National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for optics sb ras

  1. The formation mechanisms and optical characteristics of GaSb quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wei-Hsun; Pao, Chun-Wei [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)] [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kai-Wei [College of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Tainan 711, Taiwan (China)] [College of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Tainan 711, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-An [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shih-Yen [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China) [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-07

    The growth mechanisms and optical characteristics of GaSb quantum rings (QRs) are investigated. Although As-for-Sb exchange is the mechanism responsible for the dot-to-ring transition, significant height difference between GaSb quantum dots (QDs) and QRs in a dot/ring mixture sample suggests that the dot-to-ring transition is not a spontaneous procedure. Instead, it is a rapid transition procedure as long as it initiates. A model is established to explain this phenomenon. Larger ring inner diameters and heights of the sample with longer post Sb soaking time suggest that As-for-Sb exchange takes places in both vertical and lateral directions. The decreasing ring densities, enlarged ring inner/outer diameters and eventually flat GaSb surfaces observed with increasing growth temperatures are resulted from enhanced adatom migration and As-for-Sb exchange with increasing growth temperatures.

  2. Effect of arsenic on the optical properties of GaSb-based type II quantum wells with quaternary GaInAsSb layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janiak, F. Motyka, M.; S?k, G.; Dyksik, M.; Ryczko, K.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Patriarche, G.

    2013-12-14

    Optical properties of molecular beam epitaxially grown type II “W” shaped GaSb/AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb/GaSb quantum wells (QWs) designed for the active region of interband cascade lasers have been investigated. Temperature dependence of Fourier-transformed photoluminescence and photoreflectance was employed to probe the effects of addition of arsenic into the original ternary valence band well of GaInSb. It is revealed that adding arsenic provides an additional degree of freedom in terms of band alignment and strain tailoring and allows enhancing the oscillator strength of the active type II transition. On the other hand, however, arsenic incorporation apparently also affects the structural and optical material quality via generating carrier trapping states at the interfaces, which can deteriorate the radiative efficiency. These have been evidenced in several spectroscopic features and are also confirmed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images. While arsenic incorporation into type II QWs is a powerful heterostructure engineering tool for optoelectronic devices, a compromise has to be found between ideal band structure properties and high quality morphological properties.

  3. Self-Assembled ErSb Nanostructures with Optical Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electrodes - solar, defects, charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly), synthesis (scalable...

  4. Time resolved magneto-optical studies of ferromagnetic InMnSb films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, M.; Kini, R. N.; Nontapot, K.; Khodaparast, G. A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Wojtowicz, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2008-02-11

    We report time resolved magneto-optical measurements in InMnSb ferromagnetic films with 2% and 2.8% Mn contents grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. In order to probe a possible interaction between the spins of photoexcited carriers and the Mn ions, we measured spin dynamics before and after aligning the Mn ions by applying an external magnetic field at temperatures above and below the samples' Curie temperatures. We observed no significant temperature or magnetic field dependence in the relaxation times and attribute the observed dynamics entirely to the relaxation of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band where the s-d coupling with the localized Mn ions is significantly weaker compared to the p-d exchange coupling. We observed several differences in the optical response of our InMnSb samples which could have been influenced mainly by the samples' growth conditions.

  5. Optical reflection from the Bragg lattice of AsSb metal nanoinclusions in an AlGaAs matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushanov, V. I.; Chaldyshev, V. V., E-mail: chald.gvg@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhenskii, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The optical properties of metal-semiconductor metamaterials based on an AlGaAs matrix are studied. The specific feature of these materials is that there are As and AsSb nanoinclusion arrays which modify the dielectric properties of the material. These nanoinclusions are randomly arranged in the medium or form a Bragg structure with a reflectance peak at a wavelength close to 750 nm, corresponding to the transparency region of the matrix. The reflectance spectra are studied for s- and p-polarized light at different angles of incidence. It is shown that (i) As nanoinclusion arrays only slightly influence the optical properties of the medium in the wavelength range 700-900 nm, (ii) chaotic AsSb nanoinclusion arrays cause strong scattering of light, and (iii) the spatial periodicity in the arrangement of AsSb nanoinclusions is responsible for Bragg resonance in the optical reflection.

  6. Structural and optical properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rakesh K., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Kashyap, Raman, E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Vedeshwar, A. G., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Tandon, R. P., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 1-10007 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In this work conventional solid state precipitation method is adopted to fabricate Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass. The glass composition is optimized for proper host glass matrix to grow antimony trisulphide semiconductor quantum dots. The dot size is modified by heat treatment of glass samples in the temperature range from 550°C to 700°C for various time durations. Structural studies are carried out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticles with size ranges from 8 nm to 70 nm are obtained. Quantum dots so grown were further characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy and a blue shift is observed for absorption edge energy that conform the quantum confinement effect.

  7. Electronic and optical properties of TiCoSb under different pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Bin; Zhang Jing; Liang Jianchu; Gao Guoying; Yi Lin

    2012-08-15

    The electronic structure and optical properties of TiCoSb are studied by the first-principles calculation. It is found that the band gaps increase with the pressure increasing. It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of the valence band (VB) shifting away from the Fermi level. Our calculation indicates that TiCoSb has the large density of state near the Fermi level; moreover, the changes of the density of states near the Fermi level mainly are caused by Ti 3d and Co 3d under the different pressures. It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. As pressure increases, the static dielectric constants {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decrease. All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move towards higher energies within increasing pressure. - Graphical abstract: The first peak positions of the absorption spectrum increase and shift the high energy with an increase of pressure. The buleshift of the absorption edge could be observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of VB moving away from the Fermi level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As pressure increases, the static dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move to wards higher energies within creasing pressure.

  8. Structural, electronic and optical properties of La{sub x}Sc{sub 1-x}Sb alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezali, M.

    2015-03-30

    We present calculations of the structural, electronic and optic properties of LaxSc1-xSb ternary alloys for 0?x?1, by using the first principle full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FPLMTO) method based on the local density approximation (LDA). the lattice constant, bulk modulus, electronic band structures, density of state and optical properties such as dielectric functions, refractive index and extinction coefficient are calculated and discussed for (x=0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). Our results agree well with the available data in the literature.

  9. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of the structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arghavani Nia, Borhan; Sedighi, Matin; Shahrokhi, Masoud; Moradian, Rostam

    2013-11-15

    A density functional theory study of structural, electronical and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. In the exchange–correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) has been used to calculate lattice parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy, dielectric function and energy loss spectra. The electronic band structure of this compound has been calculated using the above two approximations as well as another form of PBE-GGA, proposed by Engle and Vosko (EV-GGA). It is found that the hexagonal phase of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} has an indirect gap in the ??N direction; while in the cubic phase there is a direct-gap at the ? point in the PBE-GGA and EV-GGA. Effects of applying pressure on the band structure of the system studied and optical properties of these systems were calculated. - Graphical abstract: A density functional theory study of structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Physical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases are investigated. • It is found that the hexagonal phase is an indirect gap semiconductor. • Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} is a direct-gap semiconductor at the ? point in the cubic phase. • By increasing pressure the semiconducting band gap and anti-symmetry gap are decreased.

  10. Spectral behavior of the optical constants in the visible/near infrared of GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films grown at glancing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Palma, R. J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pantano, C. G.

    2007-04-23

    GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films were deposited using glancing angle deposition onto transparent glass substrates for the determination of the spectral behavior of the optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k) in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-2500 nm) as a function of the deposition angle. Computational simulations based on the matrix method were employed to determine the values of the optical constants of the different films from the experimental reflectance and transmittance spectra. A significant dependence of the overall optical behavior on the deposition angle is found. Furthermore, the band gap of the GeSbSe thin films was calculated. The accurate determination of the optical constants of films grown at glancing angle will enable the development of sculptured thin film fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors.

  11. Structural and optical studies on AgSbSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asokan, T. Namitha; Urmila, K. S.; Pradeep, B. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi- 22, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    AgSbSe{sub 2} semiconducting thin films are successfully deposited using reactive evaporation technique at a substrate temperature of 398K. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the films are polycrystalline in nature. The structural parameters such as average particle size, dislocation density, and number of crystallites per unit have been evaluated. Atomic Force Microscopy is used to study the topographic characteristics of the film including the grain size and surface roughness. The silver antimony selenide thin films have high absorption coefficient of about 10{sup 5} cm{sup ?1} and it has an indirect band gap of 0.64eV.

  12. Ohmic contacts to n-GaSb 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhengchong

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, the Ill-V semiconductor GaSb and its ternary alloys containing antimony have exhibited interesting electrical and optical properties for device applications which include negative resistance tunnel devices, lasers, detectors and FET...

  13. Optical properties of AlAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} alloys determined by in situ ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D. [Nano-Optical Property Laboratory and Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J. J.; Lee, E. H.; Bae, M. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J. [Center for Opto-Electronic Convergence Systems, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Liang, C.-T.; Chang, Y.-C. [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    We report pseudodielectric function data <{epsilon}> = <{epsilon}{sub 1}> + i<{epsilon}{sub 2}> from 0.74 to 6.48 eV of oxide-free AlAsSb alloys that are the closest representation to date of the intrinsic bulk dielectric response {epsilon} of the material. Measurements were performed on 1.3 {mu}m thick films grown on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Data were obtained with the films in situ to avoid oxidation artifacts. Critical-point structures were identified by band-structure calculations done with the linear augmented Slater-type orbital method. Crossings of transitions at the {Gamma}- and X-points and the {Gamma}- and L-points with composition were observed.

  14. Digital Signaling and Hysteresis Characterize Ras Activation in Lymphoid Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Jayajit

    Activation of Ras proteins underlies functional decisions in diverse cell types. Two molecules, RasGRP and SOS, catalyze Ras activation in lymphocytes. Binding of active Ras to SOS' allosteric pocket markedly increases ...

  15. RAs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en NNSA sitesInformation/%2A en9/%2A

  16. The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via the Intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via the Intermediate Phase (AgSb)3Te4. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via...

  17. CRAD, NNSA- Safety Basis (SB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRAD for Safety Basis (SB). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  18. Relaxation of photoinduced spins and carriers in ferromagnetic InMnSb films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nontapot, K.; Kini, R. N.; Gifford, A.; Merritt, T. R.; Khodaparast, G. A.; Wojtowicz, T.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2007-04-02

    The authors report time resolved measurements and control of photoinduced spin and carrier relaxations in InMnSb ferromagnetic films with 2% Mn content (grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy) using femtosecond laser pulses, and compare them to analogous measurements on InBeSb and InSb films. In this work, magneto-optical Kerr effect and standard pump-probe techniques provided a direct measure of the photoexcited spin and carrier lifetimes, respectively. They observe decrease in relaxations times in the high laser fluence regime and an absence of temperature dependence of the relaxation times.

  19. Electronic and structural response of InSb to ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burzo, Andrea Mihaela

    2001-01-01

    The present work is motivated in part by the increasing interest in a better understanding of the optical properties of InSb, the main material used to manufacture infrared detectors. In addition, there have been recent ...

  20. High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

  1. The role of ras signaling associative learning and memory in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakamoto, Toshimasa

    2004-01-01

    Ras is an evolutionally conserved signaling molecule that has been implicated in a variety of cellular events, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Recent studies also suggest roles of Ras in neuronal ...

  2. Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

    2006-03-09

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

  3. Phase transitions in Ge-Sb phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raoux, Simone; Virwani, Kumar; Hitzbleck, Martina; Salinga, Martin; Madan, Anita; Pinto, Teresa L.

    2009-03-15

    Thin films of the phase change material Ge-Sb with Ge concentrations between 7.3 and 81.1 at. % were deposited by cosputtering from elemental targets. Their crystallization behavior was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray reflectivity, profilometry, optical reflectivity, and resistivity versus temperature measurements. It was found that the crystallization temperature increases with Ge content. Calculations of the glass transition temperature (which is a lower limit for the crystallization temperature T{sub x}) also show an increase with Ge concentration closely tracking the measured values of T{sub x}. For low Ge content samples, Sb x-ray diffraction peaks occurred during a heating ramp at lower temperature than Ge diffraction peaks. The appearance of Ge peaks is related to Ge precipitation and agglomeration. For Ge concentrations of 59.3 at. % and higher, Sb and Ge peaks occurred at the same temperature. Upon crystallization, film mass density and optical reflectivity increase as well as electrical contrast (ratio of resistivity in amorphous phase to crystalline phase) all showed a maximum for the eutectic alloy (14.5 at. % Ge). For the alloy with 59.3 at. % Ge there was very little change in any of these parameters, while the alloy with 81.1 at. % Ge behaved opposite to a typical phase change alloy and showed reduced mass density and reflectivity and increased resistivity.

  4. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  5. Transport properties in AlInSb/InAsSb heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhang-yang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Chengyan; Zeng, Yiping [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-12-28

    Based on theoretical studies of transport properties in InAsSb-based quantum well heterostructures, we propose a material design for InAsSb quantum well with AlInSb barrier. Variation of electron mobility and two-dimensional electron gas concentration in Al{sub y}In{sub 1?y}Sb/InAs{sub 1?x}Sb{sub x} heterostructures over the compositional range of which InAsSb is fully strained to AlInSb are investigated, where impact from dislocation scattering could be minimized. In comparison with InAs and InSb based quantum well heterostructures, InAsSb is advantageous in achieving the highest electron mobility despite of alloy disorder scattering. The maximum mobility of 37?000 cm{sup 2}/V s is attainable in 15?nm InAs{sub 0.2}Sb{sub 0.8} quantum well with Al{sub 0.24}In{sub 0.76}Sb barrier and there is great potential for further improvement. Our InAsSb based quantum well heterostructure is proved to be a robust structure for high-speed applications.

  6. Structural investigation on Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses using x-ray photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wen-Hou [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Xiang, Shen [College of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Xu, Si-Wei; Wang, Rong-Ping, E-mail: rongping.wang@anu.edu.au [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Fang, Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China)

    2014-05-14

    The structure of Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses (x?=?7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 27.5, 30, and 32.5 at. %) has been investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Different structural units have been extracted and characterized by decomposing XPS core level spectra, the evolution of the relative concentration of each structural unit indicates that, the relative contributions of Se-trimers and Se-Se-Ge(Sb) structure decrease with increasing Ge content until they become zero at chemically stoichiometric glasses of Ge{sub 25}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 65}, and then the homopolar bonds like Ge-Ge and Sb-Sb begin to appear in the spectra. Increase of homopolar bonds will extend band-tails into the gap and narrow the optical band gap. Thus, the glass with a stoichiometric composition generally has fewer defective bonds and larger optical bandgap.

  7. Electrochemical Insertion/extraction of Lithium in Multiwall Carbon Nanotube/Sb and SnSb?.? Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei Xiang

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of acetylene and used as templates to prepare CNT-Sb and CNT-SnSb?.? nanocomposites via the chemical reduction of SnCl? and SbCl? ...

  8. InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic diode physics evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Danielson, L.R. [Lockheed-Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    The hotside operating temperatures for many projected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion system applications are approximately 1,000 C, which sets an upper limit on the TPV diode bandgap of 0.6 eV from efficiency and power density considerations. This bandgap requirement has necessitated the development of new diode material systems, never previously considered for energy generation. To date, InGaAsSb quaternary diodes grown lattice-matched on GaSb substrates have achieved the highest performance. This report relates observed diode performance to electro-optic properties such as minority carrier lifetime, diffusion length and mobility and provides initial links to microstructural properties. This analysis has bounded potential diode performance improvements. For the 0.52 eV InGaAsSb diodes used in this analysis the measured dark current is 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, versus a potential Auger limit 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, a radiative limit of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} A/cm{sup 2} (no photon recycling), and an absolute thermodynamic limit of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 2}. These dark currents are equivalent to open circuit voltage gains of 20 mV (7%), 60 mV (20%) and 140 mV (45%), respectively.

  9. Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of AlSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Y. W.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.; Shin, S. H.; Kim, S. Y.; Song, J. D.

    2011-12-23

    Spectroscopic ellipometry was used to determine the optical response of an intrinsic AlSb film as a function of temperature. The 1.5 {mu}m thick film was grown on a (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Measurements were done at temperatures from 300 K to the growth temperature of 800 K over a spectral range of 0.7 to 5.0 eV. To avoid oxidation artifacts, measurements were done with the film in situ. The data were analyzed using a parametric semiconductor model for its temperature dependence.

  10. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore »to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  11. SbSI nanocrystal formation in As–Sb–S–I glass under laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azhniuk, Yu.M.; Stoyka, V.; Petryshynets, I.; Rubish, V.M.; Guranich, O.G.; Gomonnai, A.V.; Zahn, D.R.T.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? As–Sb–S–I glasses are obtained by co-melting of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and SbSI. ? The glass structure and composition are confirmed by SEM, EDX, and Raman studies. ? Laser-induced crystallization of SbSI from the glass is observed by Raman spectroscopy. -- Abstract: As–Sb–S–I glasses are obtained by co-melting of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and SbSI in a broad compositional interval. Their structure and composition are confirmed by the studies of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and micro-Raman scattering. Laser-induced crystallization of SbSI crystallites from the glass matrix is observed in the course of the micro-Raman measurement as a result of local laser beam heating.

  12. Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A.; Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1; Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 ; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7; Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7

    2013-09-21

    The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates.

  13. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  14. Ras Al Khaimah (RAK): World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on Ras Al Khalmah (RAK) that had no drilling activity in 1990. In 1991, International Petroleum Ltd., (IPL), which holds a 1,100 sq mi concession onshore, may spud their West Jiri prospect. Amoco holds an offshore concession and was to have completed seismic last year. the RAK Gas Commission was reported to be operating the offshore Saleh gas field in 1990, which a former foreign concessionaire relinquished in mid-1989 since it had reached its economic limit. Production from Saleh last year is estimated at 1,000 bcpd and about 9 MMcfgd.

  15. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Hanson, Gregory R [ORNL; Sexton, Angela Kay [ORNL; Jones Jr, J P [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  16. 1. PMU Based RAS for a Hybrid AC/DC System 1.1. Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Husheng

    1. PMU Based RAS for a Hybrid AC/DC System 1.1. Project Team Primary Thrust: Modeling Secondary to be detected more quickly allowing less severe action. This effort focuses on PMU driven response-based RAS from PMU units. The project goals break down into three efforts: · Investigating the possibility

  17. Effects of oncogenic Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the adhesion of normal human cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldman, Lynne K

    2010-01-01

    Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes commonly arise in human cancers. However, in experimental settings, oncogenic RAS has most often been studied at supraphysiological levels of expression. Importantly, work by others ...

  18. Selective Killing of K-ras Mutant Cancer Cells by Novel Small Molecule Inducers of Oxidative Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Alice

    Activating K-RAS mutations are the most frequent oncogenic mutations in human cancer. Numerous downstream signaling pathways have been shown to be deregulated by oncogenic K-ras. However, to date there are still no effective ...

  19. DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2013-06-25

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing recommendations for DWPF along with some data related to Safety Class documentation at DWPF. Some significant observations regarding SB8 follow: Reduced washing in Tank 51 led to an increase in the wt.% soluble solids of the DWPF feed. If wt.% total solids for the SRAT and SME product weren’t adjusted upward to maintain insoluble solids levels similar to past sludge batches, then the rheological properties of the slurry went below the low end of the DWPF design bases for the SRAT and SME. Much higher levels of dissolved manganese were found in the SRAT and SME products than in recent sludge batches. Closed crucible melts were more reduced than expected. The working hypothesis is that the soluble Mn is less oxidizing than assumed in the REDOX calculations. A change in the coefficient for Mn in the REDOX equation was recommended in a separate report. The DWPF (Hsu) stoichiometric acid equation was examined in detail to better evaluate how to control acid in DWPF. The existing DWPF equation can likely be improved without changing the required sample analyses through a paper study using existing data. The recommended acid stoichiometry for initial SB8 SRAT batches is 115-120% stoichiometry until some processing experience is gained. The conservative range (based on feed properties) of stoichiometric factors derived in this study was from 110-147%, but SRNL recommends using only the lower half of this range, 110-126% even after initial batches provide processing experience. The stoichiometric range for sludge-only processing appears to be suitable for coupled operation based on results from the run in the middle of the range. Catalytic hydrogen was detectable (>0.005 vol%) in all SRAT and SME cycles. Hydrogen reached 30-35% of the SRAT and SME limits at the mid-point of the stoichiometry window (bounding noble metals and acid demand).

  20. Properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films obtained by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyj, I. O.; Kurilo, I. V.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Linnik, L. F.; Tetyorkin, V. V.; Potera, P.; Luka, G.

    2013-07-15

    The properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films of variable thickness deposited onto Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si, and KCl substrates are investigated by the method of pulsed laser ablation. The samples are obtained at a substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C in a vacuum chamber with a residual pressure of 10{sup -5} Torr. The thickness of the films amounted to 40-1500 nm. The structure of the bulk material of the targets and films is investigated by the methods of X-ray diffraction and transmission high-energy electron diffraction, respectively. The electrical properties of the films are investigated in the temperature range of 253-310 K. It is shown that the films have semiconductor properties. The structural features of the films determine their optical parameters.

  1. SB 375 IMPLEMENTATION: FROM PLAN TO REALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    sustainable communities in a post-SB 375 world. · Urban Greening: $41.5 million in capital projects and plans Development Cross-Agency Facilitation and Coordination Funding and Support for Sustainable Communities connections between state, local, and regional agencies - Tools and guidance - Sustainable Communities

  2. Interband magneto-spectroscopy in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasturiarachchi, T.; Edirisooriya, M.; Mishima, T. D.; Doezema, R. E.; Santos, M. B.; Saha, D.; Pan, X.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2015-06-07

    We measure the magneto-optical absorption due to intersubband optical transitions between conduction and valence subband Landau levels in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells. InSb has the narrowest band gap (0.24?eV at low temperature) of the III–V semiconductors leading to a small effective mass (0.014 m{sub 0}) and a large g–factor (?51). As a result, the Landau level spacing is large at relatively small magnetic fields (<8?T), and one can observe spin-splitting of the Landau levels. We examine two structures: (i) a multiple-square-well structure and (ii) a structure containing multiple parabolic wells. The energies and intensities of the strongest features are well explained by a modified Pidgeon-Brown model based on an 8-band k•p model that explicitly incorporates pseudomorphic strain. The strain is essential for obtaining agreement between theory and experiment. While modeling the square well is relatively straight-forward, the parabolic well consists of 43 different layers of various thickness to approximate a parabolic potential. Agreement between theory and experiment for the parabolic well validates the applicability of the model to complicated structures, which demonstrates the robustness of our model and confirms its relevance for developing electronic and spintronic devices that seek to exploit the properties of the InSb band structure.

  3. InAs quantum dot morphology after capping with In, N, Sb alloyed thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ulloa, J. M.; Utrilla, A. D. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-03

    Using a thin capping layer to engineer the structural and optical properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) has become common practice in the last decade. Traditionally, the main parameter considered has been the strain in the QD/capping layer system. With the advent of more exotic alloys, it has become clear that other mechanisms significantly alter the QD size and shape as well. Larger bond strengths, surfactants, and phase separation are known to act on QD properties but are far from being fully understood. In this study, we investigate at the atomic scale the influence of these effects on the morphology of capped QDs with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. A broad range of capping materials (InGaAs, GaAsSb, GaAsN, InGaAsN, and GaAsSbN) are compared. The QD morphology is related to photoluminescence characteristics.

  4. The RAS is a scholarship for students supported as research assistants who meet the eligibility requirements listed below. CHICAGO CAMPUS RESEARCH ASSISTANT SCHOLARSHIP (RAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . University policy requires that all students receiving RAS be enrolled full time in The Graduate School (TGS) each quarter, either at full time residency 3-4 graduate units or at TGS 500. Please check that students have registered appropriately. (For the TGS 500 registration, make certain the student has already

  5. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujita, Maristela [Departamento de Bioquimica/Biologia Molecular, Centro Interdisciplinar de Terapia Genica CINTERGEN, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, Wagner L.; Ogata, Fernando T. [Departamento de Bioquimica/Biologia Molecular, Centro Interdisciplinar de Terapia Genica CINTERGEN, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stern, Arnold [Department of Pharmacology, New York School of Medicine, New York University, New York (United States); Monteiro, Hugo P. [Departamento de Bioquimica/Biologia Molecular, Centro Interdisciplinar de Terapia Genica CINTERGEN, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: hpmonte@uol.com.br; Arai, Roberto J. [Departamento de Bioquimica/Biologia Molecular, Centro Interdisciplinar de Terapia Genica CINTERGEN, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: arairj@yahoo.com.br

    2008-05-16

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras{sup C118S}) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG.

  6. DWPF Simulant CPC Studies For SB8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-09-25

    Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected during SME processing. Mercury behavior was consistent with that seen in previous SRAT runs. Mercury was stripped below the DWPF limit on 0.8 wt% for all runs. Rheology yield stress fell within or below the design basis of 1-5 Pa. The low acid Tank 40 run (106% acid stoichiometry) had the highest yield stress at 3.78 Pa.

  7. Qatargas exporting LNG from Qatar`s new Ras Laffan Port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-24

    When the 135,000 cu m LNG carrier Al Zubarah departed Ras Laffan Port in December, Qatar entered a new era of commerce that will both boost the emirate`s economic development and influence energy trade around the world. The event capped more than a decade of planning, design, and construction of Ras Laffan Port--the world`s newest and largest LNG exporting facility. During the 1980s, the focus in Qatar was on exploration and development of North field, which holds the world`s largest reserves of nonassociated natural gas. In the 1990s, efforts concentrated on establishing a direct production and export link between North field, the new multi-billion-dollar Qatar Liquefied Gas Co. (Qatargas) gas liquefaction plant at Ras Laffan, and LNG export facilities at the 8.5 sq km Ras Laffan Port. Markets of the Far East will be first to be served by LNG from Ras Laffan Port. Two 25-year LNG supply contracts have been signed with buyers in Japan and South Korea, and negotiations are under way with potential customers from China, Taiwan, and Thailand. The paper describes the port, its operations, and export projects.

  8. Pulling of 3 mm diameter AlSb rods by micro-pulling down method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne Ph.D., Edith

    2009-01-01

    Sb) and AlSb crystal zirconia were expected as crucibles,crucible shape with zirconia. Page 3/10 Fig 1 : vitreous

  9. K2CsSb Cathode Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley,J.; Rao, T.; Wang, E.

    2008-10-01

    K{sub 2}CsSb is an attractive photocathode for high current applications. With a quantum efficiency of >4% at 532nm and >10% at 355nm, it is the only cathode to have demonstrated an average current of 35mA in an accelerator environment We describe ongoing cathode development work. for the energy recovery linac being constructed at BNL Several cathodes have been created on both copper and stainless steel substrates, and their spatial uniformity and spectral response have been characterized. Preliminary lifetime measurements have been performed at high average current densities (>1 mA/mm{sup 2}).

  10. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-08-10

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near amore »critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.« less

  11. RAS Mutations Impact TNF-Induced Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells via ERK-Modulatory Negative and Positive Feedback Circuits along with non-ERK Pathway Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    More than 40% of colon cancers have a mutation in K-RAS or N-RAS, GTPases that operate as central hubs for multiple key signaling pathways within the cell. Utilizing an isogenic panel of colon carcinoma cells with K-RAS ...

  12. Transition threshold in Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wen-Hou [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Fang, Liang, E-mail: lfang@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Shen, Xiang [Laboratory of Infrared Material and Devices, Advanced Technology Research Institute, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Wang, Rong-Ping [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-03-21

    Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses with Ge content from 7.5 to 32.5?at.?% have been prepared by melt-quench technique, and the physical parameters including glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), density (?), compactness (C), shear elastic moduli (C{sub s}), compression elastic moduli (C{sub c}), refractive index (n), and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) have been investigated. While all these physical parameters show threshold behavior in the glass with a chemically stoichiometric composition. Raman spectra analysis also indicates that, with increasing Ge content, Se-chains or rings gradually disappear until all Se-atoms are consumed in the glass with a chemically stoichiometric composition. With further increasing Ge content, homopolar Ge-Ge and Sb-Sb bonds are formed and the chemical order in the glasses is violated. The threshold behavior of the physical properties in the Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses can be traced to demixing of networks above the chemically stoichiometric composition.

  13. Astrometric orbits of SB9 stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jancart, S; Babusiaux, C; Pourbaix, D

    2005-01-01

    Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data (IAD) have been used to derive astrometric orbital elements for spectroscopic binaries from the newly released Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (SB9). Among the 1374 binaries from SB9 which have an HIP entry, 282 have detectable orbital astrometric motion (at the 5% significance level). Among those, only 70 have astrometric orbital elements that are reliably determined (according to specific statistical tests discussed in the paper), and for the first time for 20 systems, representing a 10% increase relative to the 235 DMSA/O systems already present in the Hipparcos Double and Multiple Systems Annex. The detection of the astrometric orbital motion when the Hipparcos IAD are supplemented by the spectroscopic orbital elements is close to 100% for binaries with only one visible component, provided that the period is in the 50 - 1000 d range and the parallax is larger than 5 mas. This result is an interesting testbed to guide the choice of algorithms and stati...

  14. Formation of MnSb during the growth of MnSi layers in the presence of an Sb flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Epitaxial growth of silicide layers on Si substrates has attracted much attention due to their technologicalFormation of MnSb during the growth of MnSi layers in the presence of an Sb flux K. Matsuda, Y have been performed to elucidate the growth mechanism. The MnSi layer was grown by reactive deposition

  15. Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Small molecule modulators of protein activity have proven invaluable in the study of protein function and regulation. While inhibitors of protein activity

  16. Analysis of Diffusion of Ras2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalyan C. Vinnakota; David A. Mitchell; Robert J. Deschenes; Tetsuro Wakatsuki; Daniel A. Beard

    2010-05-10

    Binding, lateral diffusion and exchange are fundamental dynamic processes involved in protein association with cellular membranes. In this study, we developed numerical simulations of lateral diffusion and exchange of fluorophores in membranes with arbitrary bleach geometry and exchange of the membrane localized fluorophore with the cytosol during Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. The model simulations were used to design FRAP experiments with varying bleach region sizes on plasma-membrane localized wild type GFP-Ras2 with a dual lipid anchor and mutant GFP-Ras2C318S with a single lipid anchor in live yeast cells to investigate diffusional mobility and the presence of any exchange processes operating in the time scale of our experiments. Model parameters estimated using data from FRAP experiments with a 1 micron x 1 micron bleach region-of-interest (ROI) and a 0.5 micron x 0.5 micron bleach ROI showed that GFP-Ras2, single or dual lipid modified, diffuses as single species with no evidence of exchange with a cytoplasmic pool. This is the first report of Ras2 mobility in yeast plasma membrane. The methods developed in this study are generally applicable for studying diffusion and exchange of membrane associated fluorophores using FRAP on commercial confocal laser scanning microscopes.

  17. Adv. Geosci., 8, 3338, 2006 www.adv-geosci.net/8/33/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under a Creative Commons License. Advances in Geosciences Web portal on environmental sciences "ATMOS" E., Tomsk, 634055 Russia 2Institute for Numerical Mathematics RAS, 8 Gubkina Str., Moscow, 119991 Russia 3Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, 1 Akademicheskii Ave.,Tomsk, 634055 Russia Received: 15 September

  18. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 10?% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 10?% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb?. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.

  19. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 10?% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 10?% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb?. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed tomore »the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.« less

  20. SB9: The Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D; Batten, A H; Fekel, F C; Hartkopf, W I; Levato, H; Morrell, N I; Torres, G; Udry, S

    2004-01-01

    The Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (http://sb9.astro.ulb.ac.be) continues the series of compilations of spectroscopic orbits carried out over the past 35 years by Batten and collaborators. As of 2004 May 1st, the new Catalogue holds orbits for 2,386 systems. Some essential differences between this catalogue and its predecessors are outlined and three straightforward applications are presented: (1) Completeness assessment: period distribution of SB1s and SB2s; (2) Shortest periods across the H-R diagram; (3) Period-eccentricity relation.

  1. SB9: The Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pourbaix; A. A. Tokovinin; A. H. Batten; F. C. Fekel; W. I. Hartkopf; H. Levato; N. I. Morrell; G. Torres; S. Udry

    2004-06-25

    The Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (http://sb9.astro.ulb.ac.be) continues the series of compilations of spectroscopic orbits carried out over the past 35 years by Batten and collaborators. As of 2004 May 1st, the new Catalogue holds orbits for 2,386 systems. Some essential differences between this catalogue and its predecessors are outlined and three straightforward applications are presented: (1) Completeness assessment: period distribution of SB1s and SB2s; (2) Shortest periods across the H-R diagram; (3) Period-eccentricity relation.

  2. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid on ras post-translational processing and localization in a transgenic mouse colonic cell line 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, Esther Dick

    2000-01-01

    The acquisition of a chronically activated ras gene is a critical early step in colon cancer development, with membrane localization being a prerequisite for malignant transformation. Fish oil supplemented diets, containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA...

  3. FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS After the FOB alignment is complete, and it passes environmental tests, it will be checked out in a second HST. The NICMOS FOB will relay simulated images from RAS/HOMS to a Photometrics CCD camera placed where the three

  4. TANK 40 FINAL SB6 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2010-08-13

    A sample of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS), and a portion of the sample was designated for SB6 processing studies. The SB6 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile composition, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB6. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB6 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids were allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 485 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples.

  5. Impact of thermal annealing on bulk InGaAsSbN materials grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. W.; Mawst, L. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; Kuech, T. F.; Wells, N. P.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.

    2014-02-03

    Two different thermal annealing techniques (rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and in-situ post-growth annealing in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) chamber) were employed to investigate their impact on the optical characteristics of double-heterostructures (DH) of InGaAsSbN/GaAs and on the performance of single-junction solar cell structures, all grown by MOVPE. We find that an optimized RTA procedure leads to a similar improvement in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity compared with material employing a multi-step optimized anneal within the MOVPE reactor. Time-resolved photoluminescence techniques at low temperature (LT) and room temperature (RT) were performed to characterize the carrier dynamics in bulk InGaAsSbN layers. Room temperature carrier lifetimes were found to be similar for both annealing methods, although the LT-PL (16?K) measurements of the MOVPE-annealed sample found longer lifetimes than the RTA-annealed sample (680?ps vs. 260?ps) for the PL measurement energy of 1.24?eV. InGaAsSbN-based single junction solar cells processed with the optimized RTA procedure exhibited an enhancement of the electrical performance, such as improvements in open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and efficiency over solar cells subjected to the in-situ MOVPE annealing technique.

  6. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  7. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  8. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Michael J.; Zalden, Peter; Chen, Frank; Weems, Ben; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2014-06-23

    The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200?kV/cm.

  9. Structures of Ras Superfamily Effector Complexes: What have we learnt in two decades?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mott, Helen R.; Owen, Darerca

    2015-04-01

    . The smallest family is the Ran family, which contains a single member but being responsible for nuclear transport it is also one of the most abundant small G proteins in the cell. The Ras superfamily proteins can exist in two nucleotide-bound forms... different to that of PAK and WASP. ACK forms a more regular ?-sheet with Cdc42 and then proceeds to wrap around the body of Cdc42 making extensive contacts with switches 1 and 2 and forming an expansive binding interface. Unlike ACK and WASP, which...

  10. Hydrogen passivation of Se and Te in AlSb M. D. McCluskey and E. E. Haller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Hydrogen passivation of Se and Te in AlSb M. D. McCluskey and E. E. Haller Lawrence Berkeley observed local vibrational modes LVM's arising from DX-hydrogen complex in AlSb. Hydrogen was diffused into bulk AlSb:Se and AlSb:Te by annealing in sealed quartz ampoules with either hydrogen gas or methanol CH

  11. TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-03-15

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

  12. Magnetic properties of MnSb inclusions formed in GaSb matrix directly during molecular beam epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Kret, Slawomir; Kurowska, Boguslawa; Kowalski, Bogdan J.; Twardowski, Andrzej; Wasik, Dariusz; Kwiatkowski, Adam; Sadowski, Janusz

    2011-04-01

    Despite of intensive search for the proper semiconductor base materials for spintronic devices working at room temperature no appropriate material based on ferromagnetic semiconductors has been found so far. We demonstrate that the phase segregated system with MnSb hexagonal inclusions inside the GaSb matrix, formed directly during the molecular beam epitaxial growth reveals the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and is a good candidate for exploitation in spintronics. Furthermore, the MnSb inclusions with only one crystalline structure were identified in this GaMn:MnSb granular material. The SQUID magnetometry confirmed that this material exhibits ferromagnetic like behavior starting from helium up to room temperature. Moreover, the magnetic anisotropy was found which was present also at room temperature, and it was proved that by choosing a proper substrate it is possible to control the direction of easy axis of inclusions' magnetization moment between in-plane and out-of-plane; the latter is important in view of potential applications in spintronic devices.

  13. For the McCormick department, the RAS is intended only for PhD students. If a MS student will be funded from chart strings using the RAS tuition amounts, please contact the McCormick Research Administration Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that all students receiving RAS be enrolled full time in The Graduate School (TGS) per quarter, either for 3-4 graduate units or TGS 500. Please check that students have registered appropriately. (For the TGS 500 registration, make certain the student has already completed 8 quarters at the full-time rate

  14. For the McCormick department, the RAS is only for PhD students. If an MS student will be funded from chart strings using the RAS tuition amounts, please contact the McCormick Business Administrator, Paula Straaton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that all students receiving RAS be enrolled full time in The Graduate School (TGS) each quarter, either for 3-4 graduate units or TGS 500. Please check that students have registered appropriately. (For the TGS 500 registration, make certain the student has already completed 8 quarters at the full-time rate

  15. RAS Mutations Affect Tumor Necrosis Factor–Induced Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells via ERK-Modulatory Negative and Positive Feedback Circuits Along with Non-ERK Pathway Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreeger, Pamela K.

    More than 40% of colon cancers have a mutation in K-RAS or N-RAS, GTPases that operate as central hubs for multiple key signaling pathways within the cell. Utilizing an isogenic panel of colon carcinoma cells with K-RAS ...

  16. Eight-band k·p modeling of InAs/InGaAsSb type-II W-design quantum well structures for interband cascade lasers emitting in a broad range of mid infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryczko, K.; S?k, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland)

    2013-12-14

    Band structure properties of the type-II W-design AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells have been investigated theoretically in a systematic manner and with respect to their use in the active region of interband cascade laser for a broad range of emission in mid infrared between below 3 to beyond 10??m. Eight-band k·p approach has been utilized to calculate the electronic subbands. The fundamental optical transition energy and the corresponding oscillator strength have been determined in function of the thickness of InAs and GaIn(As)Sb layers and the composition of the latter. There have been considered active structures on two types of relevant substrates, GaSb and InAs, introducing slightly modified strain conditions. Additionally, the effect of external electric field has been taken into account to simulate the conditions occurring in the operational devices. The results show that introducing arsenic as fourth element into the valence band well of the type-II W-design system, and then altering its composition, can efficiently enhance the transition oscillator strength and allow additionally increasing the emission wavelength, which makes this solution prospective for improved performance and long wavelength interband cascade lasers.

  17. Structural transition and amorphization in compressed ? - Sb 2 O 3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Zhao; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Shibing; Hirai, Shigeto; Zeng, Zhidan; Mao, Wendy L.

    2015-05-27

    Sb?O?-based materials are of broad interest in materials science and industry. High-pressure study using diamond anvil cells shows promise in obtaining new crystal and electronic structures different from their pristine states. Here, we conducted in situ angle dispersive synchrotron x-ray-diffraction and Raman spectroscopy experiments on ?-Sb?O? up to 50 GPa with neon as the pressure transmitting medium. A first-order structural transition was observed in between 15 and 20 GPa, where the cubic phase I gradually transformed into a layered tetragonal phase II through structural distortion and symmetry breaking. To explain the dramatic changes in sample color and transparency, we performedmore »first-principles calculations to track the evolution of its density of states and electronic structure under pressure. At higher pressure, a sluggish amorphization was observed. Our results highlight the structural connections among the sesquioxides, where the lone electron pair plays an important role in determining the local structures.« less

  18. Comparative analysis of hole transport in compressively strained InSb and Ge quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Ashish; Barth, Michael; Madan, Himanshu; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lee, Yi-Jing; Lin, You-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Ko, Chih-Hsin; Wann, Clement H. [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Loubychev, Dmitri; Liu, Amy; Fastenau, Joel [IQE, Inc., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Lindemuth, Jeff [Lake Shore Cryotronics, Westerville, Ohio 43082 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Compressively strained InSb (s-InSb) and Ge (s-Ge) quantum well heterostructures are experimentally studied, with emphasis on understanding and comparing hole transport in these two-dimensional confined heterostructures. Magnetotransport measurements and bandstructure calculations indicate 2.5× lower effective mass for s-InSb compared to s-Ge quantum well at 1.9?×?10{sup 12}?cm{sup –2}. Advantage of strain-induced m* reduction is negated by higher phonon scattering, degrading hole transport at room temperature in s-InSb quantum well compared to s-Ge heterostructure. Consequently, effective injection velocity is superior in s-Ge compared to s-InSb. These results suggest s-Ge quantum well heterostructure is more favorable and promising p-channel candidate compared to s-InSb for future technology node.

  19. Ab initio study of structural, electronic, magnetic alloys: XTiSb (X = Co, Ni and Fe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrir, M. Berri, S.; Lakel, S.; Alleg, S.; Bensalem, R.

    2015-03-30

    Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of three semi-Heusler compounds of CoTiSb, NiTiSb and FeTiSb were calculated by the method (FP-LAPW) which is based on the DFT code WIEN2k. We used the generalized gradient approximation (GGA (06)) for the term of the potential exchange and correlation (XC) to calculate structural properties, electronic properties and magnetic properties. Structural properties obtained as the lattice parameter are in good agreement with the experimental results available for the electronic and magnetic properties was that: CoTiSb is a semiconductor NiTiSb is a metal and FeTiSb is a half-metal ferromagnetic.

  20. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na?Ti?Sb?O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, S. Y. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Lab., Mianyang (China); Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Jiang, J. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Ye, Z. R. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Niu, X. H. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Song, Y. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, C. L. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dai, P. C. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Xie, B. P. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Lai, X. C. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Lab., Mianyang (China); Feng, D. L. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China)

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na?Ti?Sb?O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na?Ti?Sb?O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na?Ti?Sb?O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na?Ti?Sb?O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)

  1. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na?Ti?Sb?O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na?Ti?Sb?O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na?Ti?Sb?O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na?Ti?Sb?O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV atmore »7 K, indicating that Na?Ti?Sb?O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)« less

  2. Cu2Sb thin film electrodes prepared by pulsed laser deposition f or lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Seung-Wan; Reade, Ronald P.; Cairns, Elton J.; Vaughey, Jack T.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2003-01-01

    The Electrochemical Society (Batteries and Energy ConversionDeposition for Lithium Batteries Seung-Wan Song, a, * Ronaldrechargeable lithium batteries. Introduction Sb-containing

  3. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  4. The C. elegans class A synthetic multivulva genes inhibit ectopic RAS-mediated vulval development by tightly restricting expression of lin-3 EGF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffer, Adam M

    2011-01-01

    The class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes of C. elegans redundantly antagonize an EGF/Ras pathway to prevent ectopic vulval induction. The class B synMuv genes encode many proteins known to remodel chromatin ...

  5. Direct imaging of InSb (110)-(1x1) surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy under a profile imaging condition (HR-profile TEM) was employed to determine the structural model for the InSb(110)-(1x1) relaxation surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HR-profile TEM analyses indicate that the chevron model, which is widely accepted for zinc-blende-type III-V(110)-(1x1) surfaces prepared by cleavage, is also applicable to the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface prepared under an Sb-rich MBE condition. The assignment of atomic species (In or Sb) of InSb(110)-(1x1) surfaces was confirmed based on a HR-profile TEM image that captures the connected facets of InSb(110)-(1x1) and InSb(111)B-(2x2). On the basis of the well-known atomic species of InSb(111)B-(2x2), the atomic species of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface were deduced straightforwardly: the atoms shifted upward and downward at the topmost layer of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface are Sb and In, respectively. The atomic arrangements of the InSb(110)-(1x1)-InSb(111)B-(2x2) facet determined by HR-profile TEM may represent the atomic arrangements of zinc-blende-type III-V(331)B surfaces.

  6. Results of measurements of an environment neutron background at BNO INR RAS objects with the helium proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. R. Barabanov; R. A. Etezov; Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; A. M. Gezhaev; V. V. Kazalov; A. Kh. Khokonov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

    2015-10-17

    A method of measurements of the environmental neutron background at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the INR RAS are described. Measurements were done by using of a proportional counter filled with mixture of Ar(2 at)+$^3$He(4 at). The results obtained at the surface and the underground laboratory of the BNO INR RAS are presented. It is shown that a neutron background in the underground laboratory at the 4900 m w.e. depth is decreased by $\\sim 260$ times without any special shield in a comparison with the Earth surface. A neutron flux density in the 5-1323.5~cm air height region is constant within the determination error and equal to $(7.1\\pm0.1_{\\rm{stat}}\\pm0.3_{\\rm{syst}})\\times10^{-3}$ s$^{-1}\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$.

  7. Results of measurements of an environment neutron background at BNO INR RAS objects with the helium proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barabanov, I R; Gavrilyuk, Yu M; Gangapshev, A M; Gezhaev, A M; Kazalov, V V; Khokonov, A Kh; Kuzminov, V V; Panasenko, S I; Ratkevich, S S

    2015-01-01

    A method of measurements of the environmental neutron background at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the INR RAS are described. Measurements were done by using of a proportional counter filled with mixture of Ar(2 at)+$^3$He(4 at). The results obtained at the surface and the underground laboratory of the BNO INR RAS are presented. It is shown that a neutron background in the underground laboratory at the 4900 m w.e. depth is decreased by $\\sim 260$ times without any special shield in a comparison with the Earth surface. A neutron flux density in the 5-1323.5~cm air height region is constant within the determination error and equal to $(7.1\\pm0.1_{\\rm{stat}}\\pm0.3_{\\rm{syst}})\\times10^{-3}$ s$^{-1}\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$.

  8. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  9. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hole mobility Insub 0.41Gasub 0.59SbAlsub 0.91Gasub 0.09Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  10. Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-11-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

  11. SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -Rob Roberts About Us Rob RobertsSelectSAE3282 August 2011SB

  12. Superconductivity in Strong Spin Orbital Coupling Compound Sb2Se3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Guoyin

    Superconductivity in Strong Spin Orbital Coupling Compound Sb2Se3 P. P. Kong1 , F. Sun1,3 , L. Y induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. Here, we report on the discovery of superconductivity superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition

  13. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

  14. Carbon acceptors and carbon-hydrogen complexes in AlSb M. D. McCluskey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Carbon acceptors and carbon-hydrogen complexes in AlSb M. D. McCluskey* Department of Physics modes LVM's arising from carbon impurities in n- and p-type AlSb. The first and second harmonics. A peak at 572.9 cm 1 is tentatively identified as the 13 C LVM. Carbon-hydrogen complexes were formed

  15. GaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    into existing multijunction cells either as a means to increase the current or efficiency by using low band gapGaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response R. B infrared spectral response of GaAs-based solar cells that incorporate type II GaSb quantum dots QDs formed

  16. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  17. Effect of annealing on the properties of Sb doped ZnO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N. Sadananda; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K. [Thin Films Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka,Surathkal - 575025, Mangalore (India)

    2014-01-28

    Sb doped ZnO thin films have been deposited on glass substrate at 450°C using spray pyrolysis technique. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as deposited films are polycrystalline in nature with (100) preferred orientation. Whereas the films annealed at 450° C for 6h show a preferential orientation along (101) direction. Crystallites size varies from 15.7 nm to 34.95 nm with annealing duration. The Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows the plane and smooth surface of the films. The optical properties of annealed films have shown a variation in the band gap between 3.37 eV and 3.19 eV. Transparency of as grown and annealed films decreases from 78 % to 65% respectively in the visible region. The electrical conductivity of the as grown film shows an increase in the electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude with increase in the annealing duration.

  18. Band offsets determination and interfacial chemical properties of the Al2O3/GaSb system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    of a high quality dielectric/substrate interface. Native oxides of III­V com- pounds lead to the formation Sb is formed at the oxide/GaSb interface, which leads to a high leakage current.8 To overcome treatment. In contrast, NH4 2S and HCl solutions inhibit the Sb oxide formation. The lowest amount of Ga

  19. Illinois SB 1987: the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    On January 12, 2009, Governor Rod Blagojevich signed SB 1987, the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law. The legislation establishes emission standards for new coal-fueled power plants power plants that use coal as their primary feedstock. From 2009-2015, new coal-fueled power plants must capture and store 50 percent of the carbon emissions that the facility would otherwise emit; from 2016-2017, 70 percent must be captured and stored; and after 2017, 90 percent must be captured and stored. SB 1987 also establishes a goal of having 25 percent of electricity used in the state to come from cost-effective coal-fueled power plants that capture and store carbon emissions by 2025. Illinois is the first state to establish a goal for producing electricity from coal-fueled power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To support the commercial development of CCS technology, the legislation guarantees purchase agreements for the first Illinois coal facility with CCS technology, the Taylorville Energy Center (TEC); Illinois utilities are required to purchase at least 5 percent of their electricity supply from the TEC, provided that customer rates experience only modest increases. The TEC is expected to be completed in 2014 with the ability to capture and store at least 50 percent of its carbon emissions.

  20. Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics Dr. Palffy-Muhoray Ines Busuladzic Department of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics The University of Akron April 21, 2008 #12;Outline · History of optical fibers · What are optical fibers? · How are optical fibers made? · Light propagation through optical fibers · Application

  1. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Depeartment of Pharmacy, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka 590-0132 ; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ? We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ? YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ? YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ? YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment in osteosarcoma.

  2. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  3. DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-11-01

    Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

  4. Effects of Ge replacement in GeTe by [Ag+Sb] on thermoelectric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in GeTe by Ag+Sb on thermoelectric properties and NMR spectra Requirements for student: general physics and chemistry courses, and desire to work in experimental laboratory. This...

  5. Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Jae-taek

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained ...

  6. Pulling of 3 mm diameter AlSb rods by micro-pulling down method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne Ph.D., Edith

    2009-01-01

    SUBCONTRACT #6836278 Pulling of 3 mm diameter AlSb rods by1 cm long, and at least 3 mm in diameter. provided by LBNL.l Crucible Power/T° Speed (mm/min) Seed Results Crucible

  7. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  8. Thermoelectric properties of AgSbTe? from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, Nafiseh; Akbarzadeh, Hadi; Hashemifar, S. Javad

    2014-09-14

    The structural, electronic, and transport properties of AgSbTe? are studied by using full-relativistic first-principles electronic structure calculation and semiclassical description of transport parameters. The results indicate that, within various exchange-correlation functionals, the cubic Fd3?m and trigonal R3?m structures of AgSbTe? are more stable than two other considered structures. The computed Seebeck coefficients at different values of the band gap and carrier concentration are accurately compared with the available experimental data to speculate a band gap of about 0.1–0.35 eV for AgSbTe? compound, in agreement with our calculated electronic structure within the hybrid HSE (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof) functional. By calculating the semiclassical Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and electronic part of thermal conductivity, we present the theoretical upper limit of the thermoelectric figure of merit of AgSbTe? as a function of temperature and carrier concentration.

  9. Self-Assembled ErSb Nanostructures with Optical Applications in Infrared

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) |Janka,Ferrara U./INFN,TaÅŸ,Superconductors (Conference)Self

  10. Activation of a c-K-ras oncogene by somatic mutation in mouse lymphomas induced by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, I.; Villasante, A.; Corces, V.; Pellicer, A.

    1984-09-14

    Mouse tumors induced by gamma radiation are a useful model system for oncogenesis. DNA from such tumors contains an activated K-ras oncogene that can transform NIH 3T3 cells. This report describes the cloning of a fragment of the mouse K-ras oncogene containing the first exon from both a transformant in rat-2 cells and the brain of the same mouse that developed the tumor. Hybrid constructs containing one of the two pieces were made and only the plasmid including the first exon from the transformant gave rise to foci in NIH 3T3 cells. There was only a single base difference (G----A) in the exonic sequence, which changed glycine to aspartic acid in the transformant. By use of a synthetic oligonucleotide the presence of the mutation was demonstrated in the original tumor, ruling out modifications during DNA-mediated gene transfer and indicating that the alteration was present in the thymic lymphoma but absent from other nonmalignant tissue. The results are compatible with gamma radiation being a source of point mutations.

  11. Solvothermal synthesis of graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composite and the degradation activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wenguang; Chang, Jiuli; Wu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhiyong; Duan, Xiaoli; Xu, Fang; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007 ; Jiang, Kai; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composites were synthesized through a facile solvothermal method. ? Hydroxyl radicals are the main species responsible for the photodegradation activity. ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} demonstrated dramatically improved visible light degradation activity. -- Abstract: Novel graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} (G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) composites were synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with graphene oxide (GO), SbCl{sub 3} and thiourea as the reactants. GO played an important role in controlling the size and the distribution of the formed Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles on the graphene sheets with different density. Due to the negative surface charge, smaller Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} particles size and efficient electrons transfer from Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} to graphene, the composites demonstrated improved photodegradation activity on rhodamine B (RhB). Among these composites, the product G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1, which was synthesized with the GO concentration of 0.1 mg/mL, exhibited the highest photodegradation activity owing to the considerable density of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles onto graphene sheet free of aggregation. Hydroxyl radicals (·OH) derived from conduction band (CB) electrons of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} is suggested to be responsible for the photodegradation of RhB. The high visible light degradation activity and the satisfactory cycling stability made the as-prepared G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1 an applicable photocatalyst.

  12. Optical microspectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2004-05-25

    An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

  13. The magnetic structure of EuCu2Sb2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryan, D. H.; Cadogan, J. M.; Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-06

    Antiferromagnetic ordering of EuCu2Sb2 which forms in the tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm #129) has been studied using neutron powder diffraction and 151Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature 151Eu isomer shift of –12.8(1) mm/s shows the Eu to be divalent, while the 151Eu hyperfine magnetic field (Bhf) reaches 28.7(2) T at 2.1 K, indicating a full Eu2+ magnetic moment. Bhf(T) follows a smooth $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ Brillouin function and yields an ordering temperature of 5.1(1) K. Refinement of the neutron diffraction data reveals a collinear A-type antiferromagnetic arrangement with the Eu moments perpendicular to the tetragonal c-axis. As a result, themore »refined Eu magnetic moment at 0.4 K is 7.08(15) ?B which is the full free-ion moment expected for the Eu2+ ion with $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ and a spectroscopic splitting factor of g = 2.« less

  14. Lead acetate induces EGFR activation upstream of SFK and PKC{alpha} linkage to the Ras/Raf-1/ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, Y.-T.; Tzeng, D.-W. [Molecular Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Yang, J.-L. [Molecular Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jlyang@life.nthu.edu.tw

    2009-03-01

    Lead acetate (Pb), a probable human carcinogen, can activate protein kinase C (PKC) upstream of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Yet, it remains unclear whether Pb activation of PKC {yields} ERK1/2 involves receptor/non-receptor tyrosine kinases and the Ras signaling transducer. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism elicited by Pb for transmitting ERK1/2 signaling in CL3 human non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma cells. Pb induction of higher steady-state levels of Ras-GTP was essential for increasing phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Pre-treatment of the cells with a conventional PKC inhibitor Goe6976 or depleting PKC{alpha} using specific small interfering RNA blocked Pb induction of Ras-GTP. Pb also activated cellular tyrosine kinases. Specific pharmacological inhibitors, PD153035 for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and SU6656 for Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK), but not AG1296 for platelet-derived growth factor receptor, could suppress the Pb-induced tyrosine kinases, PKC{alpha}, Ras-GTP, phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of tyrosines on the EGFR multiple autophosphorylation sites and the conserved SFK autophosphorylation site occurred during exposure of cells to Pb for 1-5 min and 5-30 min, respectively. Intriguingly, Pb activation of EGFR required the intrinsic kinase activity but not dimerization of the receptor. Inhibition of SFK or PKC{alpha} activities did not affect EGFR phosphorylation, while knockdown of EGFR blocked SFK phosphorylation and PKC{alpha} activation following Pb. Together, these results indicate that immediate activation of EGFR in response to Pb is obligatory for activation of SFK and PKC{alpha} and subsequent the Ras-Raf-1-MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade.

  15. High-power InAs/InAsSbP heterostructure leds for methane spectroscopy ({lambda} {approx} 3.3 {mu}m)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astakhova, A. P.; Golovin, A. S.; Il'inskaya, N. D.; Kalinina, K. V.; Kizhayev, S. S., E-mail: serguie@mail.ru; Serebrennikova, O. Yu.; Stoyanov, N. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Horvath, Zs. J. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science (Hungary); Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-02-15

    Two designs of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on InAsSbP/InAs/InAsSbP double hetero-structures grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on p- and n-InAs substrates have been studied. The current-voltage and electroluminescence characteristics of the LEDs are analyzed. It is shown that the LED design with a light-emitting crystal (chip) mounted with the epitaxial layer down on the LED case and emission extracted through the n-InAs substrate provides better heat removal. As a result, the spectral characteristics remain stable at increased injection currents and the quantum efficiency of radiative recombination is higher. The internal quantum efficiency of light-em itting structures with an emission wavelength {lambda} = 3.3-3.4 {mu}m is as high as 22.3%. The optical emission power of the LEDs is 140 {mu}W at a current of 1 A in the quasi-continuous mode and reaches a value of 5.5 mW at a current of 9 A in the pulsed mode.

  16. Superconductivity in Strong Spin Orbital Coupling Compound Sb2Se3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, P. P.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Wang, X. C.; Feng, S. M.; Yu, X. H.; et al

    2015-02-17

    Recently, A2B3 type strong spin orbital coupling compounds such as Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3 were theoretically predicated to be topological insulators and demonstrated through experimental efforts. The counterpart compound Sb2Se3 on the other hand was found to be topological trivial, but theoretical studies indicated that the pressure might induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. We report on the discovery of superconductivity in Sb2Se3 single crystal induced via pressure. Our experiments indicated that Sb2Se3 became superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition at ~3 GPa which should be related tomore »the topological quantum transition. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) increased to around 8.0 K with pressure up to 40 GPa while it keeps ambient structure. High pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around 10 GPa and 20 GPa, respectively, which correspond to occurrence of superconductivity and to the change of TC slop as the function of high pressure in conjunction with the evolutions of structural parameters at high pressures.« less

  17. Performance Study of K2CsSb Photocathode Inside a DC High Voltage Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarter J. L.; Rao T.; Smedley, J.; Grames, J.; Mammei, R.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the past decade, there has been considerable interest in the generation of tens of mA average current in a photoinjector. Until recently, GaAs:Cs cathodes and K{sub 2}CsSb cathodes have been tested successfully in DC and RF injectors respectively for this application. Our goal is to test the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode inside a DC gun. Since the multialkali cathode is a compound with constant characteristics over its entire thickness, we anticipate that the lifetime issues seen in GaAs:Cs due to surface damage by ion bombardment would be minimized. Hence successful operation of the K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun could lead to a relatively robust electron source capable of delivering ampere level currents. In order to test the performance of a K{sub 2}CsSb cathode in a DC gun, we have designed and built a load lock system that allows the fabrication of the cathode at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and its testing at Jefferson Lab (JLab). In this paper, we will present the performance of the K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode in the preparation chamber and in the DC gun.

  18. Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2012-11-01

    A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

  19. Structure of amorphous Ge8Sb2Te11: GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys and optical storage J. Akola1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland Received 28 January

  20. Electron Scattering in InSb Quantum Wells due to Micro-twin Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2011-12-26

    The transport electron scattering due to micro-twin (MT) defects in InSb quantum wells (QWs) has been investigated at room temperature (RT). A linear-regression-based scattering analysis showed that Matthiessen's rule is applicable to the RT electron mobility in 20-nm-thick InSb QWs that contain MTs (whose density is 5.6x10{sup 2}-1.2x10{sup 4} /cm) and threading dislocations (8.7x10{sup 8}-3.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}) as dominant structural defects. For such an InSb QW whose local electron mobility in its non-MT regions is 2.8x10{sup 4}-4.5x10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/(Vs), the MT-originated energy barrier against the electron transport is deduced to be 0.081-0.093 eV at RT.

  1. Natural nanostructure and superlattice nanodomains in AgSbTe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Christopher E.; De Armas, Ricardo; Shao-Horn, Yang E-mail: shaohorn@mit.edu; Ma, Jie; May, Andrew F.; Delaire, Olivier E-mail: shaohorn@mit.edu

    2014-04-14

    AgSbTe{sub 2} has long been of interest for thermoelectric applications because of its favorable electronic properties and its low lattice thermal conductivity of ?0.7?W/mK. In this work, we report new findings from a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study revealing two nanostructures in single crystal Ag{sub 1?x}Sb{sub 1+x}Sb{sub 2+x} (with x?=?0, 0.1, 0.2); (i) a rippled natural nanostructure with a period of ?2.5–5?nm and (ii) superlattice ordered nanodomains consistent with cation ordering predicted in previous density functional theory studies. These nanostructures, combined with point-defects, probably serve as sources of scattering for phonons, thereby yielding a low lattice thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range.

  2. Behavior Observation Lab Equipment Manual Room SB208 04/16/14 Behavior Science Core, CHDD, University of Washington 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavior Observation Lab Equipment Manual Room SB208 04/16/14 Behavior Science Core, CHDD visit or out of town researcher is scheduled to be in the lab. #12;Behavior Observation Lab Equipment the breeze from moving the shade out of it's track. #12;Behavior Observation Lab Equipment Manual Room SB208

  3. Stress relief from reconstructions on SbSi,,001... Yao He, X. H. Zhang, and J. G. Che*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Jingguang

    Stress relief from reconstructions on SbÕSi,,001... Yao He, X. H. Zhang, and J. G. Che* Surface; revised manuscript recieved 15 April 2002; published 11 November 2002 The structures and stress of the Sb)2 1 surface is found to be under a tensile stress of 1.0 eV/(1 1 cell along the dimer bond

  4. Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-04-30

    The Department of Energy – Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft® Excel® spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel® spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

  5. Nanoscale structure in AgSbTe2 determined by diffuse elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse elastic neutron scattering measurements confirm that AgSbTe2 has a hierarchical structure, with defects on length scales from nanometers to microns. While scattering from mesoscale structure is consistent with previously-proposed structures in which Ag and Sb order on a NaCl lattice, more diffuse scattering from nanoscale structure suggests a structural rearrangement in which hexagonal layers form a combination of (ABC), (ABA), and (AAB) stacking sequences. The AgCrSe2 structure is the best-fitting model for the local atomic arrangements.

  6. A new method based on Markov chains for deriving SB2 orbits directly from their spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salomon, J -B; Guillout, P; Halbwachs, J -L; Arenou, F; Famaey, B; Lebreton, Y; Mazeh, T; Pourbaix, D; Tal-Or, L

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method to derive orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2). The aim is to have accurate orbital parameters of a selection of SB2 in order to prepare the exploitation of astrometric Gaia observations. Combined with our results, they should allow one to measure the mass of each star with a precision of better than 1%. The new method presented here consists of using the spectra at all epochs simultaneously to derive the orbital elements without templates. It is based on a Markov chain including a new method for disentangling the spectra.

  7. Flat Plate PV Module Eligibility Listing Procedure Updated 6/2/14 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and flat plate PV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flat Plate PV Module Eligibility Listing Procedure Updated 6/2/14 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and flat plate PV modules 1 must be listed on the SB1 for adding PV modules to the SB1 list is as follows: 1 . Data submitted to the Energy Commission

  8. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia. I. Selection of the sample and mass ratios of 20 new SB2s discovered with Sophie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbwachs, Jean-Louis; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Famaey, Benoît; Guillout, Patrick; Lebreton, Yveline; Salomon, Jean-Baptiste; Tal-Or, Lev; Ibata, Rodrigo; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1% when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. Simultaneously, the luminosities of the components in the Gaia photometric band G will also be obtained. Our observation program started with 200 SBs, including 152 systems that were only known as single-lined. Thanks to the high efficiency of the Sophie spectrograph, an additional component was found for 25 SBs. After rejection of 5 multiple systems, 20 new SB2s were retained, including 8 binaries with evolved primary, and their mass ratios were derived. Our final sample contains 68 SB2s, including 2 late-type giants and 10 other evolved stars.

  9. Journal of Crystal Growth 304 (2007) 399401 Growth of high quality, epitaxial InSb nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Crystal Growth 304 (2007) 399­401 Growth of high quality, epitaxial InSb nanowires Hyun, Washington, DC. 20375, USA b School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology March 2007 Communicated by R.M. Biefeld Available online 1 April 2007 Abstract The growth of In

  10. High resolution InSb quantum well ballistic nanosensors for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Adam; Cohen, L. F.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-12-04

    We report the room temperature operation of a quasi-ballistic InSb quantum well Hall sensor that exhibits a high frequency sensitivity of 560nT/?Hz at 20uA bias current. The device utilizes a partitioned buffer layer design that suppresses leakage currents through the mesa floor and can sustain large current densities.

  11. John von Neumann Institute for Computing Structural Patterns in Ge/Sb/Te Phase-Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the phases involved and the nature of the phase transition in the nanoscale bits pose continuing challenges square'. The rapid amorphous- to-crystalline phase change can be viewed as a re-orientation of disorderedJohn von Neumann Institute for Computing Structural Patterns in Ge/Sb/Te Phase-Change Materials J

  12. Performance Study of K2CsSb Photocathode inside a DC High Voltage Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Rao, J. Smedley, J.M. Grames, R. Mammei, J.L. McCarter, M. Poelker, R. Suleiman

    2011-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been considerable interest in the generation of tens of mA average current in a photoinjector. Until recently, GaAs:Cs cathodes and K2CsSb cathodes have been tested successfully in DC and RF injectors respectively for this application. Our goal is to test the GaAs:Cs in RF injector and the K2CsSb cathode in the DC gun in order to widen our choices. Since the multialkali cathode is a compound with uniform stochiometry over its entire thickness, we anticipate that the life time issues seen in GaAs:Cs due surface damage by ion bombardment would be minimized with this material. Hence successful operation of the K2CsSb cathode in DC gun could lead to a relatively robust electron source capable of delivering ampere level currents. In order to test the performance of K2CsSb cathode in a DC gun, we have designed and built a load lock system that would allow the fabrication of the cathode at BNL and its testing at JLab. In this paper, we will present the design of the load-lock system, cathode fabrication, and the cathode performance in the preparation chamber and in the DC gun.

  13. Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1995)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    1995-01-01

    Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents by Tung Chan S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students #12;#12;Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents by Tung Chan Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

  14. Colorado State Forest Service SB09-020 --Responsibility for Responding to Wildland Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado State Forest Service SB09-020 -- Responsibility for Responding to Wildland Fires Summary, and the Colorado State Forest Service in responding to wildland fires. This legislation organizes the roles Forest Service may assist the sheriff in controlling or extinguishing such fires, and may assume command

  15. The radiation chemistry of Cs-7SB, a solvent modifier used in Cs and Sr extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, B.J.; Martin, L.R.; Elias, G.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2008-07-01

    The solvent modifier 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-propoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, (Cs- 7SB) is used in conjunction with calixarenes and crown ethers dissolved in alkane diluents for the extraction of Cs and Sr from highly radioactive solutions. Its purpose is to solvate the ligands and the resulting ligand-metal complexes in the organic phase. Given this role, and its relatively high concentration in the formulations used for solvent extraction, radiolytic degradation of Cs-7SB might decrease the extraction efficiency of these elements as the solvent accumulates absorbed radiation dose. This work presents the results of studies of Cs-7SB using post-radiolysis gas chromatography with electron-capture detection and solvent-extraction distribution-ratio measurements. Also presented is the kinetic analysis of the bimolecular rate constant for the modifier's reaction with nitrogen trioxide and nitrogen dioxide radicals, major radiolytically-produced radical species in irradiated aqueous nitric acid. Although Cs-7SB was found to undergo reactions with nitrogen-centered radicals, little decrease in extraction efficiency was found. It is concluded the modifier, always present at concentrations much higher than the ligands, acts as a radical scavenger, protecting ligands from radiolytic attack. (authors)

  16. Structural evolution and characterization of heteroepitaxial GaSb thin films on Si(111) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Thang; Varhue, Walter; Cross, Michael; Pino, Robinson; Adams, Edward; Lavoie, Mark; Lee, Jaichan [School of Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); IBM Corporation, Essex Junction, Vermont 05452 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sung Kyun Kwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the structural evolution and characterization of heteroepitaxial GaSb thin films on Si(111) substrates. The growth process used a combination of atomic sources which included the rf sputtering of Sb and the thermal effusion of Ga. The formation of crystalline GaSb thin films required that initially a monolayer thick Sb buffer layer be applied directly to a clean H-passivated Si(111) substrate surface. The resulting film was characterized by high resolution x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images were taken from the material after several periods of growth to determine the evolution of crystal structure with thickness. Atomic force microscopy images of the film surface showed that the heteroepitaxial layers were formed via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism. This result is consistent with the heteroepitaxial growth of systems representing large differences in lattice constant. The hole mobility and carrier concentration in the deposited material were determined by the Hall measurement, performed at room temperature and on a 140 nm thick sample, to be 66 cm{sup 2}/V sec and 3x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The carrier mobility was relatively low as expected for measurements taken at room temperature.

  17. Planning for sustainable communities: Regional incentives and local policy under SB375

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -Claudia Sciara, Ph.D., AICP Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis Policy Institute Policy for Energy, Environment and the Economy University of California, Davis March 19, 2014Sacramento Los Angeles S.F. Bay Area Land use component of regional transportation plans #12;2013 SB375

  18. TANK 40 FINAL SB5 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS PRIOR TO NP ADDITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.

    2010-01-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). This sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. Prior to radionuclide inventory analyses, a final sample of the H-canyon Np stream will be added to bound the Np addition anticipated for Tank 40. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB5. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB5 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 239 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four in Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Due to the use of Zr crucibles and Na in the peroxide fusions, Na and Zr cannot be determined from this preparation. Additionally, other alkali metals, such as Li and K that may be contaminants in the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} are not determined from this preparation. Three Analytical Reference Glass - 14 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. The ARG-1 glass allows for an assessment of the completeness of each digestion. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of masses 81-209 and 230-252, and cold vapor atomic absorption (CV-AA) analysis for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the peroxide fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB5 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for ion chromatography (IC), total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC), and total base analyses. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The elemental ratios of the major elements for the SB5 WAPS sample, whose major Tank 51 Qualification sample component underwent Al dissolution, are similar to those measured for the SB4 WAPS sample. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. (3) Fifty percent of the sulfur in the SB5 WAPS sample is insoluble, and this represents a significantly larger fraction than that observed in previous sludge batches. (4) The noble metal and Ag concentrations predicted from the measured values for the Tank 51 Confirmation sample and Tank 40 SB4 WAPS sample using a two-thirds Tank 51, one-third Tank 40 heel blend ratio used to arrive at the final SB5 composition, agree with the values for the Tank 40 SB5 WAPS sample measured for this report.

  19. Direct Evidence for Abrupt Postcrystallization Germanium Precipitation in Thin Phase-Change Films of Sb-15 at. % Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral,C.; Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Bruley, J.; Raoux, S.; Deline, V.; Madan, A.; Pinto, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present evidence for the instability in the crystalline (metallic) state of binary Te-free phase-change Ge-Sb thin films considered for integration into nonvolatile nanosized memory cells. We find that while the amorphous (semiconducting) phase of eutectic Sb-15 at. % Ge is very robust until Sb crystallization at 240 C, at about 350 C, germanium rapidly precipitates out. Ge precipitation, visualized directly with transmission electron microscopy, is exothermic and is found to affect the films' reflectivity, resistance, and stress. It converts melting into a two-step process, which may seriously impact the switching reliability of a device.

  20. Temperature-dependent structural property and power factor of n type thermoelectric Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} and Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, K.; Das, Diptasikha; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, Aritra; Center for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, JD-2, Sector-III, Saltlake City, Kolkata 700 098 ; Mandal, P.; Srihari, Velaga

    2013-12-09

    Thermal variation of structural property, linear thermal expansion coefficient (?), resistivity (?), thermopower (S), and power factor (PF) of polycrystalline Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} (x?=?0.10 and 0.14) samples are reported. Temperature-dependent powder diffraction experiments indicate that samples do not undergo any structural phase transition. Rietveld refinement technique has been used to perform detailed structural analysis. Temperature dependence of ? is found to be stronger for Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10}. Also, PF for direct band gap Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} is higher as compared to that for indirect band gap Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14}. Role of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering on ?, S, and PF has been discussed.

  1. Growth, strain relaxation properties and high-? dielectric integration of mixed-anion GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Clavel, M.; Goley, P.; Hudait, M. K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Mixed-anion, GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} metamorphic materials with a wide range of antimony (Sb) compositions extending from 15% to 62%, were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs substrates. The impact of different growth parameters on the Sb composition in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials was systemically investigated. The Sb composition was well-controlled by carefully optimizing the As/Ga ratio, the Sb/Ga ratio, and the substrate temperature during the MBE growth process. High-resolution x-ray diffraction demonstrated a quasi-complete strain relaxation within each composition of GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y}. Atomic force microscopy exhibited smooth surface morphologies across the wide range of Sb compositions in the GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} structures. Selected high-? dielectric materials, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were deposited using atomic layer deposition on the GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} material, and their respective band alignment properties were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed XPS analysis revealed a valence band offset of >2 eV for all three dielectric materials on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, indicating the potential of utilizing these dielectrics on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62} for p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) applications. Moreover, both Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} showed a conduction band offset of >2 eV on GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, suggesting these two dielectrics can also be used for n-type MOS applications. The well-controlled Sb composition in several GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} material systems and the detailed band alignment analysis of multiple high-? dielectric materials on a fixed Sb composition, GaAs{sub 0.38}Sb{sub 0.62}, provides a pathway to utilize GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} materials in future microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  2. Nanostructured Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} chalcogenide films produced by laser electrodispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yavsin, D. A., E-mail: yavsin@mail.ioffe.ru; Kozhevin, V. M.; Gurevich, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Melekh, B. T.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Pevtsov, A. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Amorphous nanostructured films of a complex chalcogenide (Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}) are produced by laser electrodispersion and their structural and electrical properties are studied. It is found that the characteristic size of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles in the structure of the films is 1.5–5 nm.

  3. Surface alloy model of p(2 2)Sb/Cu(001) from LEED I/V data Shougo Higashi a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Surface alloy model of p(2 Â 2)Sb/Cu(001) from LEED I/V data Shougo Higashi a , Hiroshi Tochihara 2008 Keywords: Surface structure Metallic surfaces LEED Chemisorption a b s t r a c t We report on the re-determination of the structure of p(2 Â 2)Sb/Cu(001) from measured LEED I/V data. The structure

  4. Fiber Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    said Todd Eckman, vice president of Information Management for MSA. "This new fiber optics will benefit DOE, Benton PUD and NoaNet (Northwest Open Access Network) users. This,...

  5. Abundance analysis of SB2 binary stars with HgMn primaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Ryabchikova

    1998-05-06

    We present a short review of the abundances in the atmospheres of SB2 systems with Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) primaries. Up to now a careful study has been made for both components of 8 out of 17 known SB2 binaries with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and mass ratio ranging from 1.08 to 2.2. For all eight systems we observe a lower Mn abundance in the secondary's atmospheres than in the primary's. Significant difference in the abundances is also found for some peculiar elements such as Ga, Xe, Pt. All secondary stars with effective temperatures less than 10000 K show abundance characteristics typical of the metallic-line stars.

  6. Irreversible altering of crystalline phase of phase-change Ge-Sb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shakhvorostov, D.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Raoux, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J. L.

    2010-03-22

    The stability of the crystalline phase of binary phase-change Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} films is investigated over a wide range of Ge content. From Raman spectroscopy we find the Ge-Sb crystalline structure irreversibly altered after exposure to a laser beam. We show that with increasing beam intensity/temperature Ge agglomerates and precipitates out in the amount growing with x. A simple empirical relation links Ge precipitation temperature T{sub Ge}{sup p} to the rate of change dT{sub cryst}/dx of crystallization, with the precipitation easiest on the mid-range x plateau, where T{sub cryst} is nearly constant. Our findings point to a preferable 15% < or approx. x < 50% window, that may achieve the desired cycling/archival properties of a phase-change cell.

  7. Thin-film Sb2Se3 photovoltaics with oriented one-dimensional ribbons and benign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    to the substrate, and produced Sb2Se3 thin-film solar cells with a certified device efficiency of 5.6%. Our results are one of the major limiting factors for high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. We began with first cells based on inorganic absorbers, such as Si, GaAs, CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Se2, permit a high device

  8. Terahertz emission from Ga1-xInxSb Ricardo Ascazubi and Ingrid Wilke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Ingrid

    by semiconductor properties. Narrow direct band gap semiconductors such as InAs Eg=0.35 eV ,8­16 and InN Eg=0.68 eInxSb with 0 x 1. THz emission is excited by femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses. For this material system as a result of carrier compensation NA NB for this specific material composition. The THz emission from n

  9. Bi flux-dependent MBE growth of GaSbBi alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rajpalke, M. K.; Linhart, W. M.; Yu, K. M.; Jones, T. S.; Ashwin, M. J.; Veal, T. D.

    2015-09-01

    The incorporation of Bi in GaSb1-xBix alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated as a function of Bi flux at fixed growth temperature (275 °C) and growth rate (1 ?m h?¹). The Bi content is found to vary proportionally with Bi flux with Bi contents, as measured by Rutherford backscattering, in the range 0more »with a reduction of ~32 meV/%Bi.« less

  10. Electronic structure of rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crerar, Shane J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Grosvenor, Andrew P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5C9 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    The electronic structure of the ternary rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) has been examined by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the first time. The RE 3d or 4d core-line spectra are substantially complicated by the presence of satellite peaks but their general resemblance to those of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} tends to support the presence of trivalent RE atoms in RECrSb{sub 3}. However, the Yb 4d spectrum of YbCrSb{sub 3} also shows peaks that are characteristic of divalent ytterbium. The Cr 2p core-line spectra exhibit asymmetric lineshapes and little change in binding energy (BE) relative to Cr metal, providing strong evidence for electronic delocalization. The Sb 3d core-line spectra reveal slightly negative BE shifts relative to elemental antimony, supporting the presence of anionic Sb species in RECrSb{sub 3}. The experimental valence band spectrum of LaCrSb{sub 3} matches well with the calculated density of states, and it can be fitted to component peaks belonging to individual atoms to yield an average formulation that agrees well with expectations ('La{sup 3+}Cr{sup 3+}(Sb{sup 2-}){sub 3}'). On progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}, the 4f-band in the valence band spectra grows in intensity and shifts to higher BE. The valence band spectrum for YbCrSb{sub 3} also supports the presence of divalent ytterbium. - Graphical Abstract: In their valence band spectra, the 4f-band intensifies and shifts to higher BE on progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-resolution core-line and valence band XPS spectra were measured for RECrSb{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Divalent Yb is present in YbCrSb{sub 3}, in contrast to trivalent RE in other members. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Asymmetric Cr 2p spectral lineshape confirms delocalization of Cr valence electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small negative Sb 3d BE shifts support assignment of anionic Sb atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fitted valence band spectra show shifts in the 4f band as RE is changed.

  11. Gain and tuning characteristics of mid-infrared InSb quantum dot diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Hayton, J.; Yin, M.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-21

    There have been relatively few reports of lasing from InSb quantum dots (QDs). In this work, type II InSb/InAs QD laser diodes emitting in the mid-infrared at 3.1??m have been demonstrated and characterized. The gain was determined to be 2.9?cm{sup ?1} per QD layer, and the waveguide loss was ?15?cm{sup ?1} at 4?K. Spontaneous emission measurements below threshold revealed a blue shift of the peak wavelength with increasing current, indicating filling of ground state heavy hole levels in the QDs. The characteristic temperature, T{sub 0}?=?101?K below 50?K, but decreased to 48?K at higher temperatures. The emission wavelength of these lasers showed first a blue shift followed by a red shift with increasing temperature. A hybrid structure was used to fabricate the laser by combining a liquid phase epitaxy grown p-InAs{sub 0.61}Sb{sub 0.13}P{sub 0.26} lower cladding layer and an upper n{sup +} InAs plasmon cladding layer which resulted in a maximum operating temperature (T{sub max}) of 120?K in pulsed mode, which is the highest reported to date.

  12. Strong H...F hydrogen bonds as synthons in polymeric quantum magnets: structural, magnetic, and theoretical characterization of [Cu(HF)(pyrazine)]SbF, [CuF(HF)(FH)(pyrazine)].(SbF), and [CuAg(HF)(pyrazine)](SbF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Funk, K. A.; Southerland, H. I.; Twamley, B.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Singleton, J.; McDonald, R. D.; Goddard, P. A.; Sengupta, P.; Batista, C. D.; Ding, L.; Lee, C.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Franke, I.; Cox, S.; Baines, C.; Trail, D.; Eastern Washington Univ.; Univ. of Idaho; Oxford Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; LANL; Univ. of Southern California; North Carolina State Univ.; Paul Scherrer Inst.

    2009-01-01

    Three Cu{sup 2+}-containing coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by experimental (X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, pulsed-field magnetization, heat capacity, and muon-spin relaxation) and electronic structure studies (quantum Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations). [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]SbF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine) (1a), [Cu{sub 2}F(HF)(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 4}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (1b), and [CuAg(H{sub 3}F{sub 4})(pyz){sub 5}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (2) crystallize in either tetragonal or orthorhombic space groups; their structures consist of 2D square layers of [M(pyz){sub 2}]{sup n+} that are linked in the third dimension by either HF{sub 2}{sup -} (1a and 1b) or H{sub 3}F{sub 4}{sup -} (2). The resulting 3D frameworks contain charge-balancing SbF{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every void. Compound 1b is a defective polymorph of 1a, with the difference being that 50% of the HF{sub 2}{sup -} links are broken in the former, which leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} orbital ordering. Magnetic data for 1a and 1b reveal broad maxima in x at 12.5 and 2.6 K and long-range magnetic order below 4.3 and 1.7 K, respectively, while 2 displays negligible spin interactions owing to long and disrupted superexchange pathways. The isothermal magnetization, M(B), for 1a and 1b measured at 0.5 K reveals contrasting behaviors: 1a exhibits a concave shape as B increases to a saturation field, B{sub c}, of 37.6 T, whereas 1b presents an unusual two-step saturation in which M(B) is convex until it reaches a step near 10.8 T and then becomes concave until saturation is reached at 15.8 T. The step occurs at two-thirds of M{sub sat}, suggesting the presence of a ferrimagnetic structure. Compound 2 shows unusual hysteresis in M(B) at low temperature, although x vs T does not reveal the presence of a magnetic phase transition. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on an anisotropic cubic lattice were applied to the magnetic data of 1a to afford g = 2.14, J = ?13.4 K (Cu-pyz-Cu), and J = ?0.20 K (Cu?F {hor_ellipsis} H {hor_ellipsis} F?Cu), while x vs T for 1b could be well reproduced by a spin-1/2 Heisenberg uniform chain model for g = 2.127(1), J{sub 1} = ?3.81(1), and zJ{sub 2} = ?0.48(1) K, where J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are the intra- and interchain exchange couplings, respectively, which considers the number of magnetic nearest-neighbors (z). The M(B) data for 1b could not be satisfactorily explained by the chain model, suggesting a more complex magnetic structure in the ordered state and the need for additional terms in the spin Hamiltonian. The observed variation in magnetic behaviors is driven by differences in the H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding motifs.

  13. Optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  14. Optical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  15. Optical analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  16. Microstructural evaluation of Sb-adjusted Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer layer systems for IR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.; Paine, D.C.; Uppal, P.; Ahearn, J.S.; Nichols, K.; Charache, G.W.

    1998-06-01

    The authors report on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of Sb-adjusted quaternary Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBE at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} buffer-layers grown on <001> GaAs substrates. A series of structures were grown by MBe at 470 C that utilize a multilayer grading scheme in which the Sb content of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} is successively increased in a series of 125 nm thick layers. Post growth analysis using conventional bright field and weak beam dark field imaging of these buffer layers in cross-section reveals that the interface misfit dislocations are primarily of the 60{degree} type and are distributed through out the interfaces of the buffer layer. When optimized, the authors have shown, using plan view and cross-sectional TEM, that this approach can reduce the threading defect density to below the detectability limit of TEM (< 10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}) and preserve growth surface planarity. The Sb-graded approach was used to fabricate two 2.2 {micro}m power converter structures fabricated using InGaAs grown on Sb-based buffer layers on GaAs substrates. A microstructural and electrical characterization was performed on these device structures and the results are contrasted with a sample in which InP was selected as the substrate. Microstructure, defect density and device performance in these not-yet-optimized Sb-based buffer layers compares favorably to equivalent devices fabricated using InP substrates.

  17. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Jun-Liang; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Wei; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ren, Zheng-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-02-03

    Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum-well (QW) structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies show high crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology. X-ray diffraction investigations confirm 1.94% compressive strain within In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb channel. High room temperature hole mobility with high sheet density of 1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 0.877?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, and 965 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 1.112?×?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} were obtained with different doping concentrations. Temperature dependent Hall measurements show different scattering mechanisms on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300?K to 77?K. This study shows great potential of In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb QW for high-hole-mobility device applications.

  18. Unusual magnetic hysteresis and the weakened transition behavior induced by Sn substitution in Mn{sub 3}SbN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Ying, E-mail: sunying@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Xia [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Wang, Cong [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Hai L.; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: yamaura.kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    Substitution of Sb with Sn was achieved in ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}SbN. The experimental results indicate that with an increase in Sn concentration, the magnetization continuously decreases and the crystal structure of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N changes from tetragonal to cubic phase at around x of 0.8. In the doping series, step-like anomaly in the isothermal magnetization was found and this behavior was highlighted at x?=?0.4. The anomaly could be attributed to the magnetic frustration, resulting from competition between the multiple spin configurations in the antiperovskite lattice. Meantime, H{sub c} of 18 kOe was observed at x?=?0.3, which is probably the highest among those of manganese antiperovskite materials reported so far. With increasing Sn content, the abrupt change of resistivity and the sharp peak of heat capacity in Mn{sub 3}SbN were gradually weakened. The crystal structure refinements indicate the weakened change at the magnetic transition is close related to the change of c/a ratio variation from tetragonal to cubic with Sn content. The results derived from this study indicate that the behavior of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N could potentially enhance its scientific and technical applications, such as spin torque transfer and hard magnets.

  19. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Optics Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Quantum Optics Quantum OpticsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-30T16:37:03+00:00 Quantum Optics with a Single...

  20. Controlling SEI Formation on SnSb-Porous Carbon Nanofibers for Improved Na Ion Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Liwen; Gu, Meng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-14

    Porous carbon nanofiber (CNF)-supported tin-antimony (SnSb) alloys is synthesized and applied as sodium ion battery anode. The chemistry and morphology of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film and its correlation with the electrode performance are studied. The addition of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) in electrolyte significantly reduces electrolyte decomposition and creates a very thin and uniform SEI layer on the cycled electrode surface which could promote the kinetics of Na-ion migration/transportation, leading to excellent electrochemical performance.

  1. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 post-test calculations of the OECD LOFT Experiment LP-SB-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E J; Neill, A P [UKAEA Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith (UK)

    1990-04-01

    Analysis of the small, cold leg break, OECD LOFT Experiment LP-SB-3 using the best-estimate computer code TRAC-PF1/MOD1 is presented. Descriptions of the LOFT facility and the LP-SB-3 experiment are given and development of the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 input model is detailed. The calculations performed in achieving the steady state conditions, from which the experiment was initiated, and the specification of experimental boundary conditions are outlined. Results of the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculation are found to be generally consistent with those reported, by members of the OECD LOFT Program Review Group, in the LP-SB-3 Comparison Report.'' Overall trends with respect to pressure histories, minimum primary system mass inventory and accumulator behaviour are reasonably well reproduced by TRAC-PF1/MOD1. 17 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Depth-dependent magnetism in epitaxial MnSb thin films: effects of surface passivation and cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldous J. D.; Sanchez-Hanke C.; Burrows, C.W.; Maskery, I.; Brewer, M.S.; Hase, T.P.A.; Duffy, J.A.; Lees, M. Rs; Decoster, T.; Theis, W.; Quesada, A.; Schmid, A.K.; Bell, G.R.

    2012-03-15

    Depth-dependent magnetism in MnSb(0001) epitaxial films has been studied by combining experimental methods with different surface specificities: polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). A native oxide {approx}4.5 nm thick covers air-exposed samples which increases the film's coercivity. HCl etching efficiently removes this oxide and in situ surface treatment of etched samples enables surface magnetic contrast to be observed in SPLEEM. A thin Sb capping layer prevents oxidation and preserves ferromagnetism throughout the MnSb film. The interpretation of Mn L{sub 3,2} edge XMCD data is discussed.

  3. Parallel optical sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  4. Stable p-Type Conduction from Sb-Decorated Head-to-Head Basal Plane Inversion Domain Boundaries in ZnO Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    Stable p-Type Conduction from Sb-Decorated Head-to-Head Basal Plane Inversion Domain Boundaries of WisconsinMadison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, United States ABSTRACT: We report that Sb-decorated head-to-head-type dopant due to low dopant solubility, native donor defects, and large acceptor ionization energies has

  5. GaSb-based Type-I QW LEDs and addressable arrays operated at wavelengths up to 3.66 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sb-based quantum wells (QW) light emitting diodes (LED) and LED arrays operating at room temperature at wavelengths. Kipshidze, D.Westerfeld, D. Snyder, M.Johnson, G. Belenky, "GaSb-Based Type I Quantum Well Light Emitting Diode Addressable Array Operated at Wavelengths up to 3.66 µm", IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 21, 1087

  6. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 8 (1996) 41894193. Printed in the UK Angle-resolved photoemission of InSb(111)2 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    1996-01-01

    Abstract. The electronic band structure of InSb(111) along the ­ ­L 111 direction was determined using structures of GaAs(111)­2 × 2 surfaces was also carried out to determine the atomic geometry [7, 8]. However to the surface state and the resonance process of the InSb(111)­2 × 2. Investigations of electronic properties

  7. Stibioclaudetite is a new mineral species with ideal chemistry AsSbO3. The symmetry is monoclinic, P21/n, with a 5 4.5757(4) ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    AbstrAct Stibioclaudetite is a new mineral species with ideal chemistry AsSbO3. The symmetry, colorless transparent bladed crystals to 6 mm, bound by {010}, {110}, {111}, and {101}. The mineral of stibioclaudetite, claudetite, and leiteite are presented and compared. Stibioclaudetite AsSbO3 A New Mineral from

  8. Characterization and modeling of nanocomposite thermoelectric materials system bismuth antimony telluride ((Biy?Sb1?-?y?)2?Te3?) as a function of temperature and magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Ming Y., 1979-

    2011-01-01

    This thesis looks at (BiySb1-y)2Te3 nanocomposites as an example of the currently available nano systems. In this thesis, (BiySb-y)2Te3 nanocomposites are characterized from ~325K down to ~3K. Advantages of this low ...

  9. Optical Tweezers Physics 464 Applied Optics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical Tweezers Physics 464 ­ Applied Optics, By Scott Cline #12;Project Topics · Brief history · Typical set-up · How they work · Common use #12;Discovery · Effects of optical scattering and gradient forces discovered by Arthur Ashkin 1970 · Method of creating an "optical trap" established in 1986

  10. Optical Packet Switching -1 Optical Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellia, Marco

    Optical Packet Switching - 1 Optical Networks: from fiber transmission to photonic switching Optical Packet Switching Fabio Neri and Marco Mellia TLC Networks Group ­ Electronics Department e.mellia@polito.it ­ tel. 011 564 4173 #12;Optical Packet Switching - 2 · This work is licensed under the Creative Commons

  11. Probing Spin-Relaxation Anisotropy in 1D InSb Wires by Weak Anti-Localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; Cairns, S.; Keay, J.; Murphy, S. Q.; Gaspe, C. K.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures (C-SPIN), University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2011-12-26

    Arrays of quasi-one-dimensional wires were fabricated in symmetrically doped AlInSb/InSb heterostructures to investigate the dimensional suppression of electron spin relaxation. Using weak localization analysis, it was discovered that the spin relaxation length in 300nm wide wires was enhanced by 40% relative to the two-dimensional value. Moreover, wires aligned along the <100> direction showed spin relaxation lengths {approx}30% longer than for wires aligned along <110>. This anisotropy is consistent with the additional influence of the cubic Dresselhaus interaction along the <110> direction which is predicted to be unaffected by dimensional confinement.

  12. TRAC-PF1 MOD1 post test calculations of the OECD LOFT Experiment LP-SB-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E J [UKAEA Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith (UK)

    1990-04-01

    Analysis of the small, hot leg break, OECD LOFT Experiment LP-SB-1. using the best-estimate'' computer code TRAC-PF1/MOD1 is presented. Descriptions of the LOFT facility and the LP-SB-1 experiment are given and development of the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 input model is detailed. The calculations performed in achieving the steady state conditions, from which the experiment was initiated, and the specification of experimental boundary conditions are outlined. 24 refs., 66 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Antiferromagnetism in EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.

    2015-05-07

    Single crystals of EuCu2As2 and EuCu2Sb2 were grown from CuAs and CuSb self-flux, respectively. The crystallographic, magnetic, thermal, and electronic transport properties of the single crystals were investigated by room-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility ? versus temperature T, isothermal magnetization M versus magnetic field H, specific heat Cp(T), and electrical resistivity ?(T) measurements. EuCu2As2 crystallizes in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm), whereas EuCu2Sb2 crystallizes in the related primitive tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm). The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and XRD data for the EuCu2Sb2 crystals showed the presence of vacancies on the Cu sites, yielding themore »actual composition EuCu1.82Sb2. The ?(T) and Cp(T) data reveal metallic character for both EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering is indicated from the ?(T),Cp(T), and ?(T) data for both EuCu2As2 (TN = 17.5 K) and EuCu1.82Sb2 (TN = 5.1 K). In EuCu1.82Sb2, the ordered-state ?(T) and M(H) data suggest either a collinear A-type AFM ordering of Eu+2 spins S = 7/2 or a planar noncollinear AFM structure, with the ordered moments oriented in the tetragonal ab plane in either case. This ordered-moment orientation for the A-type AFM is consistent with calculations with magnetic dipole interactions. As a result, the anisotropic ?(T) and isothermal M(H) data for EuCu2As2, also containing Eu+2 spins S = 7/2, strongly deviate from the predictions of molecular field theory for collinear AFM ordering and the AFM structure appears to be both noncollinear and noncoplanar.« less

  14. Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick Hong (Livermore, CA); Wu, Kuang Jen J. (Cupertino, CA)

    2007-05-29

    For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

  15. Volmer–Weber InAs quantum dot formation on InP (113)B substrates under the surfactant effect of Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yu Bertru, Nicolas; Folliot, Hervé; Rohel, Tony; Mauger, Samuel J. C.; Koenraad, Paul M.

    2014-07-21

    We report on Sb surfactant growth of InAs nanostructures on GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} layers deposited on InP (001) and on (113)B oriented substrates. On the (001) orientation, the presence of Sb significantly favors the two-dimensional growth regime. Even after the deposition of 5 mono-layers of InAs, the epitaxial film remains flat and InAs/GaAs{sub 0.51}Sb{sub 0.49} type-II quantum wells are achieved. On (113)B substrates, same growth runs resulted in formation of high density InAs islands. Microscopic studies show that wetting layer is missing on (113)B substrates, and thus, a Volmer-Weber growth mode is concluded. These different behaviors are attributed to the surface energy changes induced by Sb atoms on surface.

  16. The Role of Anti-Phase Domains in InSb-Based Structures Grown on On-Axis and Off-Axis Ge Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debnath, M. C.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.

    2011-12-26

    Anti-phase domains form in InSb epilayers and InSb/Al{sub 0.20}In{sub 0.80}Sb single quantum wells when grown upon on-axis (001) Ge substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Domain formation is partially suppressed through growth on Ge substrates with surfaces that are several degrees off the (001) or (211) axis. By using off-axis Ge substrates, room-temperature electron mobilities increased to {approx}60,000 cm{sup 2}/V-s and {approx}14,000 cm{sup 2}/V-s for a 4.0-{mu}m-thick InSb epilayer and a 25-nm InSb quantum well, respectively.

  17. Comparison of a TRAC calculation to the data from LSTF run SB-CL-05

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motley, F.; Schultz, R.

    1986-01-01

    Run SB-CL-05 is a 5% break in the side of the cold leg. The test results show that the core was uncovered briefly and that the rods overheated at certain core locations. Liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam generator tubes was observed. When the loop seal cleared, the core refilled and the rods cooled. The TRAC results are in reasonable agreement with the test data, meaning that TRAC correctly predicted the major trends and phenomena. TRAC predicted the core uncovery, the resulting rod heatup, and the liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam generator tubes correctly. The clearing of the loop seal allowed core recovery and cooled the overheated rods just as it had in the data, but TRAC predicted its occurrence 20 s late. The experimental and TRAC analysis results of run SB-CL-05 are similar to those for Semiscale Run S-UT-8. In both runs there was core uncovery, rod overheating, and steam generator liquid holdup. These results confirm scaling of these phenomena from Semiscale (1/1650) to LSTF (1/48).

  18. Decay heat removal during SB LOCA with loss of all feedwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosek, A.; Mavko, B.; Petelin, S. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Reactor Engineering Division

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this research was to investigate decay heat removal during SB LOCA with simultaneous loss of all feedwater in a two loop PWR plant. Following a SB LOCA, the major concern is to keep the core covered assuring decay heat removal from the core thereby preventing cladding damage. Analysis was performed based on the data for Krsko NPP in Slovenia. The spectrum of break sizes in the cold leg was analyzed using the RELAP5/MOD2 code. The results indicate that when the break diameter is lower than 2.5 cm, the steam generators will dry out and the primary side bleed and feed procedure should be initiated. For break diameters between 2.5 cm to 5.1 cm the decay heat can be removed by the break flow and by relieving the steam through the steam generator relief valves. For break diameters greater than 5.1 cm the break flow is sufficient to remove all dissipated decay heat.

  19. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ? 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ? 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to themore »mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ? 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.« less

  20. Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

  1. Ultrafast Terahertz-Induced Response of GeSbTe Phase-Change Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C.; Pop, Eric; Wong, H.-S.Philip; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M. MATSCI, OPTICS, PHYS MATSCI, OPTICS, PHYS Abstract Not Provided http:www-public.slac.stanford.edu...

  2. Optical microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-01-11

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  3. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W. [Molecular Physics Laboratory, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  4. Optical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  5. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  6. Electro-optical SLS devices for operating at new wavelength ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device includes a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8-12 um. The junction consists of a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors having mismatched lattice constants when in bulk form. A first set of layers is either InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x (where x is aobut 0.5 to 0.7) or In.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As.sub.1-y Sb.sub.y (where x and y are chosen such that the bulk bandgap of the resulting layer is about the same as the minimum bandgap in the In.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As.sub.1-y Sb.sub.y family). The second set of layers has a lattice constant larger than the lattice constant of the layers in the first set.

  7. Bias dependent dual band response from InAs/Ga,,In...Sb type II strain layer superlattice detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    available readout integrated circuits. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2824819 Infrared, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA Received 10 October 2007; accepted 23 November photodetectors based on type II InAs/Ga In Sb strain layer superlattices using an nBn heterostructure design

  8. Performance of Gd-doped Ti-based Sb-SnO2 anodes for electrochemical destruction of phenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O2 anodes (Ti/SnO2-Sb), based on their electro-catalytic activities and organic oxidation rates (Ko Available online 24 October 2007 Abstract The performance of electrodes for the electro-catalytic the elec- tro-catalytic characteristics and stability of the electrodes. Some researchers have found

  9. SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

    2011-02-22

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

  10. Optical manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  11. Non-Ideal p-n junction Diode of Sb{sub x}Se{sub 1-x}(x = 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustafa, Falah I. [Solar Energy Research Center, Renewable Energy Directorate, Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Gupta, Shikha; Goyal, N.; Tripathi, S. K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh -160014 (India)

    2011-12-12

    We have made diodes consisting of the same alloy i.e. Sb{sub x}Se{sub 1-x}(x = 0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7), but change the concentration of Sb metal from 40% to 70% atomic weight percentage. It is observed from the Hall measurements that the nature of charge carriers have changed from p- to n-type at x = 0.6 for Sb{sub x}Se{sub 1-x}. We have measured I-V characteristics of four p-n junction diodes i.e. p-Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/n-Sb{sub 3}Se{sub 2}, p-Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/n-Sb{sub 7}Se{sub 3}, p-SbSe/n-Sb{sub 3}Se{sub 2}, p-SbSe/n-Sb{sub 7}Se{sub 3}. From the I-V plots we have calculated the parameters as built-in voltage (V{sub bi}), forward resistance (R{sub f}), ideal factor (n), saturation current (I{sub o}), breakdown current (I{sub Bd}) and breakdown voltage (V{sub Bd}).

  12. The SLS optics beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    The SLS Optics Beamline U. Flechsig ? , R. Abela ? , R.in the ?eld of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation in-radiation, beamline optics, channel cut monochromator,

  13. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  14. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01

    N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

  15. NGC 1266: Characterization of the Nuclear Molecular Gas in an Unusual SB0 Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Kamenetzky, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    With a substantial nuclear molecular gas reservoir and broad, high-velocity CO molecular line wings previously interpreted as an outflow, NGC 1266 is a rare SB$0$ galaxy. Previous analyses of interferometry, spectrally resolved low-$J$ CO emission lines, and unresolved high-$J$ emission lines have established basic properties of the molecular gas and the likely presence of an AGN. Here, new spectrally resolved CO $J = 5 - 4$ to $J = 8 - 7$ lines from {\\it Herschel Space Observatory} HIFI observations are combined with ground-based observations and high-$J$ {\\it Herschel} SPIRE observations to decompose the nuclear and putative outflow velocity components and to model the molecular gas to quantify its properties. Details of the modeling and results are described, with comparisons to previous results and exploration of the implications for the gas excitation mechanisms. Among the findings, like for other galaxies, the nuclear and putative outflow molecular gas are well represented by components that are cool ($...

  16. RELAP5 simulation of SB LOCA in a VVER 440 model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parzer, I.; Mavko, B.; Petelin, S.

    1992-01-01

    The VVER-440-type plants differ considerably from western-type pressurized water reactors (PWR). The two main distinguishing characteristics are horizontal steam generators and loop seals in both hot and cold legs, which are lately a great safety concern worldwide. In 1987, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized and sponsored one of the tests performed on the Hungarian PMK-NVH test facility and called it IAEA-SPE-2. The test was chosen from a wider test matrix performed to investigate emergency core cooling system capability in VVER-440 plants for a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SB LOCA). PMK-NVA is a one-loop, full-height, full-pressure model of the Hungarian Paks nuclear power plant, type VVER-440, Soviet production. The facility power level is 100%, according to the 1:2070 scaling factor.

  17. Evaluation of electron mobility in InSb quantum wells by means of percentage-impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D.; Edirisooriya, M.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    In order to quantitatively analyze the contribution of each scattering factor toward the total carrier mobility, we use a new convenient figure-of-merit, named a percentage impact. The mobility limit due to a scattering factor, which is widely used to summarize a scattering analysis, has its own advantage. However, a mobility limit is not quite appropriate for the above purpose. A comprehensive understanding of the difference in contribution among many scattering factors toward the total carrier mobility can be obtained by evaluating percentage impacts of scattering factors, which can be straightforwardly calculated from their mobility limits and the total mobility. Our percentage impact analysis shows that threading dislocation is one of the dominant scattering factors for the electron transport in InSb quantum wells at room temperature.

  18. Chapter 2 Diffractive Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-14

    Diffractive optics is an emerging technology with many applications. Some of the important applications include the design and fabrication of optical elements ...

  19. Advanced Optical Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laser. Today, the optical team designs and fabricates a variety of custom diffractive optics for researchers worldwide. Included are multilayer dielectric and gold-overcoated...

  20. Planar micro-optic solar concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Jason Harris

    2010-01-01

    Planar Micro-Optic Solar Collectors," Optics for Solarin planar micro-optic solar collectors,” Optics Express, (inin planar micro-optic solar collectors,” Optics Express (in

  1. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India)] [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport and cell growth arrest activity of RASSF2. Taken together, the present study suggests that active transport between nucleus and cytoplasm may constitute an important regulatory mechanism for RASSF2 function.

  2. Simulation of Crystallization in Ge[subscript 2]Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 2]: A Memory Effect in the Canonical Phase-Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akola, J.

    Crystallization of amorphous Ge[subscript 2]Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 5] (GST) has been studied using four extensive (460 atoms, up to 4 ns) density functional/molecular dynamics simulations at 600 K. This phase change ...

  3. Electronic structure and thermoelectric performance of Zintl compound Sr{sub 3}GaSb{sub 3}: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Shi, Qing; Li Yan, Yu; Xu Wang, Yuan, E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-01-06

    By using first-principles method and Boltzmann theory, we simulated the thermoelectric transport properties of p-type and n-type Sr{sub 3}GaSb{sub 3}. It is found that the thermoelectric figure-of merit (ZT) of n-type Sr{sub 3}GaSb{sub 3} is probably better than that of p-type, mainly due to its large band degeneracy. Moreover, a high ZT value of 1.74 at 850?K can be achieved for n-type Sr{sub 3}GaSb{sub 3} along the yy direction, corresponding to the carrier concentration 3.5?×?10{sup 20}?e cm{sup ?3}. We propose that the high ZT value of experimentally synthesized p-type Sr{sub 3}GaSb{sub 3} is originated from appearing of the larger number of band valley on the top of valence bands.

  4. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ca.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5.mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photovoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of the growing layer.

  5. Influence of in-situ annealing ambient on p-type conduction in dual ion beam sputtered Sb-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Gupta, M.; Deshpande, U. P.

    2013-08-12

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system and subsequently annealed in-situ in vacuum and in various proportions of O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + N{sub 2})% from 0% (N{sub 2}) to 100% (O{sub 2}). Hall measurements established all SZO films were p-type, as was also confirmed by typical diode-like rectifying current-voltage characteristics from p-ZnO/n-ZnO homojunction. SZO films annealed in O{sub 2} ambient exhibited higher hole concentration as compared with films annealed in vacuum or N{sub 2} ambient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis confirmed that Sb{sup 5+} states were more preferable in comparison to Sb{sup 3+} states for acceptor-like Sb{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complex formation in SZO films.

  6. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5 .mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photolvoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of growing layer.

  7. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  8. Optical XOR gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  9. Atomistic modeling and HAADF investigations of misfit and threading dislocations in GaSb/GaAs hetero-structures for applications in high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruterana, Pierre Wang, Yi Chen, Jun Chauvat, Marie-Pierre; El Kazzi, S.; Deplanque, L.; Wallart, X.

    2014-10-06

    A detailed investigation on the misfit and threading dislocations at GaSb/GaAs interface has been carried out using molecular dynamics simulation and quantitative electron microscopy techniques. The sources and propagation of misfit dislocations have been elucidated. The nature and formation mechanisms of the misfit dislocations as well as the role of Sb on the stability of the Lomer configuration have been explained.

  10. CCD polarimetry of distant comets C/2010 S1 (LINEAR) and C/2010 R1 (LINEAR) at the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanova, Oleksandra V; Afanasiev, Viktor L; Reshetnyk, Volodymyr M; Korsun, Pavlo P

    2015-01-01

    We present first measurements of the degree of linear polarization of distant comets C/2010 S1 (LINEAR) and C/2010 R1 (LINEAR) at heliocentric distances r= 5.9 - 7.0 AU. Observations were carried out with the SCORPIO-2 focal reducer at the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS. Both comets showed considerable level of activity beyond a zone where water ice sublimation is negligible (up to 5 AU). Significant spatial variations both in the intensity and polarization are found in both comets. The slope of radial profiles of intensity changes gradually with the distance from the photocenter: from - 0.7 near the nucleus up to about - 1.3 for larger distances (up to 100000 km). The variation in polarization profiles indicates the non uniformity in the polarization distribution over the coma. The polarization degree over the coma gradually increases (in absolute value) with increasing the photocentric distance from of about - 1.9% up to - 3% for comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), and from of about - 2.5% up to - 3.5% for comet C/2010...

  11. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  12. Phase transitions in double perovskite Sr{sub 2}ScSbO{sub 6}: An Ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Rajyavardhan; Kumar, Uday; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-04-24

    First Principles study of the electronic properties of recently synthesized double perovskite Sr{sub 2}ScSbO{sub 6} have been performed using density functional theory. With increasing temperature, the Sr compound undergoes three structural phase transitions at 400K, 550K and 650K approximately, leading to the following sequence of phases: P21/n ? I2/m ? I4/m ? Fm-3m. Starting from the monoclinic phase P21/n at room temperature, resulting from the Sc/Sb ordering, the electronic structure for the tetragonal I4/m at 613K and cubic Fm-3m for T?660K has been studied in terms of the density of states and band-structure. Presence of large band gap, both direct and indirect, has been reported and analyzed.

  13. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  14. Synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films of gold on the surface of GaSb by swift heavy ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jadhav, Vidya; Dubey, S. K.; Yadav, A. D.; Singh, A.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of gold ({approx}100 nm thick) were deposited on p-type GaSb substrates. These samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe{sup 7+}ions for the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, samples were characterized using AFM, UV-VIS -NIR, X-Ray Diffraction techniques. AFM studies showed the presence of clusters on the surface of GaSb. R.M.S. roughness of the sample was found to increase w.r.t ion fluence. Absorption coefficient obtained from the Ultra violet - Visible NIR (UV-VIS -NIR) spectra of the samples irradiated with various fluences compared with non irradiated GaSb. The annealing experiment showed a significant improvement in the absorption coefficient after rapid thermal annealing at temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C. X-Ray Diffraction study reveals different orientations of Au film.

  15. Electron interactions and Dirac fermions in graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sa, Baisheng [College of Materials, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun, Zhimei, E-mail: zmsun@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Integrated Computational Materials Engineering, International Research Institute for Multidisciplinary Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-06-21

    Graphene based superlattices have been attracted worldwide interest due to the combined properties of the graphene Dirac cone feature and all kinds of advanced functional materials. In this work, we proposed a novel series of graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices based on the density functional theory calculations. We demonstrated the stability in terms of energy and lattice dynamics for such kind of artificial materials. The analysis of the electronic structures unravels the gap opening nature at Dirac cone of the insert graphene layer. The Dirac fermions in the graphene layers are strongly affected by the electron spin orbital coupling in the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers. The present results show the possible application in phase-change data storage of such kind of superlattice materials, where the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers exhibit as the phase-change data storage media and the graphene layer works as the electrode, probe, and heat conductor.

  16. Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

  17. Argon-ion-induced formation of nanoporous GaSb layer: Microstructure, infrared luminescence, and vibrational properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751 005 (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201 314 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Das, T. D. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Calcutta, APC Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2014-07-21

    Room temperature implantation of 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions in GaSb to the fluences of 7?×?10{sup 16} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2} is carried out at two incidence angles, viz 0° and 60°, leading to formation of a nanoporous layer. As the ion fluence increases, patches grow on the porous layer under normal ion implantation, whereas the porous layer gradually becomes embedded under a rough top surface for oblique incidence of ions. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies reveal the existence of nanocrystallites embedded in the ion-beam amorphized GaSb matrix up to the highest fluence used in our experiment. Oxidation of the nanoporous layers becomes obvious from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman mapping. The correlation of ion-beam induced structural modification with photoluminescence signals in the infrared region has further been studied, showing defect induced emission of additional peaks near the band edge of GaSb.

  18. 60 keV Ar?-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 203207 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-10-14

    Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60 keV Ar?-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1×10¹? to 3×10¹? ions cm?². While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In?O? and Sb?O? phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

  19. Latching micro optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  20. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Alice E [ORNL; Berlijn, Tom [ORNL; Hahn, Steven E [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Williams, Travis J [ORNL; Poudel, Lekhanath N [ORNL; Calder, Stuart A [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int

  1. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  2. The young nuclear stellar disc in the SB0 galaxy NGC 1023

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsini, E M; Pastorello, N; Bontà, E Dalla; Pizzella, A; Portaluri, E

    2015-01-01

    Small kinematically-decoupled stellar discs with scalelengths of a few tens of parsec are known to reside in the centre of galaxies. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain how they form, including gas dissipation and merging of globular clusters. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging and ground-based integral-field spectroscopy, we investigated the structure and stellar populations of the nuclear stellar disc hosted in the interacting SB0 galaxy NGC 1023. The stars of the nuclear disc are remarkably younger and more metal rich with respect to the host bulge. These findings support a scenario in which the nuclear disc is the end result of star formation in metal enriched gas piled up in the galaxy centre. The gas can be of either internal or external origin, i.e. from either the main disc of NGC 1023 or the nearby satellite galaxy NGC 1023A. The dissipationless formation of the nuclear disc from already formed stars, through the migration and accretion of star clusters into the galactic cen...

  3. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  4. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-07-28

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  5. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB6 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. The sample is the same as that on which the chemical composition was reported. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 99% of the Tc-99 and at least 90% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  6. Active Optics in Modern, Large Optical Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lothar Noethe

    2001-11-07

    Active optics is defined as the control of the shape and the alignment of the components of an optical system at low temporal frequencies. For modern large telescopes with flexible monolithic or segmented primary mirrors and also flexible structures this technique is indispensable to reach a performance which is either diffraction limited for an operation in space or limited by the atmosphere for an operation on the ground. This article first describes the theory of active optics, both of the wavefront analysis and the correction mechanisms, then the design of three representative active optics systems, two in telescopes of the four and eight meter class with meniscus mirrors and one in a telescope with a segmented primary mirror, and, finally, presents practical experience with these active optics systems.

  7. LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS Lab VII - 1 In this lab, you will solve problems in ways that take-like behavior. These conditions may be less familiar to you than the conditions for which geometrical optics

  8. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  9. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  10. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  11. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, Richard (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale (Bingham County, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-2 up-regulates the expression of nestin through the Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling axis in C6 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Yuan-Li; Wong, Zong-Ruei; Su, Peng-Han; Huang, Bu-Miin; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan ; Yang, Hsi-Yuan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. •Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. •The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. •The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. •Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce and regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFR–MAPK–ERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells.

  13. University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics Spring 2010 OSE-6432: Principles of guided wave optics; electro -optics, acousto-optics and optoelectronics. Location: CREOL-A-214 or by Appointment Reference Materials: 1. Class Notes. 2. "Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides", K. Okamoto, Academic

  14. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  15. Interfacial structure, bonding and composition of InAs and GaSb thin films determined using coherent Bragg rod analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cionca, C.; Walko, D. A.; Yacoby, Y.; Dorin, C.; Millunchick, J. M.; Clarke, R.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Michigan; Hebrew Univ.

    2007-01-01

    We have used Bragg rod x-ray diffraction combined with a direct method of phase retrieval to extract atomic resolution electron-density maps of a complementary series of heteroepitaxial III-V semiconductor samples. From the three-dimensional electron-density maps we derive the monolayer spacings, the chemical compositions, and the characteristics of the bonding for all atomic planes in the film and across the film-substrate interface. InAs films grown on GaSb(001) under two different As conditions (using dimer or tetramer forms) both showed conformal roughness and mixed GaAs/InSb interfacial bonding character. The As tetramer conditions favored InSb bonding at the interface while, in the case of the dimer, the percentages corresponding to GaAs and InSb bonding were equal within the experimental error. The GaSb film grown on InAs(001) displayed significant In and As interdiffusion and had a relatively large fraction of GaAs-like bonds at the interface.

  16. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS Nanostructures + Light = `New Optics'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL Nanostructures + Light = `New Optics' Guest Editors Nikolay Zheludev University of Southampton, UK Vladimir optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations

  17. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  18. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  19. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  20. Anisotropic magnetization and transport properties of RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Kenneth D.

    1999-11-08

    This study of the RAgSb{sub 2} series of compounds arose as part of an investigation of rare earth intermetallic compounds containing antimony with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry. Materials with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry frequently manifest strong anisotropies and rich complexity in the magnetic properties, and yet are simple enough to analyze. Antimony containing intermetallic compounds commonly possess low carrier densities and have only recently been the subject of study. Large single grain crystals were grown of the RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm) series of compounds out of a high temperature solution. This method of crystal growth, commonly known as flux growth is a versatile method which takes advantage of the decreasing solubility of the target compound with decreasing temperature. Overall, the results of the crystal growth were impressive with the synthesis of single crystals of LaAgSb{sub 2} approaching one gram. However, the sample yield diminishes as the rare earth elements become smaller and heavier. Consequently, no crystals could be grown with R=Yb or Lu. Furthermore, EuAgSb{sub 2} could not be synthesized, likely due to the divalency of the Eu ion. For most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds, strong magnetic anisotropies are created by the crystal electric field splitting of the Hund's rule ground state. This splitting confines the local moments to lie in the basal plane (easy plane) for the majority of the members of the series. Exceptions to this include ErAgSb{sub 2} and TmAgSb{sub 2}, which have moments along the c-axis (easy axis) and CeAgSb{sub 2}, which at intermediate temperatures has an easy plane, but exchange coupling at low temperatures is anisotropic with an easy axis. Additional anisotropy is also observed within the basal plane of DyAgSb{sub 2}, where the moments are restricted to align along one of the {l_angle}110{r_angle} axes. Most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds containing magnetic rare earths, antiferromagnetically ordered at low temperatures. The ordering temperatures of these compounds are approximately proportional to the de Gennes factor, which suggests that the RKKY interaction is the dominant exchange interaction between local moments. Although metamagnetic transitions were observed in many members of the series, the series of sharp step-like transitions in DyAgSb{sub 2} are impressive. In this compound, up to 11 different magnetic states are stable depending on the magnitude and direction of the applied field. The saturated magnetization of these states and the critical fields needed to induce a phase transition vary with the direction of the applied field. Through detailed study of the angular dependence of the magnetization and critical fields, the net distribution of magnetic moments was determined for most, of the metamagnetic states. In DyAgSb{sub 2}, the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the Hund's rule ground state creates a strong anisotropy where the local Dy{sup 3+} magnetic moments are constrained to one of the equivalent {l_angle}110{r_angle} directions within the basal plane. The four position clock model was introduced to account for this rich metamagnetic system. Within this model, the magnetic moments are constrained to one of four equivalent orientations within the basal plane and interactions are calculated for up third nearest neighbors. The theoretical phase diagram, generated from the coupling constants is in excellent agreement with the experimental phase diagram. Further investigation of this compound using magnetic X-ray or neutron diffraction would be extremely useful to verify the net distributions of moments and determine the wave vectors of each of the ordered states.

  1. Demonstrating 1 nm-oxide-equivalent-thickness HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure with unpinning Fermi level and low gate leakage current density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinh, Hai-Dang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Lin, Yueh-Chin; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Luc, Quang-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Duong, Quoc-Van; Nguyen, Manh-Nghia [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)] [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Wang, Shin-Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yi Chang, Edward [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the band alignment, interface, and electrical characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/InSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure have been investigated. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the conduction band offset of 1.78 ± 0.1 eV and valence band offset of 3.35 ± 0.1 eV have been extracted. The transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that HfO{sub 2} layer would be a good diffusion barrier for InSb. As a result, 1 nm equivalent-oxide-thickness in the 4 nm HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure has been demonstrated with unpinning Fermi level and low leakage current of 10{sup ?4} A/cm{sup ?2}. The D{sub it} value of smaller than 10{sup 12} eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} has been obtained using conduction method.

  2. Growth and transport properties of epitaxial lattice matched half Heusler CoTiSb/InAlAs/InP(001) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Jason K.; Johansson, Linda I. M.; Schultz, Brian D.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate the integration of the lattice matched single crystal epitaxial Half Heusler compound CoTiSb with In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As/InP(001) heterostructures using molecular beam epitaxy. CoTiSb belongs to the subset of Half Heusler compounds that is expected to be semiconducting, despite being composed entirely of metallic constituents. The lattice matching and epitaxial alignment of the CoTiSb films were confirmed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction. Temperature dependent transport measurements indicate semiconducting-like behavior, with a room temperature Hall mobility of 530 cm{sup 2}/Vs and background Hall carrier density of 9.0?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3}, which is comparable to n-Si with similar carrier density. Below 100?K, the films show a large negative magnetoresistance, and possible origins of this negative magnetoresistance are discussed.

  3. 1EV GaN[subscript x]As[subscript 1-x-y]Sb[subscript y] material for lattice-matched III-V solar cell implementation on GaAs and Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Soon Fatt

    The effect of different arsenic species (As[subscript 2] or As[subscript 4]) on the quality of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown GaNAsSb materials (samples A and B) and GaAs/ GaNAsSb/GaAs p+n-n+ devices (samples C and D) ...

  4. No. 16 ISSN 10278389 March 2012 The Southern African Large Telescope (Courtesy: S.B. Potter)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    P. Martinez South Africa Editor: wgssa@saao.ac.za P. Spargo South Africa P. Okeke Nigeria misunn-East and Africa. In partic- ular, the completion of HESS (the High Energy Stereoscopic System, in Namibia-class observational capability from ultra-high energy gamma-rays, through optical/near-IR to radio wave- lengths

  5. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  6. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  7. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  8. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  9. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  10. 27 Jan 2003 Smart Optics Faraday Partnership 1 Smart Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    27 Jan 2003 Smart Optics Faraday Partnership 1 Smart Optics Technologies, Techniques and Space Applications Alan Greenaway Physics, EPS Heriot-Watt University #12;27 Jan 2003 Smart Optics Faraday Partnership 2 Smart? · The Smart Optics Faraday Partnership interprets `Smart Optics' to mean: ­ `... includes

  11. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01

    Surface Plasmons at a Metal-Dielectric Interface . . . .Plasmons at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces . . . . A. GeneralNONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen (Ph.D.

  12. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-14

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M?,? edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [?L = 2.8(1)?B/Pu] and spin moments [?S = –2.0(1)?B/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of Lz and Sz are in excellent agreement with the values thatmore »have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. We demonstrate that a split M? as well as a narrow M? XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.« less

  13. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu?As? and ? – BaCu?Sb?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; et al

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu?As? and ? - BaCu?Sb?. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu?As? indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of amore »Cu?¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in ? - BaCu?Sb? without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu?As? follows from the stability of the Cu?¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu?As? is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.« less

  14. Ground-state wave function of plutonium in PuSb as determined via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janoschek, M.; Haskel, D.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Pu M?,? edges of the ferromagnet PuSb are reported. Using bulk magnetization measurements and a sum rule analysis of the XMCD spectra, we determine the individual orbital [?L = 2.8(1)?B/Pu] and spin moments [?S = ?2.0(1)?B/Pu] of the Pu 5f electrons for the first time. Atomic multiplet calculations of the XMCD and XANES spectra reproduce well the experimental data and are consistent with the experimental value of the spin moment. These measurements of ?Lz? and ?Sz? are in excellent agreement with the values that have been extracted from neutron magnetic form factor measurements, and confirm the local character of the 5f electrons in PuSb. Finally, we demonstrate that a split M? as well as a narrow M? XMCD signal may serve as a signature of 5f electron localization in actinide compounds.

  15. AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS... ...the light as you've never seen before... Optics:http://science.howstuffworks.com/laser5.htm #12;5 DEFINITION Quantum Optics: "Quantum optics is a field in quantum physics, dealing OPTICS OPERATORS Light is described in terms of field operators for creation and annihilation of photons

  16. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Schipper, John F. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  17. Optical scanning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villarreal, R.A.

    1985-11-06

    An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation is described.

  18. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Donald T. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  19. Optically Induced Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Shen, Zhenhua; Cao, Jianjun; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Light-matter-light interactions serve as the backbone technology of all-optical information processing for both on-chip and long-haul communication purposes. The representative example of electromagnetically induced transparency has its unique ability of optically controlling transparency windows with relative low light in atomic systems, though its practical applications are limited due to rigid experimental requirements. Here we demonstrate a new form of optically induced transparency in a micro-cavity by introducing four-wave mixing gain in order to couple nonlinearly two separated resonances of the micro-cavity in ambient environment. A signature Fano-like resonance is also observed owing to the nonlinear interference of two coupled resonances. Moreover, we show that the unidirectional gain of four-wave mixing can lead to non-reciprocal transmission at the transparency windows. Optically induced transparency may offer a unique platform for a compact, integrated solution to all-optical processing and quant...

  20. Digital optical conversion module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  1. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  2. Shallow to deep transformation of Se donors in GaSb under hydrostatic pressure H. Navarro-Contreras, F. de Anda-Salazar, and J. Olvera-Hernandez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Shallow to deep transformation of Se donors in GaSb under hydrostatic pressure H. Navarro, although it may be also an indication that the Se shallow donors change to deep donors associated pressures above a certain threshold value. The DX center is a deep-level defect found in many n

  3. Limitations on Subcontracting Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned SB Set-Aside UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limitations on Subcontracting ­ Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned SB Set-Aside UT-B Contracts Div Mar LIMITATIONS ON SUBCONTRACTING ­ SERVICE-DISABLED VETERAN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS SET-ASIDE OR SOLE SOURCE AWARD of other service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. (b) Supplies (other than procurement from

  4. A simple production-consumption system This note is for SB200, "A systems approach to biology". It provides more details of the analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Jeremy

    A simple production-consumption system This note is for SB200, "A systems approach to biology". It provides more details of the analysis of the production-consumption system that was done in the first to one of the TAs. I explained in class how the production-consumption system leads to the differential

  5. Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structural phase transitions on the nanoscale: The crucial pattern in the phase-change materials Ge and computer memory, but the structure of the amorphous phases and the nature of the phase transition of types A Ge and Sb and B Te , an "ABAB square." The rapid amorphous-to-crystalline phase change

  6. Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Draining Natural As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Natural surface coatings (biofilms) were col- lected elements Á Distribution coefficient Á Biogenic Mn oxide Natural surface coatings are ubiquitous

  7. ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng Chu, Winnie V. Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zheng

    ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng substrates using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mesa geometry light emitting diodes (LEDs) were demonstrated in recent years, such as photodetectors,8,9) light-emitting diodes (LEDs),10­13) and random lasing

  8. Evolution of glass properties during a substitution of S by Se in Ge28Sb12S60-xSex glass Guillaume Guery1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evolution of glass properties during a substitution of S by Se in Ge28Sb12S60-xSex glass network, Université de Bordeaux I, Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex, France. Keywords: Chalcogenide glass; Raman spectroscopy; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Glass properties Author whom correspondence should

  9. 504 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 33, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 Ultrathin-Body High-Mobility InAsSb-on-Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali

    504 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 33, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 Ultrathin-Body High-Mobility In- effect transistors (FETs) with ultrahigh electron mobilities are reported. The devices are obtainedAsSb-on-insulator FETs exhibit an effective mobility of 3400 cm2 /V · s for a body thickness of 7 nm, which rep- resents

  10. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2014-02-11

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ?3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 ? V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 m?·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  11. Observation and modeling of polycrystalline grain formation in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Geoffrey W.; Tchoulfian, Pierre; Topuria, Teya; Nyffeler, Clemens; Virwani, Kumar; Padilla, Alvaro; Shelby, Robert M.; Eskandari, Mona; Jackson, Bryan; Lee, Bong-Sub

    2012-05-15

    The relationship between the polycrystalline nature of phase change materials (such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}) and the intermediate resistance states of phase change memory (PCM) devices has not been widely studied. A full understanding of such states will require knowledge of how polycrystalline grains form, how they interact with each other at various temperatures, and how the differing electrical (and thermal) characteristics within the grains and at their boundaries combine through percolation to produce the externally observed electrical (and thermal) characteristics of a PCM device. We address the first of these tasks (and introduce a vehicle for the second) by studying the formation of fcc polycrystalline grains from the as-deposited amorphous state in undoped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. We perform ex situ transmission electron microscopy membrane experiments and then match these observations against numerical simulation. Ramped-anneal experiments show that the temperature ramp-rate strongly influences the median grain size. By truncating such ramped-anneal experiments at various peak temperatures, we convincingly demonstrate that the temperature range over which these grains are established is quite narrow. Subsequent annealing at elevated temperature appears to change these established distributions of grain sizes only slightly. Our numerical simulator--which models nuclei formation through classical nucleation theory and then tracks the subsequent time- and temperature-dependent growth of these grains--can match these experimental observations of initial grain distributions and crystallization temperature both qualitatively and quantitatively. These simulations show that the particular narrow temperature range over which crystallization occurs shifts as a function of temperature ramp-rate, which allows us to quantify the lower portions of the time-temperature-transformation map for Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. Future experiments and extensions of the simulator to investigate temperature-dependent interactions between neighboring grains, and to study nucleation from within the melt-quenched amorphous state, are discussed.

  12. Bringing Optical Metamaterials to Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentine, Jason Gage

    2010-01-01

    refraction in bulk metamaterials of nanowires. ," Science ,Optical negative-index metamaterials," Nature Photonics ,Optical negative-index bulk metamaterials consisting of 2D

  13. Projection optics box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry (Tracy, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Parker, John M. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  14. Trends in Electrical Transport of p-type Skutterudites RFe4Sb12 (R-Na,K,Ca,Sr,Ba,La,Ce,Pr,Yb) from First Principles Calculations and Boltzmann Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Qiu, P [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Liu, R [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Xi, L [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Zheng, S [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Zhang, W [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Singh, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We report a consistent set of ab initio calculations of the electronic structures and electrical transport properties of p-type thermoelectric compounds RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, where R is a rattling filler selected from alkali metals (Na, K), alkaline earths (Ca, Sr, Ba), and rare earth metals (La, Ce, Pr, Yb). Different from the single Sb-dominated light band in the valence band edge of CoSb{sub 3}, the heavy bands from Fe d electronic states also fall in the energy range close to the valence band edges in the RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}. These heavy bands dominate the band-edge density of states, pin the Fermi levels, and mostly determine the electrical transport properties of those p-type RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}. The Seebeck coefficients can be roughly categorized into three groups based on the charge states of fillers, and the maxima are lower than those of n-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites. Effective carrier relaxation time in p-type RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, obtained from the combinations of calculations and experiments, is remarkably similar among different compounds with values around 7.5 x 10{sup -15} s and weak temperature dependence. The optimal doping levels of those RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} are estimated to be around 0.6-0.8 holes per unit cell at 850 K, which is difficult to achieve in RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} compounds. Prospects for further improving the performance of p-type skutterudites are also discussed.

  15. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  16. Scalable optical quantum computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V [Institute for Superconductivity and Solid-State Physics, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  17. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  18. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  19. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  20. Characteristics of GaAsSb single quantum well lasers emitting near 1.3 {micro}m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPAHN,OLGA B.; KLEM,JOHN F.

    2000-02-17

    The authors report data on GaAsSb single quantum well lasers grown on GaAs substrates. Room temperature pulsed emission at 1.275 {micro}m in a 1,250 {micro}m-long device has been observed. Minimum threshold current densities of 535 A/cm{sup 2} were measured in 2000 {micro}m long lasers. The authors also measured internal losses of 2--5 cm{sup {minus}1}, internal quantum efficiencies of 30-38% and characteristic temperature T{sub 0} of 67--77 C. From these parameters a gain constant G{sub 0} of 1,660 cm{sup {minus}1} and a transparency current density J{sub tr} of 134 A/cm{sup 2} were calculated. The results indicate the potential for fabricating 1.3 {micro}m VCSELs from these materials.

  1. Enhancement mechanisms for optical forces in integrated optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhancement mechanisms for optical forces in integrated optics M. L. Povinelli(a) , M. Loncar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 ABSTRACT We investigate the extension of optical micromanipulation to integrated optics. In particular, we consider whether propagating light signals can cause

  2. Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainty, Chris

    Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy David Merino and Chris Dainty Applied Optics Group, Department of Experimental Physics, National and Adrian Gh. Podoleanu Applied Optics Group, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent at Canterbury

  3. Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

    2012-11-20

    A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

  4. A lateral optical equilibrium in waveguide-resonator optical force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    A lateral optical equilibrium in waveguide-resonator optical force Varat Intaraprasonk,1@stanford.edu Abstract: We consider the lateral optical force between a resonator and a waveguide, and study the possibility of an equilibrium that occurs solely from the optical force in such system. We prove analytically

  5. Structural characterization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-28

    The structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM™ 3451)) and the related phase Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20?K to 300?K for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and from 10?K to 298?K for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19?K to 298?K. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are isostructural, with a space group of R3{sup ¯}m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M?=?Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are similar to those of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} relative to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe{sub 2} and chalcostibite CuSbS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Gudelli, Vijay; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vaitheeswaran, G. [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-12-14

    Electronic and transport properties of CuGaTe{sub 2}, a hole-doped ternary copper based chalcopyrite type semiconductor, are studied using calculations within the Density Functional Theory and solving the Boltzmann transport equation within the constant relaxation time approximation. The electronic band structures are calculated by means of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method, using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential. The calculated band gap of 1.23?eV is in agreement with the experimental value of 1.2?eV. The carrier concentration- and temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of CuGaTe{sub 2} are derived, and a figure of merit of zT?=?1.69 is obtained at 950?K for a hole concentration of 3.7·10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}, in agreement with a recent experimental finding of zT?=?1.4, confirming that CuGaTe{sub 2} is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric applications. The good thermoelectric performance of p-type CuGaTe{sub 2} is associated with anisotropic transport from a combination of heavy and light bands. Also for CuSbS{sub 2} (chalcostibite), a better performance is obtained for p-type than for n-type doping. The variation of the thermopower as a function of temperature and concentration suggests that CuSbS{sub 2} will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly to the isostructural CuBiS{sub 2} compound.

  7. Metasurface optical antireflection coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Boyang [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.; Hendrickson, Joshua [Air Force Research Lab., Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Nader, Nima [Air Force Research Lab., Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Solid State Scientific Corporation, Nashua, New Hampshire (United States); Chen, Hou -Tong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies.; Guo, Junpeng [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    2014-12-15

    Light reflection at the boundary of two different media is one of the fundamental phenomena in optics, and reduction of reflection is highly desirable in many optical systems. Traditionally, optical antireflection has been accomplished using single- or multiple-layer dielectric films and graded index surface structures in various wavelength ranges. However, these approaches either impose strict requirements on the refractive index matching and film thickness, or involve complicated fabrication processes and non-planar surfaces that are challenging for device integration. Here, we demonstrate an antireflection coating strategy, both experimentally and numerically, by using metasurfaces with designer optical properties in the mid-wave infrared. Our results show that the metasurface antireflection is capable of eliminating reflection and enhancing transmission over a broad spectral band and a wide incidence angle range. The demonstrated antireflection technique has no requirement on the choice of materials and is scalable to other wavelengths.

  8. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  9. Metasurface optical antireflection coating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Boyang; Hendrickson, Joshua; Nader, Nima; Chen, Hou -Tong; Guo, Junpeng

    2014-12-15

    Light reflection at the boundary of two different media is one of the fundamental phenomena in optics, and reduction of reflection is highly desirable in many optical systems. Traditionally, optical antireflection has been accomplished using single- or multiple-layer dielectric films and graded index surface structures in various wavelength ranges. However, these approaches either impose strict requirements on the refractive index matching and film thickness, or involve complicated fabrication processes and non-planar surfaces that are challenging for device integration. Here, we demonstrate an antireflection coating strategy, both experimentally and numerically, by using metasurfaces with designer optical properties in the mid-wave infrared.more »Our results show that the metasurface antireflection is capable of eliminating reflection and enhancing transmission over a broad spectral band and a wide incidence angle range. The demonstrated antireflection technique has no requirement on the choice of materials and is scalable to other wavelengths.« less

  10. Optical gamma thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  11. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  12. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  13. Optical fiber switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  14. Toroidal optical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raybould, T A; Papasimakis, N; Kuprov, I; Youngs, I; Chen, W T; Tsai, D P; Zheludev, N I

    2015-01-01

    Optical activity is ubiquitous across natural and artificial media and is conventionally understood in terms of scattering from electric and magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate experimentally and confirm numerically a type of optical activity that cannot be attributed to electric and magnetic multipoles. We show that our observations can only be accounted for by the inclusion of the toroidal dipole moment, the first term of the recently established peculiar family of toroidal multipoles.

  15. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform Synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform, Shijun Xiao Funding from ARO, DARPA, and NSF #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER performance (spectral engineering, dispersion compensation) #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL

  16. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Andrew M. Weiner and Ehsan Hamidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Andrew M. Weiner ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Ultrawideband (UWB) Radio-frequency Photonics UWB;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Femtosecond Pulse Shaping A

  17. Fault location in optical networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Rick C.; Kryzak, Charles J.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Geib, Kent M.; Kornrumpf, William P.

    2008-07-01

    One apparatus embodiment includes an optical emitter and a photodetector. At least a portion of the optical emitter extends a radial distance from a center point. The photodetector provided around at least a portion of the optical emitter and positioned outside the radial distance of the portion of the optical emitter.

  18. The Mathematics of Nonlinear Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Métivier, Guy

    The Mathematics of Nonlinear Optics Guy M´etivier March 7, 2009 Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 Examples of equations arising in nonlinear optics 11 3 The framework of hyperbolic systems 18 3.1 Equations Optics 49 5.1 Linear geometric optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 5

  19. Undergraduate Handbook Dear Optics student,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Undergraduate Handbook Fall 2013 #12;2 Dear Optics student, It is my great pleasure to welcome you to The Institute of Optics. The Institute of Optics has been educating the next generation of leaders in the field since it was founded in 1929 as the first optics department in the country

  20. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - i - INTRODUCTION WHAT IS SCIENCE, 0PTICS & YOU? The Science, Optics and You Guidebook is made up as follows: Science, Optics and You is a standards light, color, and optics. Activities are designed to engage students in active investigation

  1. Fibre optics: Forty years later

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dianov, Evgenii M

    2010-01-31

    This paper presents a brief overview of the state of the art in fibre optics and its main applications: optical fibre communications, fibre lasers and fibre sensors for various physical property measurements. The future of fibre optics and the status of this important area of the modern technology in Russia are discussed. (fiber optics)

  2. Embedded fiducials in optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Embedded fiducials are provided in optical surfaces and a method for embedding the fiducials. Fiducials, or marks on a surface, are important for optical fabrication and alignment, particularly when individual optical elements are aspheres. Fiducials are used during the course of the polishing process to connect interferometric data, and the equation describing the asphere, to physical points on the optic. By embedding fiducials below the surface of the optic and slightly outside the clear aperture of the optic, the fiducials are not removed by polishing, do not interfere with the polishing process, and do not affect the performance of the finished optic.

  3. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  4. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS Polarization Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL Polarization Optics Guest Editors Jari Turunen University of Joensuu, Finland Asher A Friesem Weizmann Institute This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which

  5. Investigation of arsenic and antimony capping layers, and half cycle reactions during atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, Hong; Brennan, Barry; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Oktyabrsky, Serge [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany–SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany–SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In-situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, ion scattering spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the GaSb(100) surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy after thermal desorption of a protective As or Sb layer and subsequent atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. An antimony protective layer is found to be more favorable compared to an arsenic capping layer as it prevents As alloys from forming with the GaSb substrate. The evolution of oxide free GaSb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface is investigated by “half-cycle” ALD reactions of trimethyl aluminum and deionized water.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  7. Optical key system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  8. Generalizing Optical Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickard Jonsson; Hans Westman

    2007-08-21

    We show that by employing the standard projected curvature as a measure of spatial curvature, we can make a certain generalization of optical geometry (Abramowicz and Lasota 1997, Class. Quantum Grav. 14 (1997) A23). This generalization applies to any spacetime that admits a hypersurface orthogonal shearfree congruence of worldlines. This is a somewhat larger class of spacetimes than the conformally static spacetimes assumed in standard optical geometry. In the generalized optical geometry, which in the generic case is time dependent, photons move with unit speed along spatial geodesics and the sideways force experienced by a particle following a spatially straight line is independent of the velocity. Also gyroscopes moving along spatial geodesics do not precess (relative to the forward direction). Gyroscopes that follow a curved spatial trajectory precess according to a very simple law of three-rotation. We also present an inertial force formalism in coordinate representation for this generalization. Furthermore, we show that by employing a new sense of spatial curvature (Jonsson, Class. Quantum Grav. 23 (2006) 1) closely connected to Fermat's principle, we can make a more extensive generalization of optical geometry that applies to arbitrary spacetimes. In general this optical geometry will be time dependent, but still geodesic photons move with unit speed and follow lines that are spatially straight in the new sense. Also, the sideways experienced (comoving) force on a test particle following a line that is straight in the new sense will be independent of the velocity.

  9. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  10. Optically Reconfigurable Photonic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qian; Gholipour, Behrad; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yuan, Guanghui; Teng, Jinghua; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic components with adjustable parameters, from variable-focal-length lenses to spectral filters that can change functionality upon stimulation, have enormous technological importance. Tuning of such components is conventionally achieved by either micro- or nano-mechanical actuation of their consitutive parts, stretching or application of thermal stimuli. Here we report a new dielectric metasurface platform for reconfigurable optical components that are created with light in a non-volatile and reversible fashion. Such components are written, erased and re-written as two-dimensional binary or grey-scale patterns into a nanoscale film of phase change material by inducing a refractive-index-changing phase-transition with tailored trains of femtosecond pulses. We combine germanium-antimony-tellurium-based films optimized for high-optical-contrast ovonic switching with a sub-wavelength-resolution optical writing process to demonstrate technologically relevant devices: visible-range reconfigurable bi-chr...

  11. Explosive boiling of Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass induced by a CW laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, P.; Tichy, L.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interaction of the CW 785 nm laser with chalcogenide GeSbS glass. • First demonstration of the explosive boiling induced by CW laser in glass. • Different processes as photo-induced oxidation, expansion, and viscosity-flow observed. • Applied diagnostics SEM, DHM, AFM, force spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Damage threshold determined at 1.2 × 10{sup 24}s{sup ?1} cm{sup ?3} of absorbed photons. - Abstract: The response of bulk Ge{sub 35}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 55} glass to illumination by a continuous wave (CW) laser, sub-band-gap photons, was studied specifically with an atomic force microscopy including a force spectroscopy, with a digital holographic microscopy and with a scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the number of photons absorbed, photo-expansion, photo-oxidation and explosive boiling were observed.

  12. Annealing effects on structural, electrical and optical properties of antimony-tinoxide thin films deposited by sol gel dip coating technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekshmy, S. Sujatha, E-mail: jolly2jolly@gmail.com; Anitha, V. S., E-mail: jolly2jolly@gmail.com; Berlin, I. John, E-mail: jolly2jolly@gmail.com; Joy, K., E-mail: jolly2jolly@gmail.com [Thin film Laboratory, Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695 015 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Antimony-doped tin dioxide possess interesting physical and chemical properties. These properties have a wide range of applications such as catalysis and optoelectronic devices. In the present study, antimony-doped tin oxide (SnO2:Sb) thin films were deposited on the quartz substrates by sol-gel dip coating technique. The films were annealed at temperatures 350°C, 550°C and 850°C in air for 2 hours. The structure and surface morphologies were observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD patterns shows tetragonal structure for the SnO2:Sb films annealed at different temperatures. Crystallite size increased from 6 to 14 nm as annealing temperature increased from 350°C to 850°C. SEM studies reveals crack free and smooth surface for all the films. The grains are found to be homogenously distributed for films annealed at higher temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films annealed at 350°C and 550°C decreased and increased for the films annealed at 850°C. The optical properties of the films were investigated in the UV-visible-NIR region (200-900 nm) using UV spectra. The transmittance of the films decreased for films annealed at higher temperature. The optical energy band gap values (4.13 eV-4.83 eV) increased with the increase in annealing temperature.

  13. Optical plasma microelectronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Thyler; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices was successfully replaced with an optically triggered gas plasma channel. The combination of DC and laser-induced gas ionizations controls the conductivity of the channel, enabling us to realize different electronic devices such as transistors, switches, modulators, etc. A special micro-scale metasurface was used to enhance the laser-gas interaction, as well as combining it with DC ionization properly. Optical plasma devices benefit form the advantages of plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving most of the integrablity of semiconductor based devices.

  14. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  15. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  16. Record figure of merit values of highly stoichiometric Sb2Te3 porous bulk synthesized from tailor-made molecular precursors in ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Stefan; Schulz, Stephan; Schaumann, Julian; Mudring, Anja; Stötzel, Julia; Maculewicz, Franziska; Schierning, Gabi

    2015-08-06

    We report on the synthesis of Sb2Te3 nanoparticles with record-high figure of merit values of up to 1.5. The central thermoelectric parameters, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, were independently optimized. Critical influence of porosity for the fabrication of highly efficient thermoelectric materials is firstly demonstrated, giving a strong guidance for the optimization of other thermoelectric materials.

  17. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2010-06-30

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the opto-mechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered opto-mechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  18. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  19. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around ...

  20. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

  1. Optics in data center network architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrington, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 2 Reducing Cabling Complexity with Optics . . . . .Advances in Information Optics and Photonics. SPIE, 2008. [c-Through: Part-time Optics in Data Centers,” in Proceedings

  2. High-index-contrast electromechanical optical switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Reginald (Reginald Eugene), 1978-

    2011-01-01

    System developers are looking to replace protocol-dependent, bandwidth-limited optical networks with intelligent optically-transparent integrated photonic networks. Several electromechanical optical switches are explored ...

  3. 2.71 Optics, Fall 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbastathis, George

    Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, ...

  4. Electroforming of Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires for high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices on a chip.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2006-11-01

    Active cooling of electronic systems for space-based and terrestrial National Security missions has demanded use of Stirling, reverse-Brayton, closed Joule-Thompson, pulse tube and more elaborate refrigeration cycles. Such cryocoolers are large systems that are expensive, demand large powers, often contain moving parts and are difficult to integrate with electronic systems. On-chip, solid-state, active cooling would greatly enhance the capabilities of future systems by reducing the size, cost and inefficiencies compared to existing solutions. We proposed to develop the technology for a thermoelectric cooler capable of reaching 77K by replacing bulk thermoelectric materials with arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. Furthermore, the Sandia-developed technique we will use to produce the oriented nanowires occurs at room temperature and can be applied directly to a silicon substrate. Key obstacles include (1) optimizing the Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} alloy composition for thermoelectric properties; (2) increasing wire aspect ratios to 3000:1; and (3) increasing the array density to {ge} 10{sup 9} wires/cm{sup 2}. The primary objective of this LDRD was to fabricate and test the thermoelectric properties of arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. With this proof-of-concept data under our belts we are positioned to engage National Security systems customers to invest in the integration of on-chip thermoelectric coolers for future missions.

  5. p-type conduction from Sb-doped ZnO thin films grown by dual ion beam sputtering in the absence of oxygen ambient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Pandey, Sushil; Kumar Pandey, Saurabh; Awasthi, Vishnu; Kumar, Ashish; Mukherjee, Shaibal; Deshpande, Uday P.; Gupta, Mukul

    2013-10-28

    Sb-doped ZnO (SZO) thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system in the absence of oxygen ambient. The electrical, structural, morphological, and elemental properties of SZO thin films were studied for films grown at different substrate temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 600 °C and then annealed in situ at 800 °C under vacuum (pressure ?5 × 10{sup ?8} mbar). Films grown for temperature range of 200–500 °C showed p-type conduction with hole concentration of 1.374 × 10{sup 16} to 5.538 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, resistivity of 66.733–12.758 ? cm, and carrier mobility of 4.964–8.846 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} at room temperature. However, the film grown at 600 °C showed n-type behavior. Additionally, current-voltage (I–V) characteristic of p-ZnO/n-Si heterojunction showed a diode-like behavior, and that further confirmed the p-type conduction in ZnO by Sb doping. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that all SZO films had (002) preferred crystal orientation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of Sb{sub Zn}–2V{sub Zn} complex caused acceptor-like behavior in SZO films.

  6. Optical apparatus for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1999-05-18

    Optical apparatus is disclosed for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors. The optical apparatus comprises one or more diffractive optical elements formed on a substrate for receiving light from a source and processing the incident light. The optical apparatus includes an addressing element for alternately addressing each diffractive optical element thereof to produce for one unit of time a first correlation with the incident light, and to produce for a different unit of time a second correlation with the incident light that is different from the first correlation. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the optical apparatus is in the form of a correlation spectrometer; and in other embodiments, the apparatus is in the form of an optical processor. In some embodiments, the optical apparatus comprises a plurality of diffractive optical elements on a common substrate for forming first and second gratings that alternately intercept the incident light for different units of time. In other embodiments, the optical apparatus includes an electrically-programmable diffraction grating that may be alternately switched between a plurality of grating states thereof for processing the incident light. The optical apparatus may be formed, at least in part, by a micromachining process. 24 figs.

  7. Fiber optic compass development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kyongtae

    2005-11-01

    magnetometer based on this principle, a single mode optical fiber coated with nickel [6] 3 or wrapped around a Metglas cylinder [7] experiences a strain which is dependent on the external magnetic field [8-10]. The fiber is deployed in one arm of a Michelson...

  8. Optical cloaking with metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bilotti; S. Tricarico; L. Vegni

    2008-06-06

    In this contribution, we present the design of cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks working at optical frequencies, making use of layered structures of plasmonic and non-plasmonic materials. The simulated results confirm the validity of the proposed approach and show a rather broad-band behavior of the cloaking device.

  9. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  10. Genesis of CREOLGenesis of CREOL The College of Optics & PhotonicsThe College of Optics & Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Genesis of CREOLGenesis of CREOL The College of Optics & PhotonicsThe College of Optics & Photonics, the School of OpticsCREOL, the School of Optics CREOL, The College of Optics & PhotonicsCREOL, The College of Optics & Photonics CREOL & FPCE, The College of Optics and PhotonicsCREOL & FPCE, The College of Optics

  11. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 201 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 202 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  12. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 197 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 198 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  13. Optical single sideband modulation using strong optical injection-locked semiconductor lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Lau, Erwin K.; Wu, Ming C.

    2007-01-01

    generation by direct modulation of optical injection-lockedreported direct SSB modulation from an optically injection-

  14. 4-ID-D optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-ID-D Beamline Optics A schetch of the major optical components for beam line 4-ID-D are shown above. All these components located in the B-station upstream from the D...

  15. Frame dragging with optical vortices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strohaber, James

    2011-12-22

    General Relativistic calculations in the linear regime have been made for electromagnetic beams of radiation known as optical vortices. These exotic beams of light carry a physical quantity known as optical orbital angular momentum (OAM...

  16. Diagnostics Implemented on NIF - Optical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Streaked Optical Pyrometer Shared LOS 90-315 DIM LLNL SOP measures the breakout time of an optically emitting shock. Robert M. Malone et al., "Combining a thermal-imaging...

  17. Optics (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optics Group (X-ray Science Division) The mission of the Optics Group is to facilitate the efficient and productive use and operation of APS beamline-based research facilities. In...

  18. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  19. Optics learning through affordable kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P, Anusha N, E-mail: anushnp@gmail.com, E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@gmail.com; Shaji, Chitra, E-mail: anushnp@gmail.com, E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@gmail.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: anushnp@gmail.com, E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    An affordable kit which helps to understand some of the optical phenomena qualitatively and quantitatively is presented in this paper. It supplements optics taught in classes. The kit consists of equipments which are available in the market at nominal cost such as laser pointer, lenses, glass plates, razor blades, coins, ball bearing etc. Experiments which come under wave optics (interference and diffraction) and ray optics (reflection and refraction) are explained using this kit.

  20. Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http, A. M. Weiner Purdue University C. Lin Avanex Corporation Conference on Lasers and Electro Optics;Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/ 2

  1. Catalog Entry for PHYS 522: NONLINEAR OPTICS PHYS 522 (3) Nonlinear Optics (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akerib, Daniel S.

    Catalog Entry for PHYS 522: NONLINEAR OPTICS PHYS 522 (3) Nonlinear Optics (3) Classical and propagation. Properties of optical fibers and nonlinear materials. Theory of nonlinear propagation, solitons, inverse scattering transforms, optical chaos. Applications to lasers, optical violability, self

  2. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  3. Single-cycle nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

    2008-01-01

    g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

  4. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  5. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  6. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 \\Theta 4 square array of optical tweezers -- the hexadeca

  7. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  8. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  9. Modular optical detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  10. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    2000-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  11. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen, CH)

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  12. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    1998-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  13. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking technologies. Several years ago, when many of these optical networking research topics were first being investigated, they were the subject of controversial debate. The new techniques challenged many long-held concepts related to architecture and technology. However, today all major networking organizations are transitioning toward infrastructure that incorporates these new concepts. This progress has been assisted through the series of Optical Networking Testbed Workshops (ONT). The first (ONT1) outlined a general framework of key issues and topics and developed a series of recommendations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). The second (ONT2) developed a common vision of optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop8). Processes that allow for a common vision encourage widespread deployment of these types of resources among advanced networking communities. Also, such a shared vision enables key concepts and technologies to migrate from basic research testbeds to wider networking communities. The ONT-3 workshop built on these earlier activities by expanding discussion to include additional considerations of the international interoperability and of greater impact of optical networking technology on networking in general. In accordance with this recognition, the workshop confirmed that future-oriented research and development is indispensable to fundamentally change the current Internet architecture to create a global network incorporating completely new concepts. The workshop also recognized that the first priority to allow for this progress is basic research and development, including international collaborative activities, which are important for the global realization of interoperability of a new generation architecture.

  14. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  15. MicroSight Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  17. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  18. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  19. Optically Controlled Jitter Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Manasson; V. A. Manasson

    2006-08-17

    A new simple circuit producing random pulse trains is proposed and experimentally studied. The circuit is composed of an operational amplifier and two feedback links, one of which comprises two photodiodes. The photodiodes are responsible for nonlinearity in the feedback. By varying the illumination it is possible to control the nonlinearity in the photodiode current-voltage characteristics and change the degree of randomness in the oscillations. The circuit's simplicity and optical control make it attractive for coupled map lattices.

  20. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  1. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  2. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  3. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  4. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  5. Crystal structure of Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} (Ln=La, Pr and Nd): A new ordered rhombohedral pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, W.T., E-mail: w.fu@chem.leidenuniv.nl; IJdo, D.J.W.

    2014-05-01

    Manganese rare earth antimonates with the formula Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} (Ln=La–Yb and Y) have been prepared and their structures were determined by the Rietveld method using X-ray diffraction data. The compounds with Ln=La, Pr and Nd crystallize in a rhombohedral supercell of the cubic fluorite with the space group R3{sup ¯}m and with the lattice parameters a{sub h}??2a{sub c} and c{sub h}?2?3a{sub c}, where a{sub c} denotes the lattice constant of the cubic fluorite. The structure is pyrochlore-like but differs from the common cubic pyrochlore A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} in that it consists of fully ordered Mn:Ln in the A sites and Mn:Sb in the B sites with the ratio 1:3. The most interesting feature of Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} is that the divalent Mn ions have different coordination numbers with oxygen and the Mn(II)O{sub 6} (octahedron) and Mn(II)O{sub 8} (hexagonal bipyramid) alternate along the parent cubic fluorite axes. For medium sized lanthanides, i.e. from Ln=Sm, the rhombohedral phase coexists with the cubic phase and Mn{sub 2}Y{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} is cubic a pyrochlore. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of rhombohedral pyrochlore Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} (Ln=La, Pr, and Nd) showing the staking of Ln{sub 3}Mn and MnSb{sub 3} layers (a). (b) and (c) show the connections between Mn1O{sub 6} and LnO{sub 8} and between Mn2O{sub 8} and SbO{sub 6} polyhedra, respectively. - Highlights: • Pyrochlores of the formula Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} (Ln=La–Yb and Y) were synthesized for the first time. • Mn{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}O{sub 14} with Ln=La, Pr, Nd are rhombohedral consisting of fully 1:3 ordering of metal ions. • With medium-sized Ln, rhombohedral phase co-exists with cubic phase. • Two divalent Mn ions have coordination numbers of 6 and 8, respectively.

  6. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  7. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass.

  8. Optical single sideband modulation using strong optical injection-locked semiconductor lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Lau, Erwin K.; Wu, Ming C.

    2007-01-01

    polarization controller. OSA: optical spectrum analyzer.RF-SA; RF spectrum analyzer). Fig. 4. Measured optical powermonitored by an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution

  9. Current flow and potential efficiency of solar cells based on GaAs and GaSb p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, V. M.; Evstropov, V. V.; Kalinovsky, V. S. Lantratov, V. M.; Khvostikov, V. P.

    2009-05-15

    Dependence of the efficiency of single-junction and multijunction solar cells on the mechanisms of current flow in photoactive p-n junctions, specifically on the form of the dark current-voltage characteristic J-V, has been studied. The resistanceless J-V{sub j} characteristic (with the series resistance disregarded) of a multijunction solar cell has the same shape as the characteristic of a single-junction cell: both feature a set of exponential portions. This made it possible to develop a unified analytical method for calculating the efficiency of singlejunction and multijunction solar cells. The equation relating the efficiency to the photogenerated current at each portion of the J-V{sub j} characteristic is derived. For p-n junctions in GaAs and GaSb, the following characteristics were measured: the dark J-V characteristic, the dependence of the open-circuit voltage on the illumination intensity P-V{sub OC}, and the dependence of the luminescence intensity on the forward current L-J. Calculated dependences of potential efficiency (under idealized condition for equality to unity of external quantum yield) on the photogenerated current for single-junction GaAs and GaSb solar cells and a GaAs/GaSb tandem are plotted. The form of these dependences corresponds to the shape of J-V{sub j} characteristics: there are the diffusion- and recombination-related portions; in some cases, the tunneling-trapping portion is also observed. At low degrees of concentration of solar radiation (C < 10), an appreciable contribution to photogenerated current is made by recombination component. It is an increase in this component in the case of irradiation with 6.78-MeV protons or 1-MeV electrons that brings about a decrease in the efficiency of conversion of unconcentrated solar radiation.

  10. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  11. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  12. Integrated optical XY coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM); Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An integrated optical XY coupler having two converging input waveguide arms meeting in a central section and a central output waveguide arm and two diverging flanking output waveguide arms emanating from the central section. In-phase light from the input arms constructively interfers in the central section to produce a single mode output in the central output arm with the rest of the light being collected in the flanking output arms. Crosstalk between devices on a substrate is minimized by this collection of the out-of-phase light by the flanking output arms of the XY coupler.

  13. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  14. Quantum Gravitational Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham M Shore

    2003-04-15

    In quantum theory, the curved spacetime of Einstein's general theory of relativity acts as a dispersive optical medium for the propagation of light. Gravitational rainbows and birefringence replace the classical picture of light rays mapping out the null geodesics of curved spacetime. Even more remarkably, {\\it superluminal} propagation becomes a real possibility, raising the question of whether it is possible to send signals into the past. In this article, we review recent developments in the quantum theory of light propagation in general relativity and discuss whether superluminal light is compatible with causality.

  15. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  16. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory Fellows JerryPredictive SimulationQuantum Optics

  17. Ternary CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Four ternary pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 Degree-Sign C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} adopt the trigonal CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) A, c=24.041(3) A for SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.5352(2) A, c=23.7221(11) A for EuAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.7404(4) A, c=25.029(2) A for SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}; a=4.7239(3) A, c=24.689(2) A for EuAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn{sub 2}Pn{sub 2} by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}]{sup 2-} slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2} revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and related pnictides adopt a CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-Ag bonding develops through attractive d{sup 10}-d{sup 10} interactions.

  18. Spatial optic multiplexer/diplexer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simultaneous transmission of optic signals having different wavelengths over a single optic fiber. Multiple light signals are transmitted through optic fibers that are formed into a circumference surrounding a central core fiber. The multiple light signals are directed by a lens into a single receiving fiber where the light combines and is then focused into the central core fiber which transmits the light to a wavelength discriminating receiver assembly.

  19. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-03-24

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  20. Synthesis and crystal structure of [(C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}]{sup 2+} [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sup 2-1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Yun Zhang Miao; Shen Liang; Jin Yingying; Jin Zhimin

    2010-12-15

    The reaction of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with SbCl{sub 3} and HCl affords the title compound, the structure of which is ascertained by X-ray diffraction. The unit cell consists of one bridged Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2-} anion and two 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations. The trivalent antimony ion is bonded not only directly to chlorine anions, but also is coordinated with chlorine anions by secondary bonds. In the crystal, there exists infinite coordinated chains of [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sub n}{sup 2n-} anions running along the a axis, which link 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations by N-H-Cl hydrogen bonds.

  1. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using di#ractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  2. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  3. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  4. Optical Characterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, David Jaeyun

    2012-01-01

    V. Shalaev, Optical Metamaterials (Springer, 2010). L. D.Characterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials by David JaeyunCharacterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials Copyright 2012

  5. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  6. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  7. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  8. All-optical Reservoir Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  9. Optical computing and computational complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Optical computing and computational complexity Damien Woods Boole Centre for Research­vector algebra [9, 24]. There have been much resources devoted to designs, implementations and algorithms

  10. Optical computing and computational complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Optical computing and computational complexity Damien Woods Boole Centre for Research-vector algebra [9, 24]. There have been much resources devoted to designs, implementations and algorithms

  11. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  12. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  13. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-11-09

    A transcutaneous bilirubin detector is designed comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient. 6 figures.

  14. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  15. Be/Xray binaries and candidates N.V. Raguzova 1# and S.B. Popov 1+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Sergei

    contains 130 sources and provides information on names and spectral types of optical components, distances Institute, Universitetski pr. 13, 119992 Moscow, Russia Abstract We present a compilative catalogue of Be to new X­ray satellites data on these sources greatly increased (see a re­ cent review and references

  16. Two dimensional electron transport in modulation-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} ultrathin quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Cheng-Ying Law, Jeremy J. M.; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C.; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-03-28

    We have investigated the growth and electron transport in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} two dimensional electron gases (2DEG) and compared their properties with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As 2DEGs. For 10?nm thick InGaAs wells, the electron mobility of InGaAs/AlAsSb 2DEGs is comparable to that of InGaAs/InAlAs 2DEGs. Upon thinning the wells to 3?nm, the 2DEG mobility is degraded quickly and stronger interface roughness scattering is observed for InGaAs/AlAsSb heterointerfaces than for InGaAs/InAlAs heterointerfaces. Changing the group-V exposure between As and Sb during growth interruptions at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces did not significantly change the 2DEG mobility. With the insertion of a two monolayer InAlAs at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces, the interface roughness scattering is reduced and the mobility greatly increased. The room temperature 2DEG mobility shows 66% improvement from 1.63?×?10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V·s to 2.71?×?10{sup 3}?cm{sup 2}/V·s for a 3?nm InGaAs well.

  17. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  18. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}; as-deposited amorphous, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Jan H. Tominaga, Junji; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alex V.; Ueda, Shigenori; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ishimaru, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2014-02-10

    We have investigated the electronic structure of as-deposited, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} using high resolution, hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A shift in the Fermi level as well as a broadening of the spectral features in the valence band and the Ge 3d level between the amorphous and crystalline state is observed. Upon amorphization, Ge 3d and Sb 4d spectra show a surprisingly small breaking of resonant bonds and changes in the bonding character as evidenced by the very similar density of states in all cases.

  19. Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics OpticalEngineeringand OpticalInstrumentDesign Certificate and optical systems. These are essential to virtually every industry including defense, medical, clean energy. The Optical Engineering Certificate Program addresses the growing demand for skilled professionals who can

  20. Optical dispersion and nonlinearity in integrated silicon nanophotonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Dawn Tse Hui

    2011-01-01

    vii OSA Optical Spectrum Analyzer OTDM Optical Time Divisionusing an optical spectrum analyzer with a broadband opticalport of an optical spectrum analyzer where the reflection

  1. Optical forces and optical torques on various materials arising from optical lattices in the Lorentz-Mie regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Lin

    By combining the Maxwell stress tensor with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we calculate the optical force and optical torque on particles from optical lattices. We compare our method to the two-component ...

  2. Structural, spectroscopic and dielectric investigations on Ba{sub 8}Zn(Nb{sub 6-x}Sb{sub x})O{sub 24} microwave ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suresh, M.K.; John, Annamma; Thomas, J.K.; Wariar, P.R.S. [Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015, Kerala (India)] [Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015, Kerala (India); Solomon, Sam, E-mail: samdmrl@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015, Kerala (India)] [Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015, Kerala (India)

    2010-10-15

    Ba{sub 8}Zn(Nb{sub 6-x}Sb{sub x})O{sub 24} (x = 0, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 1.8 and 2.4) ceramics were prepared through the conventional solid-state route. The materials were calcined at 1250 {sup o}C and sintered in the range 1400-1425 {sup o}C. The structure of the system was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods. The theoretical and experimental densities were calculated. The microstructure of the sintered pellets was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The low frequency dielectric properties were studied in the frequency range 50 Hz-2 MHz. The dielectric constant ({epsilon}{sub r}), temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ({tau}{sub f}) and the unloaded quality factor (Q{sub u}) are measured in the microwave frequency region using cavity resonator method. The {tau}{sub f} values of the samples reduced considerably with the increase in Sb concentration. The materials have intense emission lines in the visible region. The compositions have good microwave dielectric properties and photoluminescence and hence are suitable for dielectric resonator and ceramic laser applications.

  3. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia. II. Masses derived from PIONIER interferometric observations for Gaia validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbwachs, J -L; Bouquin, J -B Le; Kiefer, F; Famaey, B; Salomon, J -B; Arenou, F; Pourbaix, D; Anthonioz, F; Grellmann, R; Guieu, S; Sana, H; Guillout, P; Jorissen, A; Lebreton, Y; Mazeh, T; Tal-Or, L; Gomez-Moran, A Nebot

    2015-01-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when combined with Gaia astrometric measurements. In order to validate the masses derived from Gaia, interferometric observations are obtained for three SB2s in our sample with F-K components: HIP 14157, HIP 20601 and HIP 117186. The masses of the six stellar components are derived. Due to its edge-on orientation, HIP 14157 is probably an eclipsing binary. We note that almost all the derived masses are a few percent larger than the expectations from the standard spectral-type-mass calibration and mass-luminosity relation. Our calculation also leads to accurate parallaxes for the three binaries, and the Hipparcos parallaxes are confirmed.

  4. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  5. Optical Formula Recognition Stephane Lavirotte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optical Formula Recognition St´ephane Lavirotte Lo¨ic Pottier Safir Team Safir Team INRIA Sophia This paper describes the design and the first steps of implementation of Ofr (Optical Formula Recognition on the third part: we define a class of context-sensitive graph gram- mars for mathematical formulas, study

  6. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  7. Optical Theorem in Nonlinear Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We consider the optical theorem for scattering of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear media. This result is used to obtain the power extinguished from a field by a nonlinear scatterer. The cases of second harmonic generation and the Kerr effect are studied in some detail. Applications to nonlinear apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy are considered.

  8. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21{sup ras}, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-{kappa}B pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-{kappa}B, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-{kappa}B DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-{kappa}B, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  9. Maxwell's Optics Symplectic Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulyabov, D S; Sevastyanov, L A

    2015-01-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism is extremely elegant and convenient to mechanics problems. However, its application to the classical field theories is a difficult task. In fact, you can set one to one correspondence between the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian in the case of hyperregular Lagrangian. It is impossible to do the same in gauge-invariant field theories. In the case of irregular Lagrangian the Dirac Hamiltonian formalism with constraints is usually used, and this leads to a number of certain difficulties. The paper proposes a reformulation of the problem to the case of a field without sources. This allows to use a symplectic Hamiltonian formalism. The proposed formalism will be used by the authors in the future to justify the methods of vector bundles (Hamiltonian bundles) in transformation optics.

  10. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  11. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  12. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  13. Bevalac external beamline optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  14. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  15. 1 Introduction and Ray Optics Optics is the study of light and its interaction with matter.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    1 Introduction and Ray Optics Optics is the study of light and its interaction with matter. Light and detection of light. ,Methods of studying light, in historical order are: -ray optics -wave optics -electromagnetic optics -photon optics (E & M fields are wavefunctions of photons). In this course, we will focus

  16. Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo Department@ece.ucdavis.edu, Abstract: This paper discusses important signal processing functions in all-optical packet routing systems. We will pay special attention to all-optical time-to-live, optical performance monitoring, optical

  17. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  18. Optical set-reset latch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  19. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O?: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na?/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both “disordered” and “ordered” forms, depending onmore »the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3?m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) Å and c = 16.05192(7) Å) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) Å, b = 9.18432(1) Å, c = 5.62742(1) Å and ? = 108.2797(2)°) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through ²³Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the three possible choices for distributing Ni and Sb cations into a honeycomb lattice in each transition metal layer. It is observed that the full theoretical discharge capacity expected for a Ni³?/²? redox couple (133 mAh/g) can be achieved for the ordered variant but not for the disordered variant (~110 mAh/g). The first 3.27 V plateau during charging is found to be associated with a two-phase O3 ? P3 structural transition, with the P3 stacking sequence persisting throughout all further stages of desodiation.« less

  20. The role of lanthanides in optical materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the lanthanides as chemical components in transmitting optical materials and as activators in materials for luminescent, electro-optic, magneto-optic, and various photosensitive applications.

  1. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    light energy is transmitted from one point to another in an optical system. 2. Classical theoryA. La Rosa Lecture Notes APPLIED OPTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 11.1 Optics in different regimes The electromagnetic spectrum From: http

  2. NANOSCALE OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebeck, Alvin R.

    OPTICAL COMPUTING USING RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER LOGIC A NEW NANOSCALE DEVICE BASED ON A SINGLE-MOLECULE OPTICAL PHENOMENON CALLED RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER- molecule optical devices called chromo- phores. In isolation, a given chromophore absorbs photons

  3. Planar micro-optic solar concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Jason Harris

    2010-01-01

    Collectors," Optics for Solar Energy, OSA paper STuD2 (Collectors," Optics for Solar Energy, OSA paper STuD2 (Collectors," Optics for Solar Energy, OSA paper STuD2 (

  4. Development of optical field emitter arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yujia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Optical field emitters are electron emission sources actuated by incident light. Optically actuated field emitters may produce ultrafast pulses of electrons when excited by ultrafast optical pulses, thus making them of ...

  5. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK FOR THE TEACHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE TEACHER INTRODUCTION What is Science Optics and You? ...................................................... Using Centers to Teach Science) ACTIVITIES MODULE 1: THINKINGABOUT LIGHTAND OPTICS ........................... 1. Perspectives: Powers of 10

  6. Polyhedral integrated and free space optical interconnection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erteza, I.A.

    1998-01-06

    An optical communication system uses holographic optical elements to provide guided wave and non-guided communication, resulting in high bandwidth, high connectivity optical communications. Holograms within holographic optical elements route optical signals between elements and between nodes connected to elements. Angular and wavelength multiplexing allow the elements to provide high connectivity. The combination of guided and non-guided communication allows compact polyhedral system geometries. Guided wave communications provided by multiplexed substrate-mode holographic optical elements eases system alignment. 7 figs.

  7. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  8. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on ?-conjugated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on -conjugated semiconductor systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optically Detected Magnetic...

  9. Funding Opportunity Announcement: CSP: Concentrating Optics for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CSP: Concentrating Optics for Lower Levelized Energy Costs (COLLECTS) Funding Opportunity Announcement: CSP: Concentrating Optics for Lower Levelized Energy Costs (COLLECTS)...

  10. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras,...

  11. Agile optical frequency synthesis via parametric processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Ping Piu

    2011-01-01

    spectrum analyzer. .ON-OFF keying Optical spectrum analyzer Photo-detector Phaseby an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) at the output end of

  12. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

  13. Power inverter with optical isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

    2005-12-06

    An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

  14. OPTICAL BIOPSY: COMPLEMENTING HISTOLOGY WITH NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Christina

    2006-08-16

    acquisition from 32 detectors. The initial task competed involved the scanning mechanism; a program was created to control motorized optical scanning mirrors. The next task required a circuit board to be built to interface the detectors with the computer. A...

  15. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  16. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  17. Use of layer strains in strained-layer superlattices to make devices for operation in new wavelength ranges, E. G. , InAsSb at 8 to 12. mu. m. [InAs/sub 1-x/Sb/sub x/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-10-06

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device comprises a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8 to 12 ..mu..m. This radiation responsive p-n junction comprises a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors. The lattice constants of the two semiconductors are mismatched, whereby a total strain is imposed on each pair of alternating semiconductor layers in the SLS structure, the proportion of the total strain which acts on each layer of the pair being proportional to the ratio of the layer thicknesses of each layer in the pair.

  18. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM); Raring, James (Goleta, CA); Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-07-21

    An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

  19. Graphene Nanobubble: A New Optical Nonlinear Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Qiaoliang; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Shaojuan; Jiang, Xiaofang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Loh, Kian Ping; Venkatesan, T

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a rising star in nonlinear optics due to its saturable absorption and giant Kerr nonlinearity, these properties are useful in digital optics based on optical nonlinear devices. However, practical applications require large optical nonlinearities and these are inherently limited by the interaction length of atomically thin graphene. Here, we demonstrate optical bistability in a Fabry Perot cavity containing monolayer and bilayer graphene which have been restructured to form nanobubbles. We find that graphene nanobubble can act as a new type of optical nonlinear media due to its vertical side wall as well as added curvature, which enable strong non linear dispersive effects leading to a large optically induced phase change. Unlike thermally induced bistability, the all optical switching between two transmission states happens within a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. Nanobubble based optical devices with intrinsic optical nonlinearity help to overcome the optical path length limitation of atomical...

  20. Optical sedimentation recorder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2014-05-06

    A robotic optical sedimentation recorder is described for the recordation of carbon flux in the oceans wherein both POC and PIC particles are captured at the open end of a submersible sampling platform, the captured particles allowed to drift down onto a collection plate where they can be imaged over time. The particles are imaged using three separate light sources, activated in sequence, one source being a back light, a second source being a side light to provide dark field illumination, and a third source comprising a cross polarized light source to illuminate birefringent particles. The recorder in one embodiment is attached to a buoyancy unit which is capable upon command for bringing the sedimentation recorder to a programmed depth below the ocean surface during recordation mode, and on command returning the unit to the ocean surface for transmission of recorded data and receipt of new instructions. The combined unit is provided with its own power source and is designed to operate autonomously in the ocean for extended periods of time.

  1. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  2. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  3. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS The plurality of optical singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Michael Victor

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL The plurality of optical singularities Guest Editors Michael Berry (Co-Director of NATO ARW) H H Wills Physics, Kiev, Ukraine This collection of papers arose from an Advanced Research Workshop on Singular Optics

  4. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Loinger

    2006-09-19

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  5. Stochastic Physical Optics & Bell's correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Geurdes

    2012-03-19

    With the use of classical statistical argumentation similar to the one used in e.g. statistical optics, it is demonstrated that in entanglement of photons, a classical realist explanation cannot be excluded by the CHSH measure in experiment.

  6. Low Contrast Dielectric Metasurface Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Alan; Trivedi, Rahul; Dodson, Chris; Majumdar, Arka

    2015-01-01

    The miniaturization of current image sensors is largely limited by the volume of the optical elements. Using a sub-wavelength patterned quasi-periodic structure, also known as a metasurface, one can build planar optical elements based on the principle of diffraction. However, it was believed that high refractive index materials are required for metasurface optics. Here, we show that one can employ the design principles of a metasurface even with low contrast materials, such as silicon nitride. We validate our theory by fabricating and experimentally characterizing several silicon nitride based lenses and vortex beam generators . The fabricated lenses achieved beam spots of less than 1 {\\mu}m with numerical apertures as high as ~ 0.75. A transmission efficiency of 90% and focusing efficiency of 40% in the visible regime was observed. Our results pave the way towards building low-loss metasurface based optical elements at visible frequencies using low contrast materials.

  7. Bio-inspired optical components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walish, Joseph John

    2008-01-01

    Guiding electro-magnetic radiation is fundamental to optics. Lenses, mirrors, and photonic crystals all accomplish this task by different routes. Understanding the interaction of light with materials is fundamental to ...

  8. Electrically-driven optical antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Johannes; Prangsma, Jord C; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, optical nanoantennas so far cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or via optically active materials in their proximity. Here, we demonstrate direct electrical driving of an optical nanoantenna featuring an atomic-scale feed gap. Upon applying a voltage, quantum tunneling of electrons across the feed gap creates broadband quantum shot noise. Its optical frequency components are efficiently converted into photons by the antenna. We demonstrate that the properties of the emitted photons are fully controlled by the antenna architecture, and that the antenna improves the quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude with respect to a non-resonant reference system. Our work represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometer scale, e.g. for on-chip wireless data communication, electrically driven single- and multiphoton sources, as well as for background-free linear and nonlinear spectroscopy and sensing with nanometer...

  9. All-optical polariton transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarini, Dario; Cancellieri, Emiliano; Houdré, Romuald; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Cingolani, Roberto; Bramati, Alberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    While optical technology provides the best solution for the transmission of information, optical logics is still in its infancy. In particular, energy considerations impose to reduce the power required for nonlinear interactions in future optical devices, which, in addition, should be compatible with present semiconductor technology. Exciton-polaritons are composite particles, resulting from the strong coupling between excitons and photons, which have recently demonstrated exceptional properties like huge non-linearities, condensation and superfluidity. Here we experimentally demonstrate a switching scheme for polaritons moving in the plane of a microcavity which satisfy all the requirements for an all-optical transistor. Two laser beams are converted into polariton quasi-particles, which are used as input states for generating and controlling the output, obtaining up to 19 times amplification. Moreover this polariton transistor shows to work with an interchangeable input-output signal, and needing an energy ...

  10. MScOpticalFibre Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    infrastructure were pioneered at the Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC). These developments include spin-out ventures from the ORC. Our MSc Optical Fibre Technologies programme offers a great opportunity Entrepreneurship *Subjecttoapproval Forfurtherinformationonthiscourse,pleasesearch:ORC MSc Fibre www.orc

  11. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  12. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  13. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  14. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30

    piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber...

  15. Polygonal billiards and "optical tori"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Díaz-Miguel

    2015-07-16

    We give an optical physicist view of the problem of the trajectories in a polygonal billiard using only basic facts of Optics and the theory of functions of a complex variable. This approach allow us to stablish a certain correspondence between n-gon billiards and one-holed 2n-punctured tori. Therefore the existence of periodic trajectories in a certain polygon becomes the problem of the existence of closed geodesics in its associated torus.

  16. Nanoscale Optical Devices: Force, Torque and Modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    problem. Optical interconnectors can bring severalfunctionalities for the interconnectors. Compared with

  17. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  18. Quantum optics with edge states Bernard Plaais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaçais, Bernard

    Quantum optics with edge states Bernard Plaçais placais@lpa.ens.fr Gwendal Fève Jean-Marc Berroir Genève) #12;Aalto University, Fri. April 25th. 2014, Electron Quantum Optics with Edge States, Parts 3&4, BP Summary (quantum optics with edge states) o Electron optics principles o Single electron sources o

  19. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  20. Modulated optical vortices Jennifer E. Curtis 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Modulated optical vortices Jennifer E. Curtis 1 and David G. Grier Dept. of Physics, James Franck-beam optical gradient force traps created by focusing helical modes of light are known as optical vortices. Modulating the helical pitch of such a modes' wavefront yields a new class of optical traps whose dynamically

  1. BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

  2. FOURFOUR--QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIESQUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETSFOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    -3 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - DIPOLE CORRECTORS MULTI-POLE CORRECTORS W500P kW2P Cooling: Air Natural IUP = V100U,A6I V100U,A25I PANEL #12;O. Belikov, RuPAC 2008, Zvenigorod, October 1 BINP SB RASBINP SB RAS O

  3. Neutron Scattering Investigation of Phonon Scattering Rates in Ag1-xSb1+xTe2+x (x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ma, Jie [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The phonon dispersions and scattering rates of the thermoelectric material AgSbTe$_{2}$ were measured as a function of temperature with inelastic neutron scattering. The results show that phonon scattering rates are large and weakly dependent on temperature. The lattice thermal conductivity was calculated from the measured phonon lifetimes and group velocities, providing good agreement with bulk transport measurements. The measured phonon scattering rates and their temperature dependence are compared with models of phonon scattering by anharmonicity and point defect. We find that these processes cannot account for the large total phonon scattering rates observed, and their lack of temperature dependence. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements on single crystals revealed an extensive nanostructure from cation ordering, which is likely responsible for the strong phonon scattering.

  4. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea

    2015-01-12

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6} (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80–150?nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles.

  5. Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhao, Xin-Hao [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

  6. Intrinsic Rashba-like splitting in asymmetric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} heterogeneous topological insulator films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Guo, Wanlin

    2014-08-25

    We show by density functional theory calculations that asymmetric hetero-stacking of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films can modulate the topological surface states. Due to the structure inversion asymmetry, an intrinsic Rashba-like splitting of the conical surface bands is aroused. While such splitting in homogeneous Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-class topological insulators can be realized in films with more than three quintuple layers under external electric fields, the hetero-stacking breaks the limit of thickness for preserving the topological nature into the thinnest two quintuple layers. These results indicate that the hetero-stacking can serve as an efficient strategy for spin-resolved band engineering of topological insulators.

  7. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  8. 1 x N^2 wavelength-selective switch with two cross-scanning one-axis analog micromirror arrays in a 4-f optical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, J C; Huang, STY; Hah, D; Wu, Ming C

    2006-01-01

    optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optical ?berinclude optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS),

  9. Optical manufacturing requirements for an AVLIS plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primdahl, K.; Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.

    1997-07-14

    A uranium enrichment plant utilizing Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology is currently being planned. Deployment of the Plant will require tens of thousands of commercial and custom optical components and subsystems. The Plant optical system will be expected to perform at a high level of optical efficiency and reliability in a high-average-power-laser production environment. During construction, demand for this large number of optics must be coordinated with the manufacturing capacity of the optical industry. The general requirements and approach to ensure supply of optical components is described. Dynamic planning and a closely coupled relationship with the optics industry will be required to control cost, schedule, and quality.

  10. September 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1433 Optical bistability induced by mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    September 15, 1997 / Vol. 22, No. 18 / OPTICS LETTERS 1433 Optical bistability induced by mirror, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received May 2, 1997 We have observed optical bistability caused in 106 (ppm) have been successfully measured. © 1997 Optical Society of America Optical bistability

  11. The College of Optics & Photonics The College of Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics The College of Optics and Photonics #12;CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics CREOLThe College of Optics and Photonics Industrial Affiliates Day 2010 #12;CREOL The College of Optics & Photonics Prof. William T. Rhodes Department of Comp & Elect Engrng & Comp Science

  12. Energy Efficient All-Optical Arbitration in Optical Network-on-Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Energy Efficient All-Optical Arbitration in Optical Network-on-Chip Somayyeh Koohi+ , Yawei Yin *Email: sbyoo@ucdavis.edu Abstract: We propose an all-optical arbitration architecture to resolve end-point contention in the optical networks-on-chip. The proposed architecture reduces on-chip optical power

  13. High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    High precision and continuous optical transport using a standing wave optical line trap Vassili://chaos.utexas.edu/ Abstract: We introduce the Standing Wave Optical Line Trap (SWOLT) as a novel tool for precise optical nanoparticles. © 2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (000.2170) Equipment and techniques; (120

  14. A New Optical Switching Fabric Architecture Incorporating Rapidly Switching All-Optical Variable Delay Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    1 A New Optical Switching Fabric Architecture Incorporating Rapidly Switching All-Optical Variable@ece.ucdavis.edu Abstract: This paper discusses new optical packet switch architectures utilizing all-optical variable delay the simulation performance of the proposed architectures. ? 2004 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (060

  15. Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation Based Optical-Label Switching Transmitter with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation Based Optical-Label Switching Transmitter with All-Optical, 95616 Email: sbyoo@ucdavis.edu Abstract: This paper introduces a modulation-format transparent optical-label switching transmitter based on optical arbitrary waveform generation. Packets consisting of 100 Gb

  16. Optical ampli ers in broadcast optical networks: A Yatindra Nath Singh, miete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh Yatindra Nath

    Optical ampli ers in broadcast optical networks: A survey Yatindra Nath Singh, miete Department@ee.iitd.ernet.in Abstract Optical data networks are needed to meet ever increasing bandwidth re- quirements. Broadcast optical networks can provide easy and reliable imple- mentation of optical networks, but due to limited

  17. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  18. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  19. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  20. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  1. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  2. Semiconductor-based all-optical switching for optical time-division multiplexed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Bryan S. (Bryan Shawn), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    All-optical switching will likely be required for future optical networks operating at data rates which exceed electronic processing speeds. Switches utilizing nonlinearities in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) are ...

  3. Integrated optical biosensor system (IOBS)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M. (Los Alamos, NM); Sweet, Martin R. (Los Alamos, NM); Goeller, Roy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Morrison, Leland Jean (White Rock, NM); Grace, Wynne Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Kolar, Jerome D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-10-30

    An optical biosensor has a first enclosure with a pathogen recognition surface, including a planar optical waveguide and grating located in the first enclosure. An aperture is in the first enclosure for insertion of sample to be investigated to a position in close proximity to the pathogen recognition surface. A laser in the first enclosure includes means for aligning and means for modulating the laser, the laser having its light output directed toward said grating. Detection means are located in the first enclosure and in optical communication with the pathogen recognition surface for detecting pathogens after interrogation by the laser light and outputting the detection. Electronic means is located in the first enclosure and receives the detection for processing the detection and outputting information on the detection, and an electrical power supply is located in the first enclosure for supplying power to the laser, the detection means and the electronic means.

  4. Large aperture optical switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1983-12-12

    We have developed a new approach to constructing large aperture optical switches for next generation inertial confinement fusion lasers. A transparent plasma electrode formed in low pressure ionized gas acts as a conductive coating to allow the uniform charging of the optical faces of an electro-optic material. In this manner large electric fields can be applied longitudinally to large aperture, high aspect ratio Pockels cells. We propose a four-electrode geometry to create the necessary high conductivity plasma sheets, and have demonstrated fast (less than 10 nsec) switching in a 5x5 cm aperture KD*P Pockels cell with such a design. Detaid modelling of Pockels cell performance with plasma electrodes has been carried out for 15 and 30 cm aperture designs.

  5. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  6. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  7. Optical Switch Using Risley Prisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-22

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  8. Optical switch using Risley prisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-04-15

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  9. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  10. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Sunol, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  11. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  12. Gauss Optics and Gauss Sum on an Optical Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsutani

    2008-07-12

    In the previous article (Found Phys. Lett. {\\bf{16}} 325-341), we showed that a reciprocity of the Gauss sums is connected with the wave and particle complementary. In this article, we revise the previous investigation by considering a relation between the Gauss optics and the Gauss sum based upon the recent studies of the Weil representation for a finite group.

  13. OPTICAL PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIER TEST FOR OPTICAL STOCHASTIC COOLING OF RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    that has been pumped by a second harmonic of pulsed CO2 laser system. Particle emission was emulated by output of another hybrid CO2 laser operating in single longitudenal mode regime at wavelength 9.552 m in heating. The compromise between cooling and heating imposes requirements on the optical amplifier gain

  14. Quaternary GaInAsSb 2.0-2.5 Micron Back-Illuminated Focal Plane Array for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    MEMS techniques, such a sensor has the potential to be extremely compact. To be useful, the optical-illumination is the most convenient geometry for mounting the array onto a compact blood glucose sensor because both in detector focal plane arrays optimized for mounting onto an integrated optical sensor for blood glucose

  15. Hybrid solar collector using nonimaging optics and photovoltaic components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Pablo G. B. , “Nonimaging optics”. Academic Press, 2005. [7]Pablo G. B. , “Nonimaging optics”. Academic Press, 2005. [7]Using Nonimaging Optics and Photovoltaic Components Roland

  16. MEMS multi-pole electromagnets: Compact electron optics and undulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Jere Charles

    2014-01-01

    laser system using MEMS optics . . . . . . . . . Heatattempt at MEMS undulators and focusing optics. . . . . .all published quadrupole optics by more than an order of

  17. POLARIZATION-INVARIANT DIRECTIONAL CLOAKING BY TRANSFORMATION OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Krishna; Chen, Xudong; Hu, Li; Liu, Hongyu; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    cloaking with the SHS lining,” Optics Express, Vol. 15, No.and free- space cloak,” Optics Express, Vol. 17, 19947–P. Sheng, “Transformation optics and metamaterials,” Nature

  18. Optical Modulation and Detection Techniques for High-Spectral Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien, Cheng-Chung

    2008-01-01

    an x optical spectrum analyzer with ~ 10 pm resolution. Fig.Agilent 86146B optical spectrum analyzer (OSA), operated inusing an optical spectrum analyzer with ~ 10 pm resolution.

  19. Novel Nonlinear Optics and Quantum Optics Approaches for Ultrasound-Modulated Optical Tomography in Soft Biological Tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huiliang

    2012-02-14

    the advantages of optical imaging deep into highly scattering tissue. However lack of efficient tagged light detection techniques has so far prevented ultrasound-modulated optical tomography from achieving maturity. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and imaging...

  20. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.