in the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition $T_c$ as a free parameter. It is found that $T_c=20\\pm3$ MeV (90% CL).

  17. Electromagnetics close beyond the critical state: thermodynamic prospect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majós, Antonio Badía

    -called critical current density is the single material parameter of the theory, and characterizes the balance in material characterization as well as in more fundamental studies. In brief, the CSM postulates equation between magnetic and intrinsic pinning forces: J ? B = Fp. The transition between different

  18. Measuring Project Quality Factors Critical to Project Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Measuring Project Quality ­ Factors Critical to Project Success Presented by Thomas Howe P available to measure and track project cost (cheap) and schedule (fast), the measurement and monitoring of project quality (good) is at best underdeveloped. While qualitative measures of project cost and schedule

  19. Cost increases at fusion project going critical David Kramer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost increases at fusion project going critical David Kramer Citation: Phys. Today 66(7), 24 (2013 Office to figure out how much the project will cost and what the US will have to pay. During a hearing. Congress can't evaluate the cost without a project baseline." Feinstein said she'd been told by DOE

  20. Peeling and Multi-critical Matter Coupled to Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin G. Harris; John F. Wheater

    1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to determine the unknown functions arising when the peeling decomposition is applied to multi-critical matter coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity and compute the loop-loop correlation functions. The results that $\\eta=2+2/(2K-3)$ and $\

  1. Critical Behavior of Electron Impact Ionization of Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    Critical Behavior of Electron Impact Ionization of Atoms IMAD LADADWA,1,2 SABRE KAIS1 1 Department of the electron impact ionization for different atoms are calculated numerically in the Born approximation as a function of both the incident electron energy and the nuclear charge Z of the ionized atom. We show

  2. Detection, Correlation, and Visualization of Attacks Against Critical Infrastructure Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briesemeister, Linda

    , which in the case of control systems may impact physical processes causing environmental harm or injury architectures typical of control system implementations. Index Terms--critical infrastructure security, control.lastname@sri.com Abstract--Digital control systems are essential to the safe and efficient operation of a variety

  3. Experimental criticality specifications, update through 1979. Informal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, H.C. (comp.)

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A table of contents for LA-7170-MS is provided, and publications of criticality specifications that appeared in 1978 and 1979 are listed. The table was omitted from the original document. An abstract of the original report appeared in Energy Research Abstracts, Volume 3: 43410.

  4. Change Patterns in Use: A Critical Evaluation Barbara Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Change Patterns in Use: A Critical Evaluation Barbara Weber1 , Jakob Pinggera1 , Victoria Torres2 , and Manfred Reichert3 1 University of Innsbruck, Austria {barbara.weber,jakob.pinggera}@uibk.ac.at 2. This research is supported by Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P23699-N23 #12;2 Weber et al. The use of change

  5. Critical behavior and universality in Levy spin glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andresen, Juan Carlos; Janzen, Katharina; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or bimodal-distributed interactions. Corrections to scaling are large for Levy spin glasses. To overcome these and show that the critical exponents agree with the bimodal and Gaussian case, we perform an extended scaling of the two-point finite...

  6. Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otto, Felix

    Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes Ruben Canterofilm elements is a paradigm for a multiscale patternforming system. On one hand, there is a material length functional ceases to be positive definite. The degenerate subspace consists of the "unstable modes

  7. Regression and Causation: A Critical Examination of Six Econometrics Textbooks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Regression and Causation: A Critical Examination of Six Econometrics Textbooks Bryant Chen-1596, USA (310) 825-3243 September 10, 2013 Abstract This report surveys six influential econometric acceptance of the causal content of econometric equations and, uniformly, fail to provide coherent

  8. Critical parameters of the restricted primitive model Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulosa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research.7­10 Valleau and Torrie7 studied the heat capacity of the RPM near criticality using thermodynamic-scaling methods and report no indica- tion of an Ising-type divergence of the heat capacity. Luijten et al.,9 of Stell and co-workers1 established that the model has a vapor­liquid phase transition. Three recent

  9. Incremental Natural Actor-Critic Algorithms Shalabh Bhatnagar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Richard S.

    & Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India Richard S. Sutton, Mohammad Ghavamzadeh, Mark Lee their convergence proofs. Actor-critic rein- forcement learning methods are online approximations to policy and the policy parameters are updated by stochastic gradient descent. Methods based on policy gradients

  10. ADAPTIVE CONNECTION MANAGEMENT FOR MISSION CRITICAL APPLICATIONS OVERATM NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettati, Riccardo

    include supervisory command and control of defense systems, manufacturing plants, etc. In addition critical applications through innovative connection management. A connection can be viewed as a contract­oriented communication is the existence of a connection establishment phase preceding the actual data transfer

  11. ADAPTIVE CONNECTION MANAGEMENT FOR MISSION CRITICAL APPLICATIONS OVER ATM NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Anirudha

    include supervisory command and control of defense systems, manufacturing plants, etc. In addition critical applications through innovative connection management. A connection can be viewed as a contract-oriented communication is the existence of a connection establishment phase preceding the actual data transfer

  12. Controlling colloidal phase transitions with critical Casimir forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Duc Nguyen; Suzanne Faber; Zhibing Hu; Gerard H. Wegdam; Peter Schall

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical Casimir effect provides a thermodynamic analogue of the well-known quantum mechanical Casimir effect. It acts between two surfaces immersed in a critical binary liquid mixture, and results from the confinement of concentration fluctuations of the solvent. Unlike the quantum mechanical effect, the magnitude and range of this attraction can be adjusted with temperature via the solvent correlation length, thus offering new opportunities for the assembly of nano and micron-scale structures. Here, we demonstrate the active assembly control of equilibrium phases using critical Casimir forces. We guide colloidal particles into analogues of molecular liquid and solid phases via exquisite control over their interactions. By measuring the critical Casimir particle pair potential directly from density fluctuations in the colloidal gas, we obtain insight into liquefaction at small scales: We apply the Van der Waals model of molecular liquefaction and show that the colloidal gas-liquid condensation is accurately described by the Van der Waals theory, even on the scale of a few particles. These results open up new possibilities in the active assembly control of micro and nanostructures.

  13. DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS -A CRITICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    : 47-7-594080 Figure 1: Typical simple distillation column. zF, yD and xB are mole fractions. tureDYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS - A CRITICAL SURVEY Sigurd Skogestad Chemical cation and Control, 18, 177-217, 1997. Abstract Distillation column dynamics and control has been viewed

  14. DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS A CRITICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    distillation column. z F , yD and xB are mole fractions. ture review, but a few new ideas are also presentedDYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS A CRITICAL SURVEY Sigurd Skogestad \\Lambda Chemical, Identification and Control, 18, 177217, 1997. Abstract Distillation column dynamics and control has been viewed

  15. Influence of Rotations on the Critical State of Soil Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Oquendo; J. D. Muoz; A. Lizcano

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of grains to rotate can play a crucial role on the collective behavior of granular media. It has been observed in computer simulations that imposing a torque at the contacts modifies the force chains, making support chains less important. In this work we investigate the effect of a gradual hindering of the grains rotations on the so-called critical state of soil mechanics. The critical state is an asymptotic state independent of the initial solid fraction where deformations occur at a constant shear strength and compactness. We quantify the difficulty to rotate by a friction coefficient at the level of particles, acting like a threshold. We explore the effect of this particle-level friction coefficient on the critical state by means of molecular dynamics simulations of a simple shear test on a poly-disperse sphere packing. We found that the larger the difficulty to rotate, the larger the final shear strength of the sample. Other micro-mechanical variables, like the structural anisotropy and the distribution of forces, are also influenced by the threshold. These results reveal the key role of rotations on the critical behavior of soils and suggest the inclusion of rotational variables into their constitutive equations.

  16. Array E PCU Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis ,...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    , this circuit would automatically switch power to the redundant unit. 2. 2 INVERTER MODULE ,· The Inverter the Failure Modes, Effect and Criticality Analysis on the Bendix designed Power Con- ditioning Unit resulted in IOOo/o success on all previ- ous arrays plus the following new features: I. Complete Redundancy

  17. Analysis of Fundamental NIST Sphere Experiments Related to Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Soon S.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of neutron transport experiments was performed in 1989 and 1990 at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) using a spherical stainless steel container and fission chambers. These experiments were performed to help understand errors observed in criticality calculations for arrays of individually subcritical components, particularly solution arrays [1-3]. They were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environment and Health, Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project. The intent was to evaluate the possibility that the criticality prediction errors stem from errors in the calculation of neutron leakage from individual components of the array. Thus, the explicit product of the experiments was the measurement of the leakage flux, as characterized by various Cd-shielded and unshielded fission rates. Because the various fission rates have different neutron-energy sensitivities, collectively they give an indication of the energy dependence of the leakage flux. Leakage and moderation were varied systematically through the use of different diameter spheres, with and without water. Some of these experiments with bare fission chambers have been evaluated by the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)[4].

  18. Criticality safety of an annular tank for fissile solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed to determine the criticality safety of annular tanks for storing fissile solutions are described. Six annular tanks were built in four nesting sizes to obtain experimental criticality data which could be used to validate computer codes employed in the design of such a safe storage system for an industrial plant. Each tank had an annular solution region thickness of 38 mm. The height of this region was 2.13 m, held 0.3 m off the floor by a stainless steel skirting. Walls were 6.4 mm-thick type 304L stainless steel. The uranyl nitrate solution contained 357 g U/l and had a density of 1.5 kg/m/sup 3/. The uranium was enriched to 93.2% /sup 235/U with other isotopes: 5.4% /sup 238/U, 1.0% /sup 234/U, and 0.4% /sup 236/U. The solution contained 0.5 molar nitric acid and a total impurity content of less than 1500 ppM. Important neutron absorbers, boron and cadmium, averaged 10 ppM and 30 ppM, respectively. Boron-loaded concrete and boron-loaded plaster were selected for the neutron moderator/absorber interior to the annular tank. Three configurations of tanks and reflector were taken to criticality and are reported. The critical uranium solution height in all tanks containing solution as a function of boron content in earthen interior material, tank array configuration, and other variables. (LCL)

  19. Electrorecycling of Critical and Value Metals from Mobile Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tedd E. Lister; Peming Wang; Andre Anderko

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are a significant source of valuable metals that should be recycled. Each year over a billion devices are sold world-wide and the average life is only a couple years. Value metals in phones are gold, palladium, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel. Devices now contain increasing amounts of rare earth elements (REE). In recent years the supply chain for REE has moved almost exclusively to China. They are contained in displays, speakers and vibrators within the devices. By US Department of Energy (DOE) classification, specific REEs (Nd, Dy, Eu, Tb and Y) are considered critical while others (Ce, La and Pr) are deemed near critical. Effective recycling schemes should include the recovery of these critical materials. By including more value materials in a recovery scheme, more value can be obtained by product diversification and less waste metals remains to be disposed of. REEs are mined as a group such that when specific elements become critical significantly more ore must be processed to capture the dilute but valuable critical elements. Targeted recycling of items containing the more of the less available critical materials could address their future criticality. This presentation will describe work in developing aqueous electrochemistry-based schemes for recycling metals from scrap mobile electronics. The electrorecycling process generates oxidizing agents at an anode while reducing dissolved metals at the cathode. E vs pH diagrams and metals dissolution experiments are used to assess effectiveness of various solution chemistries. Although several schemes were envisioned, a two stages process has been the focus of work: 1) initial dissolution of Cu, Sn, Ag and magnet materials using Fe+3 generated in acidic sulfate and 2) final dissolution of Pd and Au using Cl2 generated in an HCl solution. Experiments were performed using simulated metal mixtures. Both Cu and Ag were recovered at ~ 97% using Fe+3 while leaving Au and Ag intact. REE were extracted from the dissolved mixture using conventional methods. A discussion of future research directions will be discussed.

  20. Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

  1. INTEGRATION OF ADAPTIVE FILE ASSIGNMENT INTO DISTRIBUTED SAFETY-CRITICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedde, Horst F.

    . In safety-critical systems (such as nuclear power plants, autonomous cooperation of robots in Outer Space-Critical / Safety-critical Systems, Functional/ Operational Integration 1. INTRODUCTION Safety-critical systems that are typically unpredictable, a very high amount of adaptability of system functions is demanded. safety

  2. An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses--Criticality (keff) Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most significant remaining challenges associated with expanded implementation of burnup credit in the United States is the validation of depletion and criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation - in particular, the availability and use of applicable measured data to support validation, especially for fission products. Applicants and regulatory reviewers have been constrained by both a scarcity of data and a lack of clear technical basis or approach for use of the data. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff have noted that the rationale for restricting their Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issue of validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach (both depletion and criticality) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the criticality (k{sub eff}) validation approach, and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the isotopic composition (depletion) calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For criticality validation, the approach is to utilize (1) available laboratory critical experiment (LCE) data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) program to support validation of the principal actinides and (2) calculated sensitivities, nuclear data uncertainties, and the limited available fission product LCE data to predict and verify individual biases for relevant minor actinides and fission products. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for representative pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor safety analysis models to demonstrate its usage and applicability, (3) provides reference bias results based on the prerelease SCALE 6.1 code package and ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross-section data, and (4) provides recommendations for application of the results and methods to other code and data packages.

  3. The critical tension in the 6D Cascading DGP model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbisa', Fulvio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the presence of ghosts in the Cascading DGP model. We start by discussing the problem of the cosmological late time acceleration, and we introduce the modified gravity approach. We then focus on brane induced gravity models and in particular on the Cascading DGP model. We consider a specific realization of the latter model, and we study first order perturbations around pure tension solutions. In the scalar sector of a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition, the dynamics on the 4D brane can be described by a master equation where a critical tension emerges in a suitable 4D limit. We give a geometrical interpretation of this critical tension, and explain its relevance for the presence of ghosts in the theory. We comment on the difference between our result and the one present in the literature, and stress its importance regarding the phenomenological viability of the model. We finally provide a numerical check which confirms the validity of our analysis.

  4. Critical fermion density for restoring spontaneously broken symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen Kleinert; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breakdown is affected by the presence of a sea of fermions in the system. When its density exceeds a critical value, the broken symmetry can be restored. We calculate the critical value and discuss the consequences for three different physical systems: First, for the standard model of particle physics, where the spontaneous symmetry breakdown leads nonzero masses of intermediate gauge bosons and fermions. The symmetry restoration will greatly enhance various processes with dramatic consequences for the early universe. Second, for the Gell-Mann--L\\`evy $\\sigma$-model of nuclear physics, where the symmetry breakdown gives rise to the nucleon and meson masses. The symmetry restoration may have important consequences for formation or collapse of stellar cores. Third, for the superconductive phase of condensed-matter, where the BCS condensate at low-temperature may be destroyed by a too large electron density.

  5. Experiments for IFR fuel criticality in ZPPR-21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.N.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of benchmark measurements was made in ZPPR-21 to validate criticality calculations for fuel operations in Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor. Six different mixtures of Pu/U/Zr fuel with a graphite reflector were built and criticality was determined by period measurements. The assemblies were isolated from room return problems by a lithium hydride shield. Analysis was done using a fully-detailed model with the VIM Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-V.2 data. Sensitivity analysis was used to validate the measurements against other benchmark data. A simple RZ model was defined the used with the KENO code. Corrections to the RZ model were provided by the VIM calculations with low statistical uncertainty. 7 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  8. Criticality safety analysis of a borated-concrete absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funabashi, H.; Oka, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Smolen, G.R. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cycle facilities use slab tanks to store fissile solutions, because these tanks have both a high volume-to-floorspace efficiency and an easily verifiable, criticality control (thickness). The results of preliminary criticality analyses using a validated computer code and cross-section library, indicate that a slab tank designed without a solid neutron absorber is not economical in view of process requirements (inventory) and space limitations (layout). A subsequent calculational study assessed the possible increase in the thickness of a single, isolated slab tank using a solid neutron absorber. Finally, an analysis was performed to evaluate the maximum slab thickness for an array of tank/absorbers. The result of these studies showed the potential for expansion of slab tank thickness. 7 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Probabilistic assessment of critically flawed LMFBR PHTS piping elbows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, K.R.; Wallace, I.T.; Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the important functions of the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) of a large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant is to contain the circulating radioactive sodium in components and piping routed through inerted areas within the containment building. A significant possible failure mode of this vital system is the development of cracks in the piping components. This paper presents results from the probabilistic assessment of postulated flaws in the most-critical piping elbow of each piping leg. The criticality of calculated maximum sized flaws is assessed against an estimated material fracture toughness to determine safety factors and failure probability estimates using stress-strength interference theory. Subsequently, a different approach is also employed in which the randomness of the initial flaw size and loading are more-rigorously taken into account. This latter approach yields much smaller probability of failure values when compared to the stress-strength interference analysis results.

  10. Impacts of criticality safety on hot fuel examination facility operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Bacca, J.P.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) complex comprises four large hot cells. These cells are used to support the nation's nuclear energy program, especially the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor, by providing nondestructive and destructive testing of irradiated reactor fuels and furnishing the hot cell services required for operation of Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Because it is a research rather than a production facility, HFEF assignments are varied and change from time to time to meet the requirements of our experimenters. Such a variety of operations presents many challenges, especially for nuclear criticality safety. The following operations are reviewed to assure that accidental criticality is not possible, and that all rules and regulations are met: transportation, temporary storage, examinations, and disposition.

  11. Critical magnetic field of surface superconductivity in lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlyustikov, I. N., E-mail: khly@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical superconductivity field H{sub c3} is measured on lead single crystals. It is shown that the temperature dependence of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} in the vicinity of superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is essentially nonlinear. Relative changes in the value of H{sub c3}/H{sub c} reach approximately 30%, which cannot be described by the Ginzburg-Landau theory. The experimental temperature dependences lead to the conclusion that the surface superconducting transition temperature noticeably exceeds the superconducting transition temperature in the bulk of the semiconductor. The differences in the critical temperatures and in the Ginzburg-Landau parameters for lead are estimated.

  12. The critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf Weimer; Kai Morgener; Vijay Pal Singh; Jonas Siegl; Klaus Hueck; Niclas Luick; Ludwig Mathey; Henning Moritz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold $^{6}$Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity $v_c$. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound $v_s$ by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of $v_c$. We perform numerical simulations in the BEC regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime, where theoretical predictions only exist for the speed of sound, our measurements of $v_c$ provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches.

  13. Pitfalls in computer code use in criticality analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Erickson, D.G.; Heer, D.L.; Toffer, H.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well-established computer codes are rendered useless if the user does not understand the underlying principles governing the code. A sampling of Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) and KENO V.a computer code users has revealed a common misuse of the cross-section tables because of lack of foreknowledge. Cross-section tables are available to MCNP that account for molecular binding of less massive nuclei. However, the default tables are based upon collision physics of a free atom. The cross sections available to KENO V.a are based upon infinitely dilute systems. This can result in undesirable effects in criticality calculations of heterogeneous systems. This paper will describe the underlying physics and effects on criticality calculations of the various cross-section tables.

  14. Critical Ising interfaces in multiply-connected domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Izyurov

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a general result on convergence of interfaces in the critical planar Ising model to conformally invariant curves absolutely continuous with respect to SLE(3). Our setup includes multiple interfaces on arbitrary finitely connected domains, and we also treat the radial SLE case. In the case of simply and doubly connected domains, the limiting processes are described explicitly in terms of rational and elliptic functions, respectively.

  15. Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)); Whitesides, G.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to {plus minus} 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n{degrees} 19 proposed by BNFL, and to {plus minus} 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n{degrees} 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P{sub IC} method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for {sup 238}U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Critical issues in process control system security : DHS spares project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, Jacquelynne; McIntyre, Annie; Henrie, Morgan

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this event are: (1) Discuss the next-generation issues and emerging risks in cyber security for control systems; (2) Review and discuss common control system architectures; (3) Discuss the role of policy, standards, and supply chain issues; (4) Interact to determine the most pertinent risks and most critical areas of the architecture; and (5) Merge feedback from Control System Managers, Engineers, IT, and Auditors.

  17. Global regularity of critical Schrdinger maps: subthreshold dispersed energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smith

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy-critical Schroedinger map initial value problem with smooth initial data from R^2 into the sphere S^2. Given sufficiently energy-dispersed data with subthreshold energy, we prove that the system admits a unique global smooth solution. This improves earlier analogous conditional results. The key behind this improvement lies in exploiting estimates on the commutator of the Schroedinger map and harmonic map heat flows.

  18. Facing the Future: Encouraging Critical Cartographic Literacies In Indigenous Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jay T.; Louis, Renee Pualani; Pramono, Albertus Hadi

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -0368, email: jaytruman@earthlink.net Renee Pualani Louis Department of Geography, Univeristy of HawaiI at M?noa, 2424 Maile Way Honolulu, HI USA 96822, email: reneel@hawaii.edu Albertus Hadi Pramono Department of Geography, University of Hawai... of an encompassing, innovative and pragmatic new discipline. Jos Barreiro (2004) 1 Jay T. Johnson, Renee Pualani Louis and Albertus Hadi Pramono, 2006 Facing the Future: Encouraging Critical Cartographic...

  19. Critical-like behavior in a lattice gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Wieloch; J. Brzychczyk; J. Lukasik; P. Pawlowski; T. Pietrzak; W. Trautmann

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ALADIN multifragmentation data show features characteristic of a critical behavior, which are very well reproduced by a bond percolation model. This suggests, in the context of the lattice gas model, that fragments are formed at nearly normal nuclear densities and temperatures corresponding to the Kertesz line. Calculations performed with a lattice gas model have shown that similarly good reproduction of the data can also be achieved at lower densities, particularly in the liquid-gas coexistence region.

  20. Multibump solutions for quasilinear elliptic equations with critical growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiaquan, E-mail: jiaquan@math.pku.edu.cn [LMAM, School of Mathematical Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [LMAM, School of Mathematical Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: zhi-qiang.wang@usu.edu [Chern Institute of Mathematics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, People's Republic of China and Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States)] [Chern Institute of Mathematics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, People's Republic of China and Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States); Wu, Xian, E-mail: wuxian2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Mathematics, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650092 (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650092 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current paper is concerned with constructing multibump solutions for a class of quasilinear Schrdinger equations with critical growth. This extends the classical results of Coti Zelati and Rabinowitz [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45, 12171269 (1992)] for semilinear equations as well as recent work of Liu, Wang, and Guo [J. Funct. Anal. 262, 40404102 (2012)] for quasilinear problems with subcritical growth. The periodicity of the potentials is used to glue ground state solutions to construct multibump bound state solutions.

  1. Balancing of high speed, flexible rotating shafts across critical speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Gary Paul

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this is equivalent to eliminating certain sen- sors. Once the influence coefficient matrix is square, the solution procedure is exactly that of the single speed case. The computed balance weights should now null the rotor vibration at the sensor ports which were... critical speed, The Sin- gle Speed and the Exact Point-Speed techniques were determined to be relatively ineffective over this speed range; however, the Least Squares procedure yields a dramatic decrease in rotor vibration over the entire speed range...

  2. Nuclear Criticality as a Contributor to Gamma Ray Burst Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bruce Hayes

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most gamma ray bursts are able to be explained using supernovae related phenomenon. Some measured results still lack compelling explanations and a contributory cause from nuclear criticality is proposed. This is shown to have general properties consistent with various known gamma ray burst properties. The galactic origin of fast rise exponential decay gamma ray bursts is considered a strong candidate for these types of events.

  3. Critical care unit data integration and clinical information system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doma, Uma Jagdish

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which was critical to be able to complete this work. He has always gone out of his ways to help me as much as possible. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . 1n ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . . . . . TABLE OF CONTENTS, . LIST OF FIGURES. LIST OF TABLES.... . CHAPTER . . . 1X I INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 Related work. . . , . 1. 2 Objective. . . . . . 1. 3 Rationale. II SYSTEM DESCRIPTION. 2. 1 System configuration. 2. 2 Software tool. . . . . . . . I 2 2. 3 Virtual Instruments. . . . . . 12 2. 4 Modular...

  4. Helium- and Lithium-like ionic sequences: Critical charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. L. Guevara; A. V. Turbiner

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In non-relativistic quantum mechanics we study the Coulomb systems of infinitely massive center of charge Z and two-three electrons: $(Z,e,e)$ and $(Z,e,e,e)$. It is shown that in both cases the total energy curve in $Z$ is smooth, without any visible irregularities. Thus, for both systems the physical integer charges $Z=1,2,...$ do not play a distinguished role as would be associated with charge quantization. By definition, a critical charge $Z_{cr}$ is a charge which separates a domain of the existence of bound states from a domain of unbound ones (continuum). For both systems the critical charges are found, $Z_{cr,2e}=0.91085$ and $Z_{cr,3e}=2.009$, respectively. Based on numerical analysis, the Puiseux expansion in fractional powers of $(Z-Z_{cr})$ is constructed for both systems. Our results indicate the existence of a square-root branch point singularity at $Z_{cr}$ with exponent 3/2. A connection between the critical charge and the radius of convergence of 1/Z-expansion is briefly discussed.

  5. CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corones, James [Krell Institute] [Krell Institute

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

  6. Smooth double critical state theory for type-II superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. S. Ruiz; A. Bad\\'\\ia-Majs

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of the general theory for the critical states of a vortex lattice and the magnetic flux dynamics in type-II superconductors are examined by a direct variational optimisation method and widespread physical principles. Our method allows to unify a number of conventional models describing the complex vortex configurations in the critical state regime. Special attention is given to the discussion of the relation between the flux-line cutting mechanism and the depinning threshold limitation. This is done by using a smooth double critical state concept which incorporates the so-called isotropic, elliptical, T and CT models as well-defined limits of our general treatment. Starting from different initial configurations for a superconducting slab in a 3D magnetic field, we show that the predictions of the theory range from the collapse to zero of transverse magnetic moments in the isotropic model, to nearly force free configurations in which paramagnetic values can arbitrarily increase with the applied field for magnetically anisotropic current voltage laws. Noteworthily, the differences between the several model predictions are minimal for the low applied field regime.

  7. PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

  8. Experiments for IFR fuel criticality in ZPPR-21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D N; Smith, D M; Grasseschi, G L; Goin, R W; Steinhauer, J A; Collins, P J; Carpenter, S G

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of six criticality benchmark cores was built in ZPPR-21 between June and September 1990 to provide data for validating criticality calculations for systems likely to arise in the IFR fuel processing operations. The assemblies were graphite reflected and had core compositions containing different mixtures of Pu/U/Zr fuel. No previous data existed for cores of this type. Analysis of the data was done, in full detail, with an automated input processor using the VIM Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-V.2 data. Since the validated method of criticality calculations at ANL is the KENO code and data, a second set of calculations, using a simplified model in RZ geometry was made with both VIM and KENO. An RZ model is specified together with geometrical corrections from the VIM calculations. This enables simple calculations to be made and corrections applied within the statistical uncertainty limits. The full description of the experiments is provided to enable calculations to be made in detail with KENO or any other code. 13 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, T.J.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

  10. The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

  11. New enhancements to SCALE for criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Bowman, S.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the speed, available memory, and reliability of computer hardware increases and the cost decreases, the complexity and usability of computer software will increase, taking advantage of the new hardware capabilities. Computer programs today must be more flexible and user friendly than those of the past. Within available resources, the SCALE staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is committed to upgrading its computer codes to keep pace with the current level of technology. This paper examines recent additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis sections of the SCALE code package. These recent additions and enhancements made to SCALE can be divided into nine categories: (1) new analytical computer codes, (2) new cross-section libraries, (3) new criticality search sequences, (4) enhanced graphical capabilities, (5) additional KENO enhancements, (6) enhanced resonance processing capabilities, (7) enhanced material information processing capabilities, (8) portability of the SCALE code package, and (9) other minor enhancements, modifications, and corrections to SCALE. Each of these additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis capabilities of the SCALE code system are discussed below.

  12. Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Todays society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwins theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS and the preliminary results.

  13. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  14. Critical Current Measurements of the Main LHC Superconducting Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verweij, A P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the main dipole and quadrupole magnets of the LHC, CERN has ordered from industry about 7000 km of superconducting Nb-Ti Rutherford type cables, delivered between 1999 and 2005. The strands of these cables are produced by six different companies, and cabled on five different machines. In the framework of the US contribution to the LHC, BNL has been testing and analyzing the electrical properties of samples of these cables. The main purpose of these tests was to qualify the critical current of the entire cable production in the frame of the quality assurance program implemented by CERN to assure the overall strand and cable performances. In total more than 2100 cable samples have been evaluated at 4.3 K in terms of critical current $I_{C}$, n-value and the residual resistance ratio, RRR. This paper will present an overview of the results, and show the correlations of the critical current and n-value between virgin strands, extracted strands, and cables. Also described are correlations of $I_{C}$ measured a...

  15. Influence of Rotations on the Critical State of Soil Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oquendo, W F; Lizcano, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of grains to rotate can play a crucial role on the collective behavior of granular media. It has been observed in computer simulations that imposing a torque at the contacts modifies the force chains, making support chains less important. In this work we investigate the effect of a gradual hindering of the grains rotations on the so-called critical state of soil mechanics. The critical state is an asymptotic state independent of the initial solid fraction where deformations occur at a constant shear strength and compactness. We quantify the difficulty to rotate by a friction coefficient at the level of particles, acting like a threshold. We explore the effect of this particle-level friction coefficient on the critical state by means of molecular dynamics simulations of a simple shear test on a poly-disperse sphere packing. We found that the larger the difficulty to rotate, the larger the final shear strength of the sample. Other micro-mechanical variables, like the structural anisotropy and the di...

  16. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of Water-Reflected Uranium Oxyfluoride Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of twelve experiments were conducted in the mid 1950's at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine the critical conditions of a semi-infinite water-reflected slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). A different slab thickness was used for each experiment. Results from the twelve experiment recorded in the laboratory notebook were published in Reference 1. Seven of the twelve experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments for the inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This evaluation will not only be available to handbook users for the validation of computer codes and integral cross-section data, but also for the reevaluation of experimental data used in the ANSI/ANS-8.1 standard. This evaluation is important as part of the technical basis of the subcritical slab limits in ANSI/ANS-8.1. The original publication of the experimental results was used for the determination of bias and bias uncertainties for subcritical slab limits, as documented by Hugh Clark's paper 'Subcritical Limits for Uranium-235 Systems'.

  17. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT/RETURN FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of transportation casks performed in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) and Buffer Area meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''Transportation Cask Receipt/Return Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170217], Section 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of the following items: (1) Evaluate criticality effects for both dry and fully flooded conditions pertaining to TCRRF and Buffer Area operations for defense in depth. (2) Evaluate Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the TCRRF as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). This evaluation includes credible fuel reconfiguration conditions. In addition to the scope of work listed above, an evaluation was also performed of modeling assumptions for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) regarding inclusion of plenum and end regions of the active fuel. This calculation is limited to CSNF and US Department of Energy (DOE) SNF. it should be mentioned that the latter waste form is evaluated more in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167614]). Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the US Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the TCRRF and Buffer Area and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the TCRRF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168361], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  18. Correlation of superconductor strand, cable, and dipole critical currents in CBA magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.; Garber, M.; Sampson, W.B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration between vendor critical current data for 0.0268'' diameter superconductor strand supplied to Fermilab, and the BNL 10/sup -12/..cap omega..cm critical current specification is presented. Vendor critical current data for over 400 Fermilab type billets are shown, both as supplied by the vendor and converted to BNL units. Predictions of cable critical current are made using the sum of the critical currents of the 23 strands, where all strands from the same half billet are assigned the same critical current. The measured critical current shows excellent correlation to the predicted value and is approximately 14 +- 2 percent below it. Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) full length dipoles reach the conductor critical current limit, essentially without training. Magnet performance is predictable from the measured critical current of a short sample of cable to within 2%.

  19. Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suski, N; Wuest, C

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

  20. The critical tension in the Cascading DGP model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Sbisa'; Kazuya Koyama

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in the 6D Cascading DGP model using a bulk-based approach. To deal with the ambiguity in the thin limit of branes of codimension higher than one, we consider a specific regularization of the internal structure of the branes where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We consider the solutions corresponding to pure tension sources on the 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. We adopt a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition, and focus on the scalar sector of perturbations. We show that, in a suitable 4D limit, the trace part of the 4D metric perturbations obeys a decoupled equation which suggests that it is a ghost for background tensions smaller than a critical tension, while it is a healthy field otherwise. We give a geometrical interpretation of the existence of the critical tension and of the reason why the relevant field is a ghost or not depending on the background tension. We however find a value of the critical tension which is different from the one already found in the literature. Differently from the results in the literature, our analysis implies that, choosing the background tension suitably, we can construct ghost-free models for any value of the free parameters of the theory. We suggest that the difference lies in the procedure used to evaluate the pillbox integration across the codimension-2 brane. We confirm the validity of our analysis by performing numerically the integration in a particular case where the solution inside the thick cod-2 brane is known exactly. We stress that the singular structure of the perturbation fields in the nested branes set-ups is very subtle, and that great care has to be taken when deriving the codimension-2 junction conditions.

  1. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

    1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the plate lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigorous`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work. This involves such areas as uncovering problems in deterministic methods and models, pitfalls in using Monte Carlo codes, and improving predictions. The numerical illustrations included here were taken from the extensive documentation cited as references.

  2. CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

  3. Major safety and operational concerns for fuel debris criticality control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonoike, K.; Sono, H.; Umeda, M.; Yamane, Y.; Kugo, T.; Suyama, K. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It can be seen from the criticality control viewpoint that the requirement divides the decommissioning work into two parts. One is the present condition where it is requested to prevent criticality and to monitor subcritical condition while the debris is untouched. The other is future work where the subcritical condition shall be ensured even if the debris condition is changed intentionally by raising water level, debris retrieval, etc. Repair of damages on the containment vessel (CV) walls is one of the most important objectives at present in the site. On completion of this task, it will become possible to raise water levels in the CVs and to shield the extremely high radiation emitted from the debris but there is a dilemma: raising the water level in the CVs implies to bring the debris closer to criticality because of the role of water for slowing down neutrons. This may be solved if the coolant water will start circulating in closed loops, and if a sufficient concentration of soluble neutron poison (borated water for instance) will be introduced in the loop. It should be still noted that this solution has a risk of worsening corrosion of the CV walls. Design of the retrieval operation of debris should be proposed as early as possible, which must include a neutron poison concentration required to ensure that the debris chunk is subcritical. In parallel, the development of the measurement system to monitor subcritical condition of the debris chunk should be conducted in case the borated water cannot be used continuously. The system would be based on a neutron counter with a high sensitivity and an appropriate shield for gamma-rays, and the adequate statistical signal processing.

  4. Iterative methods for solving nonlinear problems of nuclear reactor criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuz'min, A. M., E-mail: mephi.kam@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents iterative methods for calculating the neutron flux distribution in nonlinear problems of nuclear reactor criticality. Algorithms for solving equations for variations in the neutron flux are considered. Convergence of the iterative processes is studied for two nonlinear problems in which macroscopic interaction cross sections are functionals of the spatial neutron distribution. In the first problem, the neutron flux distribution depends on the water coolant density, and in the second one, it depends on the fuel temperature. Simple relationships connecting the vapor content and the temperature with the neutron flux are used.

  5. Critical review of deeply bound kaonic nuclear states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Magas; E. Oset; A. Ramos; H. Toki

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically revise the recent claims of narrow deeply bound kaonic states and show that at present there is no convincing experimental evidence for their existence. In particular, we discuss in details the claim of K- pp deeply bound state associated to a peak seen in the Lambda p invariant mass spectrum from K- nuclear absorption reactions by the FINUDA collaboration. An explicit theoretical simulation shows that the peak is simply generated from a two-nucleon absorption process, like K- pp --> Lambda p, followed by final-state interactions of the produced particles with the residual nucleus.

  6. DHLW Glass Waste Package Criticality Analysis (SCPB:N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.W. Davis

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to determine the viability of the Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) Glass waste package concept with respect to criticality regulatory requirements in compliance with the goals of the Waste Package Implementation Plan (Ref. 5.1) for conceptual design. These design calculations are performed in sufficient detail to provide a comprehensive comparison base with other design alternatives. The objective of this evaluation is to show to what extent the concept meets the regulatory requirements or indicate additional measures that are required for the intact waste package.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety tools in the Chernobyl-4 accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeyro, P.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collaboration with the Italian Safety Authority (DISP), started in July 1986, has the aim of studying, from a neutronic point of view, the possible initiator event and the accident dynamics in unit four of the Chernobly nuclear power plant. This report was produced within the framework of that collaboration. A main condition of the present work was making use of standard calculational methods employed in nuclear criticality safety analysis. This means that the neutron multiplication factor calculation should be made with the modules and the cross-section libraries of the SCALE system or in any case with some KENO IV version and the burnup calculation with the ORIGEN code.

  8. Spatial homogenization for plate-type critical assemblies. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, K.R.; Smith, K.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard calculational models of plate-type LMFBR critical assemblies do not explicitly represent individual plates. Instead, detailed plate-by-plate calculations are performed only for each representative cell type, and homogenized cross sections are defined by flux-volume weighting of individual plate cross sections. Subsequent reactor calculations are performed by modeling each cell type with homogenized cross sections. The homogenized cross sections are sensitive to the manner in which the cell leakage is modeled. The intent of this paper is to present a method of representing the cell leakage which results in more accurate homogenized cross sections than the methods presently in use.

  9. Black Holes and Universality Classes of Critical Points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovtun, Pavel; Ritz, Adam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that there exists an infinite class of conformal field theories in diverse dimensions having a universal ratio of the central charge c to the normalized entropy density c-tilde. The universality class includes all conformal theories which possess a classical gravity dual according to the AdS/CFT correspondence. From the practical point of view, the universality of c/c-tilde provides an explicit test which can be applied to determine whether a given critical point may admit a dual description in terms of classical gravity.

  10. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  11. Fault simulation of combinational circuits based on critical path tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Charles James

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c1355 c17 c1908 546 880 259 385 41 33 25 40 c2670 1269 454 233 140 32 c3540 c432 c499 1669 160 202 579 89 50 36 41 22 32 47 17 c5315 2307 806 178 123 49 c6288 c7552 c880 c95 2416 3513 383 27 1456 1300 125 18 32... depending on the number of gates involved [16]. If exit lines are determined, simulation only has to proceed to the nearest critical exit line [17]. A graph based approach has been proposed that only requires one backward pass of the circuit, al- though a...

  12. Infrared Critical Exponents in Finite-Temperature Coulomb Gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Lichtenegger; Daniel Zwanziger

    2009-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the infrared critical exponents of Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory in the limit of very high temperature. This allows us to focus on one scale (the spatial momentum) since all but the lowest Matsubara frequency decouple from the deep infrared. From the first-order Dyson-Schwinger equations in a bare-vertex truncation we obtain infrared exponents which correspond to confining or overconfining (yet mathematically well-defined) solutions. For three spatial dimensions the exponents are close to what is expected for a linearly rising color-Coulomb potential.

  13. An estimate for the location of QCD critical end point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; J. Jia; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz

    2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed that a study of the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density $\\frac{\\eta}{s}$ as a function of the baryon chemical potential $\\mu_B$, and temperature T, provides a dynamic probe for the critical end point (CEP) in hot and dense QCD matter. An initial estimate from an elliptic flow excitation function gives $\\mu^{\\text{cep}}_B \\sim 150-180$ MeV and $T_{\\text{cep}} \\sim 165 - 170$ MeV for the location of the the CEP. These values place the CEP in the range for "immediate" validation at RHIC.

  14. An estimate for the location of QCD critical end point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacey, Roy A; Alexander, J M; Chung, P; Jia, J; Taranenko, A; Danielewicz, P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed that a study of the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density $\\frac{\\eta}{s}$ as a function of the baryon chemical potential $\\mu_B$, and temperature T, provides a dynamic probe for the critical end point (CEP) in hot and dense QCD matter. An initial estimate from an elliptic flow excitation function gives $\\mu^c_B \\sim 150-180$ MeV and $T_c \\sim 165$ MeV for the location of the the CEP. These values place the CEP in the range for "immediate" observation at RHIC.

  15. Nuclear Criticality Safety Guide for Fire Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2EnergyDepartment511Laws MeetingNovemberCriticality

  16. ARM - Evaluation Product - Critical soil quantities for describing land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imagingproperties ProductsCritical soil

  17. CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,MaterialsMaterialsCritical

  18. CMI in Research Publications in 2013 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,MaterialsMaterialsCritical3

  19. Continuous-Estimator Representation for Monte Carlo Criticality Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternate means of computing diagnostics for Monte Carlo criticality calculations is proposed. Overlapping spherical regions or estimators are placed covering the fissile material with a minimum center-to-center separation of the 'fission distance', which is defined herein, and a radius that is some multiple thereof. Fission neutron production is recorded based upon a weighted average of proximities to centers for all the spherical estimators. These scores are used to compute the Shannon entropy, and shown to reproduce the value, to within an additive constant, determined from a well-placed mesh by a user. The spherical estimators are also used to assess statistical coverage.

  20. Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard provides a framework for generating Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) supporting fissionable material operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities. This standard imposes no new criticality safety analysis requirements.

  1. An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatto, Donald Patrick

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the critical heat flux for subcooled refrigerant-11 and refrigerant-113 flowing upward in a vertical cylindrical tube. Critical heat flux (CHF) values are determined for a range of tube...

  2. Modeling mining economics and materials markets to inform criticality assessment and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulizac, Claire Marie Franc?oise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional criticality-assessment methods drawn from the existing literature are often limited to evaluations of scarcity risks, or rely on price as an indicator of criticality. Such approaches, however, are ill-suited ...

  3. Critical gradient for internal erosion in earthen d ams : a comparative analysis of two predictive methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donohue, Catherine, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimizing the uncertainty in predicting the critical gradient of a dam (i.e. the critical reservoir pool level) is important during the risk analysis of dams. Uncertainty leads to inexact relative risk in portfolio ...

  4. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

  5. Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) Presentation slides from the February 8,...

  6. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  7. ITL BULLETIN FOR FEBRUARY 2014 FRAMEWORK FOR IMPROVING CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CYBERSECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITL BULLETIN FOR FEBRUARY 2014 FRAMEWORK FOR IMPROVING CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CYBERSECURITY Kevin Obama issued Executive Order (EO) 13636, Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, in February standards, guidelines, and practices - for reducing cybersecurity risks. In support of this directive

  8. The critical tension in the Cascading DGP model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbis, Fulvio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in the 6D Cascading DGP model using a bulk-based approach. To deal with the ambiguity in the thin limit of branes of codimension higher than one, we consider a specific regularization of the internal structure of the branes where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We consider the solutions corresponding to pure tension sources on the 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. We adopt a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition, and focus on the scalar sector of perturbations. We show that, in a suitable 4D limit, the trace part of the 4D metric perturbations obeys a decoupled equation which suggests that it is a ghost for background tensions smaller than a critical tension, while it is a healthy field otherwise. We give a geometrical interpretation of the existence of the critical tension and of the reason why the relevant field is a ghost or not depending on the background tension. We howeve...

  9. Validation studies using joint USDOE/PNC critical experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolen, G.R.; Whitesides, G.E.; Matsumoto, T.; Funabashi, H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation studies have been performed in the United States and Japan using the SCALE-2 computer code system with benchmark data obtained from 46 critical experiments. The experiments spanned the range of neutron spectra from a very undermoderated condition (H/Pu ratio = 22) to a very overmoderated condition (H/Pu ratio = 2220). The experiments are divided into four sets: (1) heterogeneous mixed-oxide fuel pin arrays moderated by organic and aqueous solutions, (2) limiting critical concentration experiments, (3) basic cylinder and slab geometries with various reflection conditions, and (4) annular cylinder with various fixed-geometry poisons. Based on computations performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the KENO code and a 27 energy-group cross-section library, the average calculated k-effective for the 46 experiments was found to be 1.004. Calculated k-effectives ranged from 0.991 to 1.018, and the standard deviation of these results was 0.006. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) staff have obtained similar k-effective results in their validation studies. The good agreement between experiment and calculation gives confidence that the calculation methods and cross-section data can be applied to similar plant conditions. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files. (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

  11. Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

  12. Implications of Monte Carlo Statistical Errors in Criticality Safety Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pevey, Ronald E.

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most criticality safety calculations are performed using Monte Carlo techniques because of Monte Carlo's ability to handle complex three-dimensional geometries. For Monte Carlo calculations, the more histories sampled, the lower the standard deviation of the resulting estimates. The common intuition is, therefore, that the more histories, the better; as a result, analysts tend to run Monte Carlo analyses as long as possible (or at least to a minimum acceptable uncertainty). For Monte Carlo criticality safety analyses, however, the optimization situation is complicated by the fact that procedures usually require that an extra margin of safety be added because of the statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations. This additional safety margin affects the impact of the choice of the calculational standard deviation, both on production and on safety. This paper shows that, under the assumptions of normally distributed benchmarking calculational errors and exact compliance with the upper subcritical limit (USL), the standard deviation that optimizes production is zero, but there is a non-zero value of the calculational standard deviation that minimizes the risk of inadvertently labeling a supercritical configuration as subcritical. Furthermore, this value is shown to be a simple function of the typical benchmarking step outcomes--the bias, the standard deviation of the bias, the upper subcritical limit, and the number of standard deviations added to calculated k-effectives before comparison to the USL.

  13. Covariance matrices for use in criticality safety predictability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality predictability applications require as input the best available information on fissile and other nuclides. In recent years important work has been performed in the analysis of neutron transmission and cross-section data for fissile nuclei in the resonance region by using the computer code SAMMY. The code uses Bayes method (a form of generalized least squares) for sequential analyses of several sets of experimental data. Values for Reich-Moore resonance parameters, their covariances, and the derivatives with respect to the adjusted parameters (data sensitivities) are obtained. In general, the parameter file contains several thousand values and the dimension of the covariance matrices is correspondingly large. These matrices are not reported in the current evaluated data files due to their large dimensions and to the inadequacy of the file formats. The present work has two goals: the first is to calculate the covariances of group-averaged cross sections from the covariance files generated by SAMMY, because these can be more readily utilized in criticality predictability calculations. The second goal is to propose a more practical interface between SAMMY and the evaluated files. Examples are given for {sup 235}U in the popular 199- and 238-group structures, using the latest ORNL evaluation of the {sup 235}U resonance parameters.

  14. Progress and critical issues for IFE blanket and chamber research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Nobile, A.; Peterson, P.F.; Petti, D.; Schultz, K.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in high gain target designs for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and the initiation of construction of large megajoule-class laser facilities in the U.S. (National Ignition Facility) and France (Laser-Megajoule) capable of testing the requirements for inertial fusion ignition and propagating burn, have improved the prospects for IFE. Accordingly, there have recently been modest increases in the US fusion research program related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy-ion accelerators, Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE target designs for higher gains, feasibility of low cost IFE target fabrication and accurate injection, and long-lasting IFE fusion chambers and final optics. Since several studies of conceptual IFE power plant and driver designs were completed in 1992-1996 [1-5], U.S. research in the IFE blanket, chamber, and target technology areas has focused on the critical issues relating to the feasibility of IFE concepts towards the goal of achieving economically-competitive and environmentally-attractive fusion energy. This paper discusses the critical issues in these areas, and the approaches taken to address these issues. The U.S. research in these areas, called IFE Chamber and Target Technologies, is coordinated through the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) formed by the Department of Energy in December 1998.

  15. General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields including very large ones to follow the same dynamics.

  16. Join Us Tuesday, Jan. 15 for a Google+ Hangout on Critical Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What are critical materials? We will be answering that question and more during our first Google+ Hangout.

  17. Operating Experience Level 3, Importance of Conduct of Operations and Training for Effective Criticality Safety Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2012-07: Importance of Conduct of Operations and Training for Effective Criticality Safety Programs

  18. Criticality prevention during postaccident decontamination of TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) plant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palau, G. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the likelihood of a criticality outside of the reactor coolant system (RCS) during the plant cleanup was very small. Given the consequence of any possible critical event in the TMI-2 systems, However, it was always necessary to ensure that all steps were taken to prevent criticality. Therefore, engineered controls were developed to ensure that decontamination of plant systems containing fuel material could be conducted in a manner that precluded criticality.

  19. Isospin Effects of the Critical Behavior in the Lattice Gas Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Gang Ma; Qian-Min Su; Wen-Qing Shen; Jian-Song Wang; Xiang-Zhou Cai; De-Qing Fang

    1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Isospin effects of the critical phenomena were studied via Xe isotopes in the frame of lattice gas model. All the critical temperatures for four Xe isotopes are close to 5.5 MeV at the same freeze-out density of about 0.39 $\\rho_0$. The critical values of power law parameter of mass distribution, mean multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments (IMF), information entropy and Campi's second moment show minor dependence on the isospin at the critical point.

  20. CTMCONTROL: Addressing the MC/DC Objective for Safety-Critical Automotive Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CTMCONTROL: Addressing the MC/DC Objective for Safety-Critical Automotive Software Anila Mjeda.mjeda,mike.hinchey}@lero.ie Abstract. We propose a method tailored to the requirements of safety-critical embedded automotive software/DC) objective for automotive safety-critical software. CTMCONTROL is validated via a controlled experiment which

  1. Quantum Criticality at the Large-Dimensional Limit: Three-Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    -electron atoms, a second-order phase transition [5] occurs at Zc 2.0. The estima- tion of critical nuclear chargeQuantum Criticality at the Large-Dimensional Limit: Three-Body Coulomb Systems QICUN SHI, SABRE; revised 3 May 2001; accepted 14 May 2001 ABSTRACT: We present quantum phase transitions and critical

  2. Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K. Miyazaki Abstract in nuclear multifragmentation reactions and the critical temperature has been derived as TC = 20 3 MeV in Ref] to estimate the critical temperature for in...nite nuclear matter, that is, TC = 16:6 0:86 Me

  3. Preservation and Dissemination of the Hardcopy Documentation Portion of the NCSP Nuclear Criticality Bibliographic Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B L; Heinrichs, D

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy supports a nuclear criticality safety bibliographic internet database that contains approximately 15,000 records. We are working to ensure that a substantial portion of the corresponding hardcopy documents are preserved, digitized, and made available to criticality safety practitioners via the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program web site.

  4. The Pajarito Site operating procedures for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.6, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1983 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility. 11 refs.

  5. Large time behavior for the fast di#usion equation with critical absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Large time behavior for the fast di#usion equation with critical absorption Said Benachour # Razvan of nonnegative solutions to the Cauchy problem for a fast di#usion equation with critical zero order absorption: large time behavior, fast di#usion, critical absorption, gradient estimates, lower bound. # Universit

  6. Large time behavior for the fast diffusion equation with critical absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large time behavior for the fast diffusion equation with critical absorption Said Benachour Razvan of nonnegative solutions to the Cauchy problem for a fast diffusion equation with critical zero order absorption: large time behavior, fast diffusion, critical absorption, gradient estimates, lower bound. Universit

  7. Off-Policy Actor-Critic Thomas Degris thomas.degris@inria.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Off-Policy Actor-Critic Thomas Degris thomas.degris@inria.fr Flowers Team, INRIA, Talence, ENSTA the first actor-critic al- gorithm for off-policy reinforcement learning. Our algorithm is online work on actor-critic algorithms is lim- ited to the on-policy setting and does not take advantage

  8. CYBER SECURITY THREATS TO SAFETY-CRITICAL, SPACE-BASED INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    role in national critical infrastructures. The certification of Global Navigation Satellite SystemsCYBER SECURITY THREATS TO SAFETY-CRITICAL, SPACE-BASED INFRASTRUCTURES C.W. Johnson (1) , A-based systems play an important role within national critical infrastructures. They are being integrated

  9. Infusing Critical Thinking Skill Compare and Contrast into Content of Data Structures Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faisal, Kanaan Abed

    Infusing Critical Thinking Skill Compare and Contrast into Content of Data Structures Course M of our efforts in infusing the critical thinking skill of comparing and contrasting into a course on data in the course content of computer curricula at tertiary level. It is expected that infusion of critical thinking

  10. Analyticity of the Subcritical and Critical Quasi-Geostrophic equations in Besov Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Hantaek

    Analyticity of the Subcritical and Critical Quasi-Geostrophic equations in Besov Spaces Hantaek Bae Animikh Biswas Eitan Tadmor Abstract We establish analyticity of the subcritical and critical quasi the subcritical, critical and supercritical quasi-geostrophic equations. In this paper, we study the subcritical

  11. THE BEST SOBOLEV TRACE CONSTANT IN DOMAINS WITH HOLES FOR CRITICAL OR SUBCRITICAL EXPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Julio D.

    THE BEST SOBOLEV TRACE CONSTANT IN DOMAINS WITH HOLES FOR CRITICAL OR SUBCRITICAL EXPONENTS JULI in the Sobolev trace embedding H1() Lq() in a bounded smooth domain for critical or subcritical q, that is 1 embedding H1 () Lq () for critical or subcritical exponents, 1

  12. Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is examined. The material being compressed in the compactor is a homogeneous mixture of beryllium and {sup 239}Pu. The point-kinetics equations with simple thermal-hydraulic feedback are used to model the transient behavior of the system. A computer code has been developed to solve the model equations. The computer code calculates the fission power history, fission yield, bulk temperature of the system, and several other thermal-hydraulic parameters of interest. Calculations have been performed for the waste supercompactor for various material misloading configurations. The peak power for the various accident scenarios varies from 1.04 {times} 10{sup 17} to 4.85 {times} 10{sup 20} fissions per second (fps). The total yield varies from 8.21 {times} 10{sup 17} to 7.73 {times} 10{sup 18} fissions, and the bulk temperature of the system varies from 412 to >912 K.

  13. Fluctuation and gauge effects on the critical behavior of superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana V. Shopova; Dimo I. Uzunov

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge effects on the fluctuation properties of the normal-to-superconducting phase transition in bulk and thin film superconductors are reviewed. Similar problems in the description of other natural systems (liquid crystals, quantum field theory, early universe) are also discussed. The relatively strong gauge effects on the fluctuations of the ordering field at low spatial dimensionality $D$ and, in particular, in thin (quasi-2D) films are considered in details. A special attention is paid to the fluctuations of the gauge field. It is shown that the mechanism, in which these gauge fluctuations affect the phase transition order and other phase transition properties varies with the variation of spatial dimensionality $D$. The problem for the experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions about the order of phase transitions in gauge systems is discussed. Related topics: gauge effects on the critical behavior of unconventional superconductors, disorder, quantum fluctuations in a close vicinity of ultra-low phase transition temperatures, are also briefly discussed.

  14. Critical confinement and elastic instability in thin solid films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Animangsu Ghatak; Manoj K. Chaudhury

    2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When a flexible plate is peeled off a thin and soft elastic film bonded to a rigid support, uniformly spaced fingering patterns develop along their line of contact. While, the wavelength of these patterns depends only on the thickness of the film, their amplitude varies with all material and geometric properties of the film and that of the adhering plate. Here we have analyzed this instability by the regular perturbation technique to obtain the excess deformations of the film over and above the base quantities. Furthermore, by calculating the excess energy of the system we have shown that these excess deformations, associated with the instability, occur for films which are critically confined. We have presented two different experiments for controlling the degree of confinement: by pre-stretching the film and by adjusting the contact width between the film and the plate.

  15. Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

  16. The Critical Rayleigh Number in Horizontal Convection for $\\Pran=1$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, L; Sun, De-Jun; Sun, Liang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the numerical simulations of the horizontal convection within a rectangle cavity tank at high Rayleigh numbers. The physical solution of horizontal convection depends the space resolution of the meshes. The mesh number $N$ is proportion to $Ra^{1/3}$. The unstable numerical solutions are obtained as $Npower law also implies that the space resolution is dominated by the viscosity and heat diffusion. It implies that the special resolution is dominated by viscosity and thermal diffusivity but the length of the tank. Moreover, there is a Hopf bifurcation from steady solutions to unsteady solutions and the critical Rayleigh number $Ra_c$ is obtained as $5.53\\times 10^8

  17. A critical note on time in the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend E. Rugh; Henrik Zinkernagel

    2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent analyses of standard, single-universe, cosmology, it was pointed out that specific assumptions regarding the distribution and motion of matter must be made in order to set up the cosmological standard model with a global time parameter. Relying on these results, we critically examine the notion of time in the multiverse, and in particular the idea that some parts of the multiverse are older than others. By focusing on the most elaborated multiverse proposal in cosmology, the inflationary multiverse, we identify three problems for establishing a physically well-defined notion of global time; a quantum problem, a collision problem and a fractal problem. The quantum problem, and the closely related "cosmic measurement problem", may even undermine the idea that parts of the multiverse causally and temporally precede our universe.

  18. A critical note on time in the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rugh, Svend E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent analyses of standard, single-universe, cosmology, it was pointed out that specific assumptions regarding the distribution and motion of matter must be made in order to set up the cosmological standard model with a global time parameter. Relying on these results, we critically examine the notion of time in the multiverse, and in particular the idea that some parts of the multiverse are older than others. By focusing on the most elaborated multiverse proposal in cosmology, the inflationary multiverse, we identify three problems for establishing a physically well-defined notion of global time; a quantum problem, a collision problem and a fractal problem. The quantum problem, and the closely related "cosmic measurement problem", may even undermine the idea that parts of the multiverse causally and temporally precede our universe.

  19. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critical coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Garca, V; Richoux, O; Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Pagneux, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally and analytically report broadband and narrowband perfect absorption in two different acoustic waveguide-resonator geometries by the mechanism of critical coupling. In the first geometry the resonator (a Helmholtz resonator) is side-loaded to the waveguide and it has a moderate quality factor. In the second geometry the resonator (a viscoelastic porous plate) is in-line loaded and it contains two resonant modes with low quality factor. The interplay between the energy leakage of the resonant modes into the waveguide and the inherent losses of the system reveals a perfect and a broadband nearly perfect absorption. The results shown in this work can motivate relevant research for the design of broadband perfect absorbers in other domains of wave physics.

  20. Status and Value of International Standards for Nuclear Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an update to the author's standards report provided at the ICNC-2007 meeting. It includes a discussion about the difference between, and the value of participating in, the development of international 'consensus' standards as opposed to nonconsensus standards. Standards are developed for a myriad of reasons. Generally, standards represent an agreed upon, repeatable way of doing something as defined by an individual or group of people. They come in various types. Examples include personal, family, business, industrial, commercial, and regulatory such as military, community, state, federal, and international standards. Typically, national and international 'consensus' standards are developed by individuals and organizations of diverse backgrounds representing the subject matter users and developers of a service or product and other interested parties or organizations. Within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Technical Committee 85 (TC85) on nuclear energy, Subcommittee 5 (SC5) on nuclear fuel technology, there is a Working Group 8 (WG8) on standardization of calculations, procedures, and practices related to criticality safety. WG8 has developed, and is developing, ISO standards within the category of nuclear criticality safety of fissionable materials outside of reactors (i.e., nonreactor fissionable material nuclear fuel cycle facilities). Since the presentation of the ICNC-2007 report, WG8 has issued three new finalized international standards and is developing two more new standards. Nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards. The progression of consensus standards development among international partners in a collegial environment establishes a synergy of different concepts that broadens the perspectives of the members. This breadth of perspectives benefits the working group members in their considerations of consensus standards developments in their own countries. A testament to the value of the international standards efforts is that nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards and are mainly consistent with international ISO member domestic standards.

  1. Theory of finite-entanglement scaling at one-dimensional quantum critical points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Pollmann; Subroto Mukerjee; Ari Turner; Joel E. Moore

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of entanglement in many-particle systems suggest that most quantum critical ground states have infinitely more entanglement than non-critical states. Standard algorithms for one-dimensional many-particle systems construct model states with limited entanglement, which are a worse approximation to quantum critical states than to others. We give a quantitative theory of previously observed scaling behavior resulting from finite entanglement at quantum criticality: the scaling theory of finite entanglement is only superficially similar to finite-size scaling, and has a different physical origin. We find that finite-entanglement scaling is governed not by the scaling dimension of an operator but by the "central charge" of the critical point, which counts its universal degrees of freedom. An important ingredient is the recently obtained universal distribution of density-matrix eigenvalues at a critical point\\cite{calabrese1}. The parameter-free theory is checked against numerical scaling at several quantum critical points.

  2. The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

  3. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Peak Pricing Tariff Karen Herter ab* , Patrickunder critical peak pricing tariffs tested in the 2003-2004The 15-month experimental tariff gave customers a discounted

  4. Design and Criticality Considerations for 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R; Biswas, D; Abramczyk, G

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. DOT specification 6M container, phased out in September 30, 2008 due to non-compliance with current requirements 10CFR71 regulation. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. These packages provide a high degree of single containment and comply with 10CFR71, Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10CFR20 (As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)). Allowed package contents were determined accounting for nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, and decay heat rate. The Criticality Safety Index (CSI) for the package is 1.0. The package utilizes passive cooling to maintain internal temperatures within limits. Radiation shielding analyses have established the contents for which the packages can be shipped under non-exclusive use in the Safe-Secure Trailer or under exclusive use. The packages are designed to ship radioactive contents in several configurations; Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), nested food-pack cans, site specific containers, and DOE-STD-3013 containers. Each shipping package includes a 35-gallon stainless steel outer drum, insulation, a drum liner, and a single containment vessel (CV). The 9977 includes a 6-inch ID CV while the 9978 includes a 5-inch ID CV. One inch of Fiberfrax{reg_sign} insulation is wrapped around and attached to the sides and bottom of the liner. The volume between the Fiberfrax{reg_sign} and the drum wall is filled with polyurethane foam. Top and bottom aluminum Load Distribution Fixtures (LDFs) within the drum liner cavity, above and below the CV, center the CV in the liner, stiffen the package radially, and distribute loads away from the CV. The 6CV fits directly into the LDFs while honeycomb spacers position the 5CV in the LDFs.

  5. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia)] [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different radionuclides that have intake into the organism or absorbed into blood. Transport of different radionuclides between compartments is assumed to follow first order kinetics provided the concentration in red blood cells (RBCs) stays below a nonlinear threshold concentration. When the concentration in RBCs exceeds that threshold, the transfer rate from diffusible plasma to RBCs is assumed to decrease as the concentration in RBCs increases. For the calculations used capabilities AMBER by using the traces of radionuclides in the body. Model for the transfer of radionuclides in the body has been built on the basis of existing models at AMBER for lead. (authors)

  6. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

  7. Modified gravity, the Cascading DGP model and its critical tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Sbisa'

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the presence of instabilities in the Cascading DGP model. We start by discussing the problem of the cosmological late time acceleration, and we introduce the modified gravity approach. We then focus on brane induced gravity models and in particular on the Cascading DGP model. We consider configurations of the latter model where the source term is given simply by vacuum energy (pure tension), and we study perturbations at first order around these configurations. We perform a four-dimensional scalar-vector-tensor decomposition of the perturbations, and show that, regarding the scalar sector, the dynamics in a suitable limit can be described by a master equation. This master equation contains an energy scale (critical tension) which is related in a non-trivial way to the parameters of the model. We give a geometrical interpretation of why this scale emerges, and explain its relevance for the presence of ghost instabilities in the theory. We comment on the difference between our result and the one present in the literature, and stress its importance regarding the phenomenological viability of the model. We finally provide a numerical check which confirms the validity of our analysis.

  8. Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, J.C.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

  9. Nonextensive critical effects in relativistic nuclear mean field models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rozynek; G. Wilk

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a possible extension of the usual relativistic nuclear mean field models widely used to describe nuclear matter towards accounting for the influence of possible intrinsic fluctuations caused by the environment. Rather than individually identifying their particular causes we concentrate on the fact that such effects can be summarily incorporated in the changing of the statistical background used, from the usual (extensive) Boltzman-Gibbs one to the nonextensive taken in the form proposed by Tsallis with a dimensionless nonextensivity parameter $q$ responsible for the above mentioned effects (for $q \\rightarrow 1$ one recovers the usual BG case). We illustrate this proposition on the example of the QCD-based Nambu - Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model of a many-body field theory describing the behavior of strongly interacting matter presenting its nonextensive version. We check the sensitivity of the usual NJL model to a departure from the BG scenario expressed by the value of $| q - 1|$, in particular in the vicinity of critical points.

  10. Critical charges on strange quark nuggets and other extended objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicus, Duane A. [Physics Department, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Repko, Wayne W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Teplitz, V. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Physics Department, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the behavior of the critical charge for spontaneous pair production, Z{sub C}, defined as the charge at which the total energy of a K-shell electron is E=-m{sub e}, as a function of the radius R of the charge distribution. Our approach is to solve the Dirac equation for a potential V(r) consisting of a spherically symmetrical charge distribution of radius R and a Coulomb tail. For a spherical shell distribution of the type usually associated with color-flavor locked strange quark nuggets, we confirm the relation Z{sub C}=0.71R (fm) for sufficiently large R obtained by Madsen, who used an approach based on the Thomas-Fermi model. We also present results for a uniformly charged sphere and again find that Z{sub C}{approx}R for large enough R. Also discussed is the behavior of Z{sub C} when simple ad hoc modifications are made to the potential for 0{<=}r

  11. Improved criticality convergence via a modified Monte Carlo iteration method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gubernatis, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality calculations with Monte Carlo codes are normally done using a power iteration method to obtain the dominant eigenfunction and eigenvalue. In the last few years it has been shown that the power iteration method can be modified to obtain the first two eigenfunctions. This modified power iteration method directly subtracts out the second eigenfunction and thus only powers out the third and higher eigenfunctions. The result is a convergence rate to the dominant eigenfunction being |k{sub 3}|/k{sub 1} instead of |k{sub 2}|/k{sub 1}. One difficulty is that the second eigenfunction contains particles of both positive and negative weights that must sum somehow to maintain the second eigenfunction. Summing negative and positive weights can be done using point detector mechanics, but this sometimes can be quite slow. We show that an approximate cancellation scheme is sufficient to accelerate the convergence to the dominant eigenfunction. A second difficulty is that for some problems the Monte Carlo implementation of the modified power method has some stability problems. We also show that a simple method deals with this in an effective, but ad hoc manner.

  12. A new neutron absorber material for criticality control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Alan H. [PhD Consultant, 2846 Peachtree Walk, Duluth, GA 30096 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new neutron absorber material based on a nickel metal matrix composite has been developed for applications such as the Transport, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister for the Yucca Mountain Project. This new material offers superior corrosion resistance to withstand the more demanding geochemical environments found in a 300,000 year to a million year repository. The lifetime of the TAD canister is currently limited to 10,000 years, reflecting the focus of current regulations embodied in 10 CFR 63. The use of DOE-owned nickel stocks from decommissioned enrichment facilities could reduce the cost compared to stainless steel/boron alloy. The metal matrix composite allows the inclusion of more than one neutron absorber compound, so that the exact composition may be adjusted as needed. The new neutron absorber material may also be used for supplementary criticality control of stored or transported PWR spent fuel by forming it into cylindrical pellets that can be inserted into a surrogate control rod. (authors)

  13. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the proposed CFC replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.; Dyer, H.R.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron multiplication characteristics of refrigerant-114 (R-114) and proposed replacement coolants perfluorobutane (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}) and cycloperfluorobutane C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) have been compared by evaluating the infinite media multiplication factors of UF{sub 6}/H/coolant systems and by replacement calculations considering a 10-MW freezer/sublimer. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that R-114 is a neutron absorber, due to its chlorine content, and that the alternative fluorocarbon coolants are neutron moderators. Estimates of critical spherical geometries considering mixtures of UF{sub 6}/HF/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} indicate that the flourocarbon-moderated systems are large compared with water-moderated systems. The freezer/sublimer calculations indicate that the alternative coolants are more reactive than R-114, but that the reactivity remains significantly below the condition of water in the tubes, which was a limiting condition. Based on these results, the alternative coolants appear to be acceptable; however, several follow-up tasks have been recommended, and additional evaluation will be required on an individual equipment basis.

  14. A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

  15. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    241 Pu, etc. ). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuelto enhance criticality safety for spent nuclear fuel inSpent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality

  16. Closed inflationary universe in patch cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campo, Sergio del [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: sdelcamp@ucv.cl; Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: ramon.herrera@ucv.cl; Saavedra, Joel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: joel.saavedra@ucv.cl; Labrana, Pedro [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del BioBio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: plabrana@ubiobio.cl

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study closed inflationary universe models using the Gauss-Bonnet Brane. We determine and characterize the existence of a universe with {omega}>1, with an appropriate period of inflation. We have found that this model is less restrictive in comparison with the standard approach where a scalar field is considered. We use recent astronomical observations to constrain the parameters appearing in the model.

  17. Pedro Communications Patch for All Versions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month WeekReservesYearYearAugustIntroduction)Pedro

  18. Rye Patch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTI PFAN) | Open

  19. Rye Patch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRoosevelt GardensUK-basedRutherford is aEnergy

  20. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.