Sample records for optimal gap width

  1. Speculative Software Management of Datapath-width for Energy Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seznec, André

    Speculative Software Management of Datapath-width for Energy Optimization Gilles Pokam gpokam accommodate the execution of a program on a narrower datapath-width in or- der to save energy the width of the register file to be dynamically recon- figured, providing both static and dynamic energy

  2. FLOATING-POINT BIT-WIDTH OPTIMIZATION FOR LOW-POWER SIGNAL PROCESSING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    FLOATING-POINT BIT-WIDTH OPTIMIZATION FOR LOW-POWER SIGNAL PROCESSING APPLICATIONS Fang Fang design flow to the design of inverse discrete cosine transform (IDCT), and show that the power floating-point (FP) signal processing applications in low-power mobile devices, we propose a lightweight FP

  3. the ultrasonic methods find the width of a gap by measuring the time needed for a high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosmopoulos, Dimitrios I.

    of the measurement is high and there is no risk of damaging the product since the measurement is non- contact in the production process can be identi®ed and corrected as they occur, saving time, energy and labor inspection of gaps. ``Third Dimen- sion Software Ltd.'' [7] has implemented a device called ``Gap Gun

  4. Zero Duality Gap in Optimal Power Flow Problem Javad Lavaei and Steven H. Low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    power flow (OPF) problem deals with finding an optimal operating point of a power system that mini1 Zero Duality Gap in Optimal Power Flow Problem Javad Lavaei and Steven H. Low Abstract--The optimal power flow (OPF) problem is nonconvex and generally hard to solve. In this paper, we propose

  5. Optimization Online - Information Gap Decision Theory Based OPF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rabiee abbas

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 3, 2015 ... Abstract: A method for solving the optimal power flow (OPF) problem including HVDC connected offshore wind farms is presented in this paper.

  6. On the Adaptivity Gap in Two-stage Robust Linear Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 22, 2014 ... Bej ? Cj, j ? [n],BT ei ? Ri,i ? [m]}, where Cj .... by our algorithm is different from an optimal static robust solution and it is an interesting open.

  7. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Larsen, Greg J. (Brentwood, CA); Sanchez, Roberto J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  8. Air Gap Tunin Yilin Mao, Yashwanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Air Gap Tunin Yilin Mao, Yashwanth Electrical Engineering Departm The Unive ymao1@olemiss.edu, ypadooru@ Abstract-- An adjustable air gap was proposed the resonant frequency of patch antennas the frequency of coaxially fed p center conductor has to be de-soldered and r time the width of the air gap

  9. Simulations of the spontaneous emission of a quantum dot near a gap plasmon waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Chamanei S., E-mail: cp.hettiarachchige@qut.edu.au; Vernon, Kristy C.; Mcleod, Angus [Plasmonic Device Group, Queensland University of Technology, GPO box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we modeled a quantum dot at near proximity to a gap plasmon waveguide to study the quantum dot-plasmon interactions. Assuming that the waveguide is single mode, this paper is concerned about the dependence of spontaneous emission rate of the quantum dot on waveguide dimensions such as width and height. We compare coupling efficiency of a gap waveguide with symmetric configuration and asymmetric configuration illustrating that symmetric waveguide has a better coupling efficiency to the quantum dot. We also demonstrate that optimally placed quantum dot near a symmetric waveguide with 50?nm?×?50?nm cross section can capture 80% of the spontaneous emission into a guided plasmon mode.

  10. Distribution of neutron resonance widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans A. Weidenmueller

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on neutron resonance widths indicate disagreement with the Porter-Thomas distribution (PTD). I discuss the theoretical arguments for the PTD, possible theoretical modifications, and I summarize the experimantal evidence.

  11. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Energy gap of Kronig-Penney-type hydrogenated graphene superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joo-Hyoung

    The electronic structure of graphene-graphane superlattices with armchair interfaces is investigated with first-principles density-functional theory. By separately varying the widths, we find that the energy gap Eg is ...

  13. Pattern Alteration: Bodice Back Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    with the pattern mea- surements. As a guide, use the back shoulder width mea- sured 4 inches (10 cm) below the base of the neck. (Refer to line 9 on the Personal Measurement Chart.) To help determine where the alteration is needed, check t of an unaltered... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Basic fi tted bodice, princess-style bodice and shirt Here are the steps for altering a basic bodice, a princess- style bodice or a shirt: 1. Along the shoulder seam line, measure 2 inches (5 cm) from the armhole seam line and mark it. Draw a vertical...

  14. Photoluminescence line width of self-assembled Ge(Si) islands arranged between strained Si layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaleev, M. V., E-mail: shaleev@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Novikov, A. V.; Baydakova, N. A.; Yablonskiy, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, O. A. [Nizhny Novgorod State University, Physico-Technical Research Institute (Russian Federation); Lobanov, D. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of variations in the strained Si layer thicknesses, measurement temperature, and optical excitation power on the width of the photoluminescence line produced by self-assembled Ge(Si) nanoislands, which are grown on relaxed SiGe/Si(001) buffer layers and arranged between strained Si layers, is studied. It is shown that the width of the photoluminescence line related to the Ge(Si) islands can be decreased or increased by varying the thickness of strained Si layers lying above and under the islands. A decrease in the width of the photoluminescence line of the Ge(Si) islands to widths comparable with the width of the photoluminescence line of quantum dot (QD) structures based on direct-gap InAs/GaAs semiconductors is attained with consideration of diffusive smearing of the strained Si layer lying above the islands.

  15. Mean Width of a Regular Simplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Steven R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean width is a measure on n-dimensional convex bodies. An integral formula for the mean width of a regular n-simplex appeared in the electrical engineering literature in 1997. As a consequence, expressions for the expected range of a sample of n+1 normally distributed variables, for ninfty.

  16. Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

  17. Height and width of superatomic Boolean algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roitman, Judith A.

    1985-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Volume 94, Number 1, May 1985 HEIGHT AND WIDTH OF SUPERATOMIC BOOLEAN ALGEBRAS JUDY ROITMAN1 Abstract. Cantor-Bendixson height and width of superatomic Boolean algebras is investigated and it is shown.../Ja), and define the Cantor- Bendixson width of X, wd^), to be the supremum of all wda( X). An sBa X is (a) K-thin iff wd( X) = k. (Note: thin = w-thin.) (b) K-thin-thick iff wda(A') = k for a < k and wdK(X) = k+. (Note: thin-thick = to,-thin-thick + Just's thin...

  18. SU-D-12A-07: Optimization of a Moving Blocker System for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scatter Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouyang, L; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, H [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guang Dong (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A moving blocker based strategy has shown promising results for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Different parameters of the system design affect its performance in scatter estimation and image reconstruction accuracy. The goal of this work is to optimize the geometric design of the moving block system. Methods: In the moving blocker system, a blocker consisting of lead strips is inserted between the x-ray source and imaging object and moving back and forth along rotation axis during CBCT acquisition. CT image of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was used in the simulation study. Scatter signal was simulated by Monte Carlo calculation with various combinations of the lead strip width and the gap between neighboring lead strips, ranging from 4 mm to 80 mm (projected at the detector plane). Scatter signal in the unblocked region was estimated by cubic B-spline interpolation from the blocked region. Scatter estimation accuracy was quantified as relative root mean squared error by comparing the interpolated scatter to the Monte Carlo simulated scatter. CBCT was reconstructed by total variation minimization from the unblocked region, under various combinations of the lead strip width and gap. Reconstruction accuracy in each condition is quantified by CT number error as comparing to a CBCT reconstructed from unblocked full projection data. Results: Scatter estimation error varied from 0.5% to 2.6% as the lead strip width and the gap varied from 4mm to 80mm. CT number error in the reconstructed CBCT images varied from 12 to 44. Highest reconstruction accuracy is achieved when the blocker lead strip width is 8 mm and the gap is 48 mm. Conclusions: Accurate scatter estimation can be achieved in large range of combinations of lead strip width and gap. However, image reconstruction accuracy is greatly affected by the geometry design of the blocker.

  19. Closing the Mesoscale Gap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closing the Mesoscale Gap Los Alamos proposes to fill in the gaps in our fundamental understanding of materials with MaRIE, a facility designed to gain access to the mesoscale....

  20. alpha reduced widths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul B. Mackenzie; Michael E. Peskin 2014-04-01 117 SENSING ECG SIGNALS WITH VARIABLE PULSE WIDTH Engineering Websites Summary: SENSING ECG SIGNALS WITH VARIABLE PULSE WIDTH...

  1. Marshals, Monotone Marshals, and Hypertree-Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Isolde

    Marshals, Monotone Marshals, and Hypertree-Width Isolde Adler Mathematisches Institut Eckerstr. 1 D by the Monotone Robber and Marshals Game. While the Robber and Cops Game and its monotone variant coincide, Gott- lob, Leone and Scarcello stated the corresponding question for the Robber and Marshals Game as an open

  2. College Gender Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronson, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    College Gender Gaps BY MARY ANN BRONSONBY MARY ANN BRONSON FALL 2013 W HY DO WOMEN ATTEND collegerelationship is crucial. Mary Ann Bronson, a Ph.D. candidate

  3. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figs.

  4. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figures.

  5. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, Charles E. (Roanoke, VA); Boothe, Richard W. (Roanoke, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  6. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, Charles E. (Roanoke, VA); Boothe, Richard W. (Roanoke, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  7. Comparison of GAP-3 and GAP-4 experiments with conduction freezing calculations. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments GAP-3 and GAP-4 were performed at ANL to investigate the ability of molten fuel to penetrate downward through the narrow channels separating adjacent subassemblies during an LMFBR hypothetical core disruptive accident. Molten fuel-metal mixtures (81% UO/sub 2/, 19% Mo) at an initial temperature of 3470/sup 0/K generated by a thermite reaction were injected downward into 1 m long rectangular test sections (gap thickness = 0.43 cm, channel width = 20.3 cm) initially at 1170/sup 0/K simulating the nominal Clinch River Breeder Reactor intersubassembly gap. In the GAP-3 test, a prolonged reaction time of approx. 15 s resulted in segregation of the metallic Mo and oxidic UO/sub 2/ constituents within the reaction vessel prior to injection. Consequently, Mo entered the test section first and froze, forming a complete plug at a penetration distance of 0.18 m. In GAP-4, the reaction time was reduced to approx. 3 s and the constituents remained well mixed upon injection with the result that the leading edge penetration distance increased to 0.35 m. Posttest examination of the cut-open test sections has revealed the existence of stable insulating crusts upon the underlying steel walls with melting and ablation of the walls only very localized.

  8. Generation gaps in engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

  9. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R.; Hanson, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF. In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 30%. 7 refs.

  10. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R. (Department of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391 (USA)); Hanson, J.D. (Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only that information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF (Fusion Technol. {bold 10}, 179 (1986)). In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 20% even though the islands are within a factor of 2 of overlapping.

  11. Property:Width (m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This propertyVolume Jump to:s) Jump to:Width (m)

  12. Topological gap states of semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Jeong; S. C. Kim; S. -R. Eric Yang

    2015-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons a chiral lattice deformation can induce pairs of topological gap states with opposite energies. Near the critical value of the deformation potential these kink and antikink states become almost degenerate with zero energy and have a fractional charge one-half. Such a semiconducting armchair ribbon represents a one-dimensional topological insulator with nearly zero energy end states. Using data collapse of numerical results we find that the shape of the kink displays an anomalous power-law dependence on the width of the local lattice deformation. We suggest that these gap states may be probed in optical measurements. However, "metallic" armchair graphene ribbons with a gap induced by many-electron interactions have no gap states and are not topological insulators.

  13. Topological gap states of semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Y H; Yang, S -R Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons a chiral lattice deformation can induce pairs of topological gap states with opposite energies. Near the critical value of the deformation potential these kink and antikink states become almost degenerate with zero energy and have a fractional charge one-half. Such a semiconducting armchair ribbon represents a one-dimensional topological insulator with nearly zero energy end states. Using data collapse of numerical results we find that the shape of the kink displays an anomalous power-law dependence on the width of the local lattice deformation. We suggest that these gap states may be probed in optical measurements. However, "metallic" armchair graphene ribbons with a gap induced by many-electron interactions have no gap states and are not topological insulators.

  14. Topological gap states of semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Jeong; S. C. Kim; S. -R. Eric Yang

    2015-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons a chiral lattice deformation can induce pairs of topological gap states with opposite energies. Near the critical value of the deformation potential these kink and antikink states become almost degenerate with zero energy and have a fractional charge one-half. Such a semiconducting armchair ribbon represents a one-dimensional topological insulator with nearly zero energy end states. Using data collapse of numerical results we find that the shape of the kink displays an anomalous power-law dependence on the width of the local lattice deformation. We suggest that these gap states may be probed in optical measurements. However, "metallic" armchair graphene ribbons with a gap induced by many-electron interactions have no gap states and are not topological insulators.

  15. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slicker, James M. (Union Lake, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  16. Optimization Online - Optimality gap of constant-order policies ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linwei Xin

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 7, 2014 ... In this work, we make significant progress towards resolving this open problem ... OR and Management Sciences (Supply Chain Management ).

  17. Uncertainties in Gapped Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eylee Jung; Kwang S. Kim; DaeKil Park

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by graphene-based quantum computer we examine the time-dependence of the position-momentum and position-velocity uncertainties in the monolayer gapped graphene. The effect of the energy gap to the uncertainties is shown to appear via the Compton-like wavelength $\\lambda_c$. The uncertainties in the graphene are mainly contributed by two phenomena, spreading and zitterbewegung. While the former determines the uncertainties in the long-range of time, the latter gives the highly oscillation to the uncertainties in the short-range of time. The uncertainties in the graphene are compared with the corresponding values for the usual free Hamiltonian $\\hat{H}_{free} = (p_1^2 + p_2^2) / 2 M$. It is shown that the uncertainties can be under control within the quantum mechanical law if one can choose the gap parameter $\\lambda_c$ freely.

  18. Mind The Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel F. Litim

    2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an optimisation criterion for the exact renormalisation group based on the inverse effective propagator, which displays a gap. We show that a simple extremisation of the gap stabilises the flow, leading to better convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory. This improves the reliability of truncations, most relevant for any high precision computation. These ideas are closely linked to the removal of a spurious scheme dependence and a minimum sensitivity condition. The issue of predictive power and a link to the Polchinski RG are discussed as well. We illustrate our findings by computing critical exponents for the Ising universality class.

  19. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  20. GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    98-36 GAP TESTS; COMPARISON BETWEEN UN GAP TEST AND CARD GAP TEST by R. BRANKA and C. MICHOT, FRANCE (tel.: 33 3 44 55 65 19, fax: 33 3 44 55 65 10) ABSTRACT: UN gap test, type 1(a) or 2(a), is the recommended test in the acceptance procedure for transport of explosives in class 1. Up to the revision

  1. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  2. Laser diffraction process and apparatus for width measurement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    apparatus for width measurement of elongated objects Re-direct Destination: Size distribution of elongated objects is measured by forward scattering radiation from the objects...

  3. Optimization Online - Risk Analysis 101 --- Robust-Optimization: the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshe Sniedovich

    2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 4, 2012 ... Risk Analysis 101 --- Robust-Optimization: the elephant in the robust-satisficing room ... Abstract: In 2001, info-gap decision theory re-invented the then ... by info-

  4. Mind the gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Bhagwat; A. Krassnigg; P. Maris; C. D. Roberts

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  5. CV evolution: AM Her binaries and the period gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Webbink; D. T. Wickramasinghe

    2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    AM Her variables -- synchronised magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) -- exhibit a different period distribution from other CVs across the period gap. We show that non-AM Her systems may infiltrate the longer-period end of the period gap if they are metal-deficient, but that the position and width of the gap in orbital period is otherwise insensitive to other binary parameters (excepting the normalisation of the braking rate). In AM Her binaries, magnetic braking is reduced as the wind from the secondary star may be trapped within the magnetosphere of the white dwarf primary. This reduced braking fills the period gap from its short-period end as the dipole magnetic moment of the white dwarf increases. The consistency of these models with the observed distribution of CVs, both AM Her and non-AM Her type, provides compelling evidence supporting magnetic braking as the agent of angular momentum loss among long-period CVs, and its disruption as the explanation of the 2 - 3 hour period gap among nonmagnetic CVs.

  6. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  7. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semenoff, G W; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  8. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  9. Gap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pahlka, Raymond Benton

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters as well as optimal cell conditions for effective, repeatable studies using the microinjection protocol. The second objective was to determine whether or not the AG1522 cell line exhibited gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through...

  10. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalka, Alex M. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  11. Sacrificial Charge and Charge Injection! Evolution of Line Width!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    MeV). Anti-correlated with the solar cycle. Similar structures are seen in the energy scale due background" which depends on solar cycle and activity." XIS energy scale and line width as a function of cut increasing CTI, trailing charge and event/split thresholds Evolution of Energy Scale! · Radiation damage

  12. Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt? events produced in pp? collisions at Fermilab’s Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding ...

  13. Numerical and experimental design of three-electrode spark gap for synthetic test circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osmokrovic, P.; Lazarevic, Z.; Kusic, D. (Buleva Revolucije 73, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering); Arsic, N. (Suncani Breg bb, Pristina (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a three-electrode spark gap used with synthetic circuit is considered in this paper. Two types of three-electrode gas insulated spark gaps have been tested: a spark gap with a third electrode being inside the main electrode, and a spark gap with a separate third electrode. Both types of spark gaps were theoretically sized in the optimal way. Several characteristics are determined experimentally: (1) the influence of the gas insulation parameters on the spark gap functioning, (2) the influence of the working and triggering voltages polarities on the spark gap functioning, (3) the influence of the triggering voltage rate-of-rise on the spark gap functioning and (4) the degree of spark gap erosion vs number of operations. Three types of gases were applied: SF6 gas, N2 gas and mixture of 60% SF6 with 40% N2. Also, three electrode materials were used: copper, steel and tungsten. The spark gap switching time and delay time are measured. The statistical analysis of results is presented.

  14. THE ENERGY GAP IN NUCLEAR MATTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emery, V.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Physics, The Ohio State University, THE ENERGY GAP INEnergy Commission. + Permanent addross: Columbus, Ohio.

  15. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  16. Signal Timing Optimization to Improve Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Jinpeng 1983-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    the gap that the research on signal optimization at intersections lags behind the development of emissions models. The methodology development includes four levels: the vehicle level, the movement level, the intersection level, and the arterial level...

  17. Signal Timing Optimization to Improve Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Jinpeng 1983-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    the gap that the research on signal optimization at intersections lags behind the development of emissions models. The methodology development includes four levels: the vehicle level, the movement level, the intersection level, and the arterial level...

  18. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, Troy; /University Coll. London

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 {+-} 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 {+-} 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  19. A New Measurement of the $?^0$ Radiative Decay Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Larin; D. McNulty; E. Clinton; P. Ambrozewicz; D. Lawrence; I. Nakagawa; Y. Prok; A. Teymurazyan; A. Ahmidouch; A. Asratyan; K. Baker; L. Benton; A. M. Bernstein; V. Burkert; P. Cole; P. Collins; D. Dale; S. Danagoulian; G. Davidenko; R. Demirchyan; A. Deur; A. Dolgolenko; G. Dzyubenko; R. Ent; A. Evdokimov; J. Feng; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; S. Gevorkyan; A. Glamazdin; V. Goryachev; V. Gyurjyan; K. Hardy; J. He; M. Ito; L. Jiang; D. Kashy; M. Khandaker; P. Kingsberry; A. Kolarkar; M. Konchatnyi; A. Korchin; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; M. Kubantsev; V. Kubarovsky; X. Li; P. Martel; V. Matveev; B. Mecking; B. Milbrath; R. Minehart; R. Miskimen; V. Mochalov; S. Mtingwa; S. Overby; E. Pasyuk; M. Payen; R. Pedroni; B. Ritchie; T. E. Rodrigues; C. Salgado; A. Shahinyan; A. Sitnikov; D. Sober; S. Stepanyan; W. Stephens; J. Underwood; A. Vasiliev; V. Vishnyakov; M. Wood; S. Zhou

    2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  20. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  1. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hysinger, Christopher L. (Austin, TX); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NE); Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NE)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows.

  2. Investigation of Pitch and Jaw Width to Decrease Delivery Time of Helical Tomotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, Monica [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fontenot, Jonas D., E-mail: jfontenot@marybird.com [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Gibbons, John P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lee, Tae Kyu [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Rosen, Isaac I. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fields, Robert S. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helical tomotherapy plans using a combination of pitch and jaw width settings were developed for 3 patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. Three jaw widths (5, 2.5, and 1 cm) and 4 pitches (0.86, 0.43, 0.287, and 0.215) were used with a (maximum) modulation factor setting of 4. Twelve plans were generated for each patient using an identical optimization procedure (e.g., number of iterations, objective weights, and penalties, etc.), based on recommendations from TomoTherapy (Madison, WI). The plans were compared using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, conformity indexes, radiobiological models, and treatment times. Smaller pitches and jaw widths showed better target dose homogeneity and sparing of normal tissue, as expected. However, the treatment time increased inversely proportional to the jaw width, resulting in delivery times of 24 {+-} 1.9 min for the 1-cm jaw width. Although treatment plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw were dosimetrically superior to plans produced with the 5-cm jaw, subsequent calculations of tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities suggest that these differences may not be radiobiologically meaningful. Because treatment plans produced with the 5-cm jaw can be delivered in approximately half the time of plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw (5.1 {+-} 0.6 min vs. 9.5 {+-} 1.1 min), use of the 5-cm jaw in routine treatment planning may be a viable approach to decreasing treatment delivery times from helical tomotherapy units.

  3. OPTIMAL CONTROL APPLICATIONS AND METHODS Optim. Control Appl. Meth., 2004; 25:165180

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    . KEY WORDS: linear programming; friction; vibratory system; pulse width control 1. INTRODUCTION term added to the input force. With this constraint, optimal control design techniques for linear systems can be used for systems with friction. One method to find a time optimal control profile is input

  4. Mind the gap: modeling local and global context in (road) networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structural prior: roads form a connected network of thin segments, with slowly changing width and curvature-scale appearance information from a large neighborhood in the per-pixel classier. Globally, the network structure-pixel evidence, and then select pixels on an optimal subset of these paths by energy minimization in a CRF, where

  5. Band Gap Optimization of Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Using ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 10, 2009 ... proven very important as device components for integrated optics ...... Inhibited spontaneous emission in solid-state physics and electronics.

  6. Hard-gapped Holographic Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Basu; Jianyang He; Anindya Mukherjee; Hsien-Hang Shieh

    2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we discuss the zero temperature limit of a "p-wave" holographic superconductor. The bulk description consists of a non-Abelian SU(2) gauge fields minimally coupled to gravity. We numerically construct the zero temperature solution which is the gravity dual of the superconducting ground state of the "p-wave" holographic superconductors. The solution is a smooth soliton with zero horizon size and shows an emergent conformal symmetry in the IR. We found the expected superconducting behavior. Using the near horizon analysis we show that the system has a "hard gap" for the relevant gauge field fluctuations. At zero temperature the real part of the conductivity is zero for an excitation frequency less than the gap frequency. This is in contrast with what has been observed in similar scalar- gravity-gauge systems (holographic superconductors). We also discuss the low but finite temperature behavior of our solution.

  7. Microwave band gap and cavity mode in spoof-insulator-spoof waveguide with multiscale structured surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Dezhuan; Qin, Fei Fei; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yao, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a multiscale spoof-insulator-spoof (SIS) waveguide by introducing periodic geometry modulation in the wavelength scale to a SIS waveguide made of perfect electric conductor. The MSIS consists of multiple SIS subcells. The dispersion relationship of the fundamental guided mode of the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) is studied analytically within the small gap approximation. It is shown that the multiscale SIS possesses microwave band gap (MBG) due to the Bragg scattering. The "gap maps" in the design parameter space are provided. We demonstrate that the geometry of the subcells can efficiently adjust the effective refraction index of the elementary SIS and therefore further control the width and the position of the MBG. The results are in good agreement with numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). For finite-sized MSIS of given geometry in the millimeter scale, FEM calculations show that the first-order symmetric SSPP mode has zero transmission in the MBG within frequency...

  8. Width of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; H. Xie

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we report on the difference in angular sizes between radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs. For this purpose we compiled these two samples of events using Wind/WAVES and SOHO/LASCO observations obtained during 1996-2005. It is shown that the radio-loud CMEs are almost two times wider than the radio-quiet CMEs (considering expanding parts of CMEs). Furthermore we show that the radio-quiet CMEs have a narrow expanding bright part with a large extended diffusive structure. These results were obtained by measuring the CME widths in three different ways.

  9. Determination of the total width of the eta' meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Czerwinski; P. Moskal; D. Grzonka; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of both the low-emittance proton-beam of the Cooler Synchrotron COSY and the high momentum precision of the COSY-11 detector system, the mass distribution of the eta' meson was measured with a resolution of 0.33 MeV/c^2 (FWHM), improving the experimental mass resolution by almost an order of magnitude with respect to previous results. Based on the sample of more than 2300 reconstructed pp --> pp eta' events the total width of the eta' meson was determined to be 0.226 +- 0.017(stat.) +- 0.014(syst.) MeV/c^2.

  10. The History of Cranfills Gap ISD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudd, Charla J

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of Bosque County, Texas ....................................... 30 4 Topographical Map of Cranfills Gap ....................................................... 34 5 Upper Meridian Creek Settlement... ............................................................ 36 6 Topographical Map of German Settlement .............................................. 37 7 Cranfills Gap Land Deed, 1888 ............................................................... 46 8 Dream Stage to Infancy Stage...

  11. Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is a repository of e-prints about optimization and related topics. Submissions to Optimization Online are moderated by a team of volunteer

  12. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohwein, Gerald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed.

  13. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed. 13 figs.

  14. Determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t {yields} Wb) measured in t{bar t} events using up to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The result is {Lambda}{sub t} = 1.99{sub -0.55}{sup +0.69} GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.3{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}) x 10{sup -25} s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b{prime} quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V{sub tb{prime}}| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  15. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risø National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  16. Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

  17. Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

  18. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap...

  19. Beam dynamics of a double-gap acceleration cell for ion implantation with multiple atomic species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadlinger, E.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Rusnak, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Saadatmand, K. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Operation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of our work on ion implantation, we derived equations for the beam dynamics of a two-gap-resonator cavity for accelerating and bunching various ion species of varying energies with the cavity designed for one particular ion species of a given energy (the design-reference particle). A two gap structure is useful at low resonant frequencies where lumped circuit elements (inductors) can be used and the structure kept small. A single gap structure has the advantage that each gap can be independently phased to produce the desired beam dynamics behavior for various ion species and ion energies. However at low frequencies, single gap resonant structures can be large. We find that the two-gap structure, where the phase difference between gaps, for the design reference particle, is fixed at {pi} radians can give acceptable performance provided that the individual two gap cells in the entire accelerator are optimized for the ion species having the largest mass to charge ratio and having the maximum required output energy. Our equations show how to adjust the cavity phases and electric fields to obtain equivalent first-order accelerator performance for various ion species and energies. These equations allow for the effective evaluation of various accelerator concepts and can facilitate the tuning of a linac when changing energies and ion species. Extensive simulations have confirmed the efficacy of our equations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Thermal Width of the UPSILON at Large 't Hooft Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noronha, Jorge [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120 Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Dumitru, Adrian [Department of Natural Sciences, Baruch College, CUNY, 17 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10010 (United States); Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10016 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to show that the heavy quark (static) potential in a strongly coupled plasma develops an imaginary part at finite temperature. Thus, deeply bound heavy quarkonia states acquire a small nonzero thermal width when the 't Hooft coupling lambda=g{sup 2}N{sub c}>>1 and the number of colors N{sub c}->infinity. In the dual gravity description, this imaginary contribution comes from thermal fluctuations around the bottom of the classical sagging string in the bulk that connects the heavy quarks located at the boundary. We predict a strong suppression of UPSILON's in heavy-ion collisions and discuss how this may be used to estimate the initial temperature.

  1. Systematics of S- and P-wave radiation widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.S.

    1980-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of calculating differences in s- and p-wave radiation widths as a valid evaluation tool is explored. A purely statistical approach such as that provided by the Brink-Axel formula depends upon two factors: 1) an adequate description of the giant dipole resonance shape at energies well below the resonance, and 2) an adequate description of the level densities between the ground state and the excitation of the compound nucleus near the neutron separation energy. Some success has been obtained in certain regions of the periodic table with this simple approach, e.g., in the actinides where all nuclei exhibit similar rigid permanent deformations. However, if the method is to be used as a general evaluation procedure throughout the periodic table and particularly in regions where the radiative transition probabilities are enhanced by direct processes, it appears that much more nuclear structure information needs to be incorporated into the calculations.

  2. Optimization Journals, Sites, Societies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Links. Optimization related societies. Mathematical Optimization Society · SIAM · INFORMS. Optimization related journals. Mathematical ...

  3. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@kriss.re.kr; Kim, J. H. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  4. Spatial variation of dosimetric leaf gap and its impact on dose delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumaraswamy, Lalith K., E-mail: Lalith.Kumaraswamy@roswellpark.org [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Schmitt, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, RadAmerica, LLC-MedStar Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21237 (United States); Bailey, Daniel W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northside Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia 30342 (United States); Xu, Zheng Zheng [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: During dose calculation, the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) retracts the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions by half of the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value (measured at central axis) for all leaf positions in a dynamic MLC plan to accurately model the rounded leaf ends. The aim of this study is to map the variation of DLG along the travel path of each MLC leaf pair and quantify how this variation impacts delivered dose. Methods: 6 MV DLG values were measured for all MLC leaf pairs in increments of 1.0 cm (from the line intersecting the CAX and perpendicular to MLC motion) to 13.0 cm off axis distance at dmax. The measurements were performed on two Varian linear accelerators, both employing the Millennium 120-leaf MLCs. The measurements were performed at several locations in the beam with both a Sun Nuclear MapCHECK device and a PTW pinpoint ion chamber. Results: The measured DLGs for the middle 40 MLC leaf pairs (each 0.5 cm width) at positions along a line through the CAX and perpendicular to MLC leaf travel direction were very similar, varying maximally by only 0.2 mm. The outer 20 MLC leaf pairs (each 1.0 cm width) have much lower DLG values, about 0.3–0.5 mm lower than the central MLC leaf pair, at their respective central line position. Overall, the mean and the maximum variation between the 0.5 cm width leaves and the 1.0 cm width leaf pairs are 0.32 and 0.65 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The spatial variation in DLG is caused by the variation of intraleaf transmission through MLC leaves. Fluences centered on the CAX would not be affected since DLG does not vary; but any fluences residing significantly off axis with narrow sweeping leaves may exhibit significant dose differences. This is due to the fact that there are differences in DLG between the true DLG exhibited by the 1.0 cm width outer leaves and the constant DLG value utilized by the TPS for dose calculation. Since there are large differences in DLG between the 0.5 cm width leaf pairs and 1.0 cm width leaf pairs, there is a need to correct the TPS plans, especially those with high modulation (narrow dynamic MLC gap), with 2D variation of DLG.

  5. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  6. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  7. Chiral gap effect in curved space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new type of QCD phenomenon induced in curved space. In the QCD vacuum a mass gap of Dirac fermions is attributed to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. If the curvature is positive large, the chiral condensate melts but a chiral invariant mass gap can still remain, which we name the chiral gap effect in curved space. This leads to decoupling of quark deconfinement which implies a view of black holes surrounded by a first-order QCD phase transition.

  8. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  9. Effect of gaps on the performance of the vertically installed wet thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. I.; Park, C. T.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-daero 989-111, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In SMART, the main flow path of the reactor coolant and the pressurizer partially share common walls in the reactor coolant system. To reduce this heat transfer, the wet thermal insulator (WTI) is installed on the inner wall of the pressurizer. The WTI is constituted of stacked thin stainless steel plates. The water layer width between the plates is chosen to suppress natural convection in each layer. The plates of the WTI require clearance for thermal expansion. When the WTI is installed on a vertical wall, this clearance might cause gaps at the top and bottom at the operating condition. In this study, we focused on the effect of gaps at the both ends on the WTI performance. A numerical simulation was conducted for an 8-layer WTI with gaps at the both ends. To compare with this, a simulation of a WTI without a gap, which is an ideal case, was also conducted. The simulation was conducted in a 2-dimensional manner by a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT. The simulations showed that the WTI thermal performance was substantially decreased by a flow that circulated through the top and bottom gaps and water layers at the sides of the WTI. This circulation caused a high temperature difference between the wall and the circulating flow. To find a way to prevent this performance deterioration of the WTI we simulated several cases with the smaller gap heights. However, the flow circulation and the higher heat transfer rate were still observed even at a case with the smallest gap, which seems to be hardly achievable in a real installation. Another way of reducing the flow circulation was suggested and also simulated in this study. (authors)

  10. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  11. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Mechanical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  12. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Environmental Restoration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  13. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubitt, Toby; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap...

  14. Undecidability of the Spectral Gap (short version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toby Cubitt; David Perez-Garcia; Michael M. Wolf

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral gap -- the difference in energy between the ground state and the first excited state -- is one of the most important properties of a quantum many-body system. Quantum phase transitions occur when the spectral gap vanishes and the system becomes critical. Much of physics is concerned with understanding the phase diagrams of quantum systems, and some of the most challenging and long-standing open problems in theoretical physics concern the spectral gap, such as the Haldane conjecture that the Heisenberg chain is gapped for integer spin, proving existence of a gapped topological spin liquid phase, or the Yang-Mills gap conjecture (one of the Millennium Prize problems). These problems are all particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: Given a quantum many-body Hamiltonian, is the system it describes gapped or gapless? Here we show that this problem is undecidable, in the same sense as the Halting Problem was proven to be undecidable by Turing. A consequence of this is that the spectral gap of certain quantum many-body Hamiltonians is not determined by the axioms of mathematics, much as Goedels incompleteness theorem implies that certain theorems are mathematically unprovable. We extend these results to prove undecidability of other low temperature properties, such as correlation functions. The proof hinges on simple quantum many-body models that exhibit highly unusual physics in the thermodynamic limit.

  15. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Criticality Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  16. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Construction Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  17. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  18. Efficient Computation of Info-Gap Robustness for Finite Element Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent research effort at LANL proposed info-gap decision theory as a framework by which to measure the predictive maturity of numerical models. Info-gap theory explores the trade-offs between accuracy, that is, the extent to which predictions reproduce the physical measurements, and robustness, that is, the extent to which predictions are insensitive to modeling assumptions. Both accuracy and robustness are necessary to demonstrate predictive maturity. However, conducting an info-gap analysis can present a formidable challenge, from the standpoint of the required computational resources. This is because a robustness function requires the resolution of multiple optimization problems. This report offers an alternative, adjoint methodology to assess the info-gap robustness of Ax = b-like numerical models solved for a solution x. Two situations that can arise in structural analysis and design are briefly described and contextualized within the info-gap decision theory framework. The treatments of the info-gap problems, using the adjoint methodology are outlined in detail, and the latter problem is solved for four separate finite element models. As compared to statistical sampling, the proposed methodology offers highly accurate approximations of info-gap robustness functions for the finite element models considered in the report, at a small fraction of the computational cost. It is noted that this report considers only linear systems; a natural follow-on study would extend the methodologies described herein to include nonlinear systems.

  19. Gap Assessment (FY 13 Update)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getman, Dan

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To help guide its future data collection efforts, The DOE GTO funded a data gap analysis in FY2012 to identify high potential hydrothermal areas where critical data are needed. This analysis was updated in FY2013 and the resulting datasets are represented by this metadata. The original process was published in FY 2012 and is available here: https://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/db/GeoConf/papers/SGW/2013/Esposito.pdf Though there are many types of data that can be used for hydrothermal exploration, five types of exploration data were targeted for this analysis. These data types were selected for their regional reconnaissance potential, and include many of the primary exploration techniques currently used by the geothermal industry. The data types include: 1. well data 2. geologic maps 3. fault maps 4. geochemistry data 5. geophysical data To determine data coverage, metadata for exploration data (including data type, data status, and coverage information) were collected and catalogued from nodes on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). It is the intention of this analysis that the data be updated from this source in a semi-automated fashion as new datasets are added to the NGDS nodes. In addition to this upload, an online tool was developed to allow all geothermal data providers to access this assessment and to directly add metadata themselves and view the results of the analysis via maps of data coverage in Geothermal Prospector (http://maps.nrel.gov/gt_prospector). A grid of the contiguous U.S. was created with 88,000 10-km by 10-km grid cells, and each cell was populated with the status of data availability corresponding to the five data types. Using these five data coverage maps and the USGS Resource Potential Map, sites were identified for future data collection efforts. These sites signify both that the USGS has indicated high favorability of occurrence of geothermal resources and that data gaps exist. The uploaded data are contained in two data files for each data category. The first file contains the grid and is in the SHP file format (shape file.) Each populated grid cell represents a 10k area within which data is known to exist. The second file is a CSV (comma separated value) file that contains all of the individual layers that intersected with the grid. This CSV can be joined with the map to retrieve a list of datasets that are available at any given site. The attributes in the CSV include: 1. grid_id : The id of the grid cell that the data intersects with 2. title: This represents the name of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 3. abstract: This represents the description of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 4. gap_type: This represents the category of data availability that these data fall within. As the current processing is pulling data from NGDS, this category universally represents data that are available in the NGDS and are ready for acquisition for analytic purposes. 5. proprietary_type: Whether the data are considered proprietary 6. service_type: The type of service 7. base_url: The service URL

  20. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Maroone, James P. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipping, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  1. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  2. Thin plate gap bridging study for Nd:YAG pulsed laser lap welds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Robert Allen; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; Bernal, John E.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an on going study of gap bridging for thin plate Nd:YAG laser lap welds, empirical data, high speed imaging, and computer modeling were utilized to better understand surface physics attributed to the formation and solidification of a weld pool. Experimental data indicates better gap bridging can be achieved through optimized laser parameters such as pulse length, duration, and energy. Long pulse durations at low energies generating low peak powers were found to create the highest percent of gap bridging ability. At constant peak power, gap-bridging ability was further improved by using a smaller spot diameter resulting in higher irradiances. Hence, welding in focus is preferable for bridging gaps. Gas shielding was also found to greatly impact gap-bridging ability. Gapped lap welds that could not be bridged with UHP Argon gas shielding, were easily bridged when left unshielded and exposed to only air. Incident weld angle and joint offset were also investigated for their ability to improve gap bridging. Optical filters and brightlight surface illumination enabled high-speed imaging to capture the fluid dynamics of a forming and solidifying weld pool. The effects of various laser parameters and the weld pool's interaction with the laser beam could also be observed utilizing the high-speed imaging. The work described is used to develop and validate a computer model with improved weld pool physics. Finite element models have been used to derive insight into the physics of gap bridging. The dynamics of the fluid motion within the weld pool in conjunction with the free surface physics have been the primary focus of the modeling efforts. Surface tension has been found to be a more significant factor in determining final weld pool shape than expected.

  3. For "Ribbons" of Graphene, Width Matters | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For "Ribbons" of Graphene, Width Matters Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy...

  4. approximate half-intensity widths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average and dispersion differing from reduced neutron width. The main result of the analysis: the mean spacing and neutron strength function values can be determined only...

  5. Helium-cluster decay widths of molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Pei; F. R. Xu

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\alpha$ particle and $^6$He emissions from possible molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes have been studied using a mean-field-type cluster potential. Calculations can reproduce well the $\\alpha$-decay widths of excited states in $^{8}$Be, $^{12}$C and $^{20}$Ne. For the nucleus $^{10}$Be, we discussed the $\\alpha$-decay widths with different shapes or decay modes, in order to understand the very different decay widths of two excited states. The widths of $^{6}$He decay from $^{12}$Be and $\\alpha$ decays from $^{13,14}$C are predicted, which could be useful for future experiments.

  6. Optimization Neuroimaging'',

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

    Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C - PLS 1 = k 0 = k optimal k k = optimal k k £ £ 0 #12; Canonical Ridge Analysis with Ridge Parameter Optimization F. �. Nielsen, L. K. Hansen and S. C. Strother The Human Brain Project, P20 MH57180 ``Spatial

  7. Engine piston having an insulating air gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Mark Wayne (Washington, IL); Hunold,Brent Michael (Apex, NC)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A piston for an internal combustion engine has an upper crown with a top and a bottom surface, and a lower crown with a top and a bottom surface. The upper crown and the lower crown are fixedly attached to each other using welds, with the bottom surface of the upper crown and the top surface of the lower crown forming a mating surface. The piston also has at least one centrally located air gap formed on the mating surface. The air gap is sealed to prevent substantial airflow into or out of the air gap.

  8. Chiral gap effect in curved space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new type of QCD phenomenon induced in curved space. In the QCD vacuum, a mass-gap of Dirac fermions is attributed to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. If the curvature is positive large, the chiral condensate melts but a chiral invariant mass-gap can still remain, which we name the chiral gap effect in curved space. This leads to decoupling of quark deconfinement which implies a view of black holes surrounded by a first-order QCD phase transition.

  9. Yield learning with line width, sample size and bridge resistance variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Wajid

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observed the effects of certain noise sources such as line width variation, sample size and bridge resistance on yield learning, and determined how to account for them. In this research we will show that since line width variation is not random on a few...

  10. Multipole-multimode Floquet theory of rotational resonance width experiments: 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Multipole-multimode Floquet theory of rotational resonance width experiments: 13 C­13 C distance description of zero-quantum ZQ NMR processes using multipole-multimode Floquet theory is proposed for studying in rotational resonance width R2 W ex- periments based on multipole-multimode Floquet theory MMFT . The approach

  11. Reduced neutron widths in the nuclear data ensemble: Experiment and theory do not agree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Koehler

    2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I have analyzed reduced neutron widths ({\\Gamma}_{n}^0) for the subset of 1245 resonances in the nuclear data ensemble (NDE) for which they have been reported. Random matrix theory (RMT) predicts for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) that these widths should follow a \\c{hi}^2 distribution having one degree of freedom ({\

  12. Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran the Mokelumne River show that bedrock channel width decreases substantially downstream at the contact between show systematic channel widening after flood flows and debris flow impacts. We conclude that downstream

  13. Are We Closing the School Discipline Gap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Hodson, Cheri; Keith II, Michael A; Morrison, Katrina; Belway, Shakti

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.J. , (Ed). Closing the School Discipline Gap: EquitableBooth, E.A. (2011). Breaking schools’ rules: A statewidestudy of how school discipline relates to students’ success

  14. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  15. Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert...

  16. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies...

  17. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Abstract: Structure and electronic properties of...

  18. NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational Chemistry NWChem: Bridging the Gap Between Experimental and Computational Chemistry Intel recently interviewed...

  19. antiparticle spectrometer gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) - Hunt for dark matter using low-energy antideuterons CERN Preprints Summary: The GAPS experiment is...

  20. CHP: Connecting the Gap between Markets and Utility Interconnection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CHP: Connecting the Gap between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff Practices, 2006 CHP: Connecting the Gap between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff...

  1. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan; Cho, Kyuil; Kim, Hyong June; Tanatar, Makariy

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more »This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  2. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Cho, Kyuil [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Kim, Hyong June [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Tanatar, Makariy [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''. This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.

  3. Optimization 1-1 Convex Optimization & Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Xingzhe

    1 Optimization 1-1 Convex Optimization & Duality EEN634, Spring 2007 BASED ON LECTURES GIVEN AT MIT and Princeton Department of ECE, UMiami Optimization 1-2 #12;2 Optimization 1-3 Optimization 1-4 #12;3 Optimization 1-5 Optimization 1-6 #12;4 Optimization 1-7 Optimization 1-8 #12;5 Optimization 1-9 Optimization 1

  4. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the ...

  5. Dynamics of regeneration gaps following harvest of aspen stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Dynamics of regeneration gaps following harvest of aspen stands Daniel A. MacIsaac, Philip G in postharvest regeneration in five stands in north- western Alberta dominated by trembling aspen (Populus conditions in 30 aspen regeneration gaps (gaps in regeneration that were not gaps preharvest and were not due

  6. Hiding a Higgs width enhancement from off-shell gg (--> h*) --> ZZ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heather E. Logan

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the off-shell Higgs boson production cross section in gg (--> h*) --> ZZ have recently been used by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations to indirectly constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. I point out that the interpretation of these measurements as a Higgs width constraint can be invalidated if additional neutral Higgs boson(s) are present with masses below about 350 GeV.

  7. Nuclear magnetic absorption line widths in weak magnetic fields with a Robinson oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flugum, Timothy Lee

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUCLEAR MAGNETIC ABSORPTION LINE WIDTHS IN WEAK MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH A ROBINSON OSCILLATOR A Thesis by TIMOTHY LEE FLUGUM Subnntted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19SI Major Subject: Physics NUCLEAR MAGNETIC ABSORPTION LINE WIDTHS IN WEAK MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH A ROBINSON OSCILLATOR A Thesis TIMOTHY LEE FLUGUM Approved as to style and content by: Nelson M. Duller (Chairman...

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 075144 (2011) Fundamental and excitation gaps in molecules of relevance for organic photovoltaics from an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for organic photovoltaics from an optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional Sivan Refaely-Abramson,1 and optical gaps of relevant molecular systems are of primary importance for organic-based photovoltaics of photovoltaically relevant and other molecular systems. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.075144 PACS number(s): 71.15.Mb I

  9. Direct optimization overly optimizes data Kazunori Yoshizawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori

    OPINION Direct optimization overly optimizes data Kazunori Yoshizawa Systematic Entomology optimization is a criterion that recognizes sequence alignment and tree search as a single epistemological optimization criterion, all data partitions are combined and optimized simultaneously along with the same tree

  10. Homolumo gap from dynamical energy levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.; Nielsen, H. B. [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen DK 2100 (Denmark)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a dynamical matrix model where the matrix is interpreted as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show how a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest eigenvalue of the occupied single-fermion states and the lowest eigenvalue of the unoccupied single-fermion states. We describe the development of the gap in both the strong and weak coupling regimes, while for the intermediate coupling strength we expect formation of homolumo kinks.

  11. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  12. Gribov gap equation at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Canfora; Pablo Pais; Patricio Salgado-Rebolledo

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the Gribov gap equation at finite temperature is analyzed. The solutions of the gap equation (which depend explicitly on the temperature) determine the structure of the gluon propagator within the semi-classical Gribov approach. The present analysis is consistent with the standard confinement scenario for low temperatures, while for high enough temperatures, deconfinement takes place and a free gluon propagator is obtained. It also suggests the presence of the so-called semi-quark-gluon-plasma phase in between the confined and quark-gluon plasma phases.

  13. Stringent bounds on the brane width from stellar interferometry and distant gamma ray bursts: Back to the hierarchy problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Maziashvili

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple idea restricting the brane width due to astronomical observations is proposed. Not to contradict the observational data the brane width should be of about Planck size giving therefore strict criterion in selecting the realistic braneworld models.

  14. Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings C. R. Sullivan J. D. Mc the IEEE. #12;Analysis of Minimum Cost in Shape-Optimized Litz-Wire Inductor Windings Charles R. Sullivan://engineering.dartmouth.edu/inductor Abstract--Litz-wire windings for gapped inductors are optimized for minimum cost within a loss constraint

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a finite-width plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevelev, M. M.; Burinskaya, T. M., E-mail: tburinsk@iki.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear stage of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a finite-width plane-parallel plasma flow is analyzed. The analysis is performed by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations with the use of ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations describing isothermal plasma flows propagating along the magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field strength, the plasma temperature, and the ratio of the flow width to the width of the transition layer on the formation of vortex layers and large-scale flow perturbations is investigated. It is shown that, if the wavelength of periodic perturbations is shorter than the flow width, the symmetric and antisymmetric modes develop in a qualitatively similar manner. For waves with wavelengths longer than the flow width, the development of such modes is very different due to the mutual influence of the flow boundaries. Analysis of the development of instability at different values of the Alfven Mach number M{sub A} shows that long-lived vortices with a characteristic scale length on the order of the flow width appear in a weak magnetic field for both symmetric and antisymmetric modes; however, the vortex geometries for these modes are different. In a strong magnetic field, M{sub A} {approx} 5, the phase of vortex decay for both types of modes occurs faster than in a weak field; however, in the case of an antisymmetric mode, large-scale perturbations of the flow boundary are retained for a longer time. Analysis of the evolution of the initial disturbance produced by an ensemble of random small perturbations (noise) at different plasma temperatures shows that, for a flow width comparable with the width of the transition region, the development of KH instability is always antisymmetric in character and leads to well-developed large-scale perturbations of the flow as a whole. For a cold plasma with C{sub S} < 0.5U (where C{sub S} is the speed of sound and U is the flow velocity), in contrast to hot plasma with C{sub S} > 0.5U, the development of KH instability leads to the growth of the antisymmetric mode even if the flow width is much larger than the width of the transition region.

  16. FINAL REPORT ON GDE GAP CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.; Summers, W.; Danko, E.

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A project has been undertaken to develop an electrochemical cell and support equipment for evaluation of a gas diffusion electrode-based, narrow-electrolyte-gap anode for SO{sub 2} oxidation in the hydrogen production cycle of the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process. The project supported the HyS development program at the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL). The benefits of using a gas diffusion electrode in conjunction with the narrow anolyte gap are being determined through electrochemical polarization testing under a variety conditions, and by comparison to results produced by SRNL and others using anode technologies that have no anolyte gap. These test results indicate that the NGA cell has low resistance suitable for use in the HyS electrolyzer, exhibits good efficiency at high current densities compared to the direct feed HyS electrolyzer, and indicates robust performance in extended testing over 65 hours. Seepage episodes were mostly caused by port clogging, which can be mitigated in future designs through minor modifications to the hardware. Significant reductions in sulfur crossover have not yet been demonstrated in the NGA configuration compared to in-house direct feed testing, but corroborative sulfur layer analysis is as yet incomplete. Further testing in a single-pass anolyte configuration is recommended for complete evaluation of steady-state electrochemical efficiency and SO{sub 2} crossover in the narrow gap configuration.

  17. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development · Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C

  18. Gapped spin Hamiltonian motivated by quantum teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes a time-independent emulation of quan- tum teleportation. We calculate properties of the Hamiltonian, using exact diagonalization and a mean-field theory, and argue that it has a gap. The system exhibits an illuminating relationship to the well-known AKLT (Affleck, Lieb, Kennedy and Tasaki) model.

  19. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  20. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 and 26. APPENDIX B Optimizations Included in thisappendix are the three optimization steps which together

  1. Wave propagation in ordered, disordered, and nonlinear photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios

    1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap materials are artificial dielectric structures that give the promise of molding and controlling the flow of optical light the same way semiconductors mold and control the electric current flow. In this dissertation the author studied two areas of photonic band gap materials. The first area is focused on the properties of one-dimensional PBG materials doped with Kerr-type nonlinear material, while, the second area is focused on the mechanisms responsible for the gap formation as well as other properties of two-dimensional PBG materials. He first studied, in Chapter 2, the general adequacy of an approximate structure model in which the nonlinearity is assumed to be concentrated in equally-spaced very thin layers, or 6-functions, while the rest of the space is linear. This model had been used before, but its range of validity and the physical reasons for its limitations were not quite clear yet. He performed an extensive examination of many aspects of the model's nonlinear response and comparison against more realistic models with finite-width nonlinear layers, and found that the d-function model is quite adequate, capturing the essential features in the transmission characteristics. The author found one exception, coming from the deficiency of processing a rigid bottom band edge, i.e. the upper edge of the gaps is always independent of the refraction index contrast. This causes the model to miss-predict that there are no soliton solutions for a positive Kerr-coefficient, something known to be untrue.

  2. Precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, Sarah Alam; /University Coll. London

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson is presented. The W bosons are produced in proton antiproton collisions occurring at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron accelerator. The data used for the analyses is collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and corresponds to an average integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} for the W width analysis for the electron and muon channels and an average integrated luminosity of 2350 pb{sup -1} for the W mass analysis. The mass and width of the W boson is extracted by fitting to the transverse mass distribution, with the peak of the distribution being most sensitive to the mass and the tail of the distribution sensitive to the width. The W width measurement in the electron and muon channels is combined to give a final result of 2032 {+-} 73 MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the W mass from the recoil of the W boson against the initial state gluon radiation is discussed. A systematic study of the recoil in Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events where one electron is reconstructed in the central calorimeter and the other in the plug calorimeter and its effect on the W mass is presented for the first time in this thesis.

  3. Results of the GAP-4 experiment on molten-fuel drainage through intersubassembly gap geometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.W.; Vetter, D.; Wesel, R.; Sienicki, J.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key issues in assessment of the meltout phase of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in the LMFBR system involves the timing and paths for dispersal of molten fuel from the disrupted core. A program of experiments is underway at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate molten fuel penetration through these postulated escape paths. The purpose of the GAP-4 test was to examine the penetration distances of molten fuel flowing through the flat, narrow channels representing the intersubassembly gap geometry. In the experiment design, the gap geometry was selected to be two-dimensional on the basis that the gap volume in a reactor design would be interconnected and continuous. The molten fuel used in these tests was a mixture of UO/sub 2/ (81%) and molybdenum (19%) which was generated by an exothermic thermite reaction at a temperature of approx. 3470 K.

  4. LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION FOR SMALL-GAP VACUUM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim March 27, 1998 Summary - Induced charges on a four-button beam...

  5. Measurement of J/psi leptonic width with the KEDR detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Grigoriev, D N; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kudryavtsev, V N; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a new precise determination of the leptonic widths of the J/psi meson performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider. The measured values of the J/psi parameters are: \\Gamma_{ee}\\times\\Gamma_{ee}/\\Gamma = 0.3323 \\pm 0.0064 (stat.) \\pm 0.0048 (syst.) keV \\Gamma_{ee}\\times\\Gamma_{\\mu\\mu}/\\Gamma=0.3318 \\pm 0.0052 (stat.) \\pm 0.0063 (syst.) keV. Assuming $e\\mu$ universality and using the table value of the branching ratios the leptonic \\Gamma_{ll}= 5.59 \\pm 0.12 keV width and the total \\Gamma=94.1 \\pm 2.7 keV widths were obtained. We also discuss in detail a method to calculate radiative corrections at a narrow resonance.

  6. Reappraising Transition Region Line Widths in light of Recent Alfvén Wave Discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott W. McIntosh; Bart De Pontieu; Theodore D. Tarbell

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a new interpretation of ultraviolet transition region emission line widths observed by the SUMER instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This investigation is prompted by observations of the chromosphere at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode revealing that all chromospheric structures above the limb display significant transverse (Alfvenic) perturbations. We demonstrate that the magnitude, network sensitivity and apparent center-to-limb isotropy of the measured line widths (formed below 250,000K) can be explained by an observationally constrained forward-model in which the line width is caused by the line-of-sight superposition of longitudinal and Alfvenic motions on the small-scale (spicular) structures that dominate the chromosphere and low transition region.

  7. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  8. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  9. On fixed-gap adiabatic quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computation has revolutionary potential for speeding algorithms and for simulating quantum systems such as molecules. We report here a quantum computer design that performs universal quantum computation within a single non-degenerate ground state protected from decohering noise by an energy gap that we argue is system-size-independent. Closely analogous to a traditional electric circuit, it substantially changes the requirements for quantum computer construction, easing measurement, timing, and heating problems. Using the standard adiabatic condition, we present evidence that this design permits "quantum concurrent processing" distributing a quantum computation among extra qubits to perform a quantum algorithm of N gates in an amount of time that scales with the square root of N. One consequence of our work is a fixed gap version of adiabatic quantum computation, which several arguments hinted could be impossible.

  10. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward (Pinole, CA); Bourret-Courchesne, Edith (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Marvin J. (Danville, CA); Klintenberg, Mattias K. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  11. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  12. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  13. Combination of CDF and D0 Results on the W-Boson Width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results on the direct measurements of the W-boson width, based on the data collected by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 at Fermilab during Run-I from 1992 to 1996 and Run-II since 2001 are summarized. The combination of the published Run-I and preliminary Run-II results, taking correlated uncertainties properly into account, is presented. The resulting preliminary Tevatron average for the total decay width of the W boson is: {Lambda}{sub W} = 2078 {+-} 87 MeV, where the total error consists of a statistical part of 62 MeV and a systematic part of 60 MeV.

  14. Vehicle Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, C.; Buttner, W.; Rivkin, C.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies gaps in vehicle codes and standards and recommends ways to fill the gaps, focusing on six alternative fuels: biodiesel, natural gas, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, and propane.

  15. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to...

  16. Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhaohong

    Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped n-type Ge is observed through photoluminescence measurements by determining the spectrum peak shift. A linear relationship between the direct band gap emission and carrier concentration ...

  17. Substrate-induced band gap opening in epitaxial graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H.A. Electronic states of graphene nanoribbons studied withS.G. Louie. Energy gaps in graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.band-gap engineering of graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.

  18. Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Print Thursday, 19 December 2013 11:01 Using novel materials to develop...

  19. Bridging the Efficiency Gap: Commercial Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridging the Efficiency Gap: Commercial Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioners John Shugars, Consultant ofcommercialpackaged air conditioners, explore the reasons behindthis efficiency gap, and assess opportunities). Although sales of rooftop air conditioners have steadily increased over the past decade, the efficiency

  20. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonia Cafieri, Alberto Costa, Pierre Hansen. February 2012. Unconstrained Optimization Smoothing SQP Algorithm for Non-Lipschitz Optimization with ...

  1. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  2. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  3. Optimization Online - Global Optimization Submissions - 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  4. Optimization Online - Global Optimization Submissions - 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  5. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  6. Optimization Online - Combinatorial Optimization Submissions - 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  7. Superconducting gap evolution in overdoped BaFe?(As1-xPx)? single crystals through nanocalorimetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campanini, D.; Diao, Z.; Fang, L.; Kwok, W.-K.; Welp, U.; Rydh, A.

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on specific heat measurements on clean overdoped BaFe?(As1-xPx)? single crystals performed with a high resolution membrane-based nanocalorimeter. A nonzero residual electronic specific heat coefficient at zero temperature ?r=C/T|T?0 is seen for all doping compositions, indicating a considerable fraction of the Fermi surface ungapped or having very deep minima. The remaining superconducting electronic specific heat is analyzed through a two-band s-wave ? model in order to investigate the gap structure. Close to optimal doping we detect a single zero-temperature gap of ??~5.3 me V, corresponding to ??/kBTc ~ 2.2. Increasing the phosphorus concentration x, the main gap reduces tillmore »a value of ?? ~ 1.9 meV for x = 0.55 and a second weaker gap becomes evident. From the magnetic field effect on ?r, all samples however show similar behavior [?r(H) - ?r (H = 0)? Hn, with n between 0.6 and 0.7]. This indicates that, despite a considerable redistribution of the gap weights, the total degree of gap anisotropy does not change drastically with doping.« less

  8. Superconducting gap evolution in overdoped BaFe?(As1-xPx)? single crystals through nanocalorimetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campanini, D.; Diao, Z.; Fang, L.; Kwok, W.-K.; Welp, U.; Rydh, A.

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on specific heat measurements on clean overdoped BaFe?(As1-xPx)? single crystals performed with a high resolution membrane-based nanocalorimeter. A nonzero residual electronic specific heat coefficient at zero temperature ?r=C/T|T?0 is seen for all doping compositions, indicating a considerable fraction of the Fermi surface ungapped or having very deep minima. The remaining superconducting electronic specific heat is analyzed through a two-band s-wave ? model in order to investigate the gap structure. Close to optimal doping we detect a single zero-temperature gap of ??~5.3 me V, corresponding to ??/kBTc ~ 2.2. Increasing the phosphorus concentration x, the main gap reduces till a value of ?? ~ 1.9 meV for x = 0.55 and a second weaker gap becomes evident. From the magnetic field effect on ?r, all samples however show similar behavior [?r(H) - ?r (H = 0)? Hn, with n between 0.6 and 0.7]. This indicates that, despite a considerable redistribution of the gap weights, the total degree of gap anisotropy does not change drastically with doping.

  9. UV Spectra and Excitation Delocalisation in DNA: Influence of the Spectral Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    T)10. Calculations are performed in the frame of the exciton theory. Molecular dynamics calculations and molecular dynamics, which have been developed recently to describe charge transfer in DNA.[81 7/6/2006 UV Spectra and Excitation Delocalisation in DNA: Influence of the Spectral Width

  10. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  11. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle 335 - 359 [deg] 0 - 25 - 25 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to right side. b) If the angle within 335 - 359 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to left side. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image

  12. An Estimate of the Partial Width for X(3872) into p p-bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Braaten

    2008-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an estimate of the partial width of X(3872) into p p-bar under the assumption that it is a weakly-bound hadronic molecule whose constituents are a superposition of the charm mesons D^{*0} D-bar^0 and D^{0} D-bar^{*0}. The p p-bar partial width of X is therefore related to the cross section for p p-bar to D^{*0} D-bar^0 near the threshold. That cross section at an energy well above the threshold is estimated by scaling the measured cross section for p p-bar to K^{*-} K^+. It is extrapolated to the D^{*0} D-bar^0 threshold by taking into account the threshold resonance in the 1^{++} channel. The resulting prediction for the p p-bar partial width of X(3872) is proportional to the square root of its binding energy. For the current central value of the binding energy, the estimated partial width into p p-bar is comparable to that of the P-wave charmonium state chi_{c1}.

  13. Dielectron widths of the Upsilon(1S,2S,3S) resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the dielectron widths of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) resonances with better than 2% precision by integrating the cross section of e(+)e(-)->Upsilon over the e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energy. Using e(+)e(-) energy scans...

  14. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France)] [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Castel, Arnaud [Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Safety, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)] [Centre for Infrastructure Engineering and Safety, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied.

  15. Time evolution of the fission-decay width under the influence of dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jurado; K. -H. Schmidt; J. Benlliure

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Different analytical approximations to the time-dependent fission-decay width used to extract the influence of dissipation on the fission process are critically examined. Calculations with a new, highly realistic analytical approximation to the exact solution of the Fokker-Planck equation sheds doubts on previous conclusions on the dissipation strength made on the basis of less realistic approximations.

  16. Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen Department of Biology, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA Introduction Orb webs depend upon threads, the sticky spirals of orb webs perform two important functions during prey cap- ture. First

  17. Theory of resonance in uence of sawtooth crashes on ions with large orbit width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theory of resonance in uence of sawtooth crashes on ions with large orbit width Ya. I. Kolesnichenko, V. V. Lutsenko, R. B. White, and Yu. V. Yakovenko Scienti#12;c Centre \\Institute for Nuclear predictions are in agreement with exper- imental observations2{6 on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)7

  18. Theory of resonance influence of sawtooth crashes on ions with large orbit width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theory of resonance influence of sawtooth crashes on ions with large orbit width Ya. I \\Lambda Scientific Centre ``Institute for Nuclear Research'', Kyiv, 252650, Ukraine \\Lambda are in agreement with exper­ imental observations 2--6 on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) 7 and the Joint

  19. Real time pulse width monitor for Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) electro-optic shutters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, G.J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described or controlling and measuring the pulse width of electrical gate pulses used for optical shuttering of image intensifier. The intensifiers are coupled to high frame rate Charge-Coupled-Devices (CCD) or Focus-Projection Scan (FPS) vidicon TV cameras for readout and telemetry of time resolved image sequences. The shutter duration or gate width of individual shutters is measured in real time and encoded in the video frame corresponding to a given shutter interval. The shutter information is updated once catch video frame by strobing new data with each TV camera vertical sync pulse. This circuitry is used in conjunction with commercial video insertion/annotation equipment to provide die shutter width information in alpha numeric text form along with the time resolved video image on a frame-by-frame basis. The measurement technique and circuitry involving a combination of high speed digital counters and analog integrators for measurements in the Ins to 1024 ns range are described. The accuracy obtained is compared with measurements obtained using batch speed DSOs. The measured data are provided in 10-bit Binary (Bi) and four decades of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) and also displayed on four digit seven segment displays. The control circuitry including digital and analog input means for gate width selection are described. The implementation of both measurement and control circuitry into an Intensified Shuttered CCD (ISCCD) radiometric system for recording fast shuttered images at RS-170 to 4 KHz frame rates is presented.

  20. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Laerty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schar-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  1. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H?WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential of the process gg ? H? WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H? ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H ? WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H ? ZZ.

  2. Length: 238' Width: 55' Draft: 15' Full-load displacement: 3,024 LT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    AGOR 28 Length: 238' Width: 55' Draft: 15' Full-load displacement: 3,024 LT Berthing: 20 Crew, 24 profiling system, deep-, mid- and shallow-water acoustic doppler current profilers, acoustic navigation safety and load control · Condition-based power monitoring system for improved efficiency and control

  3. CO line width and the black hole -- bulge relationship at high redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue-Bing Wu

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, it has been suggested that the CO line width (FWHM(CO)) is a surrogate for the bulge velocity dispersion ($\\sigma$) of the host galaxies of high-redshift quasars, and the black hole -- bulge ($M_{BH}-\\sigma$) relation obtained with this assumption departs significantly from the $M_{BH}-\\sigma$ relation in the local universe. In this study, we first present an investigation of the correlation between the CO line width and the bulge velocity dispersion using a sample of 33 nearby Seyfert galaxies. We find that the formula adopted in previous studies, $\\sigma=\\rm{FWHM(CO)}/2.35$, is generally not a good approximation. Using it, one may underestimate the value of bulge velocity dispersion significantly when the CO line is narrower than 400 $km s^{-1}$. By involving the galactic inclination angle $i$ as an additional parameter, we obtain a tight correlation between the inclination-corrected CO line width and the bulge velocity dispersion, namely, $\\rm {FWHM(CO)}/\\sin i=-67.16\\pm80.18+(3.62\\pm0.68)\\sigma$. Using this new relation, we can better estimate the bulge velocity dispersion from the CO line width if the galactic inclination is known. We apply this new relation to nine high-redshift quasars with CO line detections and find that they are consistent with the local $M_{BH}-\\sigma$ relation if their inclination angles are around $15^o$. The possible smaller inclinations of the high-redshift quasars are preferred because of their relatively greater likelihood of detection, and are also consistent with their relatively smaller CO line widths compared to submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at high redshift having a similar total amount of molecular gas. Future observations are needed to confirm these results.

  4. Optimal Performance of Quantum Refrigerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tova Feldmann; Ronnie Kosloff

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reciprocating quantum refrigerator is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. We find that if the energy spectrum of the working medium possesses an uncontrollable gap, then there is a minimum achievable temperature above zero. Such a gap, combined with a negligible amount of noise, prevents adiabatic following during the demagnetization stage which is the necessary condition for reaching $T_c \\to 0$. The refrigerator is based on an Otto cycle where the working medium is an interacting spin system with an energy gap. For this system the external control Hamiltonian does not commute with the internal interaction. As a result during the demagnetization and magnetization segments of the operating cycle the system cannot follow adiabatically the temporal change in the energy levels. We connect the nonadiabatic dynamics to quantum friction. An adiabatic measure is defined characterizing the rate of change of the Hamiltonian. Closed form solutions are found for a constant adiabatic measure for all the cycle segments. We have identified a family of quantized frictionless cycles with increasing cycle times. These cycles minimize the entropy production. Such frictionless cycles are able to cool to $T_c=0$. External noise on the controls eliminates these frictionless cycles. The influence of phase and amplitude noise on the demagnetization and magnetization segments is explicitly derived. An extensive numerical study of optimal cooling cycles was carried out which showed that at sufficiently low temperature the noise always dominates restricting the minimum temperature.

  5. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  6. Closed Gap Enzen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityCleanInformation ClimateClio PowerClosed Gap

  7. A Simple Analytical Model for Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffell, Paul C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model is presented for calculating the surface density as a function of radius $\\Sigma(r)$ in protoplanetary disks in which a planet has opened a gap. This model is also applicable to circumbinary disks with extreme binary mass ratios. The gap profile can be solved for algebraically, without performing any numerical integrals. In contrast with previous one-dimensional gap models, this model correctly predicts that low-mass (sub-Jupiter) planets can open gaps in sufficiently low-viscosity disks, and it correctly recovers the power-law dependence of gap depth on planet-to-star mass ratio $q$, disk aspect ratio $h/r$, and dimensionless viscosity $\\alpha$ found in previous numerical studies. Analytical gap profiles are compared with numerical calculations over a range of parameter space in $q$, $h/r$, and $\\alpha$, demonstrating accurate reproduction of the "partial gap" regime, and general agreement over a wide range of parameter space.

  8. On band gaps in photonic crystal fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shane Cooper; Ilia Kamotski; Valery Smyshlyaev

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Maxwell's system for a periodic array of dielectric `fibers' embedded into a `matrix', with respective electric permittivities $\\epsilon_0$ and $\\epsilon_1$, which serves as a model for cladding in photonic crystal fibers (PCF). The interest is in describing admissible and forbidden (gap) pairs $(\\omega,k)$ of frequencies $\\omega$ and propagation constants $k$ along the fibers, for a Bloch wave solution on the cross-section. We show that, for "pre-critical" values of $k(\\omega)$ i.e. those just below $\\omega (\\min\\{\\epsilon_0,\\epsilon_1\\}\\mu)^{1/2}$ (where $\\mu$ is the magnetic permeability assumed constant for simplicity), the coupling specific to the Maxwell's systems leads to a particular partially degenerating PDE system for the axial components of the electromagnetic field. Its asymptotic analysis allows to derive the limit spectral problem where the fields are constrained in one of the phases by Cauchy-Riemann type relations. We prove related spectral convergence. We finally give some examples, in particular of small size "arrow" fibers ($\\epsilon_0>\\epsilon_1$) where the existence of the gaps near appropriate "micro-resonances" is demonstrated by a further asymptotic analysis.

  9. Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2015-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated operators. In addition, the corresponding Witten index is invariant under compact and odd perturbations.

  10. Extended Supersymmetry in Gapped and Superconducting Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the many quantum field theoretical descriptions of graphene in $2+1$ dimensions, we present another field theoretical feature of graphene, in the presence of defects. Particularly, we shall be interested in gapped graphene in the presence of a domain wall and also for superconducting graphene in the presence of a vortex. As we explicitly demonstrate, the gapped graphene electrons that are localized on the domain wall are associated with four $N=2$ one dimensional supersymmetries, with each pair combining to form an extended $N=4$ supersymmetry with non-trivial topological charges. The case of superconducting graphene is more involved, with the electrons localized on the vortex being associated with $n$ one dimensional supersymmetries, which in turn combine to form an $N=2n$ extended supersymmetry with no-trivial topological charges. As we shall prove, all supersymmetries are unbroken, a feature closely related to the number of the localized fermions and also to the exact form of the associated operators. In addition, the corresponding Witten index is invariant under compact and odd perturbations.

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  12. Quantum confinement in GaP nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurich, B.K.; Smith, D.C.; Healy, M.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared GaP and GaAs nanoclusters from organometallic condensation reactions of E[Si(ChH{sub 3})3]3 (E = P, As) and GaCl{sub 3}. The size of the as synthesized clusters is 10 {Angstrom} to 15 {Angstrom}. Larger clusters of 20 {Angstrom} to 30 {Angstrom} size were obtained by thermal annealing of the as grown material. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline quality. A lattice contraction of 6.7% could be seen for 10 {Angstrom} sized GaAs clusters. The clusters are nearly spherical in shape. Optical absorption spectra show a distinct line which can be assigned to the fundamental transition of the quantum confined electronic state. The measured blue shift, with respect to the GaP bulk absorption edge is 0.53 eV. As the cluster is smaller than the exciton radius, we can calculate the cluster size from this blue shift and obtain 20.2 {Angstrom}, consistent with the results from X-ray diffraction of 19.5 {Angstrom} for the same sample.

  13. Interconnection networks synthesis and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis and Optimization . . . . . . . . . . .1.Wire Style Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . B. PowerSynthesis and Optimization . 1. Overview . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Fuzzy Optimality and Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Fuzzy Optimality and Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization M. Farina and P. Amato. Pareto optimality is someway ineffective for optimization problems with several (more than three) objectives. In fact the Pareto optimal set tends to become a wide portion of the whole design domain search

  15. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap.

  16. Arc voltage distribution skewness as an indicator of electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode gap of a VAR is monitored by determining the skewness of a distribution of gap voltage measurements. A decrease in skewness indicates an increase in gap and may be used to control the gap. 4 figs.

  17. NET - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online An E-Print Site for the Optimization Community. Network Optimization submissions; 2001 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009

  18. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  19. Constraints on the Higgs boson total width using H*(126) -> ZZ events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Covarelli

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints are set on the Higgs boson decay width, Gamma_H, using off-shell production and decay to ZZ in the four-lepton (4l), or two-lepton-two-neutrino (2l2nu) final states. The analysis is based on the data collected in 2012 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity L = 19.7 fb^{-1} at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A maximum-likelihood fit of invariant mass and kinematic discriminant distributions in the 4l case and of transverse mass or missing energy distributions in the 2l2nu case is performed. The result of it, combined with the 4l measurement near the resonance peak, leads to an upper limit on the Higgs boson width of Gamma_H < 4.2 x Gamma_H^SM at the 95% confidence level, assuming Gamma_H^SM = 4.15 MeV.

  20. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board.

  1. The In-medium Mass and Widths of Light Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djalali, C.; Paolone, M. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Weygand, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Wood, M. H. [Canisius College, Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY 14208 (United States); Nasseripour, R. [George Washington University, Department of Physics, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial restoration of chiral symmetry in ordinary nuclear matter suggests the modification of properties of vector mesons, such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei were performed at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The properties of the {rho}, {omega} and {phi} mesons were investigated via their rare leptonic decay to e+e-. This decay channel has an advantage over hadronic modes as it eliminates final state interactions in the nuclear matter. After subtracting the combinatorial background, the meson mass distributions were extracted for each of the nuclear targets. No significant mass shift is observed, however substantial increase in the widths of the mesons is reported.

  2. Expected Precision of Higgs Boson Partial Widths within the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Peter Lepage; Paul B. Mackenzie; Michael E. Peskin

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the sources of uncertainty in calculations of the partial widths of the Higgs boson within the Standard Model. The uncertainties come from two sources: the truncation of perturbation theory and the uncertainties in input parameters. We review the current status of perturbative calculations and note that these are already reaching the parts-per-mil level of accuracy for the major decay modes. The main sources of uncertainty will then come from the parametric dependences on alpha_s, m_b, and m_c. Knowledge of these parameters is systematically improvable through lattice gauge theory calculations. We estimate the precision that lattice QCD will achieve in the next decade and the corresponding precision of the Standard Model predictions for Higgs boson partial widths.

  3. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of ...

  4. Apparatus for controlling the scan width of a scanning laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, G.W.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Swept-wavelength lasers are often used in absorption spectroscopy applications. In experiments where high accuracy is required, it is desirable to continuously monitor and control the range of wavelengths scanned (the scan width). A system has been demonstrated whereby the scan width of a swept ring-dye laser, or semiconductor diode laser, can be measured and controlled in real-time with a resolution better than 0.1%. Scan linearity, or conformity to a nonlinear scan waveform, can be measured and controlled. The system of the invention consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, three CAMAC interface modules, and a microcomputer running a simple analysis and proportional-integral control algorithm. With additional modules, multiple lasers can be simultaneously controlled. The invention also includes an embodiment implemented on an ordinary PC with a multifunction plug-in board. 8 figs.

  5. Expected Precision of Higgs Boson Partial Widths within the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Peter Lepage; Paul B. Mackenzie; Michael E. Peskin

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the sources of uncertainty in calculations of the partial widths of the Higgs boson within the Standard Model. The uncertainties come from two sources: the truncation of perturbation theory and the uncertainties in input parameters. We review the current status of perturbative calculations and note that these are already reaching the parts-per-mil level of accuracy for the major decay modes. The main sources of uncertainty will then come from the parametric dependences on alpha_s, m_b, and m_c. Knowledge of these parameters is systematically improvable through lattice gauge theory calculations. We estimate the precision that lattice QCD will achieve in the next decade and the corresponding precision of the Standard Model predictions for Higgs boson partial widths.

  6. Galactic interstellar abundance surveys with IUE. II. The equivalent widths and column densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Steenberg, M.E.; Shull, J.M.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper continues a survey of interstellar densities, abundances, and cloud structure in the Galaxy, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Equivalent widths of 18 ultraviolet resonance transitions are presented and column densities for Si II, Mn II, Fe II, S II, and Zn II toward 261 early-type stars are derived. These equivalent widths and column densities agree within the stated errors of earlier Copernicus, BUSS, or IUE surveys of Mn II, Fe II, S II, and Zn II for 45 stars in common. The column densities are derived from single-component curves of growth with a common b-value based on that of Fe II and Si II. 63 references.

  7. Natural Dynamics for Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic and or natural dynamical systems (DSs) are dominated by sudden nonlinear processes such as neuroavalanches, gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, earthquakes etc. that exhibit scale-free statistics. These behaviors also occur in many nanosystems. On phase diagrams, these DSs belong to a finite-width phase that separates the phases of thermodynamic equilibrium and ordinary chaotic dynamics, and that is known under such names as intermittency, noise-induced chaos, and self-organized criticality. Within the recently formulated approximation-free cohomological theory of stochastic differential equations, the noise-induced chaos can be roughly interpreted as a noise-induced overlap between regular (integrable) and chaotic (non-integrable) deterministic dynamics so that DSs in this phase inherit the properties of the both. Here, we analyze this unique set of properties and conclude that such DSs must be the most efficient natural optimizers. Based on this understanding, we propose the method of the natural dyn...

  8. Measurement of high-energy (10–60 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J. F., E-mail: seelyjf@gmail.com; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Pereira, N. [Ecopulse Inc., P. O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 10–60 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 ?m in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 10–60 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  9. The S-D mixing and dielectron widths of higher charmonium 1{sup --} states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badalian, A. M., E-mail: badalian@itep.r [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Bakker, B. L. G. [Vrije Universiteit, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Netherlands); Danilkin, I. V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectron widths of {psi}(4040), {psi}(4160), and {psi}(4415), and their ratios are shown to be in good agreement with experiment, if in all cases the S-D mixing with a large mixing angle {theta} {approx_equal} 34 deg. is taken. Arguments are presented why continuum states give small contributions to the wave functions at the origin. We find that the Y (4360) resonance, considered as a pure 3 {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, would have very small dielectron width, {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y (4360)) = 0.060 keV. On the contrary, for large mixing between the 4 {sup 3}S{sub 1} and 3 {sup 3}D{sub 1} states with the mixing angle {theta} = 34.8 deg., {Gamma}{sub ee}({psi}(4415)) = 0.57 keV coincides with the experimental number, while a second physical resonance, probably Y (4360), has also a rather large {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y ({approx}4400)) = 0.61 keV. For the higher Y (4660) resonance, considered as a pure 5 {sup 3}S{sub 1} state, we predict the dielectron width {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y (4660)) = 0.70 keV, but it becomes significantly smaller, namely 0.31 keV, if the mixing angle between the 5 {sup 3}S{sub 1} and 4 {sup 3}D{sub 1} states has the characteristic value {theta} = 34 deg. The mass and dielectron width of the 6 {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium state are calculated.

  10. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Martel; E. Clinton; R. McWilliams; D. Lawrence; R. Miskimen; A. Ahmidouch; P. Ambrozewicz; A. Asratyan; K. Baker; L. Benton; A. Bernstein; P. Cole; P. Collins; D. Dale; S. Danagoulian; G. Davidenko; R. Demirchyan; A. Deur; A. Dolgolenko; G. Dzyubenko; A. Evdokimov; J. Feng; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; O. Glamazdin; V. Goryachev; V. Gyurjyan; K. Hardy; M. Ito; M. Khandaker; P. Kingsberry; A. Kolarkar; M. Konchatnyi; O. Korchin; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; M. Kubantsev; V. Kubarovsky; I. Larin; V. Matveev; D. McNulty; B. Milbrath; R. Minehart; V. Mochalov; S. Mtingwa; I. Nakagawa; S. Overby; E. Pasyuk; M. Payen; R. Pedroni; Y. Prok; B. Ritchie; C. Salgado; A. Sitnikov; D. Sober; W. Stephens; A. Teymurazyan; J. Underwood; A. Vasiliev; V. Verebryusov; V. Vishnyakov; M. Wood

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  11. Poisson statistics for random deformed band matrices with power law band width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Pchelin

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show Poisson statistics for random band matrices which diagonal entries have Gaussian components. These components are possibly as small as $n^{-\\varepsilon}$. Particularly, our result is applicable for a band matrix cut from the GUE with the band width satisfying $w^{3.5}density of states (DOS) is obtained for complex deformed Gaussian band matrices with arbitrary $w$. A lower estimate of the DOS is also proven for arbitrary $w$ in a certain class of band matrices.

  12. Hadronic decay width from finite-volume energy spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giudice, Pietro; Peardon, Michael J. [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard approach to determine the parameters of a resonance is based on the study of the volume dependence of the energy spectrum. In this work we study a non-linear sigma model coupled to a scalar field in which a resonance emerges. Using an analysis method introduced recently, based on the concept of probability distribution, it is possible to determine the mass and the width of the resonance.

  13. Nonlinear classical model for the decay widths of isoscalar giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papachristou, P. K.; Mavrommatis, E.; Diakonos, F. K. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, GR-15771, Athens (Greece); Constantoudis, V. [Institute of Microelectronics (IMEL), NCSR 'Demokritos', P. O. Box 60228, Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki, Greece 15310 and Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece); Wambach, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in nuclei is studied by means of a nonlinear classical model consisting of several noninteracting nucleons (particles) moving in a potential well with an oscillating nuclear surface (wall). The motion of the nuclear surface is described by means of a collective variable that appears explicitly in the Hamiltonian as an additional degree of freedom. The total energy of the system is therefore conserved. Although the particles do not directly interact with each other, their motions are indirectly coupled by means of their interaction with the moving nuclear surface. We consider as free parameters in this model the degree of collectivity and the fraction of nucleons that participate to the decay of the collective excitation. Specifically, we have calculated the decay width of the ISGMR in the spherical nuclei {sup 208}Pb, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 116}Sn, and {sup 90}Zr. Despite its simplicity and its purely classical nature, the model reproduces the trend of the experimental data that show that with increasing mass number the decay width decreases. Moreover the experimental results (with the exception of {sup 90}Zr) can be well fitted using appropriate values for the free parameters mentioned above. It is also found that these values allow for a good description of the experimentally measured {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn decay widths. In addition, we give a prediction for the decay width of the exotic isotope {sup 132}Sn for which there is experimental interest. The agreement of our results with the corresponding experimental data for medium-heavy nuclei is dictated by the underlying classical mechanics, i.e., the behavior of the maximum Lyapunov exponent as a function of the system size.

  14. A bi-criterion optimization approach for the design and planning of hydrogen supply chains for vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    " and delivered elsewhere as a liquid or gas by truck or pipeline.2 Thus, there is still a large gap to achieve the optimal design of the production-distribution network capable of satisfying a predefined hydrogen demand

  15. Optimization Online - Optimality conditions for various efficient ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong Xuan Duc Ha

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Optimality conditions for various efficient solutions involving coderivatives: from set-valued optimization problems to set-valued equilibrium ...

  16. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Second-order necessary conditions in Pontryagin form for optimal control problems ... of Linear-Quadratic Optimal Control Problems for Two-Steps Systems

  17. Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimization Submissions - 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2014. Constrained Nonlinear Optimization New active set identification for general constrained optimization and minimax problems. Jin-bao Jian, Yi Liu.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard (INL); Perez, Danielle (INL)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  19. Optimization Jason Courter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    Optimization Jason Courter Foundations of Ecology #12;What is optimization? Maximization Minimization Optimization Natural Selection 1. Variation 2. Heritable Variation 3. Differential Reproduction #12;On Optimal use of a Patchy Environment · Robert MacArthur · Eric Pianka http

  20. Advanced Review Geometry optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Advanced Review Geometry optimization H. Bernhard Schlegel Geometry optimization is an important part of most quantum chemical calcu- lations. This article surveys methods for optimizing equilibrium geometries, lo- cating transition structures, and following reaction paths. The emphasis is on optimizations

  1. [SIAM conference on optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are presented of 63 papers on the following topics: large-scale optimization, interior-point methods, algorithms for optimization, problems in control, network optimization methods, and parallel algorithms for optimization problems.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: projected gap between western U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projected gap between western U.S. water supply and demand Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity On...

  3. Rapidity gaps in jet events at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Abolins, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Delhi Univ. (India)] [and others; D0 Collaboration

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results from the D0 experiment on jet production with rapidity gaps in p{anti p} collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies {radical}s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard diffractive process. A class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange.

  4. alteration print gap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elihu, David Morad 2006-01-01 2 Bridging the Gap: Automated Steady Scaffoldings for 3D Printing Jrmie Dumas Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  5. acoustic band gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 2 Acoustic band gap...

  6. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Fire Protection Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  7. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic...

  8. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Nuclear Explosive Safety Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

  9. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  10. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Studies on a simple platinum-alumina...

  11. 2006 - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  12. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Linear, Cone and Semidefinite ... Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society.

  13. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Combinatorial Optimization. 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011

  14. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Integer Programming ... Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society.

  15. Optimization Online - Digest Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Digest Archive. Subscribe to the digest. ... Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society. Mathematical Optimization Society.

  16. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Complementarity and ... Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Optmization Society.

  17. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Nonlinear Optimization. 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 ...

  18. Optimization Online - Coordinators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online submissions are electronically handled by a team of ... OR and Management Sciences / Integer Programming / Robust Optimization ...

  19. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets.) A rough cost/benefit analysis showed that increasing the number of empty buckets to 3 decreased the kicker system cost by {approx}30%. This could be done while not extending the running time since this is only a 1% reduction in protons per pulse, hence the rise and fall time are now 57 ns. Additionally, the {+-}1% tolerance would have required a fast correction kicker while {+-}3% could be achieved without this kicker. The loosened tolerance was based on experience on wide band damping systems in the MI. A higher power wideband damping system is a better use of the resources as it can be used to correct for multiple sources of emittance growth. Finally, with the use of this system for MI instead of Recycler, the required strength grew from 1.2 mrad to 1.7 mrad. The final requirements for this kicker are listed.

  20. Matlab-based Optimization: Optimization Toolbox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Matlab-based Optimization: the Optimization Toolbox Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff@vt.edu ) 3:00pm Engineering ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 37 #12;Matlab's Optimization Toolbox Classifying Optimization Problems A Soup Can Example Intermezzo A Trajectory Example 2nd Trajectory Example

  1. Event-driven multithreaded dynamic optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Weifeng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Speci?c Optimizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.3. Trace Optimization Overhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dynamic Optimization . . . . . . .B. Optimizations with the

  2. Spectral line width decrease in the solar corona: resonant energy conversion from Alfv{é}n to acoustic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Zaqarashvili; R. Oliver; J. L. Ballester

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations reveal an increase with height of the line width of several coronal spectral lines probably caused by outwardly propagating Alfv{\\'e}n waves. However, the spectral line width sometimes shows a sudden decrease at a height 0.1-0.2 R, where the ratio of sound to Alfven speeds may approach unity. Qualitative analysis shows that the resonant energy conversion from Alfven to acoustic waves near the region of the corona where the plasma $\\beta$ approaches unity may explain the observed spectral line width reduction.

  3. Statistical distributions of level widths and conductance peaks in irregularly shaped quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhassid, Y.; Lewenkopf, C.H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for width and conductance peak distributions for quantum dots with multichannel leads in the Coulomb blockade regime are presented for both limits of conserved and broken time-reversal symmetry. The results are valid for any number of nonequivalent and correlated channels, and the distributions are expressed in terms of the channel correlation matrix {ital M} in each lead. The matrix {ital M} is also given in closed form. A chaotic billiard is used as a model to test numerically the theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  4. Variable-gap selective photocells based on Ga/sub 1-x/Al/sub x/As:Ge:Te p-n structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessolov, V.N.; Danilova, T.N.; Imenkov, A.N.; Tsarenkov, B.V.; Yakovlev, Y.P.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doping of Ga/sub 1-x/Al/sub x/As solid solutions with Ge and Te increased the steepness of the fundamental absorption edge and this reduced the width of the quantum photosensitivity spectra of variable-gap selective p-n junction photocells made by depositing epitaxial films of these solid solutions on n-type GaAs substrates. The current-voltage and load characteristics of the photocells were detemined. The efficiency of conversion of the optical into electrical energy was 0.42--0.43 for the photocells with wider photosensitivity spectra and 0.3 for those with the narrowest spectra.

  5. SEMIEMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    SEMI­EMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS Tahir Cagin Research and Development Center, Materials Labarotory, Polymer Branch, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 geometries and energy band gaps of conjugated polymers. In this study, we used a modified version of semi

  6. Dependence of various SOL widths on plasma current and density in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, J; Maingi, R; Boedo, J; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of various SOL widths on the line-averaged density ({ovr n}{sub e}) and plasma current (l{sub p}) for the quiescent H-mode plasmas with Type-V ELMs in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) was investigated. It is found that the heat flux SOL width ({lambda}{sub q}), measured by the IR camera, is virtually insensitive to {ovr n}{sub e} and has a strong negative dependence on l{sub p}. This insensitivity of {lambda}{sub q} to {ovr n}{sub e} is consistent with the scaling law from JET H-mode plasmas that shows a very weak dependence on the upstream density. The electron temperature, ion saturation current density, electron density, and electron pressure decay lengths ({lambda}{sub Te}, {lambda}{sub jsat}, {lambda}{sub ne}, and {lambda}{sub pe}, respectively) measured by the probe showed that {lambda}{sub Te} and {lambda}{sub jsat} have strong negative dependence on l{sub p}, whereas {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} revealed only a little or no dependence. The dependence of {lambda}{sub Te} on l{sub p} is consistent with the scaling law in the literature while {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} dependence shows a different trend.

  7. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetstein, Matthew J.; /Maryland U.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (M{sub W}) and decay width ({Lambda}{sub W}) in 1 fb{sup -1} of W {yields} e{nu} collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass M{sub T}, p{sub T}(e), and E{sub T} distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the M{sub T} distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the p{sub T} and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be M{sub W} = 80.4035 {+-} 0.024(stat) {+-} 0.039(syst) from the M{sub T}, M{sub W} = 80.4165 {+-} 0.027(stat) {+-} 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.043(syst) from the E{sub T} distributions. {Lambda}{sub W} is measured to be {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.025 {+-} 0.038(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst) GeV.

  8. Determining matrix elements and resonance widths from finite volume: the dangerous mu-terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Takacs

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard numerical approach to determining matrix elements of local operators and width of resonances uses the finite volume dependence of energy levels and matrix elements. Finite size corrections that decay exponentially in the volume are usually neglected or taken into account using perturbation expansion in effective field theory. Using two-dimensional sine-Gordon field theory as "toy model" it is shown that some exponential finite size effects could be much larger than previously thought, potentially spoiling the determination of matrix elements in frameworks such as lattice QCD. The particular class of finite size corrections considered here are mu-terms arising from bound state poles in the scattering amplitudes. In sine-Gordon model, these can be explicitly evaluated and shown to explain the observed discrepancies to high precision. It is argued that the effects observed are not special to the two-dimensional setting, but rather depend on general field theoretic features that are common with models relevant for particle physics. It is important to understand these finite size corrections as they present a potentially dangerous source of systematic errors for the determination of matrix elements and resonance widths.

  9. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the Ds1(2536)+ Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay width and mass of the D{sub s1}(2536){sup +} meson are measured via the decay channel D{sub s1}{sup +} {yields} D*{sup +} K{sub S}{sup 0} using 385 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector in the vicinity of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. The result for the decay width is {Gamma}(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV. For the mass, a value of m(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 2535.08 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.15 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} is obtained. The mass difference between the D{sub s1}{sup +} and the D*{sup +} is measured to be m(D{sub s1}{sup +})-m(D*{sup +}) = 524.83 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, representing a significant improvement compared to the current world average. The unnatural spin-parity assignment for the D{sub s1}{sup +} meson is confirmed.

  10. The nucleon thermal width due to pion-baryon loops and its contribution in Shear viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabyasachi Ghosh

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the real-time thermal field theory, the standard expression of shear viscosity for the nucleonic constituents is derived from the two point function of nucleonic viscous stress tensors at finite temperature and density. The finite thermal width or Landau damping is traditionally included in the nucleon propagators. This thermal width is calculated from the in-medium self-energy of nucleon for different possible pion-baryon loops. The dynamical part of nucleon-pion-baryon interactions are taken care by the effective Lagrangian densities of standard hadronic model. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of nucleonic component decreases with the temperature and increases with the nucleon chemical potential. However, adding the contribution of pionic component, total viscosity to entropy density ratio also reduces with the nucleon chemical potential when the mixing effect between pion and nucleon components in the mixed gas is considered. Within the hadronic domain, viscosity to entropy density ratio of the nuclear matter is gradually reducing as temperature and nucleon chemical potential are growing up and therefore the nuclear matter is approaching toward the (nearly) perfect fluid nature.

  11. A Precision Measurement of the Ds1 (2536)+ Meson Mass and Decay Width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BABAR Collaboration,

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay width and the mass of the D{sub s1}(2536){sup {+-}} have been measured via the decay channel D{sub s1}{sup {+-}} {yields} D*{sup {+-}}K{sub S}{sup 0} using 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The result for the decay width is {Lambda}(D{sub s1}{sup {+-}}) = (1.03 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.12) MeV/c{sup 2}, with the first error denoting the statistical uncertainty and the second one the systematic uncertainty. For the mass, a value of m(D{sub s1}{sup {+-}}) = (2534.85 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.40) MeV/c{sup 2} has been obtained. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the D*{sup {+-}} mass. The mass difference between the D{sub s1}{sup {+-}} and D*{sup {+-}} has been measured to be {Delta}m = (524.85 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.04) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Method and apparatus for pulse width modulation control of an AC induction motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geppert, Steven (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Slicker, James M. (Union Lake, MI)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a micro-processor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .THETA., where .THETA. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands of electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  13. Above-threshold multiphoton detachment from the H- ion by 10.6-?m radiation: Angular distributions and partial widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Telnov, Dmitry A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general procedure for accurate nonperturbative treatment of the angular distribution and partial widths for multiphoton above-threshold detachment (ATD) of atoms or negative ions in intense laser fields. The procedure consists...

  14. Width dependent transition of quantized spin-wave modes in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} square nanorings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Saha, Susmita; Barman, Saswati; Barman, Anjan, E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Rousseau, Olivier [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, YoshiChika [CEMS-RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics in square shaped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanorings with varying ring width. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed whose frequencies showed a strong dependence on the ring width. Micromagnetic simulations showed different types of spin-wave modes, which are quantized upto very high quantization number. In the case of widest ring, the spin-wave mode spectrum shows quantized modes along the applied field direction, which is similar to the mode spectrum of an antidot array. As the ring width decreases, additional quantization in the azimuthal direction appears causing mixed modes. In the narrowest ring, the spin-waves exhibit quantization solely in azimuthal direction. The different quantization is attributed to the variation in the internal field distribution for different ring width as obtained from micromagnetic analysis and supported by magnetic force microscopy.

  15. The optimization problem Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    The optimization problem Genetic Algorithm Particle Swarm Optimization Experimental results for time-power optimization META, October 27-31, 2014 1 / 25 #12;The optimization problem Genetic Algorithm Particle Swarm Optimization Experimental results Conclusions Time and energy optimization Traditionally

  16. Optimization of the Ballistic Guide Design for the SNS FNPB 8.9 A Neutron Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeyasu M. Ito; Christopher B. Crawford; Geoffrey L. Greene

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of the ballistic guide design for the SNS Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline 8.9 A line is described. With a careful tuning of the shape of the curve for the tapered section and the width of the straight section, this optimization resulted in more than 75% increase in the neutron flux exiting the 33 m long guide over a straight m=3.5 guide with the same length.

  17. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Ahn, J- W [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maqueda, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Boedo, J. [Univ. of California at San Diego, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. M. Kaye, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  18. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; et al

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore »simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  19. Industrial Optimization Compact Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirches, Christian

    Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

  20. Physics of band-gap formation and its evolution in the pillar-based phononic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Khelif, Abdelkrim [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the interplay of Bragg scattering and local resonance is theoretically studied in a phononic crystal (PnC) structure composed of a silicon membrane with periodic tungsten pillars. The comparison of phononic band gaps (PnBGs) in three different lattice types (i.e., square, triangular, and honeycomb) with different pillar geometries shows that different PnBGs have varying degrees of dependency on the lattice symmetry based on the interplay of the local resonances and the Bragg effect. The details of this interplay is discussed. The significance of locally resonating pillars, specially in the case of tall pillars, on PnBGs is discussed and verified by examining the PnBG position and width in perturbed lattices via Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the PnBGs caused by the local resonance of the pillars are more resilient to the lattice perturbations than those caused by Bragg scattering.

  1. Filling Knowledge Gaps with Five Fuel Cycle Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Jess Gehin; William Halsey; Temitope Taiwo

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 2010, five studies were conducted of technology families’ applicability to various fuel cycle strategies to fill in knowledge gaps in option space and to better understand trends and patterns. Here, a “technology family” is considered to be defined by a type of reactor and by selection of which actinides provide fuel. This report summarizes the higher-level findings; the detailed analyses and results are documented in five individual reports, as follows: • Advanced once through with uranium fuel in fast reactors (SFR), • Advanced once through (uranium fuel) or single recycle (TRU fuel) in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), • Sustained recycle with Th/U-233 in light water reactors (LWRs), • Sustained recycle with Th/U-233 in molten salt reactors (MSR), and • Several fuel cycle missions with Fusion-Fission Hybrid (FFH). Each study examined how the designated technology family could serve one or more designated fuel cycle missions, filling in gaps in overall option space. Each study contains one or more illustrative cases that show how the technology family could be used to meet a fuel cycle mission, as well as broader information on the technology family such as other potential fuel cycle missions for which insufficient information was available to include with an illustrative case. None of the illustrative cases can be considered as a reference, baseline, or nominal set of parameters for judging performance; the assessments were designed to assess areas of option space and were not meant to be optimized. There is no implication that any of the cases or technology families are necessarily the best way to meet a given fuel cycle mission. The studies provide five examples of 1-year fuel cycle assessments of technology families. There is reasonable coverage in the five studies of the performance areas of waste management and uranium utilization. The coverage of economics, safety, and proliferation resistance and physical protection in the five studies was spotty. Some studies did not have existing or past work to draw on in one or more of these areas. Resource constraints limited the amount of new analyses that could be performed. Little or no assessment was done of how soon any of the technologies could be deployed and therefore how quickly they could impact domestic or international fuel cycle performance. There were six common R&D needs, such as the value of advanced fuels, cladding, coating, and structure that would survive high neutron fluence. When a technology family is considered for use in a new fuel cycle mission, fuel cycle performance characteristics are dependent on both the design choices and the fuel cycle approach. For example, the use of the sodium-cooled fast reactor to provide recycle in either breeder or burner mode has been studied for decades, but the SFR could be considered for once-through fuel cycle with the physical reactor design and fuel management parameters changed. In addition, the sustained recycle with Th/U-233 in LWR could be achieved with a heterogeneous assembly and derated power density. Therefore, it may or may not be adjustable for other fuel cycle missions although a reactor intended for one fuel cycle mission is built. Simple parameter adjustment in applying a technology family to a new fuel cycle mission should be avoided and, if observed, the results viewed with caution.

  2. British Academy (e-GAP2) Guide for Applicants The British Academy e-GAP2 applicant guide July 2012 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Academy (e-GAP2) Guide for Applicants The British Academy e-GAP2 applicant guide July 2012 Page 1 2012 INTERNAL USER GUIDE A Guide to the British Academy Electronic Submission System (e-GAP2) A Quick Guide for Applicants applying for funding using the e-GAP2 System The British Academy web page

  3. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barhen, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Unconstrained Optimization and Nonlinear Equations,equality constrained optimization, SIAM J. Optim. , 7, 28.R. , Practical Methods of Optimization, Wiley, New York, 436

  4. Pairing Gaps, Pseudogaps, and Phase Diagrams for Cuprate Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Sun; Mike Guidry; Cheng-Li Wu

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a symmetry-constrained variational procedure to construct a generalization of BCS to include Cooper pairs with non-zero momentum and angular momentum. The resulting gap equations are solved at zero and finite temperature, and the doping-dependent solutions are used to construct gap and phase diagrams. We find a pseudogap terminating at a critical doping that may be interpreted in terms of both competing order and preformed pairs. The strong similarity between observation and predicted gap and phase structure suggests that this approach may provide a unified description of the complex structure observed for cuprate superconductors.

  5. Essays on optimal taxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Catarina (Catarina Luis Monteiro dos)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies the optimal income tax scheme in four different settings. Chapter 1 focuses on the implications of lack of commitment for the optimal labor and capital income tax rates. It finds that it is optimal to ...

  6. Compiler Optimization Jordan Bradshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valtorta, Marco

    Compiler Optimization Jordan Bradshaw #12;Outline Overview Goals and Considerations ­ Scope. 346- 352. Print. "Compiler Optimization." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 25 04 2010. Web. 25 Apr 2010. #12;Compiler Optimization Goals: ­ Speed

  7. Pessimistic Bilevel Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiesemann, Wolfram

    We study a variant of the pessimistic bilevel optimization problem, which comprises constraints that must be satisfied for any optimal solution of a subordinate (lower-level) optimization problem. We present conditions ...

  8. Optimization Online - Convex and Nonsmooth Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convex Optimization Methods for Dimension Reduction and Coefficient Estimation in ... Impulsive Optimal Control of Hybrid Finite-Dimensional Lagrangian Systems ... Incremental-like Bundle Methods with Application to Energy Planning

  9. Optimized routing of unmanned aerial systems to address informational gaps in counterinsurgency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Andrew C. (Andrew Choong hon)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent military conflicts reveal that the ability to assess and improve the health of a society contributes more to a successful counterinsurgency (COIN) than direct military engagement. In COIN, a military commander ...

  10. Optimality gap of constant-order policies decays exponentially in the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, we further compute all expressions appearing in our bound in closed .... positive lead times, sometimes the best constant-order policy outperforms the ..... bounds tight enough to be useful in practice. ...... and consumer responses.

  11. Analysis and optimization of incompressible separated flow around an airfoil with two finite-gap flaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Murray Belser

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure Distribution, MS(1)-0313 with a 25% Slotted Flap (o - 0. 6 , 6f = 35 ) 69 LIST OF FIGURES (CONTINUED) Figure 18 Pressure Distribution, MS(1)-0313 with a 25% Slotted Flap (a = 9. 2 , 6f - 35 ) Page 70 19 Pressure Distribution, MS(1...)-0313 with a 25% Slotted Flap (a = 13. 6 , 6f - 35 ) 71 20 Pressure Distribution, MS(1)-0313 with a 25% Slotted Flap (a = 18. 6 , 6f - 35 ) 72 21 Pressure Distribution, GA(W)-1 with a 30% Fowler Flap (o = 0. 10 , 6f = 35 ) 74 22 Pressure Distribution, GA...

  12. Single line-of-sight dual energy backlighter for mix width experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, K. L., E-mail: baker7@llnl.gov; Glendinning, S. G.; Martinez, D.; Dittrich, T. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Felker, S.; Seugling, R.; Doane, D.; Wallace, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Guymer, T. M.; Moore, A. S. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Whiting, N.; Sorce, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a diagnostic technique used to spatially multiplex two x-ray radiographs of an object onto a detector along a single line-of-sight. This technique uses a thin, <2 ?m, cosputtered backlighter target to simultaneously produce both Ni and Zn He{sub ?} emission. A Ni picket fence filter, 500 ?m wide bars and troughs, is then placed in front of the detector to pass only the Ni He{sub ?} emission in the bar region and both energies in the trough region thereby spatially multiplexing the two radiographs on a single image. Initial experimental results testing the backlighter spectrum are presented along with simulated images showing the calculated radiographic images though the nickel picket fence filter which are used to measure the mix width in an accelerated nickel foam.

  13. Finite-Width Bundle is Most Stable in a Solution with Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuya Saito; Kenichi Yoshikawa

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied the mean-field approach to a columnar bundle assembled by the parallel arrangement of stiff polyelectrolyte rods in a salt bath. The electrostatic potential can be divided into two regions: inside the bundle for condensed counter-ions, and outside the bundle for free small ions. To determine the distribution of condensed counter-ions inside the bundle, we use a local self-consistent condition that depends on the charge density, the electrostatic potential, and the net polarization. The results showed that, upon bundle formation, the electric charge of polyelectrolytes, even those inside the bundle, tend to survive in an inhomogeneous manner, and thus their width remains finite under thermal equilibrium because of the long-range effect of charge instability.

  14. Temperature Width and Spin Structure of Superfluid 3He-A1 in Aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Baramidze; G. A. Kharadze

    2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of spin-exchange scattering centers on the triplet Cooper pairing is considered to explore the behavior of superfluid 3He in high porosity aerogel containing 3He atoms localized at the surface of silica strands. The homogeneously located and isotropically scattering system of spin-polarized ``impurity'' centers is adopted as a simple model to investigate the contribution of spin-exchange scattering chanel for quasiparticles to the formation of non-unitary superfluid A1-phase in aerogel environment. It is demonstrated that an interference between the potential and exchange parts of quasiparticle scattering against spin-polarized ``impurity'' centers can change considerably the temperature width and the spin structure of A_{1}-phase in aerogel.

  15. Optimization Online - Optimization Software and Modeling Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Software and Modeling Systems Submissions - 2009. March 2009. Modeling Languages and Systems A Structure-Conveying Modelling Language ...

  16. Optimization Online - Stochastic Topology Design Optimization for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Carrasco

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 8, 2014 ... Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering. Elsevier. Accepted. 2015 ... Optmization Society. Mathematical Optimization Society.

  17. Optimization Online - Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Cassioli

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 23, 2009 ... We propose to use a Support Vector Machine (although different machine ... Citation: Technical report - Global Optimization Laboratory, ...

  18. Optimization Online - Nonsmooth Optimization via BFGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian S. Lewis

    2008-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 14, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  19. Optimization Online - Optimal steepest descent algorithms for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cl vis Caesar Gonzaga

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 7, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  20. Optimization Online - Newton's Method for Multiobjective Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joerg Fliege

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 1, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  1. Optimization Online - A Robust Optimization Framework for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melvyn Sim

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 8, 2006 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  2. Optimization Online - Towards nonsymmetric conic optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yurii Nesterov

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 31, 2006 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  3. Two-photon widths of the {chi}{sub cJ} states of charmonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, K. M. [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a data sample of 24.5x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) the reactions {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub cJ}, {chi}{sub cJ}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} have been studied for the first time to determine the two-photon widths of the {chi}{sub cJ} states of charmonium in their decay into two photons. The measured quantities are B({psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c0})xB({chi}{sub c0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(2.17{+-}0.32{+-}0.10)x10{sup -5} and B({psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c2})xB({chi}{sub c2}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(2.68{+-}0.28{+-}0.15)x10{sup -5}. Using values for B({psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub c0,c2}) and {gamma}({chi}{sub c0,c2}) from the literature the two-photon widths are derived to be {gamma}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}({chi}{sub c0})=(2.36{+-}0.35{+-}0.22) keV, {gamma}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}({chi}{sub c2})=(0.66{+-}0.07{+-}0.06) keV, and R{identical_to}{gamma}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}({chi}{sub c2})/{gamma}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}({chi}{sub c0})=0.278{+-}0.050{+-}0.036. The importance of the measurement of R is emphasized. For the forbidden transition, {chi}{sub c1}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, an upper limit of {gamma}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}({chi}{sub c1})<0.03 keV is established.

  4. Beyond Optimality: New Trends in Network Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Mung

    , Princeton IEEE SAM Workshop July 2008 #12;Optimization Beyond Optimality Very different uses of optimization. Robustness to stochastic dynamics · IV. Feedback to engineering assumptions · V. Complexity Not much #12;Stochastic Noisy Feedback 0 5000 10000 15000 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Iteration Flowrate

  5. Optimization Online Moderation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Copyright Policy Copyright Policy By submitting a paper, all authors of the paper agree that other users of Optimization Online can download

  6. The optimal prediction method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burin des Roziers, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics. In optimal prediction. Communications press,and R. Kupferman. On the prediction of large- scale dynamicsand D. Levy. Optimal prediction and pertur- bation theory.

  7. Goal Driven Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The framework of stochastic optimization can also be adopted to address downside risk by optimizing over an expected utility or more recently, a mean risk

  8. Optimization Online - Digest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complete the form below to subscribe to the free Optimization Online Digest. ... Type your e-mail address to unsubscribe from the Optimization Online Digest.

  9. Optimization Online - Category Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Global Optimization. 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012

  10. Optimal refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen E. Allahverdyan; Karen Hovhannisyan; Guenter Mahler

    2010-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a refrigerator model which consists of two $n$-level systems interacting via a pulsed external field. Each system couples to its own thermal bath at temperatures $T_h$ and $T_c$, respectively ($\\theta\\equiv T_c/T_hrefrigerator functions in two steps: thermally isolated interaction between the systems driven by the external field and isothermal relaxation back to equilibrium. There is a complementarity between the power of heat transfer from the cold bath and the efficiency: the latter nullifies when the former is maximized and {\\it vice versa}. A reasonable compromise is achieved by optimizing the product of the heat-power and efficiency over the Hamiltonian of the two system. The efficiency is then found to be bounded from below by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}=\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{1-\\theta}}-1$ (an analogue of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency), besides being bound from above by the Carnot efficiency $\\zeta_{\\rm C} = \\frac{1}{1-\\theta}-1$. The lower bound is reached in the equilibrium limit $\\theta\\to 1$. The Carnot bound is reached (for a finite power and a finite amount of heat transferred per cycle) for $\\ln n\\gg 1$. If the above maximization is constrained by assuming homogeneous energy spectra for both systems, the efficiency is bounded from above by $\\zeta_{\\rm CA}$ and converges to it for $n\\gg 1$.

  11. Feasibility of band gap engineering of pyrite FeS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ruoshi

    We use first-principles computations to investigate whether the band gap of pyrite FeS? can be increased by alloying in order to make it a more effective photovoltaic material. In addition to the isostructural compounds ...

  12. Gap generation and semimetal-insulator phase transition in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Gamayun; E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap generation is studied in suspended clean graphene in the continuum model for quasiparticles with the Coulomb interaction. We solve the gap equation with the dynamical polarization function and show that, comparing to the case of the static polarization function, the critical coupling constant lowers to the value \\alpha_c=0.92, which is close to that obtained in lattice Monte Carlo simulations. It is argued that additional short-range four-fermion interactions should be included in the continuum model to account for the lattice simulation results. We obtain the critical line in the plane of electromagnetic and four-fermion coupling constants and find a second order phase transition separating zero gap and gapped phases with critical exponents close to those found in lattice calculations.

  13. Proper Sustainability: GAP Grant Proposal Work Plan Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this webinar I will discuss the new GAP grant requirements for tribal environmental programs and strategies for crafting a work plan that focuses on capacity building activities.  My goal is to...

  14. Combined Heat and Power: Connecting the Gap between Markets and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    801, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-8873 phone, (202) 429-2248 fax, http:aceee.org Web site CHP: Connecting the Gap, ACEEE Contents Acknowledgments......

  15. Combined Heat and Power: Connecting the Gap Between Markets and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    there seems to be very little new CHP. Instead, there are a large amount of photovoltaics in operation. Arizona is ideal for 22 CHP: Connecting the Gap (Part II), ACEEE...

  16. Plugging of intersubassembly gaps by downward flowing molten steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the assessment of the meltout phase of an LMFBR hypothetical core disruptive accident, a pathway for the escape of molten fuel from the disrupted core is provided by the narrow channels separating adjacent subassemblies. However, the removal of fuel through intersubassembly gaps might be impeded by steel blockage formation, if molten steel is postulated to enter the gap network ahead of disrupted fuel. Reported here are the results of an analysis of the conduction freezing controlled penetration behavior of molten steel flowing downward through the voided (of sodium) gap channels nominally separating adjacent subassemblies below the active core region. The objective is to determine the range of conditions under which the steel is predicted to be deposited as a thin crust on the channel walls leaving an open pathway remaining for subsequent fuel flow instead of forming a complete plug which closes off the gap channel and obstructs fuel removal immediately thereafter.

  17. Perspective The MAHB, the Culture Gap, and Some Really

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    is a product of population size, per capita consumption, and the sorts of technologies and social and economic systems that supply the consumption. A vast ``culture gap'' has developed over the past century or so

  18. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm...

  19. Bridging conduction and radiation : investigating thermal transport in nanoscale gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiloyan, Vazrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near field radiation transfer between objects separated by small gaps is a widely studied field in heat transfer and has become more important than ever. Many technologies such as heat assisted magnetic recording, aerogels, ...

  20. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  1. Excitonic gap, phase transition, and quantum Hall effect in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Gusynin; V. A. Miransky; S. G. Sharapov; I. A. Shovkovy

    2006-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that physics underlying the recently observed removal of sublattice and spin degeneracies in graphene in a strong magnetic field describes a phase transition connected with the generation of an excitonic gap. The experimental form of the Hall conductivity is reproduced and the main characteristics of the dynamics are described. Predictions of the behavior of the gap as a function of temperature and a gate voltage are made.

  2. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V., E-mail: bair@berkeley.edu; Bogy, David B., E-mail: dbogy@berkeley.edu [University of California, Etcheverry Hall, MC 1740, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  3. Indirect-to-direct band gap transition in relaxed and strained Ge{sub 1?x?y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attiaoui, Anis; Moutanabbir, Oussama [Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Sn-containing group IV semiconductors create the possibility to independently control strain and band gap thus providing a wealth of opportunities to develop an entirely new class of low dimensional systems, heterostructures, and silicon-compatible electronic and optoelectronic devices. With this perspective, this work presents a detailed investigation of the band structure of strained and relaxed Ge{sub 1?x?y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} ternary alloys using a semi-empirical second nearest neighbors tight binding method. This method is based on an accurate evaluation of the deformation potential constants of Ge, Si, and ?-Sn using a stochastic Monte-Carlo approach as well as a gradient based optimization method. Moreover, a new and efficient differential evolution approach is also developed to accurately reproduce the experimental effective masses and band gaps. Based on this, we elucidated the influence of lattice disorder, strain, and composition on Ge{sub 1?x?y}Si{sub x}Sn{sub y} band gap energy and directness. For 0???x???0.4 and 0???y???0.2, we found that tensile strain lowers the critical content of Sn needed to achieve a direct band gap semiconductor with the corresponding band gap energies below 0.76?eV. This upper limit decreases to 0.43?eV for direct gap, fully relaxed ternary alloys. The obtained transition to direct band gap is given by y?>?0.605?×?x?+?0.077 and y?>?1.364?×?x?+?0.107 for epitaxially strained and fully relaxed alloys, respectively. The effects of strain, at a fixed composition, on band gap directness were also investigated and discussed.

  4. Hydrogeologic Model for the Gable Gap Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Bruce A.; Last, George V.; Thomas, Gregory S.; Thompson, Michael D.; Ludwig, Jami L.; Lanigan, David C.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gable Gap is a structural and topographic depression between Gable Mountain and Gable Butte within the central Hanford Site. It has a long and complex geologic history, which includes tectonic uplift synchronous with erosional downcutting associated with the ancestral Columbia River during both Ringold and Cold Creek periods, and by the later Ice Age (mostly glacial Lake Missoula) floods. The gap was subsequently buried and partially backfilled by mostly coarse-grained, Ice Age flood deposits (Hanford formation). Erosional remnants of both the Ringold Formation and Cold Creek unit locally underlie the high-energy flood deposits. A large window exists in the gap where confined basalt aquifers are in contact with the unconfined suprabasalt aquifer. Several paleochannels, of both Hanford and Ringold Formation age, were eroded into the basalt bedrock across Gable Gap. Groundwater from the Central Plateau presently moves through Gable Gap via one or more of these shallow paleochannels. As groundwater levels continue to decline in the region, groundwater flow may eventually be cut off through Gable Gap.

  5. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic nanofocusing of plasmons by tapered gap plasmon waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pile, DFP; Gramotnev, D K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wave vector of the gap plasmon generated by a line sourcean adaptor between two gap plasmon waveguides of the widthslosses for the focused plasmons, because they have to

  6. Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholde...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholder's Perspective Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholder's Perspective...

  7. Investigating the book-tax income gap : factors which affect the gap and details regarding its most significant component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidman, Jeri

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) In total, my thesis suggests that recent changes in the book-tax income gap may be exogenous and transitory, due to changes to the calculation of book income, general business conditions or other factors which ...

  8. Catalyzed Water Oxidation by Solar Irradiation of Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors (Part 1. Overview).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita,E.; Khalifah, P.; Lymar, S.; Muckerman, J.T.; Rodgriguez, J.

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Investigate the catalysis of water oxidation by cobalt and manganese hydrous oxides immobilized on titania or silica nanoparticles, and dinuclear metal complexes with quinonoid ligands in order to develop a better understanding of the critical water oxidation chemistry, and rationally search for improved catalysts. (2) Optimize the light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities of stable semiconductors including both a focused effort to improve the best existing materials by investigating their structural and electronic properties using a full suite of characterization tools, and a parallel effort to discover and characterize new materials. (3) Combine these elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductor (BGNSC) surfaces and elucidate the core scientific challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

  9. Influence of gap spacing on the characteristics of Trichel pulse generated in point-to-plane discharge gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhen, E-mail: leezhen1988@gmail.com; Zhang, Bo, E-mail: shizbcn@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; He, Jinliang, E-mail: hejl@tsinghua.edu.cn; Xu, Yongsheng, E-mail: evebus@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the specific characteristics of the Trichel pulse generated in wide point-to-plane discharge gaps are investigated and compared with those of the currents generated in narrow gaps. A set of empirical formulas are derived to describe the specific characteristics. The influence of the gap spacing both on the current characteristics and on the coefficients of the formulas is studied. Based on the experiment results, an improvement is made to the space charge calculation method proposed by Lama and Gallo [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 103–113 (1974)] and the calculation results are compared to the ones obtained with Lama and Gallo's original method. With the influence of the space charge considered, the modified method obtains more accurate results of the space charge accumulating in the gap and gives a more precise description of the motion of the space charge in the gap. Based on the calculation results, the influence of the space charge on the distribution of the electric field is examined and the influence of the gap spacing on the current characteristics is also studied.

  10. Optimization Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Optimization Gordon K. Smyth Volume 3, pp 1481­1487 in Encyclopedia of Environmetrics (ISBN 0471 #12;Optimization Optimization is the process by which one finds that value of a vector x, say, that maximizes or minimizes a given function f x . The idea of optimization goes to the heart of statistical

  11. Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodwick, Weldon

    11 Optimization Under Generalized Uncertainty Optimization Modeling Math 4794/5794: Spring 2013 Weldon A. Lodwick Weldon.Lodwick@ucdenver.edu 2/14/2013 Optimization Modeling - Spring 2013 #12 in the context of optimization problems. The theoretical frame-work for these notes is interval analysis. From

  12. Fast Quantum Methods for Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Boixo; Gerardo Ortiz; Rolando Somma

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete combinatorial optimization consists in finding the optimal configuration that minimizes a given discrete objective function. An interpretation of such a function as the energy of a classical system allows us to reduce the optimization problem into the preparation of a low-temperature thermal state of the system. Motivated by the quantum annealing method, we present three strategies to prepare the low-temperature state that exploit quantum mechanics in remarkable ways. We focus on implementations without uncontrolled errors induced by the environment. This allows us to rigorously prove a quantum advantage. The first strategy uses a classical-to-quantum mapping, where the equilibrium properties of a classical system in $d$ spatial dimensions can be determined from the ground state properties of a quantum system also in $d$ spatial dimensions. We show how such a ground state can be prepared by means of quantum annealing, including quantum adiabatic evolutions. This mapping also allows us to unveil some fundamental relations between simulated and quantum annealing. The second strategy builds upon the first one and introduces a technique called spectral gap amplification to reduce the time required to prepare the same quantum state adiabatically. If implemented on a quantum device that exploits quantum coherence, this strategy leads to a quadratic improvement in complexity over the well-known bound of the classical simulated annealing method. The third strategy is not purely adiabatic; instead, it exploits diabatic processes between the low-energy states of the corresponding quantum system. For some problems it results in an exponential speedup (in the oracle model) over the best classical algorithms.

  13. Modeling and design optimization of adhesion between surfaces at the microscale.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylves, Kevin T. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research applies design optimization techniques to structures in adhesive contact where the dominant adhesive mechanism is the van der Waals force. Interface finite elements are developed for domains discretized by beam elements, quadrilateral elements or triangular shell elements. Example analysis problems comparing finite element results to analytical solutions are presented. These examples are then optimized, where the objective is matching a force-displacement relationship and the optimization variables are the interface element energy of adhesion or the width of beam elements in the structure. Several parameter studies are conducted and discussed.

  14. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malumbela, Goitseone, E-mail: malumbela@mopipi.ub.b [Dpt. of Civil Eng., Univ. of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7700 (South Africa); Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate [Dpt. of Civil Eng., Univ. of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7700 (South Africa)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  15. H-beta Line Width and the UV-X-ray Spectra of Luminous AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Wills; Z. Shang; J. M. Yuan

    2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The width of the broad H-beta emission line is the primary defining characteristic of the NLS1 class. This parameter is also an important component of Boroson and Green's optical Eigenvector 1 (EV1), which links steeper soft X-ray spectra with narrower H-beta emission, stronger H-beta blue wing, stronger optical Fe II emission, and weaker [O III] lambda 5007. Potentially, EV1 represents a fundamental physical process linking the dynamics of fueling and outflow with the accretion rate. We attempted to understand these relationships by extending the optical spectra into the UV for a sample of 22 QSOs with high quality soft-X-ray spectra, and discovered a whole new set of UV relationships that suggest that high accretion rates are linked to dense gas and perhaps nuclear starbursts. While it has been argued that narrow (BLR) H-beta means low Black Hole mass in luminous NLS1s, the C IV, lambda 1549 and Ly alpha emission lines are broader, perhaps the result of outflows driven by their high Eddington accretion rates. We present some new trends of optical-UV with X-ray spectral energy distributions. Steeper X-ray spectra appear associated with stronger UV relative to optical continua, but the presence of strong UV absorption lines is associated with depressed soft X-rays and redder optical-UV continua.

  16. Low mass dark matter and invisible Higgs width in darkon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Yi; Ren Bo [INPAC, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); He Xiaogang [INPAC, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model (SM) plus a real gauge-singlet scalar field dubbed darkon (SM+D) is the simplest model possessing a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter candidate. In this model, the parameters are constrained from dark matter relic density and direct searches. The fact that interaction between darkon and SM particles is only mediated by a Higgs boson exchange may lead to significant modifications to the Higgs boson properties. If the dark matter mass is smaller than half of the Higgs boson mass, then a Higgs boson can decay into a pair of darkons resulting in a large invisible branching ratio. The Higgs boson will be searched for at the LHC and may well be discovered in the near future. If a Higgs boson with a small invisible decay width will be found, the SM+D model with small dark matter mass will be in trouble. We find that by extending the SM+D to a two Higgs doublet model plus a darkon (THDM+D) it is possible to have a Higgs boson with a small invisible branching ratio and at the same time the dark matter can have a low mass. We also comment on other implications of this model.

  17. Interference effects of neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with a generalised narrow-width approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elina Fuchs

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing effects in the MSSM Higgs sector can give rise to a sizeable interference between the neutral Higgs bosons. On the other hand, factorising a more complicated process into production and decay parts by means of the narrow-width approximation (NWA) simplifies the calculation. The standard NWA, however, does not account for interference terms. Therefore, we introduce a generalisation of the NWA (gNWA) which allows for a consistent treatment of interference effects between nearly mass-degenerate particles. Furthermore, we apply the gNWA at the tree and 1-loop level to an example process where the neutral Higgs bosons $h$ and $H$ are produced in the decay of a heavy neutralino and subsequently decay into a fermion pair. The $h-H$ propagator mixing is found to agree well with the approximation of Breit-Wigner propagators times finite wave-function normalisation factors, both leading to a significant interference contribution. The factorisation of the interference term based on on-shell matrix elements reproduces the full interference result within a precision of better than 1% for the considered process. The gNWA also enables the inclusion of contributions beyond the 1-loop order into the most precise prediction.

  18. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  19. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balmes, Anthony A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Joseph T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Netz, Dana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Jacob B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  20. Schedule path optimization for quantum annealing and adiabatic quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lishan Zeng; Jun Zhang; Mohan Sarovar

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum annealing and adiabatic quantum computing have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent quantum annealing implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount.

  1. Impact on asteroseismic analyses of regular gaps in Kepler data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garc?a, R A; Pires, S; Regulo, C; Bellamy, B; Palle, P L; Ballot, J; Forteza, S Barcelo; Beck, P G; Bedding, T R; Ceillier, T; Cortes, T Roca; Salabert, D; Stello, D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NASA Kepler mission has observed more than 190,000 stars in the constellations of Cygnus and Lyra. Around 4 years of almost continuous ultra high-precision photometry have been obtained reaching a duty cycle higher than 90% for many of these stars. However, almost regular gaps due to nominal operations are present in the light curves at different time scales. In this paper we want to highlight the impact of those regular gaps in asteroseismic analyses and we try to find a method that minimizes their effect in the frequency domain. To do so, we isolate the two main time scales of quasi regular gaps in the data. We then interpolate the gaps and we compare the power density spectra of four different stars: two red giants at different stages of their evolution, a young F-type star, and a classical pulsator in the instability strip. The spectra obtained after filling the gaps in the selected solar-like stars show a net reduction in the overall background level, as well as a change in the background parameters....

  2. Linear conic optimization for nonlinear optimal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Didier Henrion

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2014 ... Abstract: Infinite-dimensional linear conic formulations are described for nonlinear optimal control problems. The primal linear problem consists ...

  3. Linear conic optimization for inverse optimal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edouard Pauwels

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 5, 2014 ... Abstract: We address the inverse problem of Lagrangian identification based on trajectories in the context of nonlinear optimal control.

  4. Optimization Online - Constrained optimization in seismic reflection ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Delbos

    2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2004 ... Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos (Frederic.Delbos ***at*** ifp.fr)

  5. Optimization Online - Global Optimization Submissions - 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Costa, Pierre Hansen, Leo Liberti. Theory A new look at nonnegativity on closed sets and polynomial optimization. Jean Bernard Lasserre. May 2011.

  6. Optimization Online - Stochastic Optimization for Power System ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig Kuznia

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2011 ... Stochastic Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas. Ludwig Kuznia(lkuznia ***at*** mail.usf.edu)

  7. Optimization Online - Structural optimization of the Ziegler's ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg N. Kirillov

    2010-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 24, 2010 ... Abstract: Structural optimization of non-conservative systems with ... with important applications in fluid-structure interactions, friction-induced ...

  8. Linear conic optimization for nonlinear optimal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2014 ... This linear transport equation is classical in fluid mechanics, statistical ... define a relaxed optimal control problem as an LP in the cone of non-.

  9. Optimization Online - Probabilistic optimization via approximate p ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. van vAckooij

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    May 27, 2015 ... Probabilistic optimization via approximate p-efficient points and bundle methods. W. van vAckooij(wim.van-ackooij ***at*** edf.fr )

  10. Optimization Online - Robust Optimization Submissions - 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Karimi, Somayeh Moazeni, Levent Tuncel. Robust optimization based self scheduling of hydro-thermal Genco in smart grids. Alireza Soroudi.

  11. Optimization Online - Optimal Scenario Tree Reduction for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W.L. Oliveira

    2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 21, 2008 ... Abstract: The mid-term operation planning of hydro-thermal power systems ... If the number of synthetic sequences is too big, the optimization ...

  12. Optimization Online - Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Belotti

    2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 2, 2012 ... Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization. Pietro Belotti(pbelott ***at*** clemson.edu) Sven Leyffer(leyffer ***at*** mcs.anl.gov) Christian ...

  13. Optimization Online - Convex and Nonsmooth Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Fractional Error Bounds for Nonconvex Polynomial Systems with Applications to Holderian Stability in Optimization G Li, B. S. Mordukhovich, T. S. Pham.

  14. Optimization Online - Convex and Nonsmooth Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Drusvyatskiy, A.D. Ioffe, A.S. Lewis. February 2014. Nonsmooth Optimization Variational Analysis of Circular Cone Programs Jinchuan Zhou, Jein-Shan Chen

  15. Optimization Online - Distributionally Robust Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfram Wiesemann

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 4, 2013 ... Abstract: Distributionally robust optimization is a paradigm for decision-making under uncertainty where the uncertain problem data is governed ...

  16. Optimization Online - Global Optimization via Slack Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 1, 2014 ... Citation: Siwale, I. (2014). Global optimization via slack variables. Technical Report No. RD-16-2013, London: Apex Research Ltd. Download: ...

  17. Optimization Online - Multilevel Optimization Modeling for Risk ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Eckstein

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 24, 2014 ... Abstract: Coherent risk measures have become a popular tool for incorporating risk aversion into stochastic optimization models. For dynamic ...

  18. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

  19. Regenerator optimization for Stirling cycle refrigeration II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic regenerator for a Stirling cycle is discussed using fractional loss or entropy gain as the criterion of performance. The gas losses are treated separately from heat storage medium losses. We argue that the optimum design corresponds to uniform channel flow with minimum turbulence where the gas velocity and channel width are optimized as a function of gas temperature. The maximization of heat transfer from the gas to the wall and the minimization of entropy production by friction leads to a gas flow velocity equal to sound speed times loss fraction, 1/{sigma}. This velocity and an axial thermal conductivity in the gas leads to a minimum channel width and characteristic length, L=T(dz/dT). A particular scaling of width, W{sup 2} = W{sub o}{sup 2}T{sup 1/2}, and length, L = L{sub o} T{sup {minus}1/2} leads to a design where longitudinal conduction decreases as T{sup 3/2} and the remaining two losses, transverse conduction and friction are equal and constant. The loss fraction, 1/{sigma}, must be made quite small, {approximately}(1/60) in order that the cumulative losses for a large temperature ratio like 300K to 4K, be small enough, like 20% to 40%. This is because half the entropy generated as a loss must be transported first to the cold end before returning to the hot end before being rejected. The dead volume ratio then determines the minimum frequency and with it and the pressure the necessary wall properties. The thermal properties of the channel wall must then accommodate this cyclic heat flow without substantially increasing the loss fraction. This generation of entropy in the walls is derived in terms of the wall heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  20. Giant radiation heat transfer through the micron gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nefedov, Igor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-field heat transfer between two closely spaced radiating media can exceed in orders radiation through the interface of a single black body. This effect is caused by exponentially decaying (evanescent) waves which form the photon tunnel between two transparent boundaries. However, in the mid-infrared range it holds when the gap between two media is as small as few tens of nanometers. We propose a new paradigm of the radiation heat transfer which makes possible the strong photon tunneling for micron thick gaps. For it the air gap between two media should be modified, so that evanescent waves are transformed inside it into propagating ones. This modification is achievable using a metamaterial so that the direct thermal conductance through the metamaterial is practically absent and the photovoltaic conversion of the transferred heat is not altered by the metamaterial.

  1. Finite-temperature lineshapes in gapped quantum spin chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian H. L. Essler; Robert M. Konik

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the finite-temperature dynamical structure factor (DSF) of gapped quantum spin chains such as the spin one Heisenberg model and the transverse field Ising model in the disordered phase. At zero temperature the DSF in these models is dominated by a delta-function line arising from the coherent propagation of single particle modes. Using methods of integrable quantum field theory we determine the evolution of the lineshape at low temperatures. We show that the line shape is in general asymmetric in energy and becomes Lorentzian only at temperatures far below the gap. We discuss the relevance of our results for the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering experiments on gapped spin chain systems such as CsNiCl_3 and YBaNiO_5.

  2. Prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena in large oil gaps under AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saker, A.; Gournay, P.; Lesaint, O.; Tobazeon, R. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. d`Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques; Trinh, N.G. [Inst. de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Boisdon, C. [Jeumont-Schneider Transformateurs, Lyon (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of prebreakdown and breakdown phenomena under AC voltage in mineral oil in large gaps to 60 cm. The investigations presented concern the study of streamers and the measurement of breakdown voltages in rod-plane and sphere-plane gaps. Also, the influence of a contamination by solid particles in the oil has been considered. A specific breakdown mode under AC voltage is evidenced, where bursts of streamers lead to the lowest breakdown fields recorded. Numerical values of the mean field in oil required for direct or burst breakdown modes are derived from the experiments. As a consequence, the great sensitivity to the presence of particles on EHV transformers insulation with large oil gaps is pointed out.

  3. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Fenggong, E-mail: fenggong@sas.upenn.edu; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M., E-mail: rappe@sas.upenn.edu [The Makineni Theoretical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104–6323 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2?eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics.

  4. Band gap engineering at a semiconductor - crystalline oxide interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moghadam, Jahangir-Moghadam; Shen, Xuan; Chrysler, Matthew; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Su, Dong; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO? and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We presentmore »structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO?-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.« less

  5. NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

  6. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  7. Narrow gap welding with the hot wire GTA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, G.E.; Levick, P.C.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrow gap welding offers the promise of dramatically improved weld completion rates and reduced heat input for welding of butt joints in materials of 10 mm (0.4 in.) section thickness and larger. Techniques for successful welding of narrow gap joint preparations have been discussed in the literature for approximately twenty years, with the majority of these based on the consumable electrode processes. Gas tungsten arc welding with cold wire filler addition has been shown to be capable of narrow gap welding although limited deposition rate capability has not made this a competitive alternative. The GTAW process offers the advantages of superior penetration control for one-sided welding of butt joints, as well as the potential for reducing incomplete fusion defects. The addition of hot wire filler metal to the gas tungsten arc provides an attractive alternative that combines high deposition rate capability and independent control of heat input.

  8. 1564 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 53, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 Schemes for Eliminating Transient-Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Frias, José G.

    1564 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 53, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 Schemes for Eliminating is the ability to bypass SEUs and SETs. This is crit- ical for performance, as it allows the system to proceed widths can be substantial (up to 2 ns), and so high-performance systems cannot afford to pause operations

  9. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  10. Testing the Lambda(1520) hyperon in-medium width in near-threshold proton-nucleus reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ya. Paryev

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the nuclear spectral function approach for incoherent primary proton-nucleon and secondary pion-nucleon production processes we study the inclusive Lambda(1520) hyperon production in the interaction of 2.83 GeV protons with nuclei. In particular, the A and momentum dependences of the absolute and relative Lambda(1520) hyperon yields are investigated in two scenarios for its in-medium width. Our model calculations show that the pion-nucleon production channel contributes distinctly to the "low-momentum" Lambda(1520) creation both in light and heavy nuclei in the chosen kinematics and, hence, has to be taken into consideration on close examination of the dependences of the Lambda(1520) hyperon yields on the target mass number with the aim of getting information on its width in the medium. They also demonstrate that both the A dependence of the relative Lambda(1520) hyperon production cross section and momentum dependence of the absolute Lambda(1520) hyperon yield at incident energy of interest are appreciably sensitive to the Lambda(1520) in-medium width, which means that these observables may be an important tool to determine the above width.

  11. Stark Widths and Shifts Dependence on the Rest Core Charge of the Emitters within ns-np Transition Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scepanovic, Mara [Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Montenegro, POB 211, 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Puric, Jagos [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, POB 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Stark width and shift simultaneous dependence on the upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitter has been evaluated and discussed. It has been verified that the found relations, connecting Stark broadening parameters with upper level ionization potential and rest core charge of the emitters for particular electron temperature and density, can be used for prediction of Stark line width and shift data in case of ions for which observed data, or more detailed calculations, are not yet available. Stark widths and shifts published data are used to demonstrate the existence of other kinds of regularities within similar spectra of different elements and their ionization stages. The emphasis is on the Stark parameter dependence on the upper level ionization potential and on the rest core charge for the lines from similar spectra of multiply charged ions. The found relations connecting Stark widths and shift parameters with upper level ionization potential, rest core charge and electron temperature were used for a prediction of new Stark broadening data, thus avoiding much more complicated procedures.

  12. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines With Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Coupling Between Microstrip Lines With Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3 multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines

  13. The gender gap on concept inventories in physics: what is consistent, what is inconsistent, and what factors influence the gap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Adrian; Sayre, Eleanor C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the literature on the gender gap on concept inventories in physics. Across studies, men consistently score higher on pre-tests of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE) by about 10%, and in most cases score higher on post-tests as well, also by about 10%. The average difference in normalized gain is about 6%. This difference is much smaller than the average difference in normalized gain between traditional lecture and interactive engagement (25%), but is large enough that it could impact the results of studies comparing the effectiveness of different teaching methods. Based on our analysis of 24 published articles comparing the impact of 34 factors that could potentially influence the gender gap, no single factor is sufficient to explain the gap. Several high-profile studies that have claimed to account for or reduce the gender gap have failed to be replicated, suggesting that isolated claims of explanations of the gender gap should be interpreted with ca...

  14. E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized DIG, VCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized GDi, VCR and Variable Valvetrain E85 Optimized Engine Enhanced Ethanol Engine And Vehicle Efficiency (Agreement 13425)...

  15. Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M. Sheintuch. "OPTIMIZATION OF AN AUTOTHERMAL MONOLITHICIdentification Via Global Optimization Techniques. AIChE1: 91-103. Chapter 3 Optimization of a 3-D Monolith Reactor

  16. Optimization and learning based video coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Cheolhong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Rate-Distortion Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . .Distortion Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rate-Distortion Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . .

  17. The role of the energy gap in protein folding dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estelle Pitard; Henri Orland

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of folding of proteins is studied by means of a phenomenological master equation. The energy distribution is taken as a truncated exponential for the misfolded states plus a native state sitting below the continuum. The influence of the gap on the folding dynamics is studied, for various models of the transition probabilities between the different states of the protein. We show that for certain models, the relaxation to the native state is accelerated by increasing the gap, whereas for others it is slowed down .

  18. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  19. Bridging the Gap between Crisis Response Operations and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Khaled M; Nazmy, Taymour T; Salem, Abdel-Badeeh M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exist huge problems in the current practice of crisis response operations. Response problems are projected as a combination of failure in communication, failure in technology, failure in methodology, failure of management, and finally failure of observation. In this paper we compare eight crisis response systems namely: DrillSim [2, 13], DEFACTO [12, 17], ALADDIN [1, 6], RoboCup Rescue [11, 15], FireGrid [3, 8, 18], WIPER [16], D-AESOP [4], and PLAN C [14]. Comparison results will disclose the cause of failure of current crisis response operations (the response gap). Based on comparison results; we provide recommendations for bridging this gap between response operations and systems.

  20. Rapidity gap survival in the black-disk regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize how the approach to the black-disk regime (BDR) of strong interactions at TeV energies influences rapidity gap survival in exclusive hard diffraction pp -> p + H + p (H = dijet, Qbar Q, Higgs). Employing a recently developed partonic description of such processes, we discuss (a) the suppression of diffraction at small impact parameters by soft spectator interactions in the BDR; (b) further suppression by inelastic interactions of hard spectator partons in the BDR; (c) correlations between hard and soft interactions. Hard spectator interactions substantially reduce the rapidity gap survival probability at LHC energies compared to previously reported estimates.

  1. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  2. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, Rodney J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  3. Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

  4. HOMOTOPY OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    HOMOTOPY OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION DANIEL M. DUNLAVY AND DIANNE P. O'LEARY under Grants CCR 02-04084 and CCF 05-14213. 1 #12;2 D.M. DUNLAVY AND D.P. O'LEARY point is generated

  5. c 2005 by Yuan Xue. All rights reserved. PRICE-BASED OPTIMAL RESOURCE ALLOCATION IN MULTI-HOP WIRELESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    c 2005 by Yuan Xue. All rights reserved. #12;PRICE-BASED OPTIMAL RESOURCE ALLOCATION IN MULTI have enabled rapid develop- ment of a variety of wireless network technologies. The undeniable- width and battery energy. (3) Autonomous communication entities. The wireless nodes usually belong

  6. GaN0.011P0.989–GaP Double-Heterostructure Red Light-Emitting Diodes Directly Grown on GaP Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Charles W

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. W. Tu, GaN diodes on GaP substrates, 2000. [7] J. W.on a GaN directly grown on a GaP substrate was successfullyDH) directly a GaN grown on a (100) GaP substrate. Fig. 1(a)

  7. Microgenetic optimization algorithm for optimal wavefront shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Benjamin R; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Eilers, Hergen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main limitations of utilizing optimal wavefront shaping in imaging and authentication applications is the slow speed of the optimization algorithms currently being used. To address this problem we develop a micro-genetic optimization algorithm ($\\mu$GA) for optimal wavefront shaping. We test the abilities of the $\\mu$GA and make comparisons to previous algorithms (iterative and simple-genetic) by using each algorithm to optimize transmission through an opaque medium. From our experiments we find that the $\\mu$GA is faster than both the iterative and simple-genetic algorithms and that both genetic algorithms are more resistant to noise and sample decoherence than the iterative algorithm.

  8. Power network analysis and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wanping

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chip power supply network optimization using multigrid-basedchip decoupling capacitor optimization for high- performanceSapatnekar, “Analysis and optimization of structured power/

  9. Nanoscale SRAM Variability and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toh, Seng Oon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Read Stability 5 Stochastic Optimization of SRAM 5.15.2 Bitcell Optimization . . . . . . . . .5.2.1 GlobalTechnology . . Optimization . . . . . . Read and Write

  10. Integrated Energy System Dispatch Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy System Dispatch Optimization Ryan Firestone, MichaelEnergy System Dispatch Optimization Ryan Firestone - Studentthe real-time dispatch optimization problem for a generic

  11. Eliminating the Gap between Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 12, 2003 ... optimization, Dokl. Akad. Nauk BSSR 24 (1980), no. 8, 684–687, in Russian. 16. B. Kummer, Inverse functions of pseudo regular mappings and ...

  12. Optimization of Cooling Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  13. Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models. Michael Bartholomew-Biggs. School of Physics Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire.

  14. Thermal resistance gaps for solid breeder blankets using packed beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbis, Z.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main design features of a new concept for solid breeder blanket thermal resistance gaps are described and analysis is shown for the blanket thermal characteristics. The effective thermal conductivity of a helium-beryllium packed bed configuration is studied, including the effect of a purge stream. Possible applications of this concept to ITER blanket designs are stressed.

  15. mctau: Bridging the Gap between Modest and UPPAAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    mctau: Bridging the Gap between Modest and UPPAAL Jonathan Bogdoll2 , Alexandre David1 , Arnd Saarland University ­ Computer Science, Saarbrücken, Germany Abstract. Modest is a high-level compositional of Modest is to make use of existing analysis techniques and tools in a single-formalism, multiple- solution

  16. The CSU Graduation Initiative Closing the Achievement Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Graduation Initiative is part of the nationwide Access to Success project of the National Association to Graduation 7 #12;Tracking and Reporting Consistent evaluation of project results is a critical componentThe CSU Graduation Initiative Closing the Achievement Gap Executive Vice Chancellor Jeri Echeverria

  17. "Charter and Code" Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    "Charter and Code" ­ Gap Analysis ANALYSIS FOR NORWAY The European Charter for Researchers: Acceptable. The principle of research freedom is well-established in Norway. The committee refers for Research Ethics in Norway. #12;In recent years, issues of research ethics have received increasing

  18. Topology of Local Health Officials' Advice Networks: Mind the Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    , evidence-based programs, and service delivery, and health care reform are innovations Author AffiliationsTopology of Local Health Officials' Advice Networks: Mind the Gaps Jacqueline Merrill, RN, MPH: To determine how a health officials' advice network might contribute to a high-performing public health systems

  19. Finding and Mending Barrier Gaps in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    Finding and Mending Barrier Gaps in Wireless Sensor Networks Anwar Saipulla Benyuan Liu Jie Wang--Constructing sensing barriers using wireless sensor networks has important applications in military operations results show that our algorithms can effectively improve the barrier coverage of a wireless sensor network

  20. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    David, Tanya M. S.; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Sam-Shajing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene) or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46?eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is ?4.79?eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of ?3.33?eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer wasmore »synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.« less

  1. Synthesis and Optimization of Threshold Logic Networks with Application to Nanotechnologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    of this work is to bridge the wide gap that currently exists between research on the development of nanoscale networks are well-balanced, and hence delay-optimized. I. INTRODUCTION The Semiconductor Industries Association (SIA) roadmap [1] predicts that complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chips will continue

  2. Template strand scrunching during DNA gap repair synthesis by human polymerase [lamda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Larrea, Andres A.; Havener, Jody M.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Ramsden, Dale A.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; (NIH); (UNC)

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Family X polymerases such as DNA polymerase {lambda}(Pol {lambda}) are well suited for filling short gaps during DNA repair because they simultaneously bind both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of short gaps. DNA binding and gap filling are well characterized for 1-nucleotide (nt) gaps, but the location of yet-to-be-copied template nucleotides in longer gaps is unknown. Here we present crystal structures revealing that, when bound to a 2-nt gap, Pol {lambda} scrunches the template strand and binds the additional uncopied template base in an extrahelical position within a binding pocket that comprises three conserved amino acids. Replacing these amino acids with alanine results in less processive gap filling and less efficient NHEJ when 2-nt gaps are involved. Thus, akin to scrunching by RNA polymerase during transcription initiation, scrunching occurs during gap filling DNA synthesis associated with DNA repair.

  3. Optimization Online Digest -- February 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Optimization of Gas Compressor Stations: MINLP Models vs. ... The Cyclic Block Conditional Gradient Method for Convex Optimization Problems

  4. Optimization Online Digest -- October 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  5. Optimization Online Digest -- December 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  6. Constraints on the Higgs boson width from off-shell production and decay to Z-boson pairs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints are presented on the total width of the recently discovered Higgs boson, Gamma[H], using its relative on-shell and off-shell production and decay rates to a pair of Z bosons, where one Z boson decays to an electron or muon pair, and the other to an electron, muon, or neutrino pair. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A simultaneous maximum likelihood fitmore »to the measured kinematic distributions near the resonance peak and above the Z-boson pair production threshold leads to an upper limit on the Higgs boson width of Gamma[H] « less

  7. Measurements of the mass and width of the eta_c using psi' -> gamma eta_c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. Alberto; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; R. B. Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; N. Berger; M. B. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Bogera; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; A. C. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkova; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; I. Denysenkob; M. Destefanis; W. L. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; N. B. Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Yong Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; H. Mao; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. P. Pacettic; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsevd; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shene; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. R. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; T. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Z. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; T. R. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; Jingwei Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugova; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass and width of the lowest lying S-wave spin singlet charmonium state, the eta_c, are measured using a data sample of 1.06x10^8 psi' decays collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. We use a model that incorporates interference between the signal reaction, psi' -> gamma eta_c, and a non-resonant radiative background to successfully describe the line shape of the eta_c. We measure the eta_c mass to be 2984.3 +- 0.6 +- 0.6 MeV/c^2 and the total width to be 32.0 +- 1.2 +- 1.0 MeV, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic.

  8. Optimization Online - Multimaterial topology optimization by volume ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R Tavakoli

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 14, 2013 ... The update procedure is based on the gradient flow of the objective functional by a fractional ... descent method, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, to appear, 2014. ... Mathematical Optimization Society.

  9. Optimization Online - Semidefinite optimization, a spectral approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M.A. van Bossum

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 30, 2002 ... Mathematical optimization involves the construction of methods to solve ... Examples come from electrical design, engineering, control theory, ... at the beginning of the computer technology, it has become more famous.

  10. Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

  11. Optimization Online - Stochastic Optimization Approach to Water ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan M. Salazar

    2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2012 ... The approach determines optimal set-points to maximize power output in the ... black-box simulation models and to construct empirical distributions from ... In a pulverized coal power plant study we have found that weather ...

  12. Smoothness of the Gap Function in the BCS-Bogoliubov Theory of Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuji Watanabe

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We deal with the gap equation in the BCS-Bogoliubov theory of superconductivity, where the gap function is a function of the temperature $T$ only. We show that the squared gap function is of class $C^2$ on the closed interval $[\\,0,\\,T_c\\,]$. Here, $T_c$ stands for the transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the gap function is monotonically decreasing on $[0,\\,T_c]$ and obtain the behavior of the gap function at $T=T_c$. We mathematically point out some more properties of the gap function.

  13. Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Xingzhe

    1 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization DecompositionDecomposition Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-2 CONTENTSCONTENTS Introduction (Marta;2 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-3 Layering as Optimization Decomposition Introduction By Marta

  14. Valley pair qubits in double quantum dots of gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Y. Wu; N. -Y. Lue; L. Chang

    2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of graphene opens a new door to qubit implementation, as discussed in the recent proposal of valley pair qubits in double quantum dots of gapped graphene (Wu et al., arXiv: 1104.0443 [cond-mat.mes-hall]). The work here presents the comprehensive theory underlying the proposal. It discusses the interaction of electrons with external magnetic and electric fields in such structures. Specifically, it examines a strong, unique mechanism, i.e., the analogue of the 1st-order relativistic effect in gapped graphene. This mechanism is state mixing free and allows, together with the electrically tunable exchange coupling, a fast, all-electric manipulation of qubits via electric gates, in the time scale of ns. The work also looks into the issue of fault tolerance in a typical case, yielding at 10oK a long qubit coherence time (~O(ms)).

  15. The imaginary part of the gap function in color superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Feng; Defu Hou; Jiarong Li; Hai-cang Ren

    2006-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We clarify general properties of the energy gap regarding its functional dependence on the energy-momentum dictated by the invariance under a space inversion or a time reversal. Then we derive perturbatively the equation of the imaginary part of the gap function for dense QCD in weak coupling and generalize our results from 2SC case to CFL case. We confirm that the imaginary part is down by $g$ relative to the real part in weak coupling. The numerical results show that, up to the leading order, the imaginary part is no larger than one MeV at extremely large densities and can be as large as several MeV the densities are of physical interest.

  16. Air-Gap Convection in a Switched Reluctance Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanazzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Switched reluctance machines (SRMs) have recently become popular in the automotive market as they are a good alternative to the permanent magnet machines commonly employed for an electric powertrain. Lumped parameter thermal networks are usually used for thermal analysis of motors due to their low computational cost and relatively accurate results. A critical aspect to be modelled is the rotor-stator air-gap heat transfer, and this is particularly challenging in an SRM due to the salient pole geometry. This work presents firstly a review of the literature including the most relevant correlations for this geometry, and secondly, numerical CFD simulations of air-gap heat transfer for a typical configuration. A new correlation has been derived: $\\mathbf{Nu=0.181\\ Ta_m^{0.207}}$

  17. Axionic superconductivity in three dimensional doped narrow gap semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Goswami; Bitan Roy

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the competition between the conventional s-wave and the triplet Balian-Werthamer or the B-phase pairings in the doped three dimensional narrow gap semiconductors, such as $\\mathrm{Cu}_x\\mathrm{Bi}_2\\mathrm{Se}_3$ and $\\mathrm{Sn}_{1-x}\\mathrm{In}_x\\mathrm{Te}$. When the coupling constants of the two contending channels are comparable, we find a simultaneously time-reversal and parity violating $p + is$ state at low temperatures, which provides an example of dynamic axionic state of matter. In contradistinction to the time-reversal invariant, topological B-phase, the $p + is$ state possesses gapped Majorana fermions as the surface Andreev bound states, which give rise to an anomalous surface thermal Hall effect. The anomalous gravitational and electrodynamic responses of the $p+is$ state can be described by the $\\theta$ vacuum structure, where $\\theta \

  18. Entanglement vs. gap for one-dimensional spin systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharonov, Dorit [HEBREW UNIV; Gottesman, Daniel [PERIMETER INSTITUTE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship between entanglement and spectral gap for local Hamiltonians in one dimension. The area law for a one-dimensional system states that for the ground state, the entanglement of any interval is upper-bounded by a constant independent of the size of the interval. However, the possible dependence of the upper bound on the spectral gap {Delta} is not known, as the best known general upper bound is asymptotically much larger than the largest possible entropy of any model system previously constructed for small {Delta}. To help resolve this asymptotic behavior, we construct a family of one-dimensional local systems for which some intervals have entanglement entropy which is polynomial in 1/{Delta}, whereas previously studied systems had the entropy of all intervals bounded by a constant times log(1/{Delta}).

  19. An investigation on reliable passivation of GaP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves King, Carlos A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reports the results of a study of sputtered Silicon Nitride 3N4) and Anodic Oxide as passivating techniques for Gallium Phosphide. Anodic Oxide was grown on GaP by anodizing the semiconductor in 30% hydrogen peroxide. The resulting oxide had an index... is therefore needed to prevent degradation due to contamination and charge motion on the surface of the semiconductor [1] . Traditional thermal oxidation techniques used in silicon passivation involves oxidation in high temperature furnaces like the one...

  20. Bridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limitations to bear in mind: n denied health care coverage, you almost certainly won't qualify y at the end-800-304-0372 www.anthem.com and click on visitor and click on state. United Health Care at 1-888-545-5205 or visitBridge Health Insurance Options ief gap in health of coverage became seriously hurt or ill. That

  1. Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

  2. Energy optimization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhi; de Bedout, Juan Manuel; Kern, John Michael; Biyik, Emrah; Chandra, Ramu Sharat

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for optimizing customer utility usage in a utility network of customer sites, each having one or more utility devices, where customer site is communicated between each of the customer sites and an optimization server having software for optimizing customer utility usage over one or more networks, including private and public networks. A customer site model for each of the customer sites is generated based upon the customer site information, and the customer utility usage is optimized based upon the customer site information and the customer site model. The optimization server can be hosted by an external source or within the customer site. In addition, the optimization processing can be partitioned between the customer site and an external source.

  3. Grammatically-guided resolution of filler-gap dependencies: An investigation of Chinese multiple dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have provided evidence that the parser avoids positing gaps in grammatically unlicensed positions such as islands, suggesting that the grammar constrains the construction of filler-gap dependencies (e.g., Stowe, 1986). However...

  4. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  5. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Grose, Stephen M. (Glenwood, WV)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  6. Hydraulically controlled magnetic bougienage for correction of long-gap esophageal atresia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Minkyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one in 4000 babies in the United States is born with their esophageal disconnected and separated by a gap, which is called esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia with a relatively short gap can be directly corrected ...

  7. Control and optimization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  8. 2004 - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos, J.Ch. Gilbert, R. Glowinski, D. Sinoquet.

  9. 2000 - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Problem Solving Environments iNEOS : An Interactive Environment for Nonlinear Optimization Marcel Good, Jean-Pierre Goux, Jorge Nocedal, Victor Pereyra.

  10. An optical gap calibration applied to the case of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweenor, D.E.; O'Leary, S.K.; Foutz, B.E.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many different empirical means whereby the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor may be defined. They analyze some hydrogenated amorphous silicon data with respect to a number of these empirical measures for the optical gap. By plotting these various gap measures as a function of the breadth of the optical absorption tail, they provide a means of relating these disparate measures of the optical gap. The applicability of this calibration to another set of hydrogenated amorphous silicon data is investigated.

  11. Euler's fluid equations: Optimal Control vs Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darryl D. Holm

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimization method used in image-processing (metamorphosis) is found to imply Euler's equations for incompressible flow of an inviscid fluid, without requiring that the Lagrangian particle labels exactly follow the flow lines of the Eulerian velocity vector field. Thus, an optimal control problem and an optimization problem for incompressible ideal fluid flow both yield the \\emph {same} Euler fluid equations, although their Lagrangian parcel dynamics are \\emph{different}. This is a result of the \\emph{gauge freedom} in the definition of the fluid pressure for an incompressible flow, in combination with the symmetry of fluid dynamics under relabeling of their Lagrangian coordinates. Similar ideas are also illustrated for SO(N) rigid body motion.

  12. Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas Natalia Y of capacitively coupled plasma reactors with a wafer-focus ring gap. The penetration of plasma generated species i.e., ions and radicals into the wafer-focus ring gap is discussed. We found that the penetration of plasma

  13. Erratum to ``How should gaps be treated in parsimony? A comparison of approaches using simulation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Erratum Erratum to ``How should gaps be treated in parsimony? A comparison of approaches using)]. The three comparisons for treating gaps as unknown, fifth state character, and Simple Indel Coding are shownTrueTree TAA Fig. 3. Moving average lines of treating gaps as unknown, fifth state, and Simple Indel Coding

  14. OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    OIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS for the occupancy of `safe sites' or vegetation gaps. If mortality rates are high and/or frequency-independent, ESS

  15. An Abelian Ward identity and the vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao-jie Xu; Qun Wang

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive an Abelian-like Ward identity in color superconducting phase and calculate vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap. Making use of the Ward identity, we show that subleading order contributions to the gap from vertices are absent for gapped excitations.

  16. Homotopy optimization methods for global optimization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; O'Leary, Dianne P. (University of Maryland, College Park, MD)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a new method for global optimization, the Homotopy Optimization Method (HOM). This method differs from previous homotopy and continuation methods in that its aim is to find a minimizer for each of a set of values of the homotopy parameter, rather than to follow a path of minimizers. We define a second method, called HOPE, by allowing HOM to follow an ensemble of points obtained by perturbation of previous ones. We relate this new method to standard methods such as simulated annealing and show under what circumstances it is superior. We present results of extensive numerical experiments demonstrating performance of HOM and HOPE.

  17. The evolution of the width of X-ray flares with time in Gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardini, Maria Grazia [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); ICRANet, P.le della Repubblica 10, I-65100 Pescara (Italy); Chincarini, Guido; Margutti, Raffaella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Physics Dept., P.zza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present one of the most intriguing results obtained with an updated catalog of 113 early time (i.e. t{sub pk} < or approx. 1000 s) and 36 late time (i.e. t{sub pk} > or approx. 1000 s) X-ray flares detected by Swift in the afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB): the evolution of the width of the flares with time. This result, together with other properties investigated on early and late time flares and bright flares, provides a clear observational property that every model aiming at explaining the GRB emission has to face.

  18. Combinatorial optimization of welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    C E D C Combinatorial optimization of welding sequences The problem Combinatorial optimization a welding example of a tail bearing housing vanes ­ Figure 1. The major structural details are the outer ring, the inner ring and the vanes. The vanes are welded to the rings using TIG welding. Fig. 1: Tail

  19. Stochastic Learning and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Xiren

    space [56]. The fundamental elements of learning and optimization are two types of performanceXi-Ren Cao Stochastic Learning and Optimization - A Sensitivity-Based Approach With 119 Figures, 27 be easily identified. Therefore, learning techniques have to be utilized. A Brief Description of Learning

  20. Stochastic Optimization Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Third, its theoretical properties were studied (convexity, separability and optimality con- .... in Section 3, have the structure of problems PEV and PS, respectively, and for this reason we review ... may produce poor optimization results as it is depicted in Figure 1 for the instance with ...... Second, it has been assessed that the.

  1. Optimization Online Digest -- December 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elcin Cetinkaya, Aurelie Thiele Information Gap Decision Theory Based OPF With HVDC Connected Wind Farms rabiee abbas, Alireza Soroudi, andrew keane.

  2. Optimal Uncertainty Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owhadi, Houman; Sullivan, Timothy John; McKerns, Mike; Ortiz, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a rigorous framework for Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) in which the UQ objectives and the assumptions/information set are brought to the forefront. This framework, which we call \\emph{Optimal Uncertainty Quantification} (OUQ), is based on the observation that, given a set of assumptions and information about the problem, there exist optimal bounds on uncertainties: these are obtained as extreme values of well-defined optimization problems corresponding to extremizing probabilities of failure, or of deviations, subject to the constraints imposed by the scenarios compatible with the assumptions and information. In particular, this framework does not implicitly impose inappropriate assumptions, nor does it repudiate relevant information. Although OUQ optimization problems are extremely large, we show that under general conditions, they have finite-dimensional reductions. As an application, we develop \\emph{Optimal Concentration Inequalities} (OCI) of Hoeffding and McDiarmid type. Surprisingly, contr...

  3. Low-pressure spark gap triggered by an ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.

    1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Spark gap apparatus for use as an electric switch operating at high voltage, high current and high repetition rate. Mounted inside a housing are an anode, cathode and ion plate. An ionizable fluid is pumped through the chamber of the housing. A pulse of current to the ion plate causes ions to be emitted by the ion plate, which ions move into and ionize the fluid. Electric current supplied to the anode discharges through the ionized fluid and flows to the cathode. Current stops flowing when the current source has been drained. The ionized fluid recombines into its initial dielectric ionizable state. The switch is now open and ready for another cycle.

  4. Low pressure spark gap triggered by an ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, Daniel S. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spark gap apparatus for use as an electric switch operating at high voltage, high current and high repetition rate. Mounted inside a housing are an anode, cathode and ion plate. An ionizable fluid is pumped through the chamber of the housing. A pulse of current to the ion plate causes ions to be emitted by the ion plate, which ions move into and ionize the fluid. Electric current supplied to the anode discharges through the ionized fluid and flows to the cathode. Current stops flowing when the current source has been drained. The ionized fluid recombines into its initial dielectric ionizable state. The switch is now open and ready for another cycle.

  5. Relations as patterns: bridging the gap between OBO and OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Oellrich, Anika; Dumontier, Michel; Kelso, Janet; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Herre, Heinrich

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Relations as patterns: bridging the gap between OBO and OWL Robert Hoehndorf1,5*, Anika Oellrich1, Michel Dumontier4, Janet Kelso3, Dietrich Rebholz-Schuhmann1, Heinrich Herre2 Abstract Background: Most biomedical... . Genome Biol 2005, 6(5). 8. Horridge M, Drummond N, Goodwin J, Rector A, Stevens R, Wang H: The Manchester OWL Syntax. Proc of the 2006 OWL Experiences and Directions Workshop (OWL-ED2006) 2006. 9. Hoehndorf R, Loebe F, Kelso J, Herre H: Representing...

  6. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  7. GAPS Power Infrastructure Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm Inc JumpGAD (Smart GridGAPS

  8. First and second order optimality conditions for optimal control ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with optimal control problems of integral equations, ... Keywords Optimal control, integral equations, state constraints, second-order op-.

  9. E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized GDi, VCR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GDi, VCR and Variable Valvetrain E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized GDi, VCR and Variable Valvetrain 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  10. Optimization Online - Optimal synthesis in the Reeds and Shepp ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Dmitruk

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 9, 2011 ... Keywords: Reeds and Shepp car, time-optimal problem, Pontryagin Maximum Principle, reachability sets, optimal synthesis. Category 1: ...

  11. Optimization Online - TACO - A Toolkit for AMPL Control Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Kirches

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 7, 2011 ... ... optimal control problems for ODE or DAE dynamic processes. ... This toolkit is designed to facilitate the coupling of existing optimal control ...

  12. Optimality conditions of set-valued optimization p...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimality conditions of set-valued optimization problem involving relative algebraic interior in ordered linear spaces. Zhi-Ang Zhoua, Xin-Min Yangb and ...

  13. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  14. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  15. Constraints on the Higgs boson width from off-shell production and decay to Z-boson pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints are presented on the total width of the recently discovered Higgs boson, Gamma[H], using its relative on-shell and off-shell production and decay rates to a pair of Z bosons, where one Z boson decays to an electron or muon pair, and the other to an electron, muon, or neutrino pair. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A simultaneous maximum likelihood fit to the measured kinematic distributions near the resonance peak and above the Z-boson pair production threshold leads to an upper limit on the Higgs boson width of Gamma[H] < 22 MeV at a 95% confidence level, which is 5.4 times the expected value in the standard model at the measured mass.

  16. Constraints on the Higgs boson width from off-shell production and decay to Z-boson pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints are presented on the total width of the recently discovered Higgs boson, Gamma[H], using its relative on-shell and off-shell production and decay rates to a pair of Z bosons, where one Z boson decays to an electron or muon pair, and the other to an electron, muon, or neutrino pair. The analysis is based on the data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A simultaneous maximum likelihood fit to the measured kinematic distributions near the resonance peak and above the Z-boson pair production threshold leads to an upper limit on the Higgs boson width of Gamma[H] < 22 MeV at a 95% confidence level, which is 5.4 times the expected value in the standard model at the measured mass.

  17. Direct Bound on the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present the first direct experimental bound on the total decay width of the top quark, ?[subscript t], using 955??pb[superscript -1] of the Tevatron’s pp? collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We ...

  18. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  19. Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research Methane Flame Simulations Run 6x Faster on NERSC's Hopper Supercomputer November 25,...

  20. Optimal trajectory design under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Benjamin R. (Benjamin Robert)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reference trajectory design for atmospheric reentry vehicles can be accomplished through trajectory optimization using optimal control techniques. However, this method generally focuses on nominal vehicle performance and ...

  1. Optimization Online Digest -- April 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparse optimization for inverse problems in atmospheric modelling. Lukas Adam ... JuMP: A modeling language for mathematical optimization. Iain Dunning ...

  2. Optimization Online Digest -- March 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply Pumping Systems in Urban ... Robust optimal sizing of an hybrid energy stand-alone system

  3. Projection methods in conic optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    turn the work-horse of a range of algorithms in conic optimization, having a variety of ... algorithms for linear conic optimization, and applications in polynomial.

  4. Section 3.4: Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 2, 2014 ... knowledge to solve certain optimization problems. Optimization problems arise in almost every discipline. They are one of the key applications ...

  5. NEWTON'S METHOD FOR MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The method does not scalarize the original vector optimization problem, ... for an optimization problem with an objective function with a partially ordered vector ...

  6. Robust Linear Optimization With Recourse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an approach to two-stage linear optimization with recourse that does ... Linear optimization with recourse was first introduced by Dantzig in [17] as a ...

  7. Optimization Online Digest -- July 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of mixed integer programming formulations for single machine scheduling problems with sequence dependent setup ... Linear conic optimization for nonlinear optimal control ... Circuit and bond polytopes on series-

  8. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Wells, Beric E.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Tingey, Joel M.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed.

  9. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps - 12078

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, D.E.; Wells, B.E.; Huckaby, J.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Daniel, R.C.; Burns, C.A.; Tingey, J.M.; Cooley, S.K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retrieval, transport, treatment and disposal operations associated with Hanford Tank Wastes involve the handling of a wide range of slurries. Knowledge of the physical and rheological properties of the waste is a key component to the success of the design and implementation of the waste processing facilities. Previous efforts to compile and analyze the physical and rheological properties were updated with new results including information on solids composition and density, particle size distributions, slurry rheology, and particle settling behavior. The primary source of additional data is from a recent series of tests sponsored by the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). These tests involved an extensive suite of characterization and bench-scale process testing of 8 waste groups representing approximately 75% of the high-level waste mass expected to be processed through the WTP. Additional information on the morphology of the waste solids was also included. Based on the updated results, a gap analysis to identify gaps in characterization data, analytical methods and data interpretation was completed. (authors)

  10. Transport band gap opening at metal–organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidu, Francisc, E-mail: francisc.haidu@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Salvan, Georgeta; Zahn, Dietrich R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Smykalla, Lars; Hietschold, Michael [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Knupfer, Martin [Electronic and Optical Properties Department, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface formation between copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and two representative metal substrates, i.e., Au and Co, was investigated by the combination of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals and thus the transport band gap of CuPc are highly influenced by film thickness, i.e., molecule substrate distance. Due to the image charge potential given by the metallic substrates the transport band gap of CuPc “opens” from (1.4?±?0.3) eV for 1?nm thickness to (2.2?±?0.3) eV, and saturates at this value above 10?nm CuPc thickness. The interface dipoles with values of 1.2?eV and 1.0?eV for Au and Co substrates, respectively, predominantly depend on the metal substrate work functions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements using synchrotron radiation provide detailed information on the interaction between CuPc and the two metal substrates. While charge transfer from the Au or Co substrate to the Cu metal center is present only at sub-monolayer coverages, the authors observe a net charge transfer from the molecule to the Co substrate for films in the nm range. Consequently, the Fermi level is shifted as in the case of a p-type doping of the molecule. This is, however, a competing phenomenon to the energy band shifts due to the image charge potential.

  11. Mass Flow and Accretion through gaps in Accretion Discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willy Kley

    1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the structure and dynamics of the gap created by a protoplanet in an accretion disc. The hydrodynamic equations for a flat, two-dimensional, non-selfgravitating protostellar accretion disc with an embedded, Jupiter sized protoplanet on a circular orbit are solved. To simulate possible accretion of mass onto the protoplanet we continually remove mass from the interior of the planet's Roche lobe which is monitored. Firstly, it is shown that consistent results independent on numerical issues (such as boundary or initial conditions, artificial viscosity or resolution) can be obtained. Then, a detailed parameter study delineates the influence of the disc viscosity and pressure on the magnitude of the accretion rate. We find that, even after the formation of a gap in the disc, the planet is still able to accrete more mass from the disc. This accretion occurs from regions of the disc which are radially exterior and interior to the planet's orbital radius. The rate depends on the magnitude of the viscosity and vertical thickness of the disc. For a disc viscosity alpha=10^{-3} and vertical thickness H/r=0.05 we estimate the time scale for the accumulation of one Jupiter mass to be of order hundred thousand years. For a larger(smaller) viscosity and disc thickness this accretion rate is increasing(decreasing). For a very small viscosity (alpha disc.

  12. Optimal Quantum Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Avron; A. Elgart; G. M. Graf; L. Sadun

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study adiabatic quantum pumps on time scales that are short relative to the cycle of the pump. In this regime the pump is characterized by the matrix of energy shift which we introduce as the dual to Wigner's time delay. The energy shift determines the charge transport, the dissipation, the noise and the entropy production. We prove a general lower bound on dissipation in a quantum channel and define optimal pumps as those that saturate the bound. We give a geometric characterization of optimal pumps and show that they are noiseless and transport integral charge in a cycle. Finally we discuss an example of an optimal pump related to the Hall effect.

  13. Optimizing Control- A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preisig, H. A.

    timation Int. J. of Sy,tems Science, 17,No 8, (1986), 1220 C ; Sec comments to Brdys et al. 10 Cutler C.R. & Perry ILT. Rea.l Time Optimization with Multivll.riable Control is Required to Maximize Profits Computcr.! and Chemical Enginccring, 1, No 5....) the constraints .s (K ,11. ,E.) ~ Q where In geneml, the solution to this problem is an optimal control problem since the inputs.ll would be calculated llll a function of time. Optimizing control methods make~ some simplifying 1.18 sumptions about...

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF GaN WINDOW LAYER FOR InGaN SOLAR CELLS USING POLARIZATION EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    on the design of wide-band gap GaN window layers for InGaN solar cells. Window layers serve to passivate the top into account during design of the solar cell to improve its collection efficiency. Previously, we have. The present work is a subset of the design optimization process for such solar cells, where we focus

  15. Efficient terahertz wave generation from GaP crystals pumped by chirp-controlled pulses from femtosecond photonic crystal fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jiang; Shi, Junkai; Xu, Baozhong; Xing, Qirong; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Chai, Lu, E-mail: lu-chai@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Li, Yanfeng, E-mail: lu-chai@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: yanfengli@tju.edu.cn [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); MOEMS Key Laboratory (Ministry of Education), Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fedotov, Andrey B. [Physics Department, Russian Quantum Center, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Zheltikov, Aleksei M. [Physics Department, Russian Quantum Center, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirp-tunable femtosecond 10?W, 42?MHz photonic-crystal-fiber oscillator-amplifier system that is capable of delivering sub-60 fs light pulses at 1040?nm is used to demonstrate high-efficiency terahertz radiation generation via optical rectification in GaP crystals only a few millimeters in length. The optimization of the chirp of the fiber-laser pulses is shown to radically enhance the terahertz output, indicating one possible way to more efficiently use these extended nonlinear crystals in compact fiber-pumped terahertz radiation sources.

  16. Human Capital Evolution and Economic Crisis: Minding `The Gap'*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    and aggregate demand. Ferri and Tae (1999) argue that this over-reaction by financial institution not always be the optimal response to crisis. At certain levels of human capital, maintaining the pre was responsible for worsening the crisis and if uninterrupted would have plunged the economies further

  17. Exploring adiabatic quantum trajectories via optimal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantin Brif; Matthew D. Grace; Mohan Sarovar; Kevin C. Young

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Adiabatic quantum computation employs a slow change of a time-dependent control function (or functions) to interpolate between an initial and final Hamiltonian, which helps to keep the system in the instantaneous ground state. When the evolution time is finite, the degree of adiabaticity (quantified in this work as the average ground-state population during evolution) depends on the particulars of a dynamic trajectory associated with a given set of control functions. We use quantum optimal control theory with a composite objective functional to numerically search for controls that achieve the target final state with a high fidelity while simultaneously maximizing the degree of adiabaticity. Exploring properties of optimal adiabatic trajectories in model systems elucidates the dynamic mechanisms that suppress unwanted excitations from the ground state. Specifically, we discover that the use of multiple control functions makes it possible to access a rich set of dynamic trajectories, some of which attain a significantly improved performance (in terms of both fidelity and adiabaticity) through the increase of the energy gap during most of the evolution time.

  18. Communicating optimization results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Drake (William Drake)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With global supply chains becoming increasingly complex, leading companies are embracing optimization software tools to help them structure and coordinate their supply chains. With an array of choices available, many ...

  19. On Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    one of the operands of the inner product is zero at any instance; but in this case, the ..... at: http://www.researchgate.net or at: http://www.optimization-online.org.

  20. 3190.ps - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fare, it is essential to select and operate at an equilibrium with optimal social ...... construct the CSP matrix R for L(?,(si(?))i?I? )?? based on (16) to induce a ...

  1. Polyethylene fiber drawing optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiloyan, Vazrik

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer fiber drawing creates fibers with enhanced thermal conductivity and strength compared to bulk polymer because drawing aligns the molecular chains. I optimize the polymer fiber drawing method in order to achieve ...

  2. Optimization of Hot Standby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, J.; Holden, D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Optimization is one of the key issues facing the chemical process industries today. The drivers are both economic and environmental. Utilities are among the top operating expenses for manufacturers, reflecting elevated energy prices...

  3. E85 Optimized Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Optimized Air System Layout Engine 5 8 7 3 1 2 4 MAP EGR Cooler Charge Air Cooler LH Turbo RH Turbo Throttle EGR Valve AirWater Heat Exchangers Wastegate Wastegate Surge valve...

  4. Nuclear Energy Density Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; T. Lesinski; J. Moré; W. Nazarewicz; J. Sarich; N. Schunck; M. V. Stoitsov; S. Wild

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We carry out state-of-the-art optimization of a nuclear energy density of Skyrme type in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. The particle-hole and particle-particle channels are optimized simultaneously, and the experimental data set includes both spherical and deformed nuclei. The new model-based, derivative-free optimization algorithm used in this work has been found to be significantly better than standard optimization methods in terms of reliability, speed, accuracy, and precision. The resulting parameter set UNEDFpre results in good agreement with experimental masses, radii, and deformations and seems to be free of finite-size instabilities. An estimate of the reliability of the obtained parameterization is given, based on standard statistical methods. We discuss new physics insights offered by the advanced covariance analysis.

  5. Optimal transport strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Wonjung, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally presupposed that the shapes and mechanisms encountered in nature have evolved in such a way as to maximize the robustness of a species. However, most such optimization problems arising in biology are ...

  6. An Approximate Inference Approach to Temporal Optimization in Optimal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu

    on iterative local approximations present a practical approach to optimal control in robotic systems. However the optimal control framework. The proposed approach, which is applicable to plants with non-linear dynamicsAn Approximate Inference Approach to Temporal Optimization in Optimal Control Konrad C. Rawlik

  7. Convex Analysis and Optimization, D. P. Bertsekas! CONVEX OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsekas, Dimitri

    1! Convex Analysis and Optimization, D. P. Bertsekas! CONVEX OPTIMIZATION: A SELECTIVE OVERVIEW Dimitri Bertsekas! M.I.T.! Taiwan! May 2010! #12;2! Convex Analysis and Optimization, D. P. Bertsekas! OUTLINE! · Convexity issues in optimization! · Common geometrical framework for duality and minimax

  8. Method of Controlling Corona Effects and Breakdown Voltage of Small Air Gaps Stressed by Impulse Voltages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasios Maglaras; Trifon Kousiouris; Frangiskos Topalis; Dimitrios Katsaros; Leandros A. Maglaras; Konstantina Giannakopoulou

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the influence of a resistor on the dielectric behavior of an air gap. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap and the latter is stressed by impulse voltage. Air gap arrangements of different geometry with either the rod or the plate grounded are stressed with impulse voltages of both positive and negative polarity. The resistor is connected in series with the air gap in the return circuit connecting the gap with the impulse generator. The method followed involves the investigation of the graphs of the charging time concerning the air gaps capacitances, in connection to the value of the resistor, the geometry of the gap, the effect of grounding and the polarity effect. It is determined that the charging time of the air gap increases, as the value of the resistor increases. It is also determined that the peak voltage value of the fully charged air gap decreases as the value of the resistor increases. The results of the mathematical and simulation analysis are compared with the results of the oscillograms taken from experimental work. In addition and consequently to the above results it is concluded from the experimental work that the in series connection of the resistor in the circuit has significant influence on corona pulses (partial discharges) occurring in the gap and on the breakdown voltage of the gap. A new method of controlling the corona effects and consequently the breakdown voltage of small air gaps stressed by impulse voltage of short duration in connection to the ground effect and the polarity effect has arisen. Furthermore through mathematical analysis of the charging graphs obtained from simulation and experimental oscillograms there was a calculation of the values of the capacitance of the air gaps in relation to their geometry and the results were compared to the values calculated with mathematical analysis.

  9. Optimization in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adilson E. Motter; Zoltan Toroczkai

    2007-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent surge in the network modeling of complex systems has set the stage for a new era in the study of fundamental and applied aspects of optimization in collective behavior. This Focus Issue presents an extended view of the state of the art in this field and includes articles from a large variety of domains where optimization manifests itself, including physical, biological, social, and technological networked systems.

  10. Convex Optimization Course Welcome Pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    1 NATCOR Convex Optimization Course 23rd ­ 27th June 2014 Welcome Pack This pack contains. ABSTRACT Convex optimization is the fundamental process of optimal decision-making. Although mathematically restrictive, many practical problems may be modelled directly as convex optimization problems. Convex

  11. Voltage-matched, monolithic, multi-band-gap devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a sting of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  12. Annular gap solitons in Kerr media with circular gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, Jacob [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Malomed, Boris [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce standing-light patterns trapped in a Bragg grating written along the radial direction in a self-focusing (SF) or self-defocusing (SDF) optical medium. Unlike previously studied axisymmetric settings that deal with the axial propagation, we consider the propagation of light in the radial directions (outward and inward), which may give rise to annular gap solitons (AGSs), supported by the circular grating. An estimate for the threshold of the modulational instability of the AGS against azimuthal perturbations in the SF medium is obtained analytically, and verified by direct simulations. In the SDF model, stable annular and dipole solitons are found in a numerical form, while multipole patterns and vortex rings are unstable. Similar solitons are possible in the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  13. Voltage-Matched, Monolithic, Multi-Band-Gap Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M. W.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a string of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  14. Mind the Gap: Supersymmetry Breaking in Scaling, Microstate Geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orestis Vasilakis; Nicholas P. Warner

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a multi-species supertube solution to construct an example of a scaling microstate geometry for non-BPS black rings in five dimensions. We obtain the asymptotic charges of the microstate geometry and show how the solution is related to the corresponding non-BPS black ring. The supersymmetry is broken in a very controlled manner using holonomy and this enables a close comparison with a scaling, BPS microstate geometry. Requiring that there are no closed time-like curves near the supertubes places additional restrictions on the moduli space of physical, non-BPS solutions when compared to their BPS analogs. For large holonomy the scaling non-BPS solution always has closed time-like curves while for smaller holonomy there is a "gap" in the non-BPS moduli space relative to the BPS counterpart.

  15. Speeding up critical system dynamics through optimized evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caneva, Tommaso [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Institut fuer Quanteninformationsverarbeitung, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone [Institut fuer Quanteninformationsverarbeitung, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Fazio, Rosario [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto di Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Santoro, Giuseppe E. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); CNR-INFM Democritos National Simulation Center, Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), P.O. Box 586, I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of defects which are generated upon crossing a quantum phase transition can be minimized by choosing properly designed time-dependent pulses. In this work we determine what are the ultimate limits of this optimization. We discuss under which conditions the production of defects across the phase transition is vanishing small. Furthermore we show that the minimum time required to enter this regime is T{approx}{pi}/{Delta}, where {Delta} is the minimum spectral gap, unveiling an intimate connection between an optimized unitary dynamics and the intrinsic measure of the Hilbert space for pure states. Surprisingly, the dynamics is nonadiabatic; this result can be understood by assuming a simple two-level dynamics for the many-body system. Finally we classify the possible dynamical regimes in terms of the action s=T{Delta}.

  16. Gap symmetries from the neighbor coupling in square-lattice superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liming

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap symmetries of superconductivity are studied in this work. It is found that the gap symmetries are simply determined by the 4-fold rotational symmetries of the coupling potential on neighbor sites. A local on-site coupling potential results in the on-site pairing with the conventional s-wave symmetry, but a coupling potential between the nearest neighbors or the next-nearest neighbors results in the pairing on neighbor sites with the $s^-$, $d_{x^2-y^2}$, $d_{xy}$, or $s_{x^2y^2}$ gap symmetries. It is proved that both isotropic and anisotropic gap functions are allowed by the 4-fold rotational symmetries of the coupling potential. Finally a numerical computation is performed to demonstrate the gap symmetries. This neighbor coupling provides a unified picture for the gap functions of the conventional and the high Tc superconductivity.

  17. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  18. An Approach to Plantwide Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nath, R.; Worsham, B. A.; Libby, D. J.

    AN APPROACH TO PLANTWIDE OPTIMIZATION RAVI NATH, BILL A WORSHAM, DALE J. LIBBY Union Carbide Corporation Houston, NlSTRACT Optimization of individual processing units as well as the energy systems has become common place in the processing... industries (Ref. 1,2). Typically such optimizations are done piecemeal, with heavy reliance on the 'transfer prices' to link the various optimizations. Such optimizations usually lead to decision policies which are inferior. Superior results...

  19. Surface Plasmon Band Gap Sensor A new sensor for robust on-field biosensing (SEN 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaud Benahmed; Robert Lam; Chih-Ming Ho

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networked Sensing Surface Plasmon Band Gap Sensor A newsensing concept Nanostructures for Surface Plasmon SensingSurface Plasmon are surface EM waves whose wavelength is

  20. Stationary Fuel Cell Application Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, C. W.; Rivkin, C. H.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of codes and standards related to stationary fuel cell applications and identifies gaps and resolutions associated with relative codes and standards.

  1. Influence of film thickness and air exposure on the transport gap of manganese phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidu, F.; Fechner, A.; Salvan, G.; Gordan, O. D.; Fronk, M.; Zahn, D. R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Lehmann, D. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); INNOVENT Technology Development, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Mahns, B.; Knupfer, M. [Electronic and Optical Properties Department, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface formation between manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) and cobalt was investigated combining ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The transport band gap of the MnPc increases with the film thickness up to a value of (1.2 {+-} 0.3) eV while the optical band gap as determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry amounts to 0.5 eV. The gap values are smaller compared to other phthalocyanines due to metallic Mn 3d states close to the Fermi level. The transport band gap was found to open upon air exposure as a result of the disappearance of the occupied 3d electronic states.

  2. Gap generation in Weyl semimetals in a model with local four-fermion interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. O. Sukhachov

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gap generation in Weyl semimetals in a model with local four-fermion interaction. It is shown that there exists a critical value of coupling constant separating the symmetric and broken symmetry phases, and the corresponding phase diagram is described. The gap generation in a more general class of Weyl materials with small bare gap is studied, and the quasiparticle energy spectrum is determined. It is found that, in this case, the dynamically generated gap leads to additional splitting of the quasiparticle energy bands.

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 90, 115209 (2014) Computational search for direct band gap silicon crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of microns thick, while solar cells made from direct band gap materials (such as CdTe, CIGS, or CZTS) can

  4. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  5. Design of Optimal Regulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Robert Sierakowski

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research suggests the use of a liner quadratic performance index for optimal control of regulators in various applications. Some examples include correcting the trajectory of rocket and air vehicles, vibration suppression of flexible structures, and airplane stability. In all these cases, the focus is in suppressing/decreasing system deviations rapidly. However, if one compares the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) solution with optimal solutions (minimum time), it is seen that the LQR solution is less than optimal in some cases indeed (3-6) times that obtained using a minimum time solution. Moreover, the LQR solution is sometimes unacceptable in practice due to the fact that values of control extend beyond admissible limits and thus the designer must choose coefficients in the linear quadratic form, which are unknown. The authors suggest methods which allow finding a quasi-optimal LQR solution with bounded control which is closed to the minimum time solution. They also remand the process of the minimum time decision. Keywords: Optimal regulator, minimum time controller, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). -- This paper is declared a work of the U.S. Government and not subject to copyright protection in the USA. The manuscript is accepted as paper AIAA-2003-6638 by 2nd AIAA Unmanned Unlimited Systems, Technologies, and Operations-Aerospace, Land, and See Conference and Workshop - Exhibit, San Diego, California, USA, 15-18 Sep. 2003.

  6. Relative proton and gamma widths of astrophysically important states in 30S studied in the beta-decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. T. Koldste; B. Blank; M. J. G. Borge; J. A. Briz; M. Carmona-Gallardo; L. M. Fraile; H. O. U. Fynbo; J. Giovinazzo; J. G. Johansen; A. Jokinen; B. Jonson; T. Kurturkian-Nieto; J. H. Kusk; T. Nilsson; A. Perea; V. Pesudo; E. Picado; K. Riisager; A. Saastamoinen; O. Tengblad; J. -C. Thomas; J. Van de Walle

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonances just above the proton threshold in 30S affect the 29P(p,gamma)30S reaction under astrophysical conditions. The (p,gamma)-reaction rate is currently determined indirectly and depends on the properties of the relevant resonances. We present here a method for finding the ratio between the proton and gamma partial widths of resonances in 30S. The widths are determined from the beta-2p and beta-p-gamma decay of 31Ar, which is produced at the ISOLDE facility at the European research organization CERN. Experimental limits on the ratio between the proton and gamma partial widths for astrophysical relevant levels in 30S have been found for the first time. A level at 4688(5) keV is identified in the gamma spectrum, and an upper limit on the proton to gamma width of 0.26 (95 % C.L.) is found. In the two-proton spectrum two levels at 5227(3) keV and 5847(4) keV are identified. These levels are previously seen to gamma decay and upper limits on the gamma to proton width of 0.5 and 9, respectively, (95 % C.L.) are found, where the latter differs from previous calculations.

  7. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, L. A. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Magen, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Fundacion ARAID, 50004 Zaragoza (Spain)] [Spain; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France) [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Serrano-Ramon, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain) [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  8. CIVIL-MILITARY GAP AND MILITARY EFFECTIVENESS: THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY AND MILITARY EXPERIENCE GAP ON DEFENSE SPENDING IN THE UNITED STATES, 1952-2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byeonggu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of civil-military gap have argued that the difference in values, perspectives, and opinions between civilians and the military matters because it determines military effectiveness, but empirical analyses ...

  9. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  10. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  11. Shell width Three bumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and resource managers generally agree that with climate change warming Alaska waters, it is no longer a matter be mottled dark brown to dark green, with small yellow patches. The bottom may be orange or red during of water salinity and temperature. They can also survive upstream of river mouths in some estuarine

  12. Surveillance test interval optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cepin, M.; Mavko, B. [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljublijana (Slovenia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical specifications have been developed on the bases of deterministic analyses, engineering judgment, and expert opinion. This paper introduces our risk-based approach to surveillance test interval (STI) optimization. This approach consists of three main levels. The first level is the component level, which serves as a rough estimation of the optimal STI and can be calculated analytically by a differentiating equation for mean unavailability. The second and third levels give more representative results. They take into account the results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculated by a personal computer (PC) based code and are based on system unavailability at the system level and on core damage frequency at the plant level.

  13. Distributed Optimization System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurtado, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  14. Genetic-Algorithm Discovery of a Direct-Gap and Optically Allowed Superstructure from Indirect-Gap Si and Ge Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    d'Avezac, M.; Luo, J. W.; Chanier, T.; Zunger, A.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining two indirect-gap materials - with different electronic and optical gaps - to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Si{sub n}/Ge{sub m}/.../Si{sub p}/Ge{sub q} superstructures grown on (001) Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. The search reveals a robust configurational motif - SiGe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}SiGe{sub n} on (001) Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} substrate (x {le} 0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced {Gamma}-X coupling at the band edges.

  15. Optimality of Affine Policies in Multi-stage Robust Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsimas, Dimitris J.

    In this paper, we prove the optimality of disturbance-affine control policies in the context of one-dimensional, constrained, multistage robust optimization. Our results cover the finite-horizon case, with minimax (worst-case) ...

  16. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jun-jie

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, {Lambda}{sub W}, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb{sup -1} data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, M{sub T}, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < M{sub T} < 200 GeV. The result if {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.011 {+-} 0.093(stat) {+-} 0.107(syst) GeV.

  17. Evaluation of architectural paradigms for addressing theprocessor-memory gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliker, Leonid; Gorden, Grime; Husbands, Parry; Chame, Jacqualine

    2003-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Many high performance applications run well below the peak arithmetic performance of the underlying machine, with inefficiencies often attributed to poor memory system behavior. In the context of scientific computing we examine three emerging processors designed to address the well-known gap between processor and memory performance through the exploitation of data parallelism. The VIRAM architecture uses novel PIM technology to combine embedded DRAM with a vector co-processor for exploiting its large bandwidth potential. The DIVA architecture incorporates a collection of PIM chips as smart-memory coprocessors to a conventional microprocessor, and relies on superword-level parallelism to make effective use of the available memory bandwidth. The Imagine architecture provides a stream-aware memory hierarchy to support the tremendous processing potential of SIMD controlled VLIW clusters. First we develop a scalable synthetic probe that allows us to parametize key performance attributes of VIRAM, DIVA and Imagine while capturing the performance crossover points of these architectures. Next we present results for scientific kernels with different sets of computational characteristics and memory access patterns. Our experiments allow us to evaluate the strategies employed to exploit data parallelism, isolate the set of application characteristics best suited to each architecture and show a promising direction towards interfacing leading-edge processor technology with high-end scientific computations.

  18. Bridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between BusinessBridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Bridging the Gap Between Business Process Models and ServiceProcess Models and ServiceProcess Models and Service of the major reasons for this deficiency is the gap that exists between business process models on the one hand a flexible approach for aligning business process models with workflow specifications. In order to maintain

  19. An evaluation of fusion energy R&D gaps using Technology Readiness Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for prioritization. #12;The topic of fusion energy R&D gaps is receiving increased attention page 2 of 16 In EUAn evaluation of fusion energy R&D gaps using Technology Readiness Levels M. S. Tillack to develop and apply this technology assessment approach to fusion energy are reported here. #12;We adopted

  20. Thermoelectric power measurements of wide band gap semiconducting Chul-Ho Lee,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    Thermoelectric power measurements of wide band gap semiconducting nanowires Chul-Ho Lee,1 Gyu online 13 January 2009 We investigated the temperature-dependent thermoelectric power TEP of individual concentration in wide band gap semiconducting nano- wires employing temperature-dependent thermoelectric power