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1

Enhanced optical property in quaternary GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High quality GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy using proper interface treatments. By controlling the group-V elements at interfaces, we obtained excellent optical quality QWs, which were free from undesired localized trap states, which may otherwise severely affect the exciton recombination. Strong and highly efficient exciton emissions up to room temperature with a wavelength of 2.2 ?m were observed. A comprehensive investigation on the QW quality was carried out using temperature dependent and power dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL emission intensity remains nearly constant at low temperatures and is free from the PL quenching from the defect induced localized states. The temperature dependent emission energy had a bulk-like behavior, indicating high quality well/barrier interfaces. Because of the uniformity of the QWs and smooth interfaces, the low temperature limit of inhomogeneous line width broadening is as small as 5?meV.

Lin, Chien-Hung, E-mail: chlin.ee97g@g2.nctu.edu.tw; Lee, Chien-Ping [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

2

InAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energy band simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

InAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energyAs/InAsSb strain balanced superlattices for optical detectors: Material properties and energy band simulations D February 2012) InAsSb/InAs type II strain balanced superlattices lattice matched to GaSb have recently been

Krishna, Sanjay

3

Optical nonlinear absorption characteristics of Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report for the first time, the nonlinear optical absorption properties of antimony selenide (Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) nanoparticles synthesized through solvothermal route. X-ray diffraction results revealed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. Electron microscopy studies revealed that the nanoparticles are in the range of 10 - 40 nm. Elemental analysis was performed using EDAX. By employing open aperture z-scan technique, we have evaluated the effective two-photon absorption coefficient of Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoparticles to be 5e-10 m/W at 532 nm. These nanoparticles exhibit strong intensity dependent nonlinear optical absorption and hence could be considered to have optical power limiting applications in the visible range.

Muralikrishna, Molli, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in; Kiran, Aditha Sai, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in; Ravikanth, B., E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in; Sowmendran, P., E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in; Muthukumar, V. Sai, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in; Venkataramaniah, Kamisetti, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam-515 134 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Structural and optical properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work conventional solid state precipitation method is adopted to fabricate Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in glass. The glass composition is optimized for proper host glass matrix to grow antimony trisulphide semiconductor quantum dots. The dot size is modified by heat treatment of glass samples in the temperature range from 550°C to 700°C for various time durations. Structural studies are carried out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticles with size ranges from 8 nm to 70 nm are obtained. Quantum dots so grown were further characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy and a blue shift is observed for absorption edge energy that conform the quantum confinement effect.

Mishra, Rakesh K., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Kashyap, Raman, E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Vedeshwar, A. G., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com; Tandon, R. P., E-mail: mishrarake@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 1-10007 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electronic and optical properties of TiCoSb under different pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure and optical properties of TiCoSb are studied by the first-principles calculation. It is found that the band gaps increase with the pressure increasing. It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of the valence band (VB) shifting away from the Fermi level. Our calculation indicates that TiCoSb has the large density of state near the Fermi level; moreover, the changes of the density of states near the Fermi level mainly are caused by Ti 3d and Co 3d under the different pressures. It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. As pressure increases, the static dielectric constants {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decrease. All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move towards higher energies within increasing pressure. - Graphical abstract: The first peak positions of the absorption spectrum increase and shift the high energy with an increase of pressure. The buleshift of the absorption edge could be observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the increase of the band gap is due to the electrons of Ti 3d and Co 3d of VB moving away from the Fermi level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is noted that the absorption edge increases with an increase of pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As pressure increases, the static dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub 1}(0) decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) move to wards higher energies within creasing pressure.

Xu Bin, E-mail: hnsqxb@163.com [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Zhang Jing [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Liang Jianchu [Department of electronic science, Huizhou University, Guangdong 516001 (China); Gao Guoying; Yi Lin [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ab initio density functional theory investigation of the structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A density functional theory study of structural, electronical and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. In the exchange–correlation potential, generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) has been used to calculate lattice parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy, dielectric function and energy loss spectra. The electronic band structure of this compound has been calculated using the above two approximations as well as another form of PBE-GGA, proposed by Engle and Vosko (EV-GGA). It is found that the hexagonal phase of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} has an indirect gap in the ??N direction; while in the cubic phase there is a direct-gap at the ? point in the PBE-GGA and EV-GGA. Effects of applying pressure on the band structure of the system studied and optical properties of these systems were calculated. - Graphical abstract: A density functional theory study of structural, electronic and optical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} compound in hexagonal and cubic phases is presented. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Physical properties of Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} in hexagonal and cubic phases are investigated. • It is found that the hexagonal phase is an indirect gap semiconductor. • Ca{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} is a direct-gap semiconductor at the ? point in the cubic phase. • By increasing pressure the semiconducting band gap and anti-symmetry gap are decreased.

Arghavani Nia, Borhan, E-mail: b.arghavani@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sedighi, Matin [Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahrokhi, Masoud [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, Rostam [Nano-Science and Nano-Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physics Science Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-1795, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Capping layer growth rate and the optical and structural properties of GaAsSbN-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing the growth rate during the heteroepitaxial capping of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with a 5?nm-thick GaAsSbN capping layer (CL) strongly modifies the QD structural and optical properties. A size and shape transition from taller pyramids to flatter lens-shaped QDs is observed when the CL growth rate is decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 ML/s. This indicates that the QD dissolution processes taking place during capping can be controlled to some extent by the GaAsSbN CL growth rate, with high growth rates allowing a complete preservation of the QDs. However, the dissolution processes are shown to have a leveling effect on the QD height, giving rise to a narrower size distribution for lower growth rates. Contrary to what could be expected, these effects are opposite to the strong blue-shift and improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) observed for higher growth rates. Nevertheless, the PL results can be understood in terms of the strong impact of the growth rate on the Sb and N incorporation into the CL, which results in lower Sb and N contents at higher growth rates. Besides the QD-CL band offsets and QD strain, the different CL composition alters the band alignment of the system, which can be transformed to type-II at low growth rates. These results show the key role of the alloyed CL growth parameters on the resulting QD properties and demonstrate an intricate correlation between the PL spectra and the sample morphology in complex QD-CL structures.

Ulloa, J. M., E-mail: jmulloa@isom.upm.es; Utrilla, A. D.; Guzman, A.; Hierro, A. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM) and Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Reyes, D. F.; Ben, T.; González, D. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cádiz) (Spain)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous ge-sb-te films Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

times in GeSbTe films irradiated... commercial phase-change optical recording systems, such as those based on GeSbTe Ref. 3 or AglnSbTe,4 use... the crystalline and...

9

Lattice-matched epitaxial GaInAsSb/GaSb thermophotovoltaic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices is reported. Epilayers with cutoff wavelength 2--2.4 {micro}m at room temperature and lattice-matched to GaSb substrates were grown by both low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy. These layers exhibit high optical and structural quality. For demonstrating lattice-matched thermophotovoltaic devices, p- and n-type doping studies were performed. Several TPV device structures were investigated, with variations in the base/emitter thicknesses and the incorporation of a high bandgap GaSb or AlGaAsSb window layer. Significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency is observed for devices with an AlGaAsSb window layer compared to those without one.

Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Turner, G.W.; Spears, D.L.; Manfra, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Vertical cavity surface emitting laser emitting at 1.56 microns with AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report 77K operation of an optically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting laser with an Sb-based cavity. The structure consists of 15 and 20 pair AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb top and bottom reflectors and a bulk InGaAs active region.

Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Lear, K.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Dependence of the ground-state transition energy versus optical pumping in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we report on the time-resolved photoluminescence studies of a double quantum well In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/GaAs{sub 0.8}Sb{sub 0.2}/GaAs heterostructure which, in contrast to the GaAsSb/GaAs structures, is expected to provide effective confinement of electrons due to additional InGaAs layer. The studies at 4.2?K have revealed a complicated nonmonotonic dependence of the ground-state transition energy on the concentration of nonequilibrium charge carriers in the quantum well. The effect observed in this work is important in terms of creating sources of radiation, including stimulated emission, on the basis of InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs structures.

Morozov, S. V.; Kryzhkov, D. I., E-mail: krizh@ipmras.ru; Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Yablonsky, A. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V. [Physical-Technical Research Institute, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

RAs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS/%2A contractor6/%2A en

13

RAS FRIDAYS A Monthly Networking Meeting for FAS Research Administrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAS FRIDAYS A Monthly Networking Meeting for FAS Research Administrators RAS FRIDAY MEETING AGENDA to Research Administration Services (RAS) Friday Patrick Fitzgerald Associate Dean for Research Administration FAS Research Administration Services (RAS) 10:10 Office for Technology Development Updates Julie

14

College of Health Sciences RAS Radiation Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; excitation and ionization processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RM 546.) RAS 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - activating ras mutations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 R342 Dispatch Ras effectors: Buying shares in Ras plc Summary: of hamster fibroblast proliferation by mutated ras oncogenes is not mediated...

16

Photoelectric and luminescence properties of GaSb-Based nanoheterostructures with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The luminescence and photoelectric properties of heterostructures with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown on n-GaSb substrates by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy are investigated. Intense superlinear luminescence and increased optical power as a function of the pump current in the photon energy range of 0.6-0.8 eV are observed at temperatures of T = 77 and 300 K. The photoelectric, current-voltage, and capacitance characteristics of these heterostructures are studied in detail. The photosensitivity is examined with photodetectors operating in the photovoltaic mode in the spectral range of 0.9-2.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity maximum at room temperature is observed at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m. The quantum efficiency, detectivity, and response time of the photodetectors were estimated. The quantum efficiency and detectivity at the peak of the photosensitivity spectrum are as high as {eta} = 0.6-0.7 and D{sub {lambda}max}{sup *} = (5-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup -1}, respectively. The photodiode response time determined as the rise time of the photoresponse pulse from 0.1 to the level 0.9 is 100-200 ps. The photodiode transmission bandwidth is 2-3 GHz. Photodetectors with a deep Al(As)Sb/InAsSb/Al(As)Sb quantum well grown on n-GaSb substrates are promising foruse in heterodyne detection systems and in information technologies.

Mikhailova, M. P.; Andreev, I. A., E-mail: igor@iropt9.ioffe.ru; Ivanov, E. V.; Konovalov, G. G.; Grebentshikova, E. A.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Hulicius, E.; Hospodkova, A.; Pangrac, Y. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics (Czech Republic)] [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics (Czech Republic)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

GaInAsSb/A1GaAsSb/Sb Thermophotovoltaic Devices With an Internal Back-Surface Reflector Formed by Wafer Bonding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel implementation for GAInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR) formed by wafer bonding to GaAs is demonstrated. The SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device, while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This configuration has the potential to improve TPV device performance; is compatible with monolithic series-interconnection of TPV cells for building voltage; and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control. At a short-circuit density of 0.4 A/cm{sup 2}, the open-circuit voltage of a single TPV cell is 0.2 V, compared to 0.37 and 1.8 V for 2- and 10-junction series-interconnected TPV cells, respectively.

C.A. Wang; R.K. Huang; D.A. Shiau; M.K. Connors; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; A.C. Anderson; D.M. DePoy; G. Nichols; M.N. Palmasiano

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated ras signalling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 5 R342 Dispatch Ras effectors: Buying shares in Ras plc Summary: . In this state, Ras is consti- tutively active and can transmit signals for...

19

High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1-y} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes were grown lattice-matched to GaSb substrates by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) in the bandgap range of E{sub G} = 0.5 to 0.6eV. InGaAsSb TPV diodes, utilizing front-surface spectral control filters, are measured with thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency and power density of {eta}{sub TPV} = 19.7% and PD =0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively for a radiator temperature of T{sub radiator} = 950 C, diode temperature of T{sub diode} = 27 C, and diode bandgap of E{sub G} = 0.53eV. Practical limits to TPV energy conversion efficiency are established using measured recombination coefficients and optical properties of front surface spectral control filters, which for 0.53eV InGaAsSb TPV energy conversion is {eta}{sub TPV} = 28% and PD = 0.85W/cm{sup 2} at the above operating temperatures. The most severe performance limits are imposed by (1) diode open-circuit voltage (VOC) limits due to intrinsic Auger recombination and (2) parasitic photon absorption in the inactive regions of the module. Experimentally, the diode V{sub OC} is 15% below the practical limit imposed by intrinsic Auger recombination processes. Analysis of InGaAsSb diode electrical performance vs. diode architecture indicate that the V{sub OC} and thus efficiency is limited by extrinsic recombination processes such as through bulk defects.

MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; H Ehsani; GJ Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; P Talamo; KD Rahner; EJ Brown; SR Burger; PM Foruspring; WF Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; J Li; R Martinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transport properties in AlInSb/InAsSb heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on theoretical studies of transport properties in InAsSb-based quantum well heterostructures, we propose a material design for InAsSb quantum well with AlInSb barrier. Variation of electron mobility and two-dimensional electron gas concentration in Al{sub y}In{sub 1?y}Sb/InAs{sub 1?x}Sb{sub x} heterostructures over the compositional range of which InAsSb is fully strained to AlInSb are investigated, where impact from dislocation scattering could be minimized. In comparison with InAs and InSb based quantum well heterostructures, InAsSb is advantageous in achieving the highest electron mobility despite of alloy disorder scattering. The maximum mobility of 37?000 cm{sup 2}/V s is attainable in 15?nm InAs{sub 0.2}Sb{sub 0.8} quantum well with Al{sub 0.24}In{sub 0.76}Sb barrier and there is great potential for further improvement. Our InAsSb based quantum well heterostructure is proved to be a robust structure for high-speed applications.

Zhang, Yuwei; Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhang-yang@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Chengyan; Zeng, Yiping [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electrochemical Insertion/extraction of Lithium in Multiwall Carbon Nanotube/Sb and SnSb?.? Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of acetylene and used as templates to prepare CNT-Sb and CNT-SnSb?.? nanocomposites via the chemical reduction of SnCl? and SbCl? ...

Chen, Wei Xiang

23

InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic diode physics evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hotside operating temperatures for many projected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion system applications are approximately 1,000 C, which sets an upper limit on the TPV diode bandgap of 0.6 eV from efficiency and power density considerations. This bandgap requirement has necessitated the development of new diode material systems, never previously considered for energy generation. To date, InGaAsSb quaternary diodes grown lattice-matched on GaSb substrates have achieved the highest performance. This report relates observed diode performance to electro-optic properties such as minority carrier lifetime, diffusion length and mobility and provides initial links to microstructural properties. This analysis has bounded potential diode performance improvements. For the 0.52 eV InGaAsSb diodes used in this analysis the measured dark current is 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, versus a potential Auger limit 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}, a radiative limit of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} A/cm{sup 2} (no photon recycling), and an absolute thermodynamic limit of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 2}. These dark currents are equivalent to open circuit voltage gains of 20 mV (7%), 60 mV (20%) and 140 mV (45%), respectively.

Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Danielson, L.R. [Lockheed-Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Structural investigation on Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses using x-ray photoelectron spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses (x?=?7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 27.5, 30, and 32.5 at. %) has been investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Different structural units have been extracted and characterized by decomposing XPS core level spectra, the evolution of the relative concentration of each structural unit indicates that, the relative contributions of Se-trimers and Se-Se-Ge(Sb) structure decrease with increasing Ge content until they become zero at chemically stoichiometric glasses of Ge{sub 25}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 65}, and then the homopolar bonds like Ge-Ge and Sb-Sb begin to appear in the spectra. Increase of homopolar bonds will extend band-tails into the gap and narrow the optical band gap. Thus, the glass with a stoichiometric composition generally has fewer defective bonds and larger optical bandgap.

Wei, Wen-Hou [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Xiang, Shen [College of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Xu, Si-Wei; Wang, Rong-Ping, E-mail: rongping.wang@anu.edu.au [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Fang, Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

The C-Terminus of H-Ras as a Target for the Covalent Binding of Reactive Compounds Modulating Ras-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´ficas, Madrid, Spain, 2 Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, 3 Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Ma´laga, Ma´laga, Spain, 4 Microbiologi´a, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Abstract Ras proteins are crucial players

Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

26

Ohmic contacts to n-GaSb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the semiconductor is measured during the deposition of the metal contact. In using method 1, the I-V characteristics is plotted. The thermionic emission theory predicts the current-voltage characteristics of Schottky diodes as [13]: J(rhcrmionic) = A" T' exp... of different work functions. This situation is also true for metal contacts to n-GaSb. Polyakov et al. [14] examined the Schottky diodes of Al, Au, In, Pd, Ga, and Sb on Te doped n-GaSb. They used the C-V measurements methods. They reported that barrier...

Yang, Zhengchong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Growth mechanisms of GaSb heteroepitaxial films on Si with an AlSb buffer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial growth stages of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates and the role of the AlSb buffer layer were studied by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Heteroepitaxy of GaSb and AlSb on Si both occur by Volmer-Weber (i.e., island mode) growth. However, the AlSb and GaSb islands have distinctly different characteristics as revealed through an atomic-resolution structural study using Z-contrast of HAADF-STEM imaging. While GaSb islands are sparse and three dimensional, AlSb islands are numerous and flattened. The introduction of 3D island-forming AlSb buffer layer facilitates the nucleation of GaSb islands. The AlSb islands-assisted nucleation of GaSb islands results in the formation of drastically higher quality planar film at a significantly smaller thickness of films. The interface of the AlSb and GaSb epilayers with the Si substrate was further investigated with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the key role of the AlSb buffer layer in the growth of GaSb epilayers on Si substrates.

Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)] [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada) [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Native point defects in GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing recommendations for DWPF along with some data related to Safety Class documentation at DWPF. Some significant observations regarding SB8 follow: Reduced washing in Tank 51 led to an increase in the wt.% soluble solids of the DWPF feed. If wt.% total solids for the SRAT and SME product weren’t adjusted upward to maintain insoluble solids levels similar to past sludge batches, then the rheological properties of the slurry went below the low end of the DWPF design bases for the SRAT and SME. Much higher levels of dissolved manganese were found in the SRAT and SME products than in recent sludge batches. Closed crucible melts were more reduced than expected. The working hypothesis is that the soluble Mn is less oxidizing than assumed in the REDOX calculations. A change in the coefficient for Mn in the REDOX equation was recommended in a separate report. The DWPF (Hsu) stoichiometric acid equation was examined in detail to better evaluate how to control acid in DWPF. The existing DWPF equation can likely be improved without changing the required sample analyses through a paper study using existing data. The recommended acid stoichiometry for initial SB8 SRAT batches is 115-120% stoichiometry until some processing experience is gained. The conservative range (based on feed properties) of stoichiometric factors derived in this study was from 110-147%, but SRNL recommends using only the lower half of this range, 110-126% even after initial batches provide processing experience. The stoichiometric range for sludge-only processing appears to be suitable for coupled operation based on results from the run in the middle of the range. Catalytic hydrogen was detectable (>0.005 vol%) in all SRAT and SME cycles. Hydrogen reached 30-35% of the SRAT and SME limits at the mid-point of the stoichiometry window (bounding noble metals and acid demand).

Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Wafer Bonding and Epitaxial Transfer of GaSb-based Epitaxy to GaAs for Monolithic Interconnection of Thermophotovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/InAsSb/GaSb epitaxial layers were bonded to semi-insulating GaAs handle wafers with SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au as the adhesion layer for monolithic interconnection of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices. Epitaxial transfer was completed by removal of the GaSb substrate, GaSb buffer, and InAsSb etch-stop layer by selective chemical etching. The SiO{sub x}/TiAu provides not only electrical isolation, but also high reflectivity and is used as an internal back-surface reflector. Characterization of wafer-bonded epitaxy by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and time-decay photoluminescence indicates minimal residual stress and enhancement in optical quality. 0.54-eV GaInAsSb cells were fabricated and monolithically interconnected in series. A 10-junction device exhibited linear voltage building with an open-circuit voltage of 1.8 V.

C.A. Wang; D.A. Shiau; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; R.K. Huang; M.K. Connors; A.C. Anderson; D. Donetsky; S. Anikeev; G. Belenky; D.M. Depoy; G. Nichols

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

The optimization of interfaces in InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice (SLS) semiconductors by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under a variety of conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer is indicated by x-ray diffraction patterns. Optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times, and no reactant flow during the purges. MOCVD was used to prepare an optically pumped, single heterostructure InAsSb/InGaAs SLS/InPSb laser which emitted at 3.9 {mu}m with a maximum operating temperature of approximately 100 K.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Kurtz, S.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effects of oncogenic Ras and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on the adhesion of normal human cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes commonly arise in human cancers. However, in experimental settings, oncogenic RAS has most often been studied at supraphysiological levels of expression. Importantly, work by others ...

Waldman, Lynne K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

SB 375 IMPLEMENTATION: FROM PLAN TO REALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Cross-Agency Facilitation and Coordination Funding and Support for Sustainable Communities sustainable communities in a post-SB 375 world. · Urban Greening: $41.5 million in capital projects and plans Planning - Guidance documents - Metrics and indicators - Connecting dots across state agencies - Building

California at Davis, University of

36

Thermoelectric properties of ZnSb films grown by MOCVD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermoelectric properties of ZnSb films grown by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are reported. The growth conditions necessary to obtain stoichiometric ZnSb films and the effects of various growth parameters on the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficients of the films are described. The as-grown ZnSb films are p-type. It was observed that the thicker ZnSb films offer improved carrier mobilities and lower free-carrier concentration levels. The Seebeck coefficient of ZnSb films was found to rise rapidly at approximately 160 C. The thicker films, due to the lower doping levels, indicate higher Seebeck coefficients between 25 to 200 C. A short annealing of the ZnSb film at temperatures of {approximately}200 C results in reduced free-carrier level. Thermal conductivity measurements of ZnSb films using the 3-{omega} method are also presented.

Venkatasubramanian, R.; Watko, E.; Colpitts, T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Recent progress in InGaAsSb/GaSb TPV devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AstroPower is developing InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices. This photovoltaic cell is a two-layer epitaxial InGaAsSb structure formed by liquid-phase epitaxy on a GaSb substrate. The (direct) bandgap of the In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}As{sub 1{minus}y}Sb{sub y} alloy is 0.50 to 0.55 eV, depending on its exact alloy composition (x,y); and is closely lattice-matched to the GaSb substrate. The use of the quaternary alloy, as opposed to a ternary alloy--such as, for example InGaAs/InP--permits low bandgap devices optimized for 1,000 to 1,500 C thermal sources with, at the same time, near-exact lattice matching to the GaSb substrate. Lattice matching is important since even a small degree of lattice mismatch degrades device performance and reliability and increases processing complexity. Internal quantum efficiencies as high as 95% have been measured at a wavelength of 2 microns. At 1 micron wavelengths, internal quantum efficiencies of 55% have been observed. The open-circuit voltage at currents of 0.3 A/cm{sup 2} is 0.220 volts and 0.280 V for current densities of 2 A/cm{sup 2}. Fill factors of 56% have been measured at 60 mA/cm{sup 2}. However, as current density increases there is some decrease in fill factor. The results to date show that the GaSb-based quaternary compounds provide a viable and high performance energy conversion solution for thermophotovoltaic systems operating with 1,000 to 1,500 C source temperatures.

Shellenbarger, Z.A.; Mauk, M.G.; DiNetta, L.C. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Carrier transport properties of Be-doped InAs/InAsSb type-II infrared superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice materials studied to date for infrared detector applications have been residually n-type, but p-type absorber regions with minority carrier electrons can result in increased photodiode quantum efficiency, R{sub o}A, and detectivity. Therefore, Be-doped InAs/InAsSb superlattices were investigated to determine the p-type InAs/InAsSb superlattice material transport properties essential to developing high quality photodiode absorber materials. Hall measurements performed at 10?K revealed that the superlattice converted to p-type with Be-doping of 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3} and the hole mobility reached 24 400 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Photoresponse measurements at 10?K confirmed the 175?meV bandgap and material optical quality.

Steenbergen, E. H., E-mail: Elizabeth.Steenbergen.1@us.af.mil; Mitchel, W. C.; Mou, Shin; Brown, G. J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Elhamri, S. [Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Raman Spectroscopy Determination of Hole Concentration in p-Type GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Room temperature p-type GaSb bulk coupled mode spectra were measured as a function of hole concentration. These spectra were obtained using an optical system based on 752.55 nm excitation in order to obtain more sensitivity to bulk GaSb coupled mode scattering than possible with visible wavelength excitation-based systems. A relatively simple spectral model for the electronic contribution to the dielectric function was evaluated for determination of hole concentration from the bulk coupled mode spectra. Optically-derived values for hole concentration were determined by minimizing the sum of the residuals squared between an experimental and simulated spectrum as a function of total hole concentration and a plasmon damping parameter. Hole concentrations obtained from the Raman spectroscopic measurements deviated from the values determined from single field Hall effect measurements that were corrected to account for two band conduction by {approx}20% to {approx}65%. These deviations were attributed to the limitations of the spectral model employed and uncertainties in GaSb materials properties.

Maslar JE, Hurst WS, Wang CA

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

DWPF Simulant CPC Studies For SB8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected during SME processing. Mercury behavior was consistent with that seen in previous SRAT runs. Mercury was stripped below the DWPF limit on 0.8 wt% for all runs. Rheology yield stress fell within or below the design basis of 1-5 Pa. The low acid Tank 40 run (106% acid stoichiometry) had the highest yield stress at 3.78 Pa.

Newell, J. D.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surveys; routine activities that do not affect the integrity of the well or the formation; the removal SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations Page 1 of 13 SB 4 WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS Added text is shown in underline

42

Near-surface depletion of antimony during the growth of GaAsSb and GaAs/GaAsSb nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-surface reduction of the Sb mole fraction during the growth of GaAsSb nanowires (NWs) and GaAs NWs with GaAsSb inserts has been studied using quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A model for diffusion of Sb in the hexagonal NWs was developed and employed in combination with the quantitative STEM analysis. GaAsSb NWs grown by Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and GaAs/GaAsSb NWs grown by Ga- and Au-assisted MBE were investigated. At the high temperatures employed in the NW growth, As-Sb exchange at and outward diffusion of Sb towards the surface take place, resulting in reduction of the Sb concentration at and near the surface in the GaAsSb NWs and the GaAsSb inserts. In GaAsSb NWs, an increasing near-surface depletion of Sb was observed towards the bottom of the NW due to longer exposure to the As beam flux. In GaAsSb inserts, an increasing change in the Sb concentration profile was observed with increasing post-insert axial GaAs growth time, resulting from a combined effect of radial GaAs overgrowth and diffusion of Sb. The effect of growth temperature on the diffusion of Sb in the GaAsSb inserts was identified. The consequences of these findings for growth optimization and the optoelectronic properties of GaAsSb are discussed.

Kauko, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van, E-mail: a.helvoort@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Fimland, B. O.; Munshi, A. M. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Grieb, T.; Müller, K.; Rosenauer, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Bremen, Bremen (Germany)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

Husaini, S.; Shima, D.; Ahirwar, P.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dang, T.; Bedford, R. G.; Balakrishnan, G. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Transition threshold in Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses with Ge content from 7.5 to 32.5?at.?% have been prepared by melt-quench technique, and the physical parameters including glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), density (?), compactness (C), shear elastic moduli (C{sub s}), compression elastic moduli (C{sub c}), refractive index (n), and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) have been investigated. While all these physical parameters show threshold behavior in the glass with a chemically stoichiometric composition. Raman spectra analysis also indicates that, with increasing Ge content, Se-chains or rings gradually disappear until all Se-atoms are consumed in the glass with a chemically stoichiometric composition. With further increasing Ge content, homopolar Ge-Ge and Sb-Sb bonds are formed and the chemical order in the glasses is violated. The threshold behavior of the physical properties in the Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90?x} glasses can be traced to demixing of networks above the chemically stoichiometric composition.

Wei, Wen-Hou [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Fang, Liang, E-mail: lfang@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Shen, Xiang [Laboratory of Infrared Material and Devices, Advanced Technology Research Institute, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Wang, Rong-Ping [Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Planning for sustainable communities: Regional incentives and local policy under SB375  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;SB 375: Sustainable Communities & Climate Protection Act (2008) isolation dispersion automobility

California at Davis, University of

46

Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

Segercrantz, N., E-mail: natalie.segercrantz@aalto.fi; Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 14100, FIN-00076 Aalto Espoo (Finland); Song, Y.; Wang, S. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Manifestation of the Purcell effect in the conductivity of InAs/AlSb short-period superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical transport in short-period InAs/AlSb superlattices with type-II heterojunctions is studied at room temperature. It is found that negative differential conductivity appears in the miniband-conduction mode upon the overlapping of quantum-confined states in a periodic system of quantum wells. In the nonresonant-tunneling mode, equidistant peaks appear on the current-voltage characteristic of these superlattices. These peaks are attributed to the influence of the optical cavity on optical electron transitions in quantum wells (Purcell effect)

Kagan, M. S., E-mail: kagan@cplire.ru; Altukhov, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation); Baranov, A. N. [Universite Montpellier 2, Institute d'Electronique du Sud (France)] [Universite Montpellier 2, Institute d'Electronique du Sud (France); Il'inskaya, N. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Paprotskiy, S. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation); Teissier, R. [Universite Montpellier 2, Institute d'Electronique du Sud (France)] [Universite Montpellier 2, Institute d'Electronique du Sud (France); Usikova, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

RAS Mutations Impact TNF-Induced Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells via ERK-Modulatory Negative and Positive Feedback Circuits along with non-ERK Pathway Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 40% of colon cancers have a mutation in K-RAS or N-RAS, GTPases that operate as central hubs for multiple key signaling pathways within the cell. Utilizing an isogenic panel of colon carcinoma cells with K-RAS ...

Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

49

The antimony-group 11 chemical bond: Dissociation energies of the diatomic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intermetallic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb were identified in the effusive molecular beam produced at high temperature under equilibrium conditions in a double-cell-like Knudsen source. Several gaseous equilibria involving these species were studied by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature in the overall range 1349–1822 K, and the strength of the chemical bond formed between antimony and the group 11 metals was for the first time measured deriving the following thermochemical dissociation energies (D{sub 0}{sup ?}, kJ/mol): 186.7 ± 5.1 (CuSb), 156.3 ± 4.9 (AgSb), 241.3 ± 5.8 (AuSb). The three species were also investigated computationally at the coupled cluster level with single, double, and noniterative quasiperturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)). The spectroscopic parameters were calculated from the potential energy curves and the dissociation energies were evaluated at the Complete Basis Set limit, resulting in an overall good agreement with experimental values. An approximate evaluation of the spin-orbit effect was also performed. CCSD(T) calculations were further extended to the corresponding group 11 arsenide species which are here studied for the first time and the following dissociation energies (D{sub 0}{sup ?}, kJ/mol): 190 ± 10 (CuAs), 151 ± 10 (AgAs), 240 ± 15 (AuAs) are proposed. Taking advantage of the new experimental and computational information here presented, the bond energy trends along group 11 and 4th and 5th periods of the periodic table were analyzed and the bond energies of the diatomic species CuBi and AuBi, yet experimentally unobserved, were predicted on an empirical basis.

Carta, V.; Ciccioli, A., E-mail: guido.gigli@uniroma1.it, E-mail: andrea.ciccioli@uniroma1.it; Gigli, G., E-mail: guido.gigli@uniroma1.it, E-mail: andrea.ciccioli@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Università di Roma, p.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy of n-GaSb and n-GaInAsSb for Low Resistance Ohmic Contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of n-GaSb and n-GaInAsSb epilayers for ohmic contacts in GaSb-based devices is studied. The epilayers were grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and doped with Te. At similar electron concentrations, the atomic Te concentration, as determined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, is more than 2 times higher in n-GaSb compared to n-GaInAsSb. In addition, the electron mobility is lower in n-GaSb than n-GaInAsSb at similar electron concentrations. The electron concentration saturates at about 1.3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for n-GaSb, but linearly increases for n-GaInAsSb. Pd/Ge/Au/Pt/Au metallization was studied for ohmic contacts. A specific contact resistivity of 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega}-cm{sup 2} for n-GaSb was measured. The specific contact resistivity can be greatly improved by contacting n-GaInAsSb, and a significantly lower specific contact resistivity of 2 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} for n-GaInAsSb was measured.

C.A. Wang; D.A. Shiau; R.K. Huang; C.T. Harris; M.K. Connors

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interface effect of InSb quantum dots embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interface effect of InSb quantum dots (QDs) embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix has been investigated by Raman scattering spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray absorption fine structure (both of EXAFS and XANES). The EXAFS and XRD results show clearly that the bond length of the Sb-In first shell of the InSb QDs contracts slightly about 0.02 A compared with that of the bulk InSb. The Raman scattering spectrum of the InSb QDs reveals that the lattice contraction partly weakens the phonon confinement effect. The coordination geometry at the interface of the InSb QDs is mainly Sb (In)-O covalent bridge bonds. The Sb K-XANES calculations of InSb QDs embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix based on FEFF8 indicate that the intensity increase and the broadening of the white line peak of Sb atoms are essentially attributed to both the increase of Sb p-hole population and the change of Sb intra-atomic potential {mu}{sub 0}(E) affected by the SiO{sub 2} matrix. Our results show that the interface effect between the InSb QDs and the SiO{sub 2} matrix leads not only to the slight lattice contraction of InSb QDs and the large structural distortion in the interface area of InSb QDs, but also to the significant change of the Sb intra-atomic potential and the obvious charge redistribution around Sb atoms.

Chen Dongliang; Fan Jiangwei; Wei Shiqiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Li Chaosheng; Zhu Zhengang [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

SeZnSb alloy and its nano tubes, graphene composites properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite can alter the individual element physical property, could be useful to define the specific use of the material. Therefore, work demonstrates the synthesis of a new composition Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} and its composites with 0.05% multi-walled carbon nano tubes and 0.05% bilayer graphene, in the glassy form. The diffused amorphous structure of the multi walled carbon nano tubes and bilayer gaphene in the Se{sub 96}-Zn{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2} alloy have been analyzed by using the Raman, X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy, Furrier transmission infrared spectra, photoluminescence, UV/visible absorption spectroscopic measurements. The diffused prime Raman bands (G and D) have been appeared for the multi walled carbon nano tubes and graphene composites, while the X-ray photoluminescence core energy levels peak shifts have been observed for the composite materials. Subsequently the photoluminescence property at room temperature and a drastic enhancement (upto 80%) in infrared transmission percentage has been obtained for the bilayer graphene composite, along with optical energy band gaps for these materials have been evaluated 1.37, 1.39 and 1.41 eV.

Singh, Abhay Kumar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Physics, Bangalore-560012 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartmentRestrictions onSB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory SB

54

Effect of Sb on the Properties of GaInP Top Cells (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summary of this report is that: (1) Sb can be used to increase V{sub oc} of a GaInP top cell; (2) the photovoltaic quality of GaInP is relatively unaffected by the presence of Sb; and (3) Sb-doped GaInP/GaAs tandem cells show promise for achieving efficiencies over 32%.

Olson, J. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Kurtz, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Carrington, P. J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200?kV/cm.

Shu, Michael J. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zalden, Peter [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chen, Frank [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Weems, Ben [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Chatzakis, Ioannis [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hoffmann, Matthias C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); JARA–Fundamentals of Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Lindenberg, Aaron M., E-mail: aaronl@stanford.edu [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Waveguide effect of GaAsSb quantum wells in a laser structure based on GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waveguide effect of GaAsSb quantum wells in a semiconductor-laser structure based on GaAs is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that quantum wells themselves can be used as waveguide layers in the laser structure. As the excitation-power density attains a value of 2 kW/cm{sup 2} at liquid-nitrogen temperature, superluminescence at the wavelength corresponding to the optical transition in bulk GaAs (at 835 nm) is observed.

Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Afonenko, A. A. [Belarussian State University (Belarus)] [Belarussian State University (Belarus); Dikareva, N. V. [Research Physical-Technical Institute of Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)] [Research Physical-Technical Institute of Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Dubinov, A. A., E-mail: sanya@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Morozov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Nekorkin, S. M. [Research Physical-Technical Institute of Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)] [Research Physical-Technical Institute of Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Influence of substituting Sn for Sb on the thermoelectric transport properties of CoSb{sub 3}-based skutterudites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Band structure calculations that incorporate impurity effects suggest that a band resonant state may be formed in p-type CoSb{sub 3}-based skutterudites by replacing Sb atoms with Sn dopant atoms. Such resonant states have the potential to greatly improve thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by increasing the density of states variation near the Fermi level, thereby increasing the Seebeck coefficient at a given carrier concentration. Through transport measurements of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall coefficient, we show that a practical band resonant state is not achieved by Sn doping. Compared to undoped CoSb{sub 3}, the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) in Sn-doped CoSb{sub 3} is enhanced slightly at high temperatures to a value of 0.2, mostly due to a reduction in thermal conductivity. The Fermi level is calculated not to reach the band resonant state induced by Sn impurity atoms within the range of Sn concentrations examined here.

Hui, Si [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Nielsen, Michele D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Homer, Mark R.; Medlin, Douglas L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Tobola, Janusz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Salvador, James R. [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, GM R and D Center, Warren, Michigan 48090 (United States); Heremans, Joseph P. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Pipe, Kevin P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Uher, Ctirad [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydrogen passivation of Se and Te in AlSb M. D. McCluskey and E. E. Haller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen passivation of Se and Te in AlSb M. D. McCluskey and E. E. Haller Lawrence Berkeley observed local vibrational modes LVM's arising from DX-hydrogen complex in AlSb. Hydrogen was diffused into bulk AlSb:Se and AlSb:Te by annealing in sealed quartz ampoules with either hydrogen gas or methanol CH

McCluskey, Matthew

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61

GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High performance photodiodes based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for very long wavelength infrared detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Very long wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices are demonstrated on GaSb substrate. A heterostructure photodiode was grown with 50% cut-off wavelength of 14.6??m. At 77?K, the photodiode exhibited a peak responsivity of 4.8?A/W, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 46% at ?300?mV bias voltage from front side illumination without antireflective coating. With the dark current density of 0.7?A/cm{sup 2}, it provided a specific detectivity of 1.4?×?10{sup 10} Jones. The device performance was investigated as a function of operating temperature, revealing a very stable optical response and a background limited performance below 50?K.

Hoang, A. M.; Chen, G.; Chevallier, R.; Haddadi, A.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

New Antimony Lanthanide Disulfide Dibromides LnSbS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CeSbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (I), Ce{sub 1/2}La{sub 1/2}SbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (II), and LaSbS{sub 2}Br{sub 2} (III) have been synthesized at 700 C from a mixture of LnBr{sub 3}, Ln{sub 2}S{sub 3}, Sb, and S and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The three phases are isostructural (space group P2{sub 1}/c, Z=4) and crystallize in a novel, dense, bidimensional structure with cell parameters a=8.709(3) {angstrom}, b=9.187(2) {angstrom}, c=17.397(5) {angstrom} {beta}=104.26(3) for I, a=8.739(7) {angstrom}, b=9.219(7) {angstrom}, c=17.41(2) {angstrom}, =104.3(1) for II, and a=8.785(1) {angstrom}, b=9.236(2) {angstrom}, c=17.372(3) {angstrom}, {beta}=104.09(2) for III. In these compounds, [Ln S{sub 5}Br{sub 4}] and [Ln S{sub 3}Br{sub 6}] (Ln=Ce, La) distorted tricapped trigonal prisms define infinite {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}[LnS{sub 2}Br{sub 2}] layers counterbalanced and capped by antimony cations. In good accordance with the structural features, the charge balance in these materials is to be written Ln{sup III}Sb{sup III}S{sup -II}{sub 2}Br{sup -I}{sub 2}. These compounds exhibit a yellow hue with a measured absorption threshold of 2.42(1), 2.55(1), and 2.72(1) eV for I, II, and III, respectively. In the two cerium containing bromothioantimonates I and II, the origin of the color is assigned to a Ce-4f{yields}Ce-5d electronic transition, which shifts to higher energy from I to II due either to a matrix effect (increase of the mean Ln-S distances under the substitution of Ce for La) or to an atomic ordering between Ce and La cations on the Ln(1) and Ln(2) crystallographic sites. In contrast, the electronic transition at play in III involves a charge transfer from the bromine and sulfur ions to the antimony ions, the latter contributing substantially to the lowermost levels of the conduction band.

Gout, D.; Jobic, S.; Evain, M.; Brec, R.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Strain analysis of compositionally tailored interfaces in InAs/GaSb superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of interface composition control on interfacial strain distribution in InAs/GaSb superlattices on (100)-GaSb substrates is investigated by atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The interface composition was controlled by either depositing InSb at each interface or soaking the GaSb-on-InAs interface under Sb{sub 2} atmosphere. The strain profiles reveal a distinct difference in the extent to which the superlattice strain is balanced using the two methods. In particular, they indicate that the degree of strain balance achievable with soaking is inherently limited by the arsenic surface coverage during GaSb-on-InAs interface formation, emphasizing the influence of V/III flux ratio at this interface. The results also explain observed X-ray diffraction profiles.

Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy; Haugan, Heather J.; Brown, Gail J.; Aronow, Andrew J. [AFRL/RXAN, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7707 (United States)] [AFRL/RXAN, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7707 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

RAS Mutations Affect Tumor Necrosis Factor–Induced Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells via ERK-Modulatory Negative and Positive Feedback Circuits Along with Non-ERK Pathway Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 40% of colon cancers have a mutation in K-RAS or N-RAS, GTPases that operate as central hubs for multiple key signaling pathways within the cell. Utilizing an isogenic panel of colon carcinoma cells with K-RAS ...

Kreeger, Pamela K.

66

Page 1 MATH 262 Quiz 1 Name.- Sb 0“ PID: Sokve the problem ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH 262 Quiz 1. Name.- Sb 0“ PID: Sokve the problem systematicaìly and neatly und show aìl your work. (4pts) l. Find the equation of the orthogonal ...

67

Cu2Sb thin film electrodes prepared by pulsed laser deposition f or lithium batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Deposition for Lithium Batteries Seung-Wan Song, a, *in rechargeable lithium batteries. Introduction Sb-in rechargeable lithium batteries. Two advantages of

Song, Seung-Wan; Reade, Ronald P.; Cairns, Elton J.; Vaughey, Jack T.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Confirmation of intrinsic electron gap states at nonpolar GaN(1-100) surfaces combining photoelectron and surface optical spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of GaN(1–100) surfaces is investigated in-situ by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). Occupied surface states 3.1?eV below the Fermi energy are observed by PES, accompanied by surface optical transitions found in RAS around 3.3?eV, i.e., below the bulk band gap. These results indicate that the GaN(1–100) surface band gap is smaller than the bulk one due to the existence of intra-gap states, in agreement with density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrate that RAS can be applied for optical surface studies of anisotropic crystals.

Himmerlich, M., E-mail: marcel.himmerlich@tu-ilmenau.de; Eisenhardt, A.; Shokhovets, S.; Krischok, S. [Institut für Physik and Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Räthel, J.; Speiser, E.; Neumann, M. D.; Navarro-Quezada, A.; Esser, N. [Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Direct imaging of InSb (110)-(1x1) surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution transmission electron microscopy under a profile imaging condition (HR-profile TEM) was employed to determine the structural model for the InSb(110)-(1x1) relaxation surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HR-profile TEM analyses indicate that the chevron model, which is widely accepted for zinc-blende-type III-V(110)-(1x1) surfaces prepared by cleavage, is also applicable to the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface prepared under an Sb-rich MBE condition. The assignment of atomic species (In or Sb) of InSb(110)-(1x1) surfaces was confirmed based on a HR-profile TEM image that captures the connected facets of InSb(110)-(1x1) and InSb(111)B-(2x2). On the basis of the well-known atomic species of InSb(111)B-(2x2), the atomic species of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface were deduced straightforwardly: the atoms shifted upward and downward at the topmost layer of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface are Sb and In, respectively. The atomic arrangements of the InSb(110)-(1x1)-InSb(111)B-(2x2) facet determined by HR-profile TEM may represent the atomic arrangements of zinc-blende-type III-V(331)B surfaces.

Mishima, T. D. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

Bannochie, C. J.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ultralow noise midwave infrared InAsGaSb strain layer superlattice avalanche photodiode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultralow noise midwave infrared InAs­GaSb strain layer superlattice avalanche photodiode InAs­GaSb strain layer superlattice p+ -n- -n homojunction avalanche photodiodes APDs grown by solid characteristics. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2817608 Photodiodes operating in the eye

Krishna, Sanjay

73

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

Short, Daniel

74

Describing Leaf Area Distribution in Loblolly Pine Trees with Johnson's SB Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of leaf area of a wide variety of loblolly pine trees. FOR. SCI. 51(2):93­101. Key Words: ProbabilityDescribing Leaf Area Distribution in Loblolly Pine Trees with Johnson's SB Function Mauricio Jerez fractions of leaf area calculated with fitted SB functions matched measured values well; cumulative values

Cao, Quang V.

75

Superconductivity in Strong Spin Orbital Coupling Compound Sb2Se3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconductivity in Strong Spin Orbital Coupling Compound Sb2Se3 P. P. Kong1 , F. Sun1,3 , L. Y induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. Here, we report on the discovery of superconductivity superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition

Shen, Guoyin

76

ccsd00001219 Superconducting phase diagram of the lled skuterrudite PrOs 4 Sb 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00001219 (version 2) : 16 Mar 2004 Superconducting phase diagram of the #12;lled skuterrudite a precise magnetic #12;eld-temperature superconducting phase diagram of PrOs4Sb12 down to 350 mK. We discuss the superconducting phase diagram of PrOs4Sb12 and its possible relation with an unconventional superconducting order

77

Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.

Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Illinois SB 1987: the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 12, 2009, Governor Rod Blagojevich signed SB 1987, the Clean Coal Portfolio Standard Law. The legislation establishes emission standards for new coal-fueled power plants power plants that use coal as their primary feedstock. From 2009-2015, new coal-fueled power plants must capture and store 50 percent of the carbon emissions that the facility would otherwise emit; from 2016-2017, 70 percent must be captured and stored; and after 2017, 90 percent must be captured and stored. SB 1987 also establishes a goal of having 25 percent of electricity used in the state to come from cost-effective coal-fueled power plants that capture and store carbon emissions by 2025. Illinois is the first state to establish a goal for producing electricity from coal-fueled power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To support the commercial development of CCS technology, the legislation guarantees purchase agreements for the first Illinois coal facility with CCS technology, the Taylorville Energy Center (TEC); Illinois utilities are required to purchase at least 5 percent of their electricity supply from the TEC, provided that customer rates experience only modest increases. The TEC is expected to be completed in 2014 with the ability to capture and store at least 50 percent of its carbon emissions.

NONE

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

XRD, Electron Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy Characterization of Simulated SB6 HLW Glasses - 13028  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sample glasses have been made using SB6 high level waste (HLW) simulant (high in both Al and Fe) with 12 different frit compositions at a constant waste loading of 36 wt.%. As follows from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data, all the samples are composed of primarily glass and minor concentration of spinel phases which form both isometric grains and fine cubic (?1 ?m) crystals. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) spectra of all the glasses within the range of 400-1600 cm{sup -1} consist of the bands due to stretching and bending modes in silicon-oxygen, boron-oxygen, aluminum-oxygen and iron-oxygen structural groups. Raman spectra showed that for the spectra of all the glasses within the range of 850-1200 cm{sup -1} the best fit is achieved by suggestion of overlapping of three major components with maxima at 911-936 cm{sup -1}, 988-996 cm{sup -1} and 1020-1045 cm{sup -1}. The structural network is primarily composed of metasilicate chains and rings with embedded AlO{sub 4} and FeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Major BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} triangles form complex borate units and are present as separate constituents. (authors)

Stefanovsky, S.V. [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation) [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS, Leninskii av. 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nikonov, B.S.; Omelianenko, B.I. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetniy lane 35, Moscow 100117 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetniy lane 35, Moscow 100117 (Russian Federation); Choi, A.; Marra, J.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 773A, Aiken 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 773A, Aiken 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

TEM Characterization of InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots Capped by a GaSb/GaAs Layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that there is intense interest in expanding the usable wavelength for electronic devices. This is one of the reasons to study new self-assembled semiconductor nanostructures. Telecommunication applications use InGaAsP/InP emitting at 1.3 and 1.55 m. Research efforts are dedicated to develop GaAs technology in order to achieve emission at the same range as InP, so GaAs could be used for optical fibre communications. Ga(As)Sb on InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) is a promising nanostructure to be used in telecommunications. The introduction of antimony during or after the QDs growth is an effective solution to obtain a red shift in the emission wavelength, even at room temperature.

Beltran, AM [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Ben, Teresa [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Sanchez, AM [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Sales Lerida, David [ORNL; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Ripalda, JM [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Molina Rubio, Sergio I [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Effect of annealing on the properties of Sb doped ZnO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sb doped ZnO thin films have been deposited on glass substrate at 450°C using spray pyrolysis technique. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as deposited films are polycrystalline in nature with (100) preferred orientation. Whereas the films annealed at 450° C for 6h show a preferential orientation along (101) direction. Crystallites size varies from 15.7 nm to 34.95 nm with annealing duration. The Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows the plane and smooth surface of the films. The optical properties of annealed films have shown a variation in the band gap between 3.37 eV and 3.19 eV. Transparency of as grown and annealed films decreases from 78 % to 65% respectively in the visible region. The electrical conductivity of the as grown film shows an increase in the electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude with increase in the annealing duration.

Kumar, N. Sadananda; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K. [Thin Films Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka,Surathkal - 575025, Mangalore (India)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

The C. elegans class A synthetic multivulva genes inhibit ectopic RAS-mediated vulval development by tightly restricting expression of lin-3 EGF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes of C. elegans redundantly antagonize an EGF/Ras pathway to prevent ectopic vulval induction. The class B synMuv genes encode many proteins known to remodel chromatin ...

Saffer, Adam M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the same acid stoichiometric factor. The slow acid addition in MCU seemed to alter the reactions that consumed the small excess acid present such that hydrogen generation was promoted relative to sludge-only processing. The coupled test reached higher wt.% total solids, and this likely contributed to the SME cycle hydrogen limit being exceeded at 110% KMA. It is clear from the trends in the SME processing GC data, however, that the frit slurry formic acid contributed to driving the hydrogen generation rate above the SME cycle limit. Hydrogen generation rates after the second frit addition generally exceeded those after the first frit addition. SRAT formate loss increased with increasing acid stoichiometry (15% to 35%). A substantial nitrate gain which was observed to have occurred after acid addition (and nitrite destruction) was reversed to a net nitrate loss in runs with higher acid stoichiometry (nitrate in SRAT product less than sum of sludge nitrate and added nitric acid). Increased ammonium ion formation was also indicated in the runs with nitrate loss. Oxalate loss on the order 20% was indicated in three of the four acid stoichiometry runs and in the coupled flowsheet run. The minimum acid stoichiometry run had no indicated loss. The losses were of the same order as the official analytical uncertainty of the oxalate concentration measurement, but were not randomly distributed about zero loss, so some actual loss was likely occurring. Based on the entire set of SB7b test data, it is recommended that DWPF avoid concentrating additional sludge solids in single SRAT batches to limit the concentrations of noble metals to SB7a processing levels (on a grams noble metal per SRAT batch basis). It is also recommended that DWPF drop the formic acid addition that accompanies the process frit 418 additions, since SME cycle data showed considerable catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from this additional acid (about 5% increase in stoichiometry occurred from the frit formic acid). Frit 418 also does not appear to need formic acid addition to prevent gel formation in

Koopman, D.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electronic and structural response of InSb to ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity of Ac 2. 00 gauss. cm. lrn(&(l'1)) for lnSb for a field intensity of A&i ? 2. 23 gauss cm. Im(e(E)) for InSb for a field intensity of A&i -- 2. 40 gauss cm. hn(e(E)) for InSb for a field intensity of A&i 2. 82 gauss cm. Im(&(E)) for InSb for a...-correlation function for InSb for a field intcnsit, y of Ac ? 2. 00 gauss cin. 21 Tiiiic. cvoluti&m of thc pair-correlation function for lnSb for a field intensity of As = 2. 46 gauss cm. 44 Time evolution of the pair-correlation function for InSb for a field...

Burzo, Andrea Mihaela

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Room temperature midinfrared electroluminescence from InSb/InAs quantum dot light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-assembled InSb submonolayer quantum dots (QDs) in an InAs matrix have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy using Sb{sub 2} and As{sub 2} fluxes. The structures exhibit bright midinfrared photoluminescence up to room temperature. Intense room temperature electroluminescence with a peak at wavelength near 3.8 {mu}m was observed from p-i-n light emitting diode structures containing ten InSb submonolayer QD sheets inserted within the InAs active region.

Carrington, P. J.; Solov'ev, V. A.; Zhuang, Q.; Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Ivanov, S. V. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nano-porosity in GaSb induced by swift heavy ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nano-porous structures form in GaSb after ion irradiation with 185 MeV Au ions. The porous layer formation is governed by the dominant electronic energy loss at this energy regime. The porous layer morphology differs significantly from that previously reported for low-energy, ion-irradiated GaSb. Prior to the onset of porosity, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates the formation of small vacancy clusters in single ion impacts, while transmission electron microscopy reveals fragmentation of the GaSb into nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Following this fragmentation process, macroscopic porosity forms, presumably within the amorphous phase.

Kluth, P., E-mail: patrick.kluth@anu.edu.au; Schnohr, C. S.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Lei, W.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, J.; Weed, R. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Li, W.; Ewing, R. C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Improvement in the quantum sensitivity of InAs/InAsSb/InAsSbP heterostructure photodiodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

InAs/InAs{sub 0.88}Sb{sub 0.12}/InAs{sub 0.50}Sb{sub 0.20}P{sub 0.30} heterostructure photodiodes operating at room temperature in the spectral range 1-4.8 {mu}m are developed. It is shown that the formation of a curvilinear reflecting surface constituted by a number of hemispheres on the rearside of the photodiode chip leads to an increase in the quantum sensitivity of the photodiodes by a factor of 1.5-1.7 at wavelengths in the range 2.2-4.8 {mu}m. At an exposed photodiode area of 0.9 mm{sup 2} and a p-n junction area of 0.15 mm{sup 2}, a zero-bias differential resistance of 30 {Omega} and a quantum sensitivity of 0.24 electron/photon at a wavelength of 3 {mu}m are obtained. The operation of a photodiode with re-reflection of the photon flux in the crystal due to reflection from the curvilinear surface of the rearside of the photodiode chip is theoretically analyzed. The possibility of effective conversion of the re-reflected flux of photons into a photocurrent, with a simultaneous decrease in the p-n junction area, is demonstrated. An increase in the quantum sensitivity in the short-wavelength spectral range 1-2.2 {mu}m by 35% relative to the calculated data is observed, which is probably due to impact ionization in the narrow-gap active region.

Imenkov, A. N.; Grebenshchikova, E. A., E-mail: eagr.iropt7@mail.ioffe.ru; Starostenko, D. A.; Sherstnev, V. V.; Konovalov, G. G.; Andreev, I. A.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Controlling SEI Formation on SnSb-Porous Carbon Nanofibers for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Improved Na Ion Storage. Abstract: Porous carbon nanofiber (CNF)-supported tin-antimony (SnSb) alloys is synthesized and applied as sodium ion battery anode. The...

89

Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Structural and Magnetic Properties of Co-Mn-Sb Thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin Co-Mn-Sb films of different compositions were investigated and utilized as electrodes in alumina based magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFe counterelectrode. The preparation conditions were optimized with respect to magnetic and structural properties. The Co-Mn-Sb/Al-O interface was analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism with particular focus on the element-specific magnetic moments. Co-Mn-Sb crystallizes in different complex cubic structures depending on its composition. The magnetic moments of Co and Mn are ferromagnetically coupled in all cases. A tunnel magnetoresistance ratio of up to 24% at 13 K was found and indicates that Co-Mn-Sb is not a ferromagnetic half-metal. These results are compared to recent works on the structure and predictions of the electronic properties.

Meinert, M.; Schmalhorst, J.-M.; Ebke, D.; Liu, N. N.; Thomas, A.; Reiss, G.; Kanak, J.; Stobiecki, T.; Arenholz, E.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Theoretical study of defect formation during the initial stages of native-oxide growth on GaSb (001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of defects during the initial stages of native-oxide growth on the GaSb (001)-?(4?×?3) surface has been studied computationally using spin-unrestricted density functional theory. It is found that insertion into a Ga-Sb adatom dimer to form a peroxo Ga-O-O-Sb bridge is the most energetically favorable process with insertion into Ga-Sb back-bonds being somewhat less so. A Ga-O-O-Ga bridge between dimers is also favorable, but Sb-O-O-Sb bridges show little if any stability. In the course of analyzing molecular adsorption, a particularly reactive site has been identified that leads to O{sub 2} dissociation with little or no barrier. This process is initiated in the vicinity of an Sb-Sb dimer in the terminating layer and leads to sub-surface Ga and Sb defect sites (i.e., coordinatively unsaturated atoms) and to strained Ga-Sb bonds that may be susceptible to further O{sub 2} attack. However, the defects formed in these reactions do not produce states in the gap.

Bermudez, V. M., E-mail: victor.bermudez@nrl.navy.mil [Electronics Science and Technology Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

GaAsSb-based heterojunction tunnel diodes for tandem solar cell interconnects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a new approach to tunnel junctions that employs a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer to obtain a band alignment at a InGaAs or InAlAs p-n junction favorable for forward bias tunneling. Since the majority of the band offset between GaAsSb and InGaAs or InAlAs is in the valence band, when an GaAsSb layer is placed at an InGaAs or InAlAs p-n junction the tunneling distance is reduced and the tunneling current is increased. For all doping levels studied, the presence of the GaAsSb-layer enhanced the forward tunneling characteristics. In fact, in a InGaAs/GaAsSb tunnel diode a peak tunneling current sufficient for a 1000 sun intercell interconnect was achieved with p = 1.5{times}l0{sup 18} cm{sup -3} while a similarly doped all-InGaAs diode was rectifying. This approach affords a new degree of freedom in designing tunnel junctions for tandem solar cell interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. Our approach relaxes the doping requirements by employing a GaAsSb-based heterojunction.

Zolper, J.C.; Klem, J.F.; Plut, T.A.; Tigges, C.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effect of lanthanide contraction on the mixed polyamine systems Ln/Sb/Se/(en+dien) and Ln/Sb/Se/(en+trien): Syntheses and characterizations of lanthanide complexes with a tetraelenidoantimonate ligand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed polyamine systems Ln/Sb/Se/(en+dien) and Ln/Sb/Se/(en+trien) (Ln=lanthanide, en=ethylenediamine, dien=diethylenetriamine, trien=triethylenetetramine) were investigated under solvothermal conditions, and novel mixed-coordinated lanthanide(III) complexes [Ln(en){sub 2}(dien)({eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4})] (Ln=Ce(1a), Nd(1b)), [Ln(en){sub 2}(dien)(SbSe{sub 4})] (Ln=Sm(2a), Gd(2b), Dy(2c)), [Ln(en)(trien)({mu}-{eta}{sup 1},{eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4})]{sub {infinity}} (Ln=Ce(3a), Nd(3b)) and [Sm(en)(trien)({eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4})] (4a) were prepared. Two structural types of lanthanide selenidoantimonates were obtained across the lanthanide series in both en+dien and en+trien systems. The tetrahedral anion [SbSe{sub 4}]{sup 3-} acts as a monodentate ligand mono-SbSe{sub 4}, a bidentate chelating ligand {eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4} or a tridentate bridging ligand {mu}-{eta}{sup 1},{eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4} to the lanthanide(III) center depending on the Ln{sup 3+} ions and the mixed ethylene polyamines, indicating the effect of lanthanide contraction on the structures of the lanthanide(III) selenidoantimonates. The lanthanide selenidoantimonates exhibit semiconducting properties with E{sub g} between 2.08 and 2.51 eV. - Graphical Abstract: Two structural types of lanthanide(III) selenidoantimonates are formed in both en-dien and en-trien mixed polyamines across lanthanide series, indicating the lanthanide contraction effect on the structures of the lanthanide(III) selenidoantimonates. Highlights: > Two structural types of lanthanide selenidoantimonates are prepared across the lanthanide series in both Ln/Sb/Se/(en+dien) and Ln/Sb/Se/(en+trien) systems. > The [SbSe{sub 4}]{sup 3-} anion acts as a mono-SbSe{sub 4}, a {eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4} or a {mu}-{eta}{sup 1},{eta}{sup 2}-SbSe{sub 4} ligand to the Ln{sup 3+} ions. > The soft base ligand [SbSe{sub 4}]{sup 3-} can be controlled to coordinate to the Ln{sup 3+} ions with en+dien and en+trien as co-ligands.

Zhao Jing; Liang Jingjing; Pan Yingli; Zhang Yong [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, No. 199 Hengyi Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Jia Dingxian, E-mail: jiadingxian@suda.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Dushu Lake Campus, Soochow University, No. 199 Hengyi Road, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

PRELIMINARY FRIT DEVELOPMENT AND MELT RATE TESTING FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 (SB6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) with a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projection in March 2009. Based on this projection, frit development efforts were undertaken to gain insight into compositional effects on the predicted and measured properties of the glass waste form and to gain insight into frit components that may lead to improved melt rate for SB6-like compositions. A series of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) based glasses was selected, fabricated and characterized in this study to better understand the ability of frit compositions to accommodate uncertainty in the projected SB6 composition. Acceptable glasses (compositions where the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) predicted acceptable properties, good chemical durability was measured, and no detrimental nepheline crystallization was observed) can be made using Frit 418 with SB6 over a range of Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. However, the ability to accommodate variation in the sludge composition limits the ability to utilize alternative frits for potential improvements in melt rate. Frit 535, which may offer improvements in melt rate due to its increased B2O3 concentration, produced acceptable glasses with the baseline SB6 composition at waste loadings of 34 and 42%. However, the PCCS MAR results showed that it is not as robust as Frit 418 in accommodating variation in the sludge composition. Preliminary melt rate testing was completed in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) with four candidate frits for SB6. These four frits were selected to evaluate the impacts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O concentrations in the frit relative to those of Frit 418, although they are not necessarily candidates for SB6 vitrification. Higher concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the frit relative to that of Frit 418 appeared to improve melt rate. However, when a higher concentration of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was coupled with a lower concentration of Na{sub 2}O relative to Frit 418, melt rate did not appear to improve. It is expected that a SB6 composition projection with less uncertainty will be received during analysis of the Tank 51 E-1 sample, which will be pulled after the completion of aluminum dissolution in August 2009. At that time, additional frit development work will be performed to seek improved melt rates while maintaining viable projected operating windows. This later work will ultimately lead to a frit recommendation for SB6.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Edwards, T.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics Dr. Palffy-Muhoray Ines Busuladzic Department of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics The University of Akron April 21, 2008 #12;Outline · History of optical fibers · What are optical fibers? · How are optical fibers made? · Light propagation through optical fibers · Application

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

96

Recent progress in GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaics grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies on the materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices are reviewed. Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} epilayers were grown lattice matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) using all organometallic precursors including triethylgallium, trimethylindium, tertiarybutylarsine, and trimethylantimony with diethyltellurium and dimethylzinc as the n- and p-type dopants, respectively. The overall material quality of these alloys depends on growth temperature, In content, V/III ratio, substrate misorientation, and to a lesser extent, growth rate. A mirror-like surface morphology and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) are obtained for GaInAsSb layers with peak emission in the wavelength range between 2 and 2.5 {micro}m. The crystal quality improves for growth temperature decreasing from 575 to 525 C, and with decreasing In content, as based on epilayer surface morphology and low temperature PL spectra. A trend of smaller full width at half-maximum for low temperature PL spectra is observed as the growth rate is increased from 1.5 to 2.5 and 5 {micro}m/h. In general, GaInAsSb layers grown on (100) GaSb substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation exhibited overall better material quality than layers grown on the more standard substrate (100)2{degree} toward (110). Consistent growth of high performance lattice-matched GaInAsSb TPV devices is also demonstrated.

Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Oakley, D.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

OMVPE growth and characterization of GaInAsSb for thermophotovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies on the materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices are reviewed. Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} epilayers were grown lattice matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) using all organometallic precursors including triethylgallium, trimethylindium, tertiarybutylarsine, and trimethylantimony with diethyltellurium and dimethylzinc as the n- and p-type dopants, respectively. The overall material quality of these alloys depends on growth temperature, In content, V/III ratio, substrate misorientation, and to a lesser extent, growth rate. A mirror-like surface morphology and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) are obtained for GaInAsSb layers with peak emission in the wavelength range between 2 and 2.5 {micro}m. The crystal quality improves for growth temperature decreasing from 575 to 525 C, and with decreasing In content, as based on epilayer surface morphology and low temperature PL spectra. A trend of smaller full width at half-maximum for low temperature PL spectra is observed as the growth rate is increased from 1.5 to 2.5 and 5 {micro}m/h. In general, GaInAsSb layers grown on (100) GaSb substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation exhibited overall better material quality than layers grown on the more standard substrate (100) 2{degree} toward (110). Consistent growth of high performance lattice-matched GaInAsSb TPV devices is also demonstrated.

Wang, C.A.; Charache, G.W.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Lin, Y. H. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

GaSb based ternary and quaternary diffused junction devices for TPV applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we report the characteristics of ternary, GaInSb (Eg=0.70eV) and quarternary, GaInAsSb (Eg=0.5eV) diffused junction photovoltaic devices. The unique feature of the quarternary device is the extended long-wavelength response to 2.1 microns enabling the efficient use of the blackbody-like thermal sources operating at 1373 K in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion systems. The ternary device was fabricated by diffusing zinc into a n-type (100) oriented GaInSb substrate. For the quarternary, a four micron thick Te doped GaInAsSb layer grown by LPE on a n-type GaSb(100) wafer was used as the starting substrate for zinc diffusion. The ternary device exhibits an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V, Fill Factor of 0.63 and a short circuit current of 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, while the corresponding values for the quarternary device are 0.25 V, 0.58 and 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The peak internal quantum efficiency for the ternary is over 90{percent} and that of the quarternary is above 75{percent}. Process optimization should improve the performance charcateristics of the quarternary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Sundaram, V.S.; Saban, S.B.; Morgan, M.D.; Horne, W.E.; Evans, B.D.; Ketterl, J.R. [EDTEK Inc. 7082 S. 220th Street Kent, Washington 98032 (United States); Morosini, M.B.; Patel, N.B. [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil (Brazil); Field, H. [NREL, Golden, Colorado (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N. [Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

(GeTe){sub n}SbInTe{sub 3} (n?3)—Element distribution and thermal behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimony in germanium antimony tellurides (GeTe){sub n}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) can be substituted by indium. Homogeneous bulk samples of GeSbInTe{sub 4} (R3-bar m, Z=3, a=4.21324(5) Å, c=41.0348(10) Å) and Ge{sub 2}SbInTe{sub 5} (P3-bar m1, Z=1, a=4.20204(6) Å, c=17.2076(4) Å) were obtained; their structures were refined with the Rietveld method. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation at the K edges of Sb and Te (exploiting anomalous dispersion) yields precise information on the element distribution in the trigonal layered structure of Ge{sub 3}SbInTe{sub 6} (R3-bar m, Z=3, a=4.19789(4) Å, c=62.1620(11) Å). The structure is characterized by van der Waals gaps between distorted rocksalt-type slabs of alternating cation and anion layers. The cation concentration is commensurately modulated with Sb preferring the positions near the gaps. In contrast to unsubstituted Ge{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 6}, quenching the NaCl-type high-temperature phase (stable above ?510 °C) easily yields a pseudocubic modification that is metastable at ambient conditions. Temperature-dependent powder diffraction reveals a broader stability range of the cubic high-temperature modification of Ge{sub 3}SbInTe{sub 6} compared to the ternary phases. In-containing samples partially decompose at ca. 300 °C but become homogeneous again when the high-temperature phase is formed. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of 33R-Ge{sub 3}SbInTe{sub 6} as determined by resonant X-ray diffraction, one example of the (GeTe){sub n}SbInTe{sub 3} series of compounds investigated. - Highlights: • The new compounds 21R-GeSbInTe{sub 4}, 9P-Ge{sub 2}SbInTe{sub 5} and 33R-Ge{sub 3}SbInTe are described. • The element distribution in 33R-Ge{sub 3}SbInTe{sub 6} was determined by resonant scattering. • The cation concentration in the crystal structure is strongly modulated. • The Sb substitution by In has a significant impact on phase transitions. • Results may be relevant for thermoelectrics and thin-film phase-change materials.

Fahrnbauer, Felix; Urban, Philipp; Welzmiller, Simon [Institute for Mineralogy, Crystallography and Materials Science, Leipzig University, Scharnhorststraße 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany); Schröder, Thorsten; Rosenthal, Tobias [Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstraße 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Oeckler, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.oeckler@gmx.de [Institute for Mineralogy, Crystallography and Materials Science, Leipzig University, Scharnhorststraße 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University, Butenandtstraße 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Unambiguous determination of carrier concentration and mobility for InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiode optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this communication we report on electrical properties of nonintentionally doped (nid) type II InAs/GaSb superlattice grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We present a simple technological process which, thanks to the suppression of substrate, allows direct Hall measurement on superlattice structures grown on conductive GaSb substrate. Two samples were used to characterize the transport: one grown on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate and another grown on n-GaSb substrate where a etch stop layer was inserted to remove the conductive substrate. Mobilities and carrier concentrations have been measured as a function of temperature (77-300 K), and compared with capacitance-voltage characteristic at 80 K of a photodiode comprising a similar nid superlattice.

Cervera, C.; Rodriguez, J. B.; Perez, J. P.; Aiet-Kaci, H.; Chaghi, R.; Christol, P. [Institut d'Electronique du Sud (IES), UMR CNRS 5214, Case 067, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Konczewicz, L.; Contreras, S. [Groupe d'Etude des Semiconducteurs (GES), UMR CNRS 5650, Case 074, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Electrical characteristics and thermal stability of HfO{sub 2} metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces fabricated by high-vacuum HfO{sub 2} deposition on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces were examined to explore a thermally stable GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure with low interface-state density (D{sub it}). Interface Sb-O bonds were electrically and thermally unstable, and post-metallization annealing at temperatures higher than 200?°C was required to stabilize the HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces. However, the annealing led to large D{sub it} in the upper-half band gap. We propose that the decomposition products that are associated with elemental Sb atoms act as interface states, since a clear correlation between the D{sub it} and the Sb coverage on the initial GaSb surfaces was observed.

Miyata, Noriyuki, E-mail: nori.miyata@aist.go.jp; Mori, Takahiro; Yasuda, Tetsuji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohtake, Akihiro [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ichikawa, Masakazu [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Synthesis and Characterization of Ag-or Sb-Doped ZnO Nanorods by a Facile Hydrothermal Route  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis and Characterization of Ag- or Sb-Doped ZnO Nanorods by a Facile Hydrothermal Route Oleg Stefan Cel Mare BouleVard, MD-2004 Chisinau, Republic of MoldoVa, AdVanced Materials Processing ZnO nanorods doped with Ag and Sb have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal technique. Crystal

Kik, Pieter

105

Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy – Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft® Excel® spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel® spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Prospects of nanostructures Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} for thermoelectricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been predicted that surface states of topological insulators have large a thermopower and also ultrahigh mobilities. The authors report results of a magneto-thermoelectric investigation of single crystal Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires in a glass cover with diameters ranging from 90 nm to 5 {mu}m. The wide-ranging antimony concentration enabled us to study the effect of nanowire dimensionality in the semimetal, semi-conductor and gapless regimes. Quantum size effects in Bi-2 at%Sb nanowires, which are shown in temperature dependences of resistance R(T) and thermopower {alpha}(T) for the diameters significantly higher than the critical diameter for pure Bi-wires, are observed. The thermopower in weak magnetic fields, reaches values +400 {mu}V/K at T=20-40 K. Power factor {alpha}{sup 2}{sigma} depending on diameter of wires, structure, temperature and magnetic field is calculated. In connection with topological insulators, we will discuss the surface effect in the thermoelectric properties that we observe. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependences of resistance R{sub T}/R{sub 300}(T) (a) for Bi-2 at%Sb wires various diameters d: 1-d=300 nm, 2-d=400 nm, 3-d=600 nm, 4-d=1600 nm. Inset (a) SEM cross sectional image of the 650 nm Bi-2 at%Sb wire (clear) in glass envelope (gray). The magnetic field dependences thermopower (H Double-Vertical-Line {Delta}T) (b) Bi-2 at%Sb wires, with different diameters: (1). d=300 nm, (2). d=400 nm, (3). d=600 nm, T=26 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SMSC transition in semimetal Bi-Sb wires due to the quantum size effect is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In Bi-6 at%Sb wires alloys has been realized the gapless (GL) state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the area GS state abnormal growth thermopower in magnetic fields is found out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semiconductor Bi{sub 1-x} Sb{sub x} nanowires manifest properties of the topological insulators.

Nikolaeva, Albina A., E-mail: A.Nikolaeva@nano.asm.md [Gitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academiei 3/3, MD-2028, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Konopko, Leonid A. [Gitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academiei 3/3, MD-2028, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of) [Gitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academiei 3/3, MD-2028, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Huber, Tito E. [Department of Chemistry, Howard University, 500 College St. N.W., DC 20059, Washington (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Howard University, 500 College St. N.W., DC 20059, Washington (United States); Bodiul, Pavel P.; Popov, Ivan A. [Gitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academiei 3/3, MD-2028, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)] [Gitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academiei 3/3, MD-2028, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of Bi-Sb-Te ternary alloy with compositionally graded structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compositionally graded p-type Bi-Sb-Te thermoelectric material was synthesized by PIES (Pulverized and Intermixed Elements Sintering) method. The materials consisted of three segmented regions of different alloy composition, i.e., y = 0.8/0.825/0.9 in (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub 1{minus}y} (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub y} system. It was found that the electrical power output of the compositionally graded material was larger than that of the best single composition material when the temperature difference was the designed value.

Yamamoto, A.; Ohta, T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Carrier lifetime reduction in 1.5 m AlGaAsSb saturable absorbers with air and AlAsSb barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SESAM structures consist of a 60-period InGaAsP/InP distributed Bragg reflector DBR and a 7-nm-thick Al exponential carrier decay time of 20 ps can be achieved. The studied AlGaAsSb absorbers were deposited on InGaAsP depth, the saturation fluence, the inverse absorption, the nonsaturable absorption, and the carrier de

Keller, Ursula

109

TiSnSb a new efficient negative electrode for Li-ion batteries: mechanism investigations by operando-XRD and Mossbauer techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiSnSb a new efficient negative electrode for Li-ion batteries: mechanism investigations We report the electrochemical study of TiSnSb towards Li, as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries. TiSnSb can reversibly take up more than 5 lithiums per formula unit leading to reversible

Boyer, Edmond

110

Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy for monitoring protein dynamics exemplified by functional studies of Ras protein bound to a lipid bilayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bilayers can be investigated in near physiological con- ditions with the attenuated total reflection (ATR online 22 August 2011 Keywords: Infrared Time-resolved Difference spectroscopy Rapid scan Step scan GTPases GTP Caged-substances Ras Isotopic labeling Band assignment Global fit Attenuated total reflection

Gerwert, Klaus

111

Room-temperature mid-infrared “M”-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well lasers on InP substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated experimentally the InP-based “M”-type GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum-well (QW) laser lasing at 2.41??m at room temperature by optical pumping. The threshold power density per QW and extracted internal loss were about 234?W/cm{sup 2} and 20.5?cm{sup ?1}, respectively. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and lasing spectra revealed interesting characteristics for this type of lasers. Two distinct regions in the temperature dependent threshold behavior were observed and the transition temperature was found to coincide with the cross over point of the PL and lasing emission peaks. The current-voltage characteristic of “M”-type QW laser was superior to the inverse “W”-type one due to its thinner barrier for holes. Further improvement of the “M”-type QW structure could lead to a cost-effective mid-infrared light source.

Chang, Chia-Hao; Li, Zong-Lin; Pan, Chien-Hung; Lu, Hong-Ting; Lee, Chien-Ping; Lin, Sheng-Di, E-mail: sdlin@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Superconductivity in Topological Insulator Sb2Te3 Induced by Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconductivity in Topological Insulator Sb2Te3 Induced by Pressure J. Zhu1 *, J. L. Zhang1 *, P superconductivity and topology nature. A s new states of quantum matter, topological insulators are characterized to topological insulators, topological superconductors are expected to have a full pairing gap in the bulk

Wang, Wei Hua

113

Defining Good Infill A Convening Report on SB 226 and the California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the facilitation of the discussion and presented their draft regulations for feedback. This report provides a brief) and SB 375 (Steinberg), state planning priorities, water conservation and energy efficiency standards, the performance standards include requirements that residential and commercial projects meet or exceed specified

Kammen, Daniel M.

114

Development of Nanostructures in Thermoelectric Pb-Te-Sb Alloys , L. A. Collins2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the figure of merit of thermoelectric materials. Fabrication of nanostructured thermoelectric materials via the discovery of materials with a high thermoelectric figure of merit, zT, defined as S2 T/, where immiscible thermoelectric materials: PbTe-Sb2Te3. This ternary system was selected for investigation because

115

Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained and textured...

Im, Jae-taek

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

0.52eV Quaternary InGaAsSb Thermophotovoltaic Diode Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) diodes fabricated from 0.52eV lattice-matched InGaAsSb alloys are grown by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) on GaSb substrates. 4cm{sup 2} multi-chip diode modules with front-surface spectral filters were tested in a vacuum cavity and attained measured efficiency and power density of 19% and 0.58 W/cm{sup 2} respectively at operating at temperatures of T{sub radiator} = 950 C and T{sub diode} = 27 C. Device modeling and minority carrier lifetime measurements of double heterostructure lifetime specimens indicate that diode conversion efficiency is limited predominantly by interface recombination and photon energy loss to the GaSb substrate and back ohmic contact. Recent improvements to the diode include lattice-matched p-type AlGaAsSb passivating layers with interface recombination velocities less than 100 cm/s and new processing techniques enabling thinned substrates and back surface reflectors. Modeling predictions of these improvements to the diode architecture indicate that conversion efficiencies from 27-30% and {approx}0.85 W/cm{sup 2} could be attained under the above operating temperatures.

MW Dashiell; JF Beausang; G Nichols; DM Depoy; LR Danielson; H Ehsani; KD Rahner; J Azarkevich; P Talamo; E Brown; S Burger; P Fourspring; W Topper; PF Baldasaro; CA Wang; R Huang; M Connors; G Turner; Z Shellenbarger; G Taylor; Jizhong Li; R Marinelli; D Donetski; S Anikeev; G Belenky; S Luryi; DR Taylor; J Hazel

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Semimetallic antiferromagnetism in the half-Heusler compound CuMnSb Ruben Weht,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CuMnSb, the first antiferromagnet AFM in the Mn-based class of Heuslers and half-Heuslers that contains several conventional and half metallic ferromagnets, shows a peculiar stability of its magnetic order in high magnetic fields. Density functional based studies reveal an unusual nature of its unstable

Pickett, Warren

118

Engineering Sciences SB ESE Track Rev. July 2014 1/6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

b or 21a) AM 101 ­ Statistical Inference for Scientists & Engineers ES 150 ­ Intro to Probability with Engineering Applications Statistics 110 ­ Introduction to Probability 1.0 _______ Applied Mathematics (1halfEngineering Sciences SB ­ ESE Track Rev. July 2014 1/6 Plan of Study for the Environmental Science

Chou, James

119

Study of the shape of an optical window in a super-resolution state by electromagnetic-thermal coupled simulation: Effects of melting of an active layer in an optical disc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed a multi-physics simulation for the propagation of electromagnetic waves and heat conduction in a super-resolution optical disc that includes an active layer of InSb. Because the change in the optical constant of InSb due to the phase transition is taken into account, the melting of the active layer can be realistically simulated in our calculation. It was found that in the case of an incident light power (P) of 2 mW, a profile of the electric field intensity transmitted through the InSb layer has an asymmetric shape with a narrow peak. This beam-narrowing was suggested to be an essential mechanism of the super-resolution, because a narrower light beam allows the detection of a smaller pit structure than the optical diffraction limit. This beam-narrowing was found to be originating from a small molten region produced in the InSb layer, which works as a mask for light exposure.

Sano, Haruyuki, E-mail: h-sano@ishikawa-nct.ac.jp [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Kitacyujo, Tsubata, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan); Shima, Takayuki; Kuwahara, Masashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Fujita, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Munehisa; Aono, Yoshiyuki [Pulstec Industrial Co., Ltd., 7000-35, Nakagawa, Hosoe-cho, Kita-ku, Hamamatsu 431-1304 (Japan)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Temperature-dependent structural property and power factor of n type thermoelectric Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} and Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal variation of structural property, linear thermal expansion coefficient (?), resistivity (?), thermopower (S), and power factor (PF) of polycrystalline Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} (x?=?0.10 and 0.14) samples are reported. Temperature-dependent powder diffraction experiments indicate that samples do not undergo any structural phase transition. Rietveld refinement technique has been used to perform detailed structural analysis. Temperature dependence of ? is found to be stronger for Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10}. Also, PF for direct band gap Bi{sub 0.90}Sb{sub 0.10} is higher as compared to that for indirect band gap Bi{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14}. Role of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering on ?, S, and PF has been discussed.

Malik, K.; Das, Diptasikha [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)] [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, Aritra, E-mail: arbphy@caluniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India) [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Center for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, JD-2, Sector-III, Saltlake City, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Mandal, P.; Srihari, Velaga [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Deb, A. K. [Department of Physics, Raiganj College (University College), Uttar Dinajpur 733 134 (India)] [Department of Physics, Raiganj College (University College), Uttar Dinajpur 733 134 (India)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Strain relief and AlSb buffer layer morphology in GaSb heteroepitaxial films grown on Si as revealed by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocation array of an epitaxial GaSb film on a Si substrate has been imaged with high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The mismatch strain accommodation through dislocation formation has been investigated using geometric phase analysis (GPA) on HAADF-STEM images with atomic resolution to probe the defects' local strain distribution. These measurements indicate that the lattice parameter of the epitaxial film recovers its bulk value within three unit cells from the interface due to the relaxation through IMF dislocations. The atomic number contrast of the HAADF-STEM images and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry illustrate the formation of islands of AlSb buffer layer along the interface. The role of the AlSb buffer layer in facilitating the GaSb film growth on Si is further elucidated by investigating the strain field of the islands with the GPA.

Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Couillard, M.; Cui, K. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tavakoli, S. Ghanad; Robinson, B.; Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S. [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Botton, G. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atomic resolution mapping of interfacial intermixing and segregation in InAs/GaSb superlattices: A correlative study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine quantitative analyses of Z-contrast images with composition analyses employing atom probe tomography (APT) correlatively to provide a quantitative measurement of atomic scale interfacial intermixing in an InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL). Contributions from GaSb and InAs in the Z-contrast images are separated using an improved image processing technique. Correlation with high resolution APT composition analyses permits an examination of interfacial segregation of both cations and anions and their incorporation in the short period InAs/GaSb SL. Results revealed short, intermediate, and long-range intermixing of In, Ga, and Sb during molecular beam epitaxial growth and their distribution in the SL.

Kim, Honggyu; Meng Yifei; Zuo Jianmin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA/INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, 19 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France); Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography (NUCAPT), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Impact of stress relaxation in GaAsSb cladding layers on quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb structures grown on GaAs (001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe InAs quantum dot creation in InAs/GaAsSb barrier structures grown on GaAs (001) wafers by molecular beam epitaxy. The structures consist of 20-nm-thick GaAsSb barrier layers with Sb content of 8%, 13%, 15%, 16%, and 37% enclosing 2 monolayers of self-assembled InAs quantum dots. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results indicate the onset of relaxation of the GaAsSb layers at around 15% Sb content with intersected 60° dislocation semi-loops, and edge segments created within the volume of the epitaxial structures. 38% relaxation of initial elastic stress is seen for 37% Sb content, accompanied by the creation of a dense net of dislocations. The degradation of In surface migration by these dislocation trenches is so severe that quantum dot formation is completely suppressed. The results highlight the importance of understanding defect formation during stress relaxation for quantum dot structures particularly those with larger numbers of InAs quantum-dot layers, such as those proposed for realizing an intermediate band material.

Bremner, S. P. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)] [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Ban, K.-Y.; Faleev, N. N.; Honsberg, C. B. [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Solar Power Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)] [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Solar Power Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Smith, D. J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nanostructured Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} chalcogenide films produced by laser electrodispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous nanostructured films of a complex chalcogenide (Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}) are produced by laser electrodispersion and their structural and electrical properties are studied. It is found that the characteristic size of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoparticles in the structure of the films is 1.5–5 nm.

Yavsin, D. A., E-mail: yavsin@mail.ioffe.ru; Kozhevin, V. M.; Gurevich, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Melekh, B. T.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Pevtsov, A. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Synthesis and transport property of AgSbTe{sub 2} as a promising thermoelectric compound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline AgSbTe{sub 2} ternary compound materials with high phase purity were fabricated using a combined process of mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering. It was found that stoichiometric AgSbTe{sub 2} is a promising composition for low-and-mediate temperature applications, whose ZT reaches 1.59 at 673 K, benefiting from its extremely low thermal conductivity (0.30 W/mK) in addition to its low electrical resistivity (<1.1x10{sup -4} {omega} m) and large positive Seebeck coefficient (260 {mu}V/K). On the other hand, deviating from this formula would lead to unstable phase structures and higher thermal conductivity, which make the samples less attractive as thermoelectric materials or components of thermoelectric systems.

Wang Heng; Li Jingfeng; Zou Minmin; Sui Tao [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Height stabilization of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots by Al-rich capping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaSb quantum dots (QDs) in a GaAs matrix are investigated with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (X-STM) and photoluminescence (PL). We observe that Al-rich capping materials prevent destabilization of the nanostructures during the capping stage of the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth process and thus preserves the QD height. However, the strain induced by the absence of destabilization causes many structural defects to appear around the preserved QDs. These defects originate from misfit dislocations near the GaSb/GaAs interface and extend into the capping layer as stacking faults. The lack of a red shift in the QD PL suggests that the preserved dots do not contribute to the emission spectra. We suggest that a better control over the emission wavelength and an increase of the PL intensity is attainable by growing smaller QDs with an Al-rich overgrowth.

Smakman, E. P., E-mail: e.p.smakman@tue.nl; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); DeJarld, M.; Martin, A. J.; Millunchick, J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Luengo-Kovac, M.; Sih, V. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Abundance analysis of SB2 binary stars with HgMn primaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a short review of the abundances in the atmospheres of SB2 systems with Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) primaries. Up to now a careful study has been made for both components of 8 out of 17 known SB2 binaries with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and mass ratio ranging from 1.08 to 2.2. For all eight systems we observe a lower Mn abundance in the secondary's atmospheres than in the primary's. Significant difference in the abundances is also found for some peculiar elements such as Ga, Xe, Pt. All secondary stars with effective temperatures less than 10000 K show abundance characteristics typical of the metallic-line stars.

T. Ryabchikova

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

REVUE DE PHYSIQUE APPLIQUE PHASE DIAGRAM CALCULATION IN THE Te-Bi-Sb TERNARY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the stoichio- metric compounds Bi2Te3-Sb2Te3 and SnTe-PbTe [16, 17] exhibit complete miscibility in both liquid 1976) Résumé. 2014 On calcule le diagramme de l'équilibre liquide-solide dans le système ternaire Te be achieved either by means of time- and labor-consuming measurements which permit plotting the equilibrium

Boyer, Edmond

129

Gain and tuning characteristics of mid-infrared InSb quantum dot diode lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been relatively few reports of lasing from InSb quantum dots (QDs). In this work, type II InSb/InAs QD laser diodes emitting in the mid-infrared at 3.1??m have been demonstrated and characterized. The gain was determined to be 2.9?cm{sup ?1} per QD layer, and the waveguide loss was ?15?cm{sup ?1} at 4?K. Spontaneous emission measurements below threshold revealed a blue shift of the peak wavelength with increasing current, indicating filling of ground state heavy hole levels in the QDs. The characteristic temperature, T{sub 0}?=?101?K below 50?K, but decreased to 48?K at higher temperatures. The emission wavelength of these lasers showed first a blue shift followed by a red shift with increasing temperature. A hybrid structure was used to fabricate the laser by combining a liquid phase epitaxy grown p-InAs{sub 0.61}Sb{sub 0.13}P{sub 0.26} lower cladding layer and an upper n{sup +} InAs plasmon cladding layer which resulted in a maximum operating temperature (T{sub max}) of 120?K in pulsed mode, which is the highest reported to date.

Lu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Hayton, J.; Yin, M.; Krier, A. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

RHEOLOGICAL AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSES OF SIMULANT SB5 SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR-MELTER FEED TANK SLURRIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will complete Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in fiscal year 2010. DWPF has experienced multiple feed stoppages for the SB5 Melter Feed Tank (MFT) due to clogs. Melter throughput is decreased not only due to the feed stoppage, but also because dilution of the feed by addition of prime water (about 60 gallons), which is required to restart the MFT pump. SB5 conditions are different from previous batches in one respect: pH of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product (9 for SB5 vs. 7 for SB4). Since a higher pH could cause gel formation, due in part to greater leaching from the glass frit into the supernate, SRNL studies were undertaken to check this hypothesis. The clogging issue is addressed by this simulant work, requested via a technical task request from DWPF. The experiments were conducted at Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) wherein a non-radioactive simulant consisting of SB5 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product simulant and frit was subjected to a 30 hour SME cycle at two different pH levels, 7.5 and 10; the boiling was completed over a period of six days. Rheology and supernate elemental composition measurements were conducted. The caustic run exhibited foaming once, after 30 minutes of boiling. It was expected that caustic boiling would exhibit a greater leaching rate, which could cause formation of sodium aluminosilicate and would allow gel formation to increase the thickness of the simulant. Xray Diffraction (XRD) measurements of the simulant did not detect crystalline sodium aluminosilicate, a possible gel formation species. Instead, it was observed that caustic conditions, but not necessarily boiling time, induced greater thickness, but lowered the leach rate. Leaching consists of the formation of metal hydroxides from the oxides, formation of boric acid from the boron oxide, and dissolution of SiO{sub 2}, the major frit component. It is likely that the observed precipitation of Mg(OH){sub 2} and Mn(OH){sub 2} caused the increase in yield stress. The low pH run exhibited as much as an order of magnitude greater B and Li (frit components) leachate concentrations in the supernate. At high pH a decrease of B leaching was found and this was attributed to adsorption onto Mg(OH){sub 2}. A second leaching experiment was performed without any sludge to deconvolute the leach rate behavior of Frit 418 from those of the SB5 sludge-Frit 418 system. At high pH, the sludgeless system demonstrated very fast leaching of all the frit components, primarily due to fast dissolution of the main component, silica, by hydroxide anion; various semiconductor studies have established this reactivity. Overall, the frit-water system exhibited greater leaching from a factor two to almost three orders of magnitude (varying by conditions and species). The slower leaching of the sludge system is possibly due to a greater ionic strength or smaller driving force. Another possible reason is a physical effect, coating of the frit particles with sludge; this would increase the mass transfer resistance to leaching. Based on this study, the cause of clogs in the melter feed loop is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the SME product, like the simulant, is too thin and could contribute to a loss of two-phase flow which could cause plugging of a restricted and poorly mixed zone like the melter feed loop. This is feasible since a previous study of a slurry showed an increase in resistance to flow at lower flow rates. Testing with a radioactive SME sample is underway and should help understand this potential mechanism.

Fernandez, A.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif Akitoshi Yoshida July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec- trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits into an optical

Reif, John H.

132

Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in 133Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of 132Sn on 7Li: an advanced test of nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in 133Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of 132Sn on 7Li: an advanced test of nuclear interactions

Leoni S, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bocchi G, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bottoni S, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Bracco A, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Camera F, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy; Crespi F, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Morales A, University of Milano and INFN Milano (Italy); Fornal B, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Szpak B, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Bednarczyk P, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Cieplicka N, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Krolas W, IFJ-PAN Krakow ( Poland); Maj A, IFJ-PAN Krakow (Poland); Rusek K, Heavy Ion Laboratory University of Warsaw (Poland); Bazzacco D, INFN Padova (Italy); Lunardi S, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Mengoni D, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Recchia F, University of Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Ur C, INFN Padova (Italy); Valiente-Dobon J, LNL-INFN (Italy); Gramegna F, LNL-INFN (Italy); Marchi T, LNL-INFN (Italy); Huyse M, KU Leuven (Belgium); Raabe R, KU Leuven (Belgium); VanDuppen P, KU Leuven (Belgium); Sferrazza M, Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Georgiev G, CSNSM Orsay (France); Blazhev A, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Rosiak D, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Siebeck B, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Seidlitz M, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Reiter P, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Köln (Germany); Warr N, Institut fur Kernphysik der Universitat zu Koln (Germany); Hartig AL, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Henrich C, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Ilieva S, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Kroell T, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Thurauf M, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser R, TU Munchen (Germany); Mucher D, TU Munchen (Germany); Janssens R, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Carpenter MP, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Zhu S, Argonne National Laboratory (USA); Kowalska M, ISOLDE-CERN (Switzerland); CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; INTC

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fiber optic coupled optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nonlinear optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nicolaas Bloembergen, recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physics (1981), wrote Nonlinear Optics in 1964, when the field of nonlinear optics was only three years old. The available literature has since grown by at least three orders of magnitude.The vitality of Nonlinear Optics is evident from the still-growing number of scientists and engineers engaged in the study of new nonlinear phenomena and in the development of new nonlinear devices in the field of opto-electronics. This monograph should be helpful in providing a historical introduction and a general background of basic ideas both for expe

Bloembergen, Nicolaas

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Thermal conductivity of Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} solid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} was recently identified at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a new high performance p-type thermoelectric material with a maximum dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of 1.4 at a temperature of 673K. A usual approach, used for many state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials, to further improve ZT values is to alloy {beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} with isostructural compounds because of the expected decrease in lattice thermal conductivity. The authors have grown Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} crystals with 0.2 {le} x < 1.2 and measured their thermal conductivity from 10 to 500K. The thermal conductivity values of Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} alloys are significantly lower than those measured for {beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} and are comparable to its calculated minimum thermal conductivity. A strong atomic disorder is believed to be primarily at the origin of the very low thermal conductivity of these materials which are also fairly good electrical conductors and are therefore excellent candidates for thermoelectric applications.

Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.; Fleurial, J.P.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Unusual magnetic hysteresis and the weakened transition behavior induced by Sn substitution in Mn{sub 3}SbN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substitution of Sb with Sn was achieved in ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}SbN. The experimental results indicate that with an increase in Sn concentration, the magnetization continuously decreases and the crystal structure of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N changes from tetragonal to cubic phase at around x of 0.8. In the doping series, step-like anomaly in the isothermal magnetization was found and this behavior was highlighted at x?=?0.4. The anomaly could be attributed to the magnetic frustration, resulting from competition between the multiple spin configurations in the antiperovskite lattice. Meantime, H{sub c} of 18 kOe was observed at x?=?0.3, which is probably the highest among those of manganese antiperovskite materials reported so far. With increasing Sn content, the abrupt change of resistivity and the sharp peak of heat capacity in Mn{sub 3}SbN were gradually weakened. The crystal structure refinements indicate the weakened change at the magnetic transition is close related to the change of c/a ratio variation from tetragonal to cubic with Sn content. The results derived from this study indicate that the behavior of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N could potentially enhance its scientific and technical applications, such as spin torque transfer and hard magnets.

Sun, Ying, E-mail: sunying@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Xia [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Wang, Cong [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Hai L.; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: yamaura.kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides. [/sup 248/CmP, /sup 248/CmSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of /sup 248/CmP and /sup 248/CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms.

Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Unique nanostructures and enhanced thermoelectric performance of melt-spun BiSbTe alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a melt spinning technique followed by a quick spark plasma sintering procedure to fabricate high-performance p-type Bi{sub 0.52}Sb{sub 1.48}Te{sub 3} bulk material with unique microstructures. The microstructures consist of nanocrystalline domains embedded in amorphous matrix and 5-15 nm nanocrystals with coherent grain boundary. The significantly reduced thermal conductivity leads to a state-of-the-art dimensionless figure of merit ZT{approx}1.56 at 300 K, more than 50% improvement of that of the commercial Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} ingot materials.

Xie Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States); Tang Xinfeng; Yan Yonggao; Zhang Qingjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States)

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

Long wavelength, high gain InAsSb strained-layer superlattice photoconductive detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high gain photoconductive device for 8 to 12 .mu.m wavelength radiation including an active semiconductor region extending from a substrate to an exposed face, the region comprising a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x compounds having x>0.75. A pair of spaced electrodes are provided on the exposed face, and changes in 8 to 12 .mu.m radiation on the exposed face cause a large photoconductive gain between the spaced electrodes.

Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif \\Lambda Akitoshi Yoshida \\Lambda July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec­ trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits

Reif, John H.

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141

Growth of an {alpha}-Sn film on an InSb(111) A-(2x2) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the initial growth process of {alpha}-Sn films on the In-terminated InSb(111)A-(2x2) surface using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy. Taking the LEED observation and the Sn coverage-dependent integrated intensities of the In 4d, Sb 4d, and Sn 4d core-level spectra into account, we conclude that the {alpha}-Sn film grows epitaxially by a bilayer mode and that there is no interdiffusion of the substrate atoms as suggested in the literature. Furthermore, the coverage-dependent In 4d and Sn 4d core levels indicate that the In vacancy site of InSb(111)A-(2x2) surface is not the preferable Sn absorption site.

Kondo, Daiyu; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Shima, Masahide; Takeyama, Wakaba [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nakamura, Kenya; Ono, Kanta; Oshima, Masaharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kasukabe, Yoshitaka [Department of Electronic Engineering/International Student Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Diffusion of Te vacancy and interstitials of Te, Cl, O, S, P and Sb in CdTe: A density functional theory study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion of Te vacancy and interstitials of Te, Cl, O, S, P and Sb in CdTe: A density functional profiles in CdTe of native, Te adatom and vacancy, and anionic non-native interstitial adatoms P, Sb, O, S B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Cadmium telluride (CdTe) based thin films have emerged

Khare, Sanjay V.

143

Micro-Raman spectroscopy of mechanically exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2Te3 materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-Raman spectroscopy of mechanically exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2-like" exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and Sb2Te3. It is found that crystal symmetry breaking

144

Effect of Pressure and Chemical Substitutions on the Charge-Density-Wave in LaAgSb2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present data on the crystal structure and evolution of the electrical resistivity in lightly doped La{sub 1-x}R{sub x}AgSb{sub 2} (R=Gd, Y, Ce, and Nd) at ambient pressure and in LaAgSb{sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure. The upper charge density wave transition is suppressed by both doping and pressure with substitution-related disorder being the dominant mechanism for this suppression in the former case and the anisotropic pressure dependence of the unit cell dimensions (as seen in the c/a ratio) prevailing in the latter case.

Budko,S.; Weiner, T.; Ribeiro, R.; Canfield, P.; Lee, Y.; Vogt, T.; Lacerda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick Hong (Livermore, CA); Wu, Kuang Jen J. (Cupertino, CA)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Room temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb nBn detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we investigate the high temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb-AlAsSb nBn detectors with cut-off wavelengths near 4.5??m. The quantum efficiency of these devices is 35% without antireflection coatings and does not change with temperature in the 77–325?K temperature range, indicating potential for room temperature operation. The current generation of nBn detectors shows an increase of operational bias with temperature, which is attributed to a shift in the Fermi energy level in the absorber. Analysis of the device performance shows that operational bias and quantum efficiency of these detectors can be further improved. The device dark current stays diffusion limited in the 150?K–325?K temperature range and becomes dominated by generation-recombination processes at lower temperatures. Detector detectivities are D*(?)?=?1?×?10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T?=?300?K and D*(?)?=?5?×?10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T?=?250?K, which is easily achievable with a one stage TE cooler.

Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Hoglund, Linda; Rosenberg, Robert; Kowalczyk, Robert; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Fisher, Anita; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91030 (United States)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a “trunk” (average diameter of 150?nm), large branches (average diameter of 100?nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10?nm to sub-20?nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420?°C in argon produced single crystalline structures along ?311? directions for the branches and along ?111? for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B., E-mail: janes@ecn.purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Akatay, Cem [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Maeda, Kosuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta–cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yong P. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Sands, Timothy D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaSb using in situ hydrogen plasma exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we study the effectiveness of hydrogen plasma surface treatments for improving the electrical properties of GaSb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. Prior to atomic layer deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric, p-GaSb surfaces were exposed to hydrogen plasmas in situ, with varying plasma powers, exposure times, and substrate temperatures. Good electrical interfaces, as indicated by capacitance-voltage measurements, were obtained using higher plasma powers, longer exposure times, and increasing substrate temperatures up to 250 Degree-Sign C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the most effective treatments result in decreased SbO{sub x}, decreased Sb, and increased GaO{sub x} content at the interface. This in situ hydrogen plasma surface preparation improves the semiconductor/insulator electrical interface without the use of wet chemical pretreatments and is a promising approach for enhancing the performance of Sb-based devices.

Ruppalt, Laura B.; Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Prokes, Sharka M.; Brad Boos, J.; Park, Doewon; Bennett, Brian R. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optical memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

Optical coupler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Processes Limiting the Performance of InAs/GaSb Superlattice Mid-Infrared PIN Mesa Photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processes Limiting the Performance of InAs/GaSb Superlattice Mid-Infrared PIN Mesa Photodiodes J. P superlattice pin photodiodes for different temperature and mesa size regimes. We show that the performance of large mesa photodiodes at low temperature is most severely limited by a trap-assisted tunneling leakage

Flatte, Michael E.

152

Performance of Gd-doped Ti-based Sb-SnO2 anodes for electrochemical destruction of phenol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a thermal deposition method. Phenol degradation followed first-order rate kinetics, with the maxi- mum rate with the control (plain Ti/SnO2-Sb). TOC removal and UV scans revealed that different intermediates were produced reserved. Keywords: Gd; SnO2; DSA electrode; Phenol; Electrochemical degradation 1. Introduction

153

Review of Scientific instruments InAs/Al0.2Ga0.8Sb Quantum Well Hall Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Review of Scientific instruments InAs/Al0.2Ga0.8Sb Quantum Well Hall Sensors with improved Boeck, G. Borghs IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium Cross-shaped Hall sensors with high. Introduction Hall effect devices are by far the most widely used magnetic sensors today. Their future mainly

Moshchalkov, Victor V.

154

Alternative route for the preparation of CoSb{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}Si derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative manufacturing route has been developed for cobalt triantimonide and magnesium disilicide derivatives. Elemental powders were mixed in stoichiometric proportions, cold pressed into cylindrical preforms and heated in oxygen-free environment to initiate the exothermic reaction. According to DTA/TG measurements and observations under high-temperature microscope, the onset of reaction occurred at a temperature not exceeding the melting point of the more volatile component, i.e. antimony in the case of CoSb{sub 3} and magnesium in the case of Mg{sub 2}Si. The reaction products were additionally heat treated to secure homogenization. Dense sinters were obtained by hot uniaxial pressing of the obtained powders in moderate temperature-and-pressure conditions. Several advantages were identified in the proposed technology: absence of liquid phases, relatively short time of the synthesis, possibility of in-situ or ex-situ doping and grain size control. - Graphical abstract: (1) Manufacturing flow sheet for CoSb{sub 3} (milling included) and Mg{sub 2}Si (no milling). (2) Micrographs of CoSb{sub 3} product. (3) Micrographs of Mg{sub 2}Si product. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combustion synthesis followed by HP was used for the manufacturing of CoSb{sub 3} or Mg{sub 2}Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time of reaction is shorter compared with many other synthesis methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process is scalable and practically wasteless.

Godlewska, E., E-mail: godlewsk@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Krakow (Poland); Mars, K.; Zawadzka, K. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Krakow (Poland)] [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Krakow (Poland)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mapping two-way grids onto free-form surfaces P. Winslow S. Pellegrino S.B. Sharma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping two-way grids onto free-form surfaces P. Winslow S. Pellegrino S.B. Sharma Department, however existing techniques focus on relatively simple geometrical rules and algorithms to map a grid onto in the Millennium Dome, London . Use of a grid structure, consisting of a lattice of rods (see Figure 1) may be more

Pellegrino, Sergio

156

Vertical minority carrier electron transport in p-type InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical minority carrier electron transport in p-type InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices G. A. Umana transport J. Appl. Phys. 112, 123715 (2012) Characteristics of built-in polarization potentials Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 243113 (2012) Thermal stability of the deep ultraviolet emission from Al

Krishna, Sanjay

157

High thermoelectric performance of In, Yb, Ce multiple filled CoSb{sub 3} based skutterudite compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filling voids with rare earth atoms is an effective way to lowering thermal conductivity which necessarily enhances thermoelectric properties of skutterudite compounds. Yb atom is one of the most effective species among the rare earth atoms for filling the voids in the skutterudite structure due to a large atomic mass, radius and it is intermediate valence state. In this work, we aim to find the best filling partners for Yb using different combinations of Ce and In as well as to optimize actual filling fraction in order to achieve high values of ZT. The traditional method of synthesis relying on melting-annealing and followed by spark plasma sintering was used to prepare all samples. The thermoelectric properties of four samples of Yb{sub 0.2}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, and Yb{sub 0.3}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (nominal) were examined based on the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall coefficient. Hall coefficient and Seebeck coefficient signs confirm that all samples are n-type skutterudite compounds. Carrier density increases with the increasing Yb+Ce content. A high power factor value of 57.7 {mu}W/K{sup 2}/cm for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and a lower thermal conductivity value of 2.82 W/m/K for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} indicate that small quantities of Ce with In may be a good partner to Yb to reduce the thermal conductivity further and thus enhance the thermoelectric performance of skutterudites. The highest ZT value of 1.43 was achieved for Yb{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.15}In{sub 0.2}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} triple-filled skutterudite at 800 K. - Graphical abstract: Thermoelectric figure of merit of Yb{sub x}In{sub y}Ce{sub z}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x,y,z{<=}0.18 actual) compounds versus temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TE properties of Yb,In,Ce multiple-filled Yb{sub x}In{sub y}Ce{sub z}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} skutterudites were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal conductivity is strongly suppressed by multiple filling of Yb, Ce and In. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small amounts of Ce and In with Yb are beneficial for the enhancement of TE performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest ZT=1.43 was achieved with Yb{sub 0.07}In{sub 0.094}Ce{sub 0.065}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 11.92} at 800 K.

Ballikaya, Sedat [Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey) [Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Uzar, Neslihan; Yildirim, Saffettin [Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey)] [Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, 34134 Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey); Salvador, James R. [Chemical Sci. and Mater. Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States)] [Chemical Sci. and Mater. Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Uher, Ctirad, E-mail: cuher@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Properties of CoSb{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline CoSb{sub 3} films were grown on a variety of electrically insulating substrates by pulsed laser ablation from a stoichiometric hot-pressed target. These films are fully crystallized in the skutterudite structure, and the grains exhibit a strongly preferred alignment of the cubic [310]-axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. The film quality is studied for different single-crystal substrates and as a function of growth temperature and background gas. Hall measurements show that the films are p-type semiconducting with a room-temperature carrier density of 3 x 10{sup 20} holes/cm{sup 3}. The Hall mobility is found to be 50 to 60 cm{sup 2}/Vs, which is high for such a heavily-doped material. The Seebeck coefficient and the resistivity are measured as a function of temperature and are compared to bulk measurements.

Christen, H.M.; Mandrus, D.G.; Norton, D.P.; Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of electron mobility in InSb quantum wells by means of percentage-impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to quantitatively analyze the contribution of each scattering factor toward the total carrier mobility, we use a new convenient figure-of-merit, named a percentage impact. The mobility limit due to a scattering factor, which is widely used to summarize a scattering analysis, has its own advantage. However, a mobility limit is not quite appropriate for the above purpose. A comprehensive understanding of the difference in contribution among many scattering factors toward the total carrier mobility can be obtained by evaluating percentage impacts of scattering factors, which can be straightforwardly calculated from their mobility limits and the total mobility. Our percentage impact analysis shows that threading dislocation is one of the dominant scattering factors for the electron transport in InSb quantum wells at room temperature.

Mishima, T. D.; Edirisooriya, M.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Thermoelectric properties of p-type (Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} fabricated by mechanical alloying process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline (Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} (0.75 {le} x {le} 0.85), fabricated by mechanical alloying and hot pressing methods, have been investigated. Formation of (Bi{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} alloy powder was completed by mechanical alloying for 5 hours at ball-to-material ratio of 5:1, and processing time for (Bi{sub 1{minus}sub x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} formation increased with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} content x. When (Bi{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} was hot pressed at temperatures ranging from 300 C to 550 C for 30 minutes, figure-of-merit increased with hot pressing temperature and maximum value of 2.8 x 10{sup {minus}3}/K could be obtained by hot pressing at 550 C. When hot pressed at 550 C, (Bi{sub 0.2}Sb{sub 0.8}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} exhibited figure-of-merit of 2.92 x 10{sup {minus}3}/K, which could be improved to 2.97 x 10{sup {minus}3}/K with addition of 1 wt% Sb as acceptor dopant.

Jung, B.Y.; Choi, J.S.; Oh, T.S.; Hyun, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

High thermoelectric performance BiSbTe alloy with unique low-dimensional structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a detailed description of an innovative route of a melt spinning (MS) technique combined with a subsequent spark plasma sintering process in order to obtain high performance p-type Bi{sub 0.52}Sb{sub 1.48}Te{sub 3} bulk material, which possesses a unique low-dimensional structure. The unique structure consists of an amorphous structure, 5-15 nm fine nanocrystalline regions, and coherent interfaces between the resulting nanocrystalline regions. Measurements of the thermopower, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity have been performed over a range of temperature of 300-400 K. We found that MS technique can give us considerable control over the resulting nanostructure with good thermal stability during the temperature range of 300-400 K and this unique structure can effectively adjust the transport of phonons and electrons, in a manner such that it is beneficial to the overall thermoelectric performance of the material, primarily a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. Subsequently, this results in a maximum figure of merit ZT value of 1.56 at 300 K for p-type Bi{sub 0.52}Sb{sub 1.48}Te{sub 3} bulk material. This ZT value is over a 50% improvement of that of the state of the art commercial Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} materials. We also report results of thermal cycling of this material for over one hundred cycles between 300-400 K. Our work offers an innovative route for developing high performance bismuth telluride based alloys and devices, which have even broader prospects for commercial applications. This technique may also be applicable to other thermoelectric materials.

Xie Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States); Tang Xinfeng; Yan Yonggao; Zhang Qingjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 14 | Next | Last Back to Index Optics Line up of optics after cleaning. Photo Number: 2013-048779...

164

Parallel optical sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Optical Packet Switching -1 Optical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Packet Switching - 1 Optical Networks: from fiber transmission to photonic switching Optical Packet Switching Fabio Neri and Marco Mellia TLC Networks Group ­ Electronics Department e.mellia@polito.it ­ tel. 011 564 4173 #12;Optical Packet Switching - 2 · This work is licensed under the Creative Commons

Mellia, Marco

166

Ultrafast optics For optics and photonics course,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafast and ultrashort generally describe pulses of widths in the nanosecond to femtosecond, or shorterUltrafast optics For optics and photonics course, Spring 2012 By :Alireza Moheghi Ultrafast optics, regimes. · Interest in ultrashort optical pulses began with the invention of the laser, · Ultrashort

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

167

Optical devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn Jr., William A.

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

168

Optical microphone  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optical microfluidics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W. [Molecular Physics Laboratory, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fiber Optics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000TechnologyTuneFewer Faults for

171

Jimmy Krozel is with Metron Aviation, Inc., Herndon, VA. Changkil Lee and Joseph S.B. Mitchell are with Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Jimmy Krozel is with Metron Aviation, Inc., Herndon, VA. Changkil Lee and Joseph S.B. Mitchell 1064-3818/95/030163-20 159 Turn-Constrained Route Planning for Avoiding Hazardous Weather Jimmy Krozel

Mitchell, Joseph S.B.

172

Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

Cantlon, Jessica F.

173

CdSe/CdTe type-II superlattices grown on GaSb (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdSe/CdTe superlattices are grown on GaSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images indicate high crystalline quality. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the effective bandgap varies with the superlattice layer thicknesses and confirm the CdSe/CdTe heterostructure has a type-II band edge alignment. The valence band offset between unstrained CdTe and CdSe is determined as 0.63 {+-} 0.06 eV by fitting the measured PL peak positions using the envelope function approximation and the Kronig-Penney model. These results suggest that CdSe/CdTe superlattices are promising candidates for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices based on GaSb substrates.

Li Jingjing; Liu Shi; Wang Shumin; Ding Ding; Johnson, Shane R.; Zhang Yonghang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Liu Xinyu; Furdyna, Jacek K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Smith, David J. [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

Islam, Muhammad Monirul, E-mail: islam.monir.ke@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Abstract KeLP \\Lambda S.B. Baden y , P. Colella z , D. Shalit y , B. Van  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``paper'' 2000/12/12 page 1 i i i i i i i i Abstract KeLP \\Lambda S.B. Baden y , P. Colella z , D. The resultant infrastructure, called KeLP \\Lambda , has been applied to a variety of applications including­ tured adaptive refinement for ab­initio molecular dynamics [13]. A distinguishing feature of KeLP

Baden, Scott B.

177

Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S. [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion induced modification of microstructural, compositional, and vibrational properties of InSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Room temperature irradiation of InSb(111) by 60?keV Ar{sup +}-ions at normal (0°) and oblique (60°) angles of incidence led to the formation of nanoporous structure in the high fluence regime of 1?×?10{sup 17} to 3?×?10{sup 18} ions cm{sup ?2}. While a porous layer comprising of a network of interconnected nanofibers was generated by normal ion incidence, evolution of plate-like structures was observed for obliquely incident ions. Systematic studies of composition and structure using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman mapping, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a high degree of oxidation of the ion-induced microstructures with the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases and presence of nanocrystallites within the nanoporous structures. The observed structural evolution was understood in terms of processes driven by ion-induced defect accumulation within InSb.

Datta, D. P.; Garg, S. K.; Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751005 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 203207 (India); Dhara, S. [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Electron interactions and Dirac fermions in graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene based superlattices have been attracted worldwide interest due to the combined properties of the graphene Dirac cone feature and all kinds of advanced functional materials. In this work, we proposed a novel series of graphene-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} superlattices based on the density functional theory calculations. We demonstrated the stability in terms of energy and lattice dynamics for such kind of artificial materials. The analysis of the electronic structures unravels the gap opening nature at Dirac cone of the insert graphene layer. The Dirac fermions in the graphene layers are strongly affected by the electron spin orbital coupling in the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers. The present results show the possible application in phase-change data storage of such kind of superlattice materials, where the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers exhibit as the phase-change data storage media and the graphene layer works as the electrode, probe, and heat conductor.

Sa, Baisheng [College of Materials, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun, Zhimei, E-mail: zmsun@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Integrated Computational Materials Engineering, International Research Institute for Multidisciplinary Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

Optical manifold  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Quantum efficiency investigations of type-II InAs/GaSb midwave infrared superlattice photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present in this paper a comparison between different type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) photodiodes and focal plane array (FPA) in the mid-wavelength infrared domain to understand which phenomenon drives the performances of the T2SL structure in terms of quantum efficiency (QE). Our measurements on test photodiodes suggest low minority carrier diffusion length in the “InAs-rich” design, which penalizes carriers' collection in this structure for low bias voltage and front side illumination. This analysis is completed by a comparison of the experimental data with a fully analytic model, which allows to infer a hole diffusion length shorter than 100?nm. In addition, measurements on a FPA with backside illumination are finally presented. Results show an average QE in the 3–4.7 ?m window equal to 42% for U{sub bias}?=??0.1?V, 77?K operating temperature and no anti-reflection coating. These measurements, completed by modulation transfer function and noise measurements, reveal that the InAs-rich design, despite a low hole diffusion length, is promising for high performance infrared imaging applications.

Giard, E., E-mail: edouard.giard@onera.fr; Ribet-Mohamed, I.; Jaeck, J.; Viale, T.; Haïdar, R. [ONERA, DOTA, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Taalat, R.; Delmas, M.; Rodriguez, J.-B.; Christol, P. [Institut d'Electronique du Sud, UMR-CNRS 5214, Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Steveler, E.; Bardou, N. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Boulard, F. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 Avenue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

Chen, Chenson K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

Shen, Y.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The SLS optics beamline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SLS Optics Beamline U. Flechsig ? , R. Abela ? , R.in the ?eld of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation in-radiation, beamline optics, channel cut monochromator,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optical data latch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 14 | Next | Last Back to Index Optics Optics processing of Target Wedged Focus Lens into cleaningcoating frame. Photo Number: 2013-048765...

188

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 14 | Next | Last Back to Index Optics Alignment Conducting an optics alignment after replacement of a Pockels Cell in the clean room. Photo Number: 2013-050691...

189

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 14 | Next | Last Back to Index Optics Processing Optics for the National Ignition Facility must be manufactured to exacting standards. To ensure quality, precise measurements...

190

Hydrothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Single-phase Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} powders have been synthesized by a hydrothermal route. {yields} Hexagonal Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} naosheets due to the anisotropic growth of the crystals. {yields} The temperature gradients lead to directional arrangement nanosheet-agglomerates. {yields} Nanosheet-agglomerates are beneficial for improving the TE property of products. {yields} A maximum figure of merit of 0.86 is achieved at about 100 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Single-phase Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} compounds have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis at 150 {sup o}C for 24 h using SbCl{sub 3}, BiCl{sub 3} and tellurium powder as precursors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) have been applied to analyze the phase distributions, microstructures and grain sizes of the as-grown Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} products. It is found that the hydrothermally synthesized Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} nanopowders have a morphology dominated by irregular hexagonal sheets due to the anisotropic growth of the crystals. The Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} nanosheets are parallelly stacked in certain direction to form sheet-agglomerates attribute to the temperature gradients in the solution.

Zhang, Yanhua [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China) [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, Beijing 102249 (China); Xu, Guiying [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Mi, Jianli [Department of Chemistry and iNANO, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Chemistry and iNANO, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Han, Fei; Wang, Ze [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Ge, Changchun, E-mail: ccge@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Optical NAND gate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM); Raring, James (Goleta, CA); Tauke-Pedretti, Anna (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

Minnesota, University of

193

Fiber optic connector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optical XOR gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

Vawter, G. Allen

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optical NOR gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM); Tauke-Pedretti, Anna (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

196

de Haas{endash}van Alphen and Shubnikov{endash}de Haas oscillations in RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

de Haas{endash}van Alphen and Shubnikov{endash}de Haas oscillations have been used to study the Fermi surface of the simple tetragonal RAgSb{sub 2} series of compounds with R=Y, La-Nd, and Sm. The high quality of the flux-grown single crystals, coupled with very small extremal cross sections of Fermi surface, allow the observation of quantum oscillations at modest fields (H{lt}30&hthinsp;kG) and high temperatures (up to 25 K in SmAgSb{sub 2}). For H{parallel}c, the effective masses, determined from the temperature dependence of the amplitudes, are quite small, typically between 0.07 and 0.5m{sub 0}. The topology of the Fermi surface was determined from the angular dependence of the frequencies for R=Y, La, and Sm. In SmAgSb{sub 2}, antiferromagnetic ordering below 8.8 K is shown to dramatically alter the Fermi surface. For LaAgSb{sub 2} and CeAgSb{sub 2}, the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the frequencies was also studied. Finally, the experimental data were compared to the Fermi surface calculated within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Overall, the calculated electronic structure was found to be consistent with the experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Myers, K.D.; Budko, S.L.; Antropov, V.P.; Harmon, B.N.; Canfield, P.C. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lacerda, A.H. [National High Field Laboratory, Los Alamos Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [National High Field Laboratory, Los Alamos Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

de Haas[endash]van Alphen and Shubnikov[endash]de Haas oscillations in RAgSb[sub 2] (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

de Haas[endash]van Alphen and Shubnikov[endash]de Haas oscillations have been used to study the Fermi surface of the simple tetragonal RAgSb[sub 2] series of compounds with R=Y, La-Nd, and Sm. The high quality of the flux-grown single crystals, coupled with very small extremal cross sections of Fermi surface, allow the observation of quantum oscillations at modest fields (H[lt]30 hthinsp;kG) and high temperatures (up to 25 K in SmAgSb[sub 2]). For H[parallel]c, the effective masses, determined from the temperature dependence of the amplitudes, are quite small, typically between 0.07 and 0.5m[sub 0]. The topology of the Fermi surface was determined from the angular dependence of the frequencies for R=Y, La, and Sm. In SmAgSb[sub 2], antiferromagnetic ordering below 8.8 K is shown to dramatically alter the Fermi surface. For LaAgSb[sub 2] and CeAgSb[sub 2], the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the frequencies was also studied. Finally, the experimental data were compared to the Fermi surface calculated within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Overall, the calculated electronic structure was found to be consistent with the experimental data. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

Myers, K.D.; Budko, S.L.; Antropov, V.P.; Harmon, B.N.; Canfield, P.C. (Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)); Lacerda, A.H. (National High Field Laboratory, Los Alamos Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Highly tunable electron transport in epitaxial topological insulator (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomically smooth, single crystalline (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films have been grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. A full range of Sb-Bi compositions have been studied in order to obtain the lowest possible bulk conductivity. For the samples with optimized Sb compositions (x=0.5{+-}0.1), the carrier type can be tuned from n-type to p-type across the whole thickness with the help of a back-gate. Linear magnetoresistance has been observed at gate voltages close to the maximum in the longitudinal resistance of a (Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} sample. These highly tunable (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films provide an excellent platform to explore the intrinsic transport properties of the three-dimensional topological insulators.

He Xiaoyue; Guan Tong; Wang Xiuxia; Feng Baojie; Cheng Peng; Chen Lan; Li Yongqing; Wu Kehui [Institute of Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

The effects of the chemical composition and strain on the electronic properties of GaSb/InAs core-shell nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the chemical composition and strain on the electronic properties of [111] zinc-blende (ZB) and [0001] wurtzite (WZ) GaSb/InAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) with different core diameters and shell thicknesses are studied using first-principles methods. The band structures of the [111] ZB GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs underwent a noticeable type-I/II band alignment transition, associated with a direct-to-indirect band gap transition under a compressive uniaxial strain. The band structures of the [0001] WZ GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs preserved the direct band gap under either compressive or tensile uniaxial strains. In addition, the band gaps and the effective masses of the carriers could be tuned by their composition. For the core-shell NWs with a fixed GaSb-core size, the band gaps decreased linearly with an increasing InAs-shell thickness, caused by the significant downshift of the conduction bands. For the [111] ZB GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs, the calculated effective masses indicated that the transport properties could be changed from hole-dominated conduction to electron-dominated conduction by changing the InAs-shell thickness.

Ning, Feng; Wang, Dan; Tang, Li-Ming, E-mail: lmtang@hnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ke-Qiu, E-mail: keqiuchen@hnu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Transport properties of partially-filled Ce{sub y}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have investigated the magnetic and transport properties of Ce{sub y}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} filled skutterudites with the filling fraction y {le} 0.1. These compounds are n-type materials that develop a magnetic moment upon the presence of trivalent cerium. Cerium has a strong influence on all transport properties and even in small amounts it drastically reduces the lattice thermal conductivity. The resulting figures of merit are comparable to the values established previously for the p-type filled skutterudites.

Uher, C.; Chen, B.; Hu, S.; Morelli, D.T.; Meisner, G.P.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demonstrating 1 nm-oxide-equivalent-thickness HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure with unpinning Fermi level and low gate leakage current density  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the band alignment, interface, and electrical characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/InSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure have been investigated. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the conduction band offset of 1.78 ± 0.1 eV and valence band offset of 3.35 ± 0.1 eV have been extracted. The transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that HfO{sub 2} layer would be a good diffusion barrier for InSb. As a result, 1 nm equivalent-oxide-thickness in the 4 nm HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure has been demonstrated with unpinning Fermi level and low leakage current of 10{sup ?4} A/cm{sup ?2}. The D{sub it} value of smaller than 10{sup 12} eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} has been obtained using conduction method.

Trinh, Hai-Dang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Lin, Yueh-Chin; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Luc, Quang-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Duong, Quoc-Van; Nguyen, Manh-Nghia [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)] [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Wang, Shin-Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yi Chang, Edward [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Low-temperature transport properties of the mixed-valence semiconductor Ru{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the transport properties of Ru{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 3} from 300 down to 4 K and compared them to those of the binary-skutterudite antimonides. In particular, the lattice thermal conductivity of this compound is substantially lower than that of CoSb{sub 3} and IrSb{sub 3}. This is attributed to the mixed-valency of ruthenium in this compound. Using near-edge extended absorption fine structure analysis, it is observed that ruthenium in this compound is in the Ru{sup 4+}- and Ru{sup 2+}-valence states in approximately equal proportions. The potential for thermoelectric applications of this material is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Nolas, G.S. [Research and Development Division, Marlow Industries, Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States)] [Research and Development Division, Marlow Industries, Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Harris, V.G.; Tritt, T.M. [Materials Physics Branch, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Materials Physics Branch, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Slack, G.A. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Optimization of InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for use in infrared emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using a variety of growth conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer was indicated by x-ray diffraction. This interface effect was minimized by optimizing the purge times, reactant flows, and growth conditions. The optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times between the growth of the layers, and no reactant flow during the purges. Electron diffraction indicates that CuPt-type compositional ordering occurs in InAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} alloys and SLSs which explains an observed bandgap reduction from previously accepted alloy values.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Anisotropic magnetization and transport properties of RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study of the RAgSb{sub 2} series of compounds arose as part of an investigation of rare earth intermetallic compounds containing antimony with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry. Materials with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry frequently manifest strong anisotropies and rich complexity in the magnetic properties, and yet are simple enough to analyze. Antimony containing intermetallic compounds commonly possess low carrier densities and have only recently been the subject of study. Large single grain crystals were grown of the RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm) series of compounds out of a high temperature solution. This method of crystal growth, commonly known as flux growth is a versatile method which takes advantage of the decreasing solubility of the target compound with decreasing temperature. Overall, the results of the crystal growth were impressive with the synthesis of single crystals of LaAgSb{sub 2} approaching one gram. However, the sample yield diminishes as the rare earth elements become smaller and heavier. Consequently, no crystals could be grown with R=Yb or Lu. Furthermore, EuAgSb{sub 2} could not be synthesized, likely due to the divalency of the Eu ion. For most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds, strong magnetic anisotropies are created by the crystal electric field splitting of the Hund's rule ground state. This splitting confines the local moments to lie in the basal plane (easy plane) for the majority of the members of the series. Exceptions to this include ErAgSb{sub 2} and TmAgSb{sub 2}, which have moments along the c-axis (easy axis) and CeAgSb{sub 2}, which at intermediate temperatures has an easy plane, but exchange coupling at low temperatures is anisotropic with an easy axis. Additional anisotropy is also observed within the basal plane of DyAgSb{sub 2}, where the moments are restricted to align along one of the {l_angle}110{r_angle} axes. Most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds containing magnetic rare earths, antiferromagnetically ordered at low temperatures. The ordering temperatures of these compounds are approximately proportional to the de Gennes factor, which suggests that the RKKY interaction is the dominant exchange interaction between local moments. Although metamagnetic transitions were observed in many members of the series, the series of sharp step-like transitions in DyAgSb{sub 2} are impressive. In this compound, up to 11 different magnetic states are stable depending on the magnitude and direction of the applied field. The saturated magnetization of these states and the critical fields needed to induce a phase transition vary with the direction of the applied field. Through detailed study of the angular dependence of the magnetization and critical fields, the net distribution of magnetic moments was determined for most, of the metamagnetic states. In DyAgSb{sub 2}, the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the Hund's rule ground state creates a strong anisotropy where the local Dy{sup 3+} magnetic moments are constrained to one of the equivalent {l_angle}110{r_angle} directions within the basal plane. The four position clock model was introduced to account for this rich metamagnetic system. Within this model, the magnetic moments are constrained to one of four equivalent orientations within the basal plane and interactions are calculated for up third nearest neighbors. The theoretical phase diagram, generated from the coupling constants is in excellent agreement with the experimental phase diagram. Further investigation of this compound using magnetic X-ray or neutron diffraction would be extremely useful to verify the net distributions of moments and determine the wave vectors of each of the ordered states.

Myers, Kenneth D.

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Asian Forum for Accelerators and Detectors 25 -26 February, 2013, Budker INP, Novosibirsk, Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Russia 4th Asian Forum for Accelerators and Detectors (AFAD'13) will be hosted by Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia, from February 25 to February 26, 2013. AFAD is the new name INP SB RAS, Lavrentiev av. 11, Novosibirsk 630090 Russia Meeting Web-site: http

206

Nanoscale -structural domains in the phonon-glass thermoelectric material -Zn4Sb3 H. J. Kim,1 E. S. Bozin,1 S. M. Haile,2 G. J. Snyder,2 and S. J. L. Billinge1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale -structural domains in the phonon-glass thermoelectric material -Zn4Sb3 H. J. Kim,1 E. S April 2007 A study of the local atomic structure of the promising thermoelectric material -Zn4Sb3, using Thermoelectric materials allow for direct conversion of heat into electrical energy and vice versa. They hold

207

Latching micro optical switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of La{sub 3}Co{sub 2}SbO{sub 9}: A double perovskite with competing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties of La{sub 3}Co{sub 2}SbO{sub 9} double perovskite are reported. The crystal structure has been refined by X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n. Co{sup 2+} and Sb{sup 5+} have the maximum order allowed for the La{sub 3}Co{sub 2}SbO{sub 9} stoichiometry. Rietveld refinements of powder neutron diffraction data show that at room temperature the cell parameters are a=5.6274(2) A, b=5.6842(2) A, c=7.9748(2) A and {beta}=89.999(3) Degree-Sign . Magnetization measurements indicate the presence of ferromagnetic correlations with T{sub C}=55 K attributed to the exchange interactions for non-linear Co{sup 2+}-O-Sb{sup 5+}-O-Co{sup 2+} paths. The effective magnetic moment obtained experimentally is {mu}{sub exp}=4.38 {mu}{sub B} (per mol Co{sup 2+}), between the theoretical one for spin only (3.87 {mu}{sub B}) and spin-orbit value (6.63 {mu}{sub B}), indicating partially unquenched contribution. The low magnetization value at high magnetic field and low temperature (1 {mu}{sub B}/f.u., 5 T and 5 K) and the difference between ZFC and FC magnetization curves (at 5 kOe) indicate that the ferromagnetism do not reach a long range order and that the material has an important magnetic frustration. - Graphical abstract: Co-O-Co (Yellow octahedra only) rich zones (antiferromagnetic) are in contact with Co-O-Sb-O-Co (Red and yellow octahedra) rich zones (Ferromagnetic) to give the peculiar magnetic properties, as a consequence, a complex hysteresis loop can be observed composed by a main and irreversible curve in all the measured range, superimposed with a ferromagnetic component at low fields. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 3}Co{sub 2}SbO{sub 9} has small Goldschmidt Tolerance Factor (t) due to the small size of La{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small t determines an angle for the path Co{sup 2+}-O-Sb{sup 5+}-O-Co{sup 2+} of 153 Degree-Sign . Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetism is attributed to exchange interactions for Co{sup 2+}-O-Sb{sup 5+}-O-Co{sup 2+} paths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic nanoclusters are embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix.

Franco, D.G.; Fuertes, V.C.; Blanco, M.C. [INFIQC (CONICET), Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)] [INFIQC (CONICET), Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina); Fernandez-Diaz, M.T. [Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) 156X, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) 156X, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sanchez, R.D., E-mail: rodo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Rio Negro (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E., E-mail: carbonio@fcq.unc.edu.ar [INFIQC (CONICET), Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Study of a 1?eV GaNAsSb photovoltaic cell grown on a silicon substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the performance of a 1?eV GaNAsSb photovoltaic cell grown on a Si substrate with a SiGe graded buffer grown using molecular beam epitaxy. For comparison, the performance of a similar 1?eV GaN{sub 0.018}As{sub 0.897}Sb{sub 0.085} photovoltaic cell grown on a GaAs substrate was also reported. Both devices were in situ annealed at 700?°C for 5?min, and a significant performance improvement over our previous result was observed. The device on the GaAs substrate showed a low open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.42?V and a short circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 23.4?mA/cm{sup 2} while the device on the Si substrate showed a V{sub OC} of 0.39?V and a J{sub SC} of 21.3?mA/cm{sup 2}. Both devices delivered a quantum efficiency of 50%–55% without any anti-reflection coating.

Tan, K. H.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Li, D.; Leong, Y. R.; Yoon, S. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sharma, P.; Milakovich, T.; Bulsara, M. T.; Fitzgerald, E. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Active optical zoom system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

Wick, David V.

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in 1998 and was incorporated into this project (September, 1998) with the required additional funding provided through this already existing grant.

Roland Winston Joseph O'Gallagher

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Crystal and magnetic study of the disordered perovskites Ca(Mn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} and Ca(Fe{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the double perovskites Ca{sub 2}MSbO{sub 6} (M = Mn, Fe) that have been prepared by solid-state reaction (M = Fe) and wet chemistry procedures (M = Mn). The crystal and magnetic structures have been studied from X-ray (XRD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. Rietveld refinements show that the crystal structures are orthorhombic (space group Pbnm) with complete disorder of M and Sb cations, so the formula should be rewritten as Ca(M{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}. Due to this disorder no evidences of Jahn-Teller distortion can be observed in the MnO{sub 6} octahedra of Ca(Mn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, in contrast with the ordered double perovskite Sr{sub 2}MnSbO{sub 6}. Ca(Fe{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} behaves as an antiferromagnet with an ordered magnetic moment for Fe{sup 3+} of 1.53(4){mu}{sub B} and a propagation vector k = 0, as investigated by low-temperature NPD. The antiferromagnetic ordering is a result of the high degree of Fe/Sb anti-site disorder of the sample, which originates the spontaneous formation of Fe-rich islands, characterized by the presence of strong Fe-O-Fe antiferromagnetic couplings with enough long-range coherence to produce a magnetic contribution perceptible by NPD. By contrast, the magnetic structure of Ca(Mn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} cannot be observed by low-temperature NPD because the magnitude of the ordered magnetic moments is below the detection threshold for neutrons.

Retuerto, M., E-mail: mretuerto@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Energia, Medio Ambiente y Tecnologias Sostenibles, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Garcia-Hernandez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Energia, Medio Ambiente y Tecnologias Sostenibles, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Energia, Medio Ambiente y Tecnologias Sostenibles, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, EPS, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes-Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, EPS, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes-Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Diaz, M.T. [Institut Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (France)] [Institut Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Alonso, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Energia, Medio Ambiente y Tecnologias Sostenibles, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Energia, Medio Ambiente y Tecnologias Sostenibles, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

High bandwidth optical mount  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas (Oakdale, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

test optic after receiving chemical process called AMP2.5, which is under development for increasing the damage threshold of 3 fused silica optics. Photo Number: 2013-05031...

215

High bandwidth optical mount  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optics and Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 14 | Next | Last Back to Index Optics Diffraction Gratings for APPOLON laser. Photo Number: 2011-020040...

217

Reflective optical imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Optical voltage reference  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Optical Diagnostics Thomas Tsang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Diagnostics Thomas Tsang · tight environment · high radiation area · non-serviceable area · passive components · optics only, no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle #12;New imaging fiber bundle Core size: 12 µm, diameter: 1/8" Optical Diagnostics Total fiber counts ~50

McDonald, Kirk

220

REVIEW ARTICLE Optical trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW ARTICLE Optical trapping Keir C. Neuman and Steven M. Blocka) Department of Biological ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology--and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of--optically trapped objects. We review progress

Block, Steven

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221

University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics Spring 2010 OSE-6432: Principles of guided wave optics; electro -optics, acousto-optics and optoelectronics. Location: CREOL-A-214 or by Appointment Reference Materials: 1. Class Notes. 2. "Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides", K. Okamoto, Academic

Van Stryland, Eric

222

Zintl Phases as Thermoelectric Materials: Tuned Transport Properties of the Compounds CaxYb1xZn2Sb2**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zintl Phases as Thermoelectric Materials: Tuned Transport Properties of the Compounds CaxYb1±xZn2Sb. Introduction Because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity, thermoelectric materials have in efficiency, thermoelectric materials could pro- vide a substantial amount of electrical power from automotive

223

Thermoelectric Properties of n-type Polycrystalline BixSb2-xTe3 Alloys N. Gerovac, G. J. Snyder, and T. Caillat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction The best thermoelectric materials are semiconductors which limit the movement of heat conducting. The quality of a thermoelectric material is described by a dimensionless figure-of-merit, ZT, which depends thermoelectric materials have been made from (Bi,Sb)2Te3 compounds. In polycrystalline form, meaning made up

224

Proceedings of the MRS Spring Meeting, San Francisco, March 1997, Symposium Q -Thermoelectrics, in press (1997) THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF Zn4-xCdxSb3 SOLID SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance p-type thermoelectric material with a maximum dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of 1.4 at a temperature of 673K. A usual approach, used for many state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials, to further performance p-type material [1,2]. -Zn4Sb3 has interesting thermoelectric properties in the 473-673K

225

Analytical electron microscopy investigation of elemental composition and bonding structure at the Sb-doped Ni-fully-silicide/SiO{sub 2} interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is very important to control the elemental composition and bonding structure at the gate electrode/gate dielectrics interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor devices because this determines the threshold voltage of the gate electrode. In this study, we investigated the structure at the interface between the antimony (Sb)-doped nickel-fully-silicide gate electrode and SiO{sub 2} dielectrics by employing high-spatial resolution techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope. In one region, we found a thin nickel layer at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface originating from the migration of native oxide at the face of the poly-silicon. In another region, a Sb pileup was detected at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface where the Ni L{sub 3}-edge spectrum showed Ni-Sb bonding, then it was suggested that Sb atoms exist at the bottom of NiSi, substituting for Si atoms in NiSi.

Kawasaki, Naohiko; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Yuji; Hashimoto, Hideki [Morphological Research Laboratory, Toray Research Center Inc., Otsu, Shiga (Japan); Kurata, Hiroki; Isoda, Seiji [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Strong Coupling between 4f Valence Instability and 3d Ferromagnetism in YbxFe4Sb12 Studied by Resonant X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrons tends to stabilize magnetic ordered states. Permanent ferromagnets, such as Nd-Fe-B and SmStrong Coupling between 4f Valence Instability and 3d Ferromagnetism in YbxFe4Sb12 Studied valence is independent of temperature. This evidences a close interplay between the magnetic instability

Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

227

Synthesis and electrochemical performances of amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particles as anode material for lithium-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles. The as-prepared composite materials show much improved electrochemical performances as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries compared with Sn-Sb alloy and carbon alone. This amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particle is extremely promising anode materials for lithium secondary batteries and has a high potentiality in the future use. - Graphical abstract: The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles.

Wang Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metal, Beijing 100088 (China); Tian Wenhuai [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Xiaohe [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yang Rong [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li Xingguo [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Confirmatory Survey Report for Area B1S/B2S at the Chevron Mining Washington Remediation Project, Washington, PA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of October 2 and 3, 2007, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included gamma surface scans within Area B1S/B2S and the collection of soil samples from these areas.

W. C. Adams

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ?3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 ? V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 m?·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fiber optic vibration sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fiber optic vibration sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Diluted magnetic semiconductors based on Sb2-xVxTe3 | Energy Frontier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileep Singh Dileep SinghDilute

234

High capacity, reversible alloying reactions in SnSb/C nanocomposites for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in thein the Assembly ofNa-ion battery applications.

235

Effects of Ge replacement in GeTe by [Ag+Sb] on thermoelectric properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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236

Embedded Nanofibers Induced by High-Energy Ion Irradiation of Bulk GaSb. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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237

Controlling SEI Formation on SnSb-Porous Carbon Nanofibers for Improved Na  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01Controlling Graphene's

238

AlSb/InAs HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovationAirport Viz - A 3D Tool toC omputa0onal

239

Topological insulators in Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 with a single Dirac cone on the surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter in which surface states residing in the bulk insulating gap of such systems are protected by time-reversal symmetry. The study of such states was originally inspired by the robustness to scattering of conducting edge states in quantum Hall systems. Recently, such analogies have resulted in the discovery of topologically protected states in two-dimensional and three-dimensional band insulators with large spin-orbit coupling. So far, the only known three-dimensional topological insulator is Bi{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}, which is an alloy with complex surface states. Here, we present the results of first-principles electronic structure calculations of the layered, stoichiometric crystals Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, whereas Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. These topological insulators have robust and simple surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the point. In addition, we predict that Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3 eV, which is larger than the energy scale of room temperature. We further present a simple and unified continuum model that captures the salient topological features of this class of materials.

Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Proposal for a second-generation, lattice matched, multiple junction Ga{sub 2}AsSb TPV converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First order device modeling is used to show that spontaneously ordered Ga{sub 2}AsSb may prove useful in the newly-active field of thermophotovoltaic power generation. Optimal band gaps for single-, double- and triple-junction III-V devices are presented for a range of blackbody emitter temperatures (1000--2000 K), and it is shown that monolithic, current-matched devices may be constructed that are lattice-matched throughout the stack to an underlying InP substrate. Device efficiency, short-circuit current, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage calculations are presented. The power generation capabilities are expected to be substantial due to the proximity of the devices to the thermal radiators. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Horner, G.S. [Keithley Instruments, Solon Ohio (United States); Coutts, T.J.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado (United States)

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measurement and modeling of infrared nonlinear absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds in Ge and GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, we measure two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients for Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 {mu}m for the first time, to our knowledge. Results agreed well with published theory. Single-shot damage thresholds were also measured at 2.5 {mu}m and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally determined parameters including nonlinear absorption coefficients and temperature dependent linear absorption. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively.

Wagner, T. J.; Bohn, M. J.; Coutu, R. A. Jr. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Gonzalez, L. P.; Murray, J. M.; Guha, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Schepler, K. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Atomic intermixing and interface roughness in short-period InAs/GaSb superlattices for infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of advanced characterization methods, including high-resolution X-ray diffraction (measurements and simulations), cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is applied to quantify the interface roughness and atomic intermixing (in both cation and anion sub-lattices) in short period (6–7?nm) InAs/GaSb superlattices intended for mid-wavelength (M) and long-wavelength (L) infrared detectors. The undesired atomic intermixing and interface roughness in the L-samples were found to be considerably lower than in the M-samples. In all specimens, anion intermixing is much higher than that in the cation sub-lattice. Possible origins of these findings are discussed.

Ashuach, Y.; Lakin, E.; Kaufmann, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Saguy, C. [Solid State Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Zolotoyabko, E., E-mail: zloto@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Solid State Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Thermodynamic and transport properties of single-crystal Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relatively large (up to 250 mg) single crystals of the intermetallic compound Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} have been prepared by a flux-growth technique. The results of thermodynamic and transport measurements of these samples are presented. The compound orders ferromagnetically at approximately T{sub C}=53{plus_minus}1K, with a magnetization consistent with the assignment Mn{sup 3+} (3d{sup 4}) and Yb{sup 2+} (4f{sup 14}). The Mn moments are local in nature, with the full effective and saturated moment of the Hund{close_quote}s rule spin-only ground state. The electrical resistivity has a metallic temperature dependence, with only a modest anisotropy. Room-temperature values of the resistivity are relatively high for an intermetallic compound: 1630{plus_minus}160 {mu}{Omega}cm and 1250{plus_minus}130 {mu}{Omega}cm for currents flowing approximately parallel and perpendicular to the {ital c} axis, respectively. There is a distinct loss of spin-disorder scattering in the resistivity at T{sub C}. From the heat capacity, a rough estimation of the magnetic entropy gives {Delta}S{sub M}{approx}12.1 J/mol K, the value in reasonable agreement with the expected {Delta}S{sub M}{approx}R ln 5 from the assignment of these moments. All of these data are consistent with a picture of Mn{sup 3+} local moments being coupled via conduction electrons. To this end, Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} appears to be analogous to local-moment rare-earth intermetallic compounds, and may point the way toward a class of 3d Kondo lattice compounds. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Fisher, I.R.; Wiener, T.A.; Budko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Chan, J.Y.; Kauzlarich, S.M. [Department of Chemistry, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Transpiration purged optical probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

Entanglement in Classical Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emerging field of entanglement or nonseparability in classical optics is reviewed, and its similarities with and differences from quantum entanglement clearly pointed out through a recapitulation of Hilbert spaces in general, the special restrictions on Hilbert spaces imposed in quantum mechanics and the role of Hilbert spaces in classical polarization optics. The production of Bell-like states in classical polarization optics is discussed, and new theorems are proved to discriminate between separable and nonseparable states in classical wave optics where no discreteness is involved. The influence of the Pancharatnam phase on a classical Bell-like state is deived. Finally, to what extent classical polarization optics can be used to simulate quantum information processing tasks is also discussed. This should be of great practical importance because coherence and entanglement are robust in classical optics but not in quantum systems.

Partha Ghose; Anirban Mukherjee

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

246

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Quantum optical waveform conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

D Kielpinski; JF Corney; HM Wiseman

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Optical atomic magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

Optically measuring interior cavities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

Stone, Gary Franklin (Livermore, CA)

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optical theorem and unitarity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that an application of optical theorem for the non-unitary S-matrix can lead to the qualitative error in the result.

Valeriy Nazaruk

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

LSST Camera Optics Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optical limiting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Prismatic optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spatially modulated light beam is projected, reflected, and redirected through a prismatic optical panel to form a video image for direct viewing thereon.

Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Brewster, Calvin

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Optical contact micrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

Jacobson, Steven D.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

Amir, Yair

256

Collisionless Shocks and TeV Neutrinos before Supernova Shock Breakout from an Optically Thick Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During a supernova explosion, a radiation-dominated shock (RDS) travels through its progenitor. A collisionless shock (CS) is usually assumed to replace it during shock breakout (SB). We demonstrate here that for some realistic progenitors enshrouded in optically thick winds, such as possibly SN 2008D, a CS forms deep inside the wind, soon after the RDS leaves the core, and therefore significantly before SB. The RDS does not survive the transition from the core to the thick wind when the wind close to the core is not sufficiently dense to compensate for the $r^{-2}$ dilution of photons due to shock curvature. This typically happens when the shock velocity is $\\lesssim 0.1 {\\rm c} \\, (\\frac{u_{\\rm w}}{10\\,{\\rm km/s}}) (\\frac{\\dot{M}}{5 \\cdot 10^{-4} \\, {\\rm M}_\\odot {\\rm /yr}})^{-1} (\\frac{r_\\ast}{10^{13}\\,{\\rm cm}})$, where $u_{\\rm w}$, $\\dot{M}$ and $r_\\ast$ are respectively the wind velocity, mass-loss rate and radius of the progenitor star. The radiative CS results in a hard spectrum of the photon flash at...

Giacinti, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Improved Thermoelectric Performance of p-type Skutterudite YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric performance of p-type skutterudites currently lags that of the corresponding n-type materials and improvement of this important class of materials have become the focus of considerable research effort world-wide. Recent calculations find promising band structural features in p-type skutterudite materials of the type AeFe3NiSb12 ( Ae = Ca, Sr, or Ba) which could potentially lead to excellent thermoelectric properties. Recent work on the Yb- filled analog of the these formulations (YbFe3NiSb12) however finds that the onset of intrinsic conduction at lower than expected temperatures deteriorates the performance above 500 K leading to poor performance in the temperature range of interest for automotive waste heat recovery applications. We therefore seek a way to increase the band gap in order to find a way to minimize the deleterious effects of intrinsic conduction. Here we present ab initio band structure calculations and the synthesis and thermoelectric properties of YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5). Ab initio calculations find that the band gap increases for YbFe3PtSb12 as compared to the Ni-containing analog, though no such increase in the band gap energy was found for as compared to YbFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12. The y = 1 samples shows a characteristic transition to intrinsic conduction with a decrease in the Seebeck coefficient at temperatures above 700 K. The increased carrier concentration in y = 0.5 virtually eliminates any evidence of intrinsic conduction and the Seebeck coefficients for these samples increase monotonically up to 750 K, resulting in power factors approaching 27 W/cm K2 at 750 K. These power factors combined with low thermal conductivity result in a ZT = 0.9 at 750 K for Yb0.95Fe3.5Pt0.5Sb12.

Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Ye, Zuxin [GM Research and Development Center; Tessema, Misle [GM Research and Development Center; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Waldo, Richard [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Zhang, Weiqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jihui [University of Washington; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS... ...the light as you've never seen before... Optics:http://science.howstuffworks.com/laser5.htm #12;5 DEFINITION Quantum Optics: "Quantum optics is a field in quantum physics, dealing OPTICS OPERATORS Light is described in terms of field operators for creation and annihilation of photons

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

259

Optical fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane at a cylindrical outside surface by use of an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image of an encircled cylindrical surface area to a stationary photodiode array.

Kirchner, Tommy L. (Richland, WA); Powers, Hurshal G. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Flexible optical panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multimode optical fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optical scanning apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation is described.

Villarreal, R.A.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fiber optic hydrophone  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Donald T. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fiber optic hydrophone  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optical amplifier-powered quantum optical amplification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that an optical amplifier, when combined with photon subtraction, can be used for quantum state amplification, adding noise at a level below the standard minimum. The device could be used to significantly decrease the probability of incorrectly identifying coherent states chosen from a finite set.

John Jeffers

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reverse Monte Carlo simulation of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional Monte Carlo of the total pair distribution functions g(r) is determined for Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} alloys, and then it used to assemble the three-dimensional atomic configurations using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The partial pair distribution functions g{sub ij}(r) indicate that the basic structure unit in the Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glass is di-antimony tri-selenide units connected together through Se-Se and Se-Te chain. The structure of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} alloys is a chain of Se-Te and Se-Se in addition to some rings of Se atoms.

Abdel-Baset, A. M.; Rashad, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science , Assiut University, Assiut, P.O. Box 71516 (Egypt); Moharram, A. H. [Faculty of Science, King Abdul Aziz Univ., Rabigh Branch, P.O. Box 433 (Saudi Arabia)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermoelectric power of Bi and Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} alloy thin films and superlattices grown by MBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have measured the thermoelectric power (TEP) of MBE-grown epitaxial Bi and Bi{sub 1{minus}x} alloy thin films and superlattices as a function of temperature in the range 20--300 K. They have observed that the TEP of a Bi thin film of 1 {micro}m thickness is in good agreement with the bulk single crystal value and that the TEPs for superlattices with 400 {angstrom} and 800 {angstrom} Bi well thicknesses are enhanced over the bulk values. For x = 0.072 and 0.088 in Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} thin films showing semiconducting behavior, TEP enhancement was observed by a factor of two. However as Bi or Bi{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} well thickness decreases in superlattice geometry, the TEP decreases, which may be due to unintentional p-type doping.

Cho, S.; DiVenere, A.; Wong, G.K.; Ketterson, J.B.; Meyer, J.R.; Hoffman, C.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Preferred orientation of nanoscale order at the surface of amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report evidence that as-deposited amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films contain nanoscale clusters that exhibit a preferred orientation, attributed to the earliest stages of heterogeneous nucleation. Fluctuation transmission electron microscopy reveals structural order in the samples, but (220)-related contributions are suppressed. When homogeneous nucleation is promoted via electron bombardment, the sample remains diffraction amorphous but the (220) contribution appears. We simulated data for randomly oriented nanoscale order using ab initio molecular-dynamics models of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The simulated (220) contribution always has larger magnitude than higher-order signals; thus, the lack of the experimental signal indicates a significant preferred orientation.

Tony Li, Tian; Abelson, John R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1308 W. Main St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Hoon Lee, Tae; Elliott, Stephen R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Optically Interconnected MulticomputersUsing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optically Interconnected MulticomputersUsing Inverted-GraphTopologies Tosuccessfullyexploitthebenefitsofopticaltechnologyinatightlycoupledmulticomputer, the architecturaldesignmust reflectboth the advantages and limitationsof optics. This article systems. Although optics have con- tributed dramatically to long-distance communi- cation and more

Krchnavek, Robert R.

272

Dynamical scaling properties of nanoporous undoped and Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} supported thin films during tri- and bidimensional structure coarsening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coarsening of the nanoporous structure developed in undoped and 3% Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} sol-gel dip-coated films deposited on a mica substrate was studied by time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) during in situ isothermal treatments at 450 and 650 deg. C. The time dependence of the structure function derived from the experimental SAXS data is in reasonable agreement with the predictions of the statistical theory of dynamical scaling, thus suggesting that the coarsening process in the studied nanoporous structures exhibits dynamical self-similar properties. The kinetic exponents of the power time dependence of the characteristic scaling length of undoped SnO{sub 2} and 3% Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} films are similar ({alpha}{approx_equal}0.09), this value being invariant with respect to the firing temperature. In the case of undoped SnO{sub 2} films, another kinetic exponent, {alpha}{sup '}, corresponding to the maximum of the structure function was determined to be approximately equal to three times the value of the exponent {alpha}, as expected for the random tridimensional coarsening process in the dynamical scaling regime. Instead, for 3% Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} films fired at 650 deg. C, we have determined that {alpha}{sup '}{approx_equal}2{alpha}, thus suggesting a bidimensional coarsening of the porous structure. The analyses of the dynamical scaling functions and their asymptotic behavior at high q (q being the modulus of the scattering vector) provided additional evidence for the two-dimensional features of the pore structure of 3% Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} films. The presented experimental results support the hypotheses of the validity of the dynamic scaling concept to describe the coarsening process in anisotropic nanoporous systems.

Santilli, C. V.; Rizzato, A. P.; Pulcinelli, S. H.; Craievich, A. F. [Instituto de Quimica/UNESP, P.O. Box 355, Araraquara, Sao Paulo 14800-900 (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica/USP, P.O. Box 66318, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05315-970, (Brazil)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Supplementary Information N. Vidal, J.-C. Rage, A. Couloux, and S.B. Hedges. Snakes (Serpentes). Pp. 390397 in The Timetree of Life, S. B.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supplementary Information N. Vidal, J.-C. Rage, A. Couloux, and S.B. Hedges. Snakes (Serpentes-TCC-ATG-TCR-ATR-GGG-GA-3' (Vidal and Hedges, 2005) for the JUN gene; LAM2D, 5'-TAY-CCA-CRK-TAY-DSY-TAT-GAR-CC-3' (Vidal. References Mortlock, D.P., Sateesh, P., Innis, J.W., 2000. Evolution of N-terminal sequences

Hedges, Blair

274

Electroforming of Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires for high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices on a chip.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active cooling of electronic systems for space-based and terrestrial National Security missions has demanded use of Stirling, reverse-Brayton, closed Joule-Thompson, pulse tube and more elaborate refrigeration cycles. Such cryocoolers are large systems that are expensive, demand large powers, often contain moving parts and are difficult to integrate with electronic systems. On-chip, solid-state, active cooling would greatly enhance the capabilities of future systems by reducing the size, cost and inefficiencies compared to existing solutions. We proposed to develop the technology for a thermoelectric cooler capable of reaching 77K by replacing bulk thermoelectric materials with arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. Furthermore, the Sandia-developed technique we will use to produce the oriented nanowires occurs at room temperature and can be applied directly to a silicon substrate. Key obstacles include (1) optimizing the Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} alloy composition for thermoelectric properties; (2) increasing wire aspect ratios to 3000:1; and (3) increasing the array density to {ge} 10{sup 9} wires/cm{sup 2}. The primary objective of this LDRD was to fabricate and test the thermoelectric properties of arrays of Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. With this proof-of-concept data under our belts we are positioned to engage National Security systems customers to invest in the integration of on-chip thermoelectric coolers for future missions.

Overmyer, Donald L.; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Projection optics box  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry (Tracy, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Parker, John M. (Tracy, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Science, Optics and You: Shadows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:micro.magnet.fsu.eduopticstutorialsindex.html INTRODUCTION SHADOWS MODULE m5 SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 96 - SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 97 - m5: Shadows...

277

Silicon fiber optic sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optical Quadratic Measure Eigenmodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a mathematically rigorous technique which facilitates the optimization of various optical properties of electromagnetic fields. The technique exploits the linearity of electromagnetic fields along with the quadratic nature of their interaction with matter. In this manner we may decompose the respective fields into optical quadratic measure eigenmodes (QME). Key applications include the optimization of the size of a focused spot, the transmission through photonic devices, and the structured illumination of photonic and plasmonic structures. We verify the validity of the QME approach through a particular experimental realization where the size of a focused optical field is minimized using a superposition of Bessel beams.

Michael Mazilu; Joerg Baumgartl; Sebastian Kosmeier; Kishan Dholakia

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optical limiting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fiber optic laser rod  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

Erickson, G.F.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tuned optical cavity magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Neutron diffraction studies on the Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sb{sub 13}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of martensitic to austenitic transformation in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sb{sub 13} has been studied usingtemperature dependent neutron diffraction, thermal property, and magnetization studies. Differential scanning calorimetric studies reveal a martensitic transformation T{sub M} around 291 K. The magnetization data yield a ferromagnetic ordering temperature of 329 K in the austenitic phase and 230 K in the martensitic phase. The analysis of the powder neutron diffraction data in the temperature range of 325-12 K indicates a structural transition from a high temperature cubic L2{sub 1} type structure to an orthorhombic structure. At 270 K, both cubic and orthorhombic phases coexist. Anisotropic unit cell changes are observed at the martensitic transformation: The unit cell expands by about 1.5% along the a axis, by about 2.5% along the c axis, and compresses by about 4.28% along the b axis. Both cubic and orthorhombic phases show commensurate collinear ferromagnetic ordering with a magnetic moment of {approx}3.67 {mu}{sub B}/Mn in Mn (2a and 2f) sites.

Rama Rao, N. V.; Chelvane, J. Arout; Chandrasekaran, V. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Morozkin, A. V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow Lomonosov State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Lamsal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Yelon, W. B. [Materials Research Center and Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Nirmala, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Suresh, K. G. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Malik, S. K. [International Institute of Physics (IIP)-UFRN, Natal, 59072-970 (Brazil)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy David Merino and Chris Dainty Applied Optics Group, Department of Experimental Physics, National and Adrian Gh. Podoleanu Applied Optics Group, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent at Canterbury

Dainty, Chris

285

Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Jessen/Deutsch, "Optical Lattices" 1 OPTICAL LATTICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jessen/Deutsch, "Optical Lattices" 1 OPTICAL LATTICES P. S. JESSEN Optical Sciences Center@rhea.opt-sci.arizona.edu I. H. DEUTSCH Center for Advanced Studies University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM, 87131 Phone, 1996). #12;Jessen/Deutsch, "Optical Lattices" 2 CONTENTS I. Introduction

Jessen, Poul S.

287

Optical displacement sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Optical Quantum Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2001 all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single photon sources, linear optical elements, and single photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high efficiency single photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

Jeremy L. O'Brien

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Optical gamma thermometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Stereoscopic optical viewing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

Tallman, Clifford S. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Optical adhesive property study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

Sundvold, P.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Stereoscopic optical viewing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

Tallman, C.S.

1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Absorbance modulation optical lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the concept of absorbance-modulation optical lithography (AMOL) is described, and the feasibility experimentally verified. AMOL is an implementation of nodal lithography, which is not bounded by the diffraction ...

Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fiber optic fluid detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

Angel, S.M.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Intracoronary Optical Diagnostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence tomography (OCT), is a novel intravascular imaging modality analogous to intravascular ultrasound but uses light instead of sound. This review details the background, development, and status of current ...

Lowe, Harry C.

296

Electro-Optical Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Electro-Optical Characterization group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use various electrical and optical experimental techniques to relate photovoltaic device performance to the methods and materials used to produce them. The types of information obtained by these techniques range from small-scale atomic-bonding information to large-scale macroscopic quantities such as optical constants and electron-transport properties. Accurate and timely measurement of the electro-optical properties as a function of device processing provides researchers and manufacturers with the knowledge needed to troubleshoot problems and develop the knowledge base necessary for reducing cost, maximizing efficiency, improving reliability, and enhancing manufacturability. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes our primary techniques and capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Erected mirror optical switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

Allen, James J.

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optical Quantum Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the field of Optical Quantum Computation, considering the various implementations that have been proposed and the experimental progress that has been made toward realizing them. We examine both linear and nonlinear approaches and both particle and field encodings. In particular we discuss the prospects for large scale optical quantum computing in terms of the most promising physical architectures and the technical requirements for realizing them.

T. C. Ralph; G. J. Pryde

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Supersymmetric transparent optical intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supersymmetric (SUSY) optical structures provide a versatile platform to manipulate the scattering and localization properties of light, with potential applications to mode conversion, spatial multiplexing and invisible devices. Here we show that SUSY can be exploited to realize broadband transparent intersections between guiding structures in optical networks for both continuous and discretized light. These include transparent crossing of high-contrast-index waveguides and directional couplers, as well as crossing of guiding channels in coupled resonator lattices.

Stefano Longhi

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Relaying an optical wavefront  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM)

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction pathlengths which are achieved in a small volume.

Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Optical pumping in a whispering-mode optical waveguide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide are described. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

Kurnit, N.A.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fault location in optical networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One apparatus embodiment includes an optical emitter and a photodetector. At least a portion of the optical emitter extends a radial distance from a center point. The photodetector provided around at least a portion of the optical emitter and positioned outside the radial distance of the portion of the optical emitter.

Stevens, Rick C. (Apple Valley, MN); Kryzak, Charles J. (Mendota Heights, MN); Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Geib, Kent M. (Tijeras, NM); Kornrumpf, William P. (Schenectady, NY)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optical computing Damien Woods a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract In this survey we consider optical computers of such optical computing archi- tectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical

Woods, Damien

305

Optical Solitons and their applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Solitons and their applications By: Mohammad Nopoush Supervisor: Professor Palffy-Muhoray #12;Definition Optical: Non-changing optical field during propagation due to delicate balance between nonlinear and linear effects. Nonlinear effects: Due to the optical Kerr effect (AC Kerr effect

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

306

Undergraduate Handbook Dear Optics student,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Handbook Fall 2013 #12;2 Dear Optics student, It is my great pleasure to welcome you to The Institute of Optics. The Institute of Optics has been educating the next generation of leaders in the field since it was founded in 1929 as the first optics department in the country

Cantlon, Jessica F.

307

Embedded fiducials in optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embedded fiducials are provided in optical surfaces and a method for embedding the fiducials. Fiducials, or marks on a surface, are important for optical fabrication and alignment, particularly when individual optical elements are aspheres. Fiducials are used during the course of the polishing process to connect interferometric data, and the equation describing the asphere, to physical points on the optic. By embedding fiducials below the surface of the optic and slightly outside the clear aperture of the optic, the fiducials are not removed by polishing, do not interfere with the polishing process, and do not affect the performance of the finished optic.

Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform Synthesis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform, Shijun Xiao Funding from ARO, DARPA, and NSF #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER performance (spectral engineering, dispersion compensation) #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL

Purdue University

309

PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Femtosecond Pulse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as new pulse sequence processing functionalities. #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002 One Guide ­ One PulsePURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002

Purdue University

310

Transparent electrode for optical switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS Polarization Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL Polarization Optics Guest Editors Jari Turunen University of Joensuu, Finland Asher A Friesem Weizmann Institute This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which

Friesem, Asher A.

312

THE IMPACT OF A TANK 40H DECANT ON THE PROJECTED OPERATING WINDOWS FOR SB4 AND GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY IN SUPPORT OF THE VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assess the impact of a 100K gallon decant volume from Tank 40H on the existing sludge-only Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)-Frit 510 flowsheet and the coupled operations flowsheet (SB4 with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)). Another potential SB4 flowsheet modification of interest includes the addition of 3 wt% sodium (on a calcined oxide basis) to a decanted sludge-only or coupled operations flowsheet. These potential SB4 flowsheet modifications could result in significant compositional shifts to the SB4 system. This paper study provides an assessment of the impact of these compositional changes to the projected glass operating windows and to the variability study for the Frit 510-SB4 system. The influence of the compositional changes on melt rate was not assessed in this study nor was it requested. Nominal Stage paper study assessments were completed using the projected compositions for the various flowsheet options coupled with Frit 510 (i.e., variation was not applied to the sludge and frit compositions). In order to gain insight into the impacts of sludge variation and/or frit variation (due to the procurement specifications) on the projected operating windows, three versions of the Variation Stage assessment were performed: (1) the traditional Variation Stage assessment in which the nominal Frit 510 composition was coupled with the extreme vertices (EVs) of each sludge, (2) an assessment of the impact of possible frit variation (within the accepted frit specification tolerances) on each nominal SB4 option, and (3) an assessment of the impact of possible variation in the Frit 510 composition due to the vendor's acceptance specifications coupled with the EVs of each sludge case. The results of the Nominal Stage assessment indicate very little difference among the various flowsheet options. All of the flowsheets provide DWPF with the possibility of targeting waste loadings (WLs) from the low 30s to the low 40s with Frit 510. In general, the Tank 40H decant has a slight negative impact on the operating window, but DWPF still has the ability to target current WLs (34%) and higher WLs if needed. While the decant does not affect practical WL targets in DWPF, melt rate could be reduced due to the lower Na{sub 2}O content. If true, the addition of 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to the glass system may regain melt rate, assuming that the source of alkali is independent of the impact on melt rate. Coupled operations with Frit 510 via the addition of ARP to the decanted SB4 flowsheet also appears to be viable based on the projected operating windows. The addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to a decanted Tank 40H sludge may be problematic using Frit 510. Although the Nominal Stage assessments provide reasonable operating windows for the SB4 flowsheets being considered with Frit 510, introduction of potential sludge and/or frit compositional variation does have a negative impact. The magnitude of the impact on the projected operating windows is dependent on the specific flowsheet options as well as the applied variation. The results of the traditional Variation Stage assessments indicate that the three proposed Tank 40H decanted flowsheet options (Case No.2--100K gallon decant, Case No.3--100K gallon decant and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O addition and Case No.4--100K gallon decant and ARP) demonstrate a relatively high degree of robustness to possible sludge variation over WLs of interest with Frit 510. However, the case where the addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O is considered was problematic during the traditional Variation Stage assessment. The impact of coupling the frit specifications with the nominal SB4 flowsheet options on the projected operating windows is highly dependent on whether the upper WLs are low viscosity or liquidus temperature limited in the Nominal Stage assessments. Systems that are liquidus temperature limited exhibit a high degree of robustness to the applied frit and sludge variation, while those that are low viscosity li

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Optical key system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

MECHANISMS OF PHASE FORMATION IN THE VITRIFICATION OF HIGH-FERROUS SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB2 HLW SLUDGE SURROGATE - 9300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase formation mechanisms associated with the vitrification of high-ferrous Savannah River Site (SRS) Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) high level waste surrogate were studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two mixtures at 50 wt% waste loading with commercially available Frit 320 (Li{sub 2}O - 8 wt %, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8 wt %, Na{sub 2}O - 12 wt %, SiO{sub 2} - 72 wt %) and batch chemicals (LiOH {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}) to represent the frit formulation were prepared as slurries with a water content of {approx}50 wt%. The mixtures were air-dried at a temperature of 115 C and heat-treated at 500, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, and 1300 C for 1 hr at each temperature. Infrared spectra and XRD patterns of the products produced at each temperature were recorded. In both mixtures prepared using frit and batch chemicals to represent the frit, phase formation reactions were completed within the temperature range between 900 and 1000 C. However, residual quartz was still present in glass produced from the mixture with batch chemicals even at 1100 C. Although, the phase composition and structure of the glassy products obtained from both mixtures at temperatures over 1000 C were similar, the products obtained from the mixture using actual frit were more homogeneous than those from the mixture with batch chemicals. Thus, the use of frit rather than batch chemicals reduced the temperature range of phase formation and provided for production of higher quality glass.

Marra, J

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive-optics optical coherence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

optics optical coherence Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adaptive-optics optical coherence Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NW...

320

Absolute calibration of optical flats  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

Sommargren, Gary E.

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied optical metrology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Sciences Summary: Research - Quantum Optics Applied Optics & Photonics - Optoelectronics - Optical Communications - Medical... Optics Engineering - Optical System Design...

322

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

Winston, R.; Ries, H.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

Winston, R.; Ries, H.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

Young, I.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, Ian T. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Full spectrum optical safeguard  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cavity quantum electro-optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the opto-mechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered opto-mechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

Mankei Tsang

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lorentz Group in Ray Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been almost one hundred years since Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity in 1905. He showed that the basic space-time symmetry is dictated by the Lorentz group. It is shown that this group of Lorentz transformations is not only applicable to special relativity, but also constitutes the scientific language for optical sciences. It is noted that coherent and squeezed states of light are representations of the Lorentz group. The Lorentz group is also the basic underlying language for classical ray optics, including polarization optics, interferometers, the Poincare\\'e sphere, one-lens optics, multi-lens optics, laser cavities, as well multilayer optics.

S. Baskal; E. Georgieva; Y. S. Kim; M. E. Noz

2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

Optical and infrared emission of H II complexes as a clue to PAHs lifecycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of optical spectroscopy and infrared aperture photometry of more than 100 H II complexes in nine galaxies. Spectra obtained with the 6-m telescope of SAO RAS are used along with archival data from Spitzer and several ground-based telescopes to infer a strength of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, age, properties of the UV radiation field, and metallicity of studied H II complexes. Physical properties (age, radiation field parameters, metallicity) are related to the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio used as a proxy for the PAH abundance in order to reveal factors that may influence the PAH evolution in H II complexes. The well-known correlation between the $F_{8}/F_{24}$ ratio and metallicity is confirmed in the studied complexes. The infrared flux ratio also correlates with the [O III]$\\lambda 5007/\\mathrm{H\\beta}$ ratio which is often considered as an indicator of the radiation field hardness, but this correlation seems to be a mere reflection of a correlation between [O III]$\\lambda ...

Khramtsova, M S; Lozinskaya, T A; Egorov, O V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

Larson, Adam Michael

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

333

Quantum Optics (Nir Davidson -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity and Cost Effectiveness Enhancment Technique Using a Combined Time Division and Multilevel California, USA, "Advanced System Functions in Optical Communications Using E-O Technologies" Moshe Nazarathy for fabricating printed circuit boards" Solar Cells (Jeffrey Gordon, Uzi Efron - Ben- Gurion University) David

Ribak, Erez

334

OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ________________________________ Chairperson Michael Krueger ________________________________ Norman Akers ________________________________ Shawn Bitters Date Defended: March 29, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for ANDREW HUFFMAN certifies... OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY BY ANDREW HUFFMAN Submitted to the graduate degree program in ART and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts...

Huffman, Andrew Jacob

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

High throughput optical scanner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

High-index-contrast electromechanical optical switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System developers are looking to replace protocol-dependent, bandwidth-limited optical networks with intelligent optically-transparent integrated photonic networks. Several electromechanical optical switches are explored ...

Bryant, Reginald (Reginald Eugene), 1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

2.71 Optics, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, ...

Barbastathis, George

338

Optics in data center network architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Reducing Cabling Complexity with Optics . . . . .Advances in Information Optics and Photonics. SPIE, 2008. [c-Through: Part-time Optics in Data Centers,” in Proceedings

Farrington, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optical apparatus for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical apparatus is disclosed for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors. The optical apparatus comprises one or more diffractive optical elements formed on a substrate for receiving light from a source and processing the incident light. The optical apparatus includes an addressing element for alternately addressing each diffractive optical element thereof to produce for one unit of time a first correlation with the incident light, and to produce for a different unit of time a second correlation with the incident light that is different from the first correlation. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the optical apparatus is in the form of a correlation spectrometer; and in other embodiments, the apparatus is in the form of an optical processor. In some embodiments, the optical apparatus comprises a plurality of diffractive optical elements on a common substrate for forming first and second gratings that alternately intercept the incident light for different units of time. In other embodiments, the optical apparatus includes an electrically-programmable diffraction grating that may be alternately switched between a plurality of grating states thereof for processing the incident light. The optical apparatus may be formed, at least in part, by a micromachining process. 24 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synthesis and crystal structure of [(C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}]{sup 2+} [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sup 2-1}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with SbCl{sub 3} and HCl affords the title compound, the structure of which is ascertained by X-ray diffraction. The unit cell consists of one bridged Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2-} anion and two 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations. The trivalent antimony ion is bonded not only directly to chlorine anions, but also is coordinated with chlorine anions by secondary bonds. In the crystal, there exists infinite coordinated chains of [Sb{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}]{sub n}{sup 2n-} anions running along the a axis, which link 2,6-dimethylpyridinium cations by N-H-Cl hydrogen bonds.

Guo Yun, E-mail: apharm@sina.com; Zhang Miao [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Shen Liang [Hangzhou Normal University, College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Jin Yingying; Jin Zhimin [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Two dimensional electron transport in modulation-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} ultrathin quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the growth and electron transport in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} two dimensional electron gases (2DEG) and compared their properties with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As 2DEGs. For 10?nm thick InGaAs wells, the electron mobility of InGaAs/AlAsSb 2DEGs is comparable to that of InGaAs/InAlAs 2DEGs. Upon thinning the wells to 3?nm, the 2DEG mobility is degraded quickly and stronger interface roughness scattering is observed for InGaAs/AlAsSb heterointerfaces than for InGaAs/InAlAs heterointerfaces. Changing the group-V exposure between As and Sb during growth interruptions at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces did not significantly change the 2DEG mobility. With the insertion of a two monolayer InAlAs at the InGaAs/AlAsSb interfaces, the interface roughness scattering is reduced and the mobility greatly increased. The room temperature 2DEG mobility shows 66% improvement from 1.63?×?10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V·s to 2.71?×?10{sup 3}?cm{sup 2}/V·s for a 3?nm InGaAs well.

Huang, Cheng-Ying, E-mail: cyhuang@ece.ucsb.edu; Law, Jeremy J. M.; Rodwell, Mark J. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 201 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 202 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

345

Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 197 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 198 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

Mahon, Bradford Z.

346

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - i - INTRODUCTION WHAT IS SCIENCE, 0PTICS & YOU? The Science, Optics and You Guidebook is made up as follows: Science, Optics and You is a standards-based interdisciplinary science curriculum package for elementary students and teachers through which they can explore

Weston, Ken

347

Optical computing Damien Woods a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical

Woods, Damien

348

Single-cycle nonlinear optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Optical Diagnostics March 13, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fiber is not good #12;Irradiation Studies of Optical Components - II Sumitomo fused silica imaging fiber · passive components · optics only, no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle In Secondary Containment One set of optics per viewport Conceptual design completed #12;Irradiation Studies

McDonald, Kirk

350

Aerogel-clad optical fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Aerogel-clad optical fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

Sprehn, Gregory A. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Sandler, Pamela H. (San Marino, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http, A. M. Weiner Purdue University C. Lin Avanex Corporation Conference on Lasers and Electro Optics;Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/ 2

Purdue University

353

Thermoelectric Properties of P-type Skutterudites YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

P-type skutterudites, with nominal compositions YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1), have been synthesized by induction melting with subsequent annealing, and their thermoelectric properties evaluated from 3.5 K to 745 K to assess their suitability for thermoelectric based waste heat recovery applications. We report results for the synthesis and measurements of Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity ( ), thermal conductivity ( ), Hall coefficient (RH), and effective mass (m*/m0) of YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1). Powder x-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) show that this system has a narrow filling fraction range of x ~ 0.84 to 0.86 for Yb in the crystallographic voids. All samples show positive RH for the entire temperature range studied with carrier concentrations ranging from 9.6 1020 to 2.8 1021 cm-3 at room temperature. Relatively high values of S result in high power factors up to 17 Wcm-1K-2 at room temperature. However, large values of and a sharp reduction in the S at high temperature due to bipolar conduction prevent the attainment of high thermoelectric figure of merit.

Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Ye, Zuxin [GM Research and Development Center; Tessema, M. [GM Research and Development Center; Waldo, R.A. [GM Research and Development Center; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yang, Jihui [General Motors Corporation; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Magnetic susceptibility of (Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x})Te{sub 3} (0 < x < 1) alloys in the temperature range 2 to 50 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting quantum interferometer device with Josephson junctions (SQUID magnetometer) is used to study the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility of (Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x})Te{sub 3} (0 < x < 1) alloy crystals in the temperature range 2 to 50 K, at the magnetic field vector H orientations H perpendiular C{sub 3} and H Up-Tack C{sub 3} with respect to the crystal trigonal axis C{sub 3}. It is found that the magnetic susceptibility of the ion core of the samples under study is {chi}{sup G} = -0.35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} cm{sup 3}/g, the contribution of lattice defects to magnetic susceptibility can be disregarded, and the contribution of free carriers is of a diamagnetic nature in the entire studied temperature range. It is shown that the contribution of free carriers to the resulting magnetic susceptibility and its anisotropy can be described within the Pauli and Landau-Peierls approach. In calculating the magnetic susceptibility, taking into account the constant concentration of free carriers in the state of pronounced degeneracy, it is found that the temperature dependence of the anisotropic effective masses varies with crystal chemical composition. This is possibly associated with the complex structure of the valence band and its variation as the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} content in the alloy increases.

Stepanov, N. P., E-mail: np-stepanov@mail.ru [Chernishevsky Zabaikalsky State Humanitarian Pedagogical University (Russian Federation); Nalivkin, V. U. [Chita State University (Russian Federation); Potapov, G. A. [Chernishevsky Zabaikalsky State Humanitarian Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Stimulated crystallization of melt-quenched Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films employing femtosecond laser double pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase transformation of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films from the melt-quenched amorphous phase into the crystalline phase induced by 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses has been studied. For partly amorphized films, progressive crystallization could be induced by single pulses, which can be explained by growth of already existing crystalline embryos. For completely amorphized films, it was not possible to induce crystallization with one or two consecutive pulses; three pulses being the threshold for the onset of crystallization. By employing a fs laser double pulse with an adjustable inter-pulse delay, partial crystallization could be triggered for a delay range of 200 fs-100 ps, while for longer delays no crystallization was possible. The time window for stimulated crystallization can be related to the relaxation dynamics of free electrons excited by the first pulse, which are further excited by the second pulse still remaining in the excited state. Our results indicate that the lifetime of excited electrons in melt-quenched amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} is Almost-Equal-To 100 ps.

Cotton, Rebecca L.; Siegel, Jan [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 \\Theta 4 square array of optical tweezers -- the hexadeca

Grier, David

357

LSST Camera Optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a unique, three-mirror, modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary feeding a camera system that includes corrector optics to produce a 3.5 degree field of view with excellent image quality (<0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled diffracted energy) over the entire field from blue to near infra-red wavelengths. We describe the design of the LSST camera optics, consisting of three refractive lenses with diameters of 1.6m, 1.0m and 0.7m, along with a set of interchangeable, broad-band, interference filters with diameters of 0.75m. We also describe current plans for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing these lenses and filters.

Olivier, S S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, K; Hale, L; Whistler, W

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

358

Black optic display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Optical Network Testbeds Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking technologies. Several years ago, when many of these optical networking research topics were first being investigated, they were the subject of controversial debate. The new techniques challenged many long-held concepts related to architecture and technology. However, today all major networking organizations are transitioning toward infrastructure that incorporates these new concepts. This progress has been assisted through the series of Optical Networking Testbed Workshops (ONT). The first (ONT1) outlined a general framework of key issues and topics and developed a series of recommendations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). The second (ONT2) developed a common vision of optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop8). Processes that allow for a common vision encourage widespread deployment of these types of resources among advanced networking communities. Also, such a shared vision enables key concepts and technologies to migrate from basic research testbeds to wider networking communities. The ONT-3 workshop built on these earlier activities by expanding discussion to include additional considerations of the international interoperability and of greater impact of optical networking technology on networking in general. In accordance with this recognition, the workshop confirmed that future-oriented research and development is indispensable to fundamentally change the current Internet architecture to create a global network incorporating completely new concepts. The workshop also recognized that the first priority to allow for this progress is basic research and development, including international collaborative activities, which are important for the global realization of interoperability of a new generation architecture.

Joe Mambretti

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modular optical detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Existence of Optical Vortices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical vortices arise as phase singularities of the light fields and are of central interest in modern optical physics. In this paper, some existence theorems are established for stationary vortex wave solutions of a general class of nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equations. There are two types of results. The first type concerns the existence of positive-radial-profile solutions which are obtained through a constrained minimization approach. The second type addresses the existence of saddle-point solutions through a mountain-pass-theorem or min-max method so that the wave propagation constant may be arbitrarily prescribed in an open interval. Furthermore some explicit estimates for the lower bound and sign of the wave propagation constant with respect to the light beam power and vortex winding number are also derived for the first type solutions.

Yisong Yang; Ruifeng Zhang

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optically Controlled Jitter Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new simple circuit producing random pulse trains is proposed and experimentally studied. The circuit is composed of an operational amplifier and two feedback links, one of which comprises two photodiodes. The photodiodes are responsible for nonlinearity in the feedback. By varying the illumination it is possible to control the nonlinearity in the photodiode current-voltage characteristics and change the degree of randomness in the oscillations. The circuit's simplicity and optical control make it attractive for coupled map lattices.

Julia Manasson; V. A. Manasson

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

PXIE Optics and Layout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) will serve as a prototype for the Project X front end. The aim is to validate the Project-X design and to decrease technical risks mainly related to the front end. The paper discusses the main requirements and constraints motivating the facility layout and optics. Final adjustments to the Project X front end design, if needed, will be based on operational experience gained with PXIE.

Lebedev, V.A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Shteynas, B.G.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Optically pulsed electron accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

MicroSight Optics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Bonded, walk-off compensated optical elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bonded, walk-off compensated crystal, for use with optical equipment, and methods of making optical components including same.

Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Virtual Optical Comparator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

Thompson, Greg

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gamma ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F38042 Grenoble (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

Moore, F.W.

1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Adaptive Optics in Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

Wolfgang Brandner

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pedestal substrate for coated optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

All-optical switching in optically induced nonlinear waveguide couplers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate all-optical vortex switching in nonlinear coupled waveguide arrays optically induced in photorefractive media. Our technique is based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams to induce various types of waveguide configurations. Using double- and quadruple-well potentials, we demonstrate precise control over the coupling strength between waveguides, the linear and nonlinear dynamics and symmetry-breaking bifurcations of guided light, and a power-controlled optical vortex switch.

Diebel, Falko, E-mail: falko.diebel@uni-muenster.de; Boguslawski, Martin; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia [Institut für Angewandte Physik and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

La Rosa, Andres H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 Multiple Output Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DSTAWG DST Pulse Shaper Fiber ports Imaging optics U.S. Quarter #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 One Guide ­ One Pulse Pulses slab Loss-engineering to control relative pulse amplitude. #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER

Purdue University

382

Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe2 and chalcostibite CuSbS2 Vijay Kumar Gudelli, V. Kanchana, G. Vaitheeswaran, A. Svane, and N. E. Christensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of zT ¼ 1.4, confirming that CuGaTe2 is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric and concentration suggests that CuSbS2 will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly Thermoelectric (TE) materials with potential applica- tions within power generation and refrigeration have repre

Svane, Axel Torstein

383

Crystal structure and high temperature transport properties of Yb-filled p-type skutterudites Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partially Yb-filled Fe substituted polycrystalline p-type skutterudites with nominal compositions Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, with varying filler concentrations x, were synthesized by reacting the constituent elements and subsequent solid state annealing, followed by densification by hot-pressing. The compositions and filling fractions were confirmed with a combination of Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis. Their thermoelectric properties were evaluated from 300 to 800 K. The Seebeck coefficients for the specimens increase with increasing temperature and plateau at around 750 K. The thermal conductivity decreases with increasing Yb filling fraction, and bipolar conduction becomes evident and increases at elevated temperatures. A maximum ZT value of 0.8 was obtained at 750 K for Yb{sub 0.47}Co{sub 2.6}Fe{sub 1.4}Sb{sub 12}. The thermoelectric properties and potential for further optimization are discussed in light of our results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Yb-filled Fe-substituted p-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites, Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, were structurally and physically characterized. • Both filling fraction and Co-to-Fe ratio affect the transport properties. • High ZT was obtained for the composition with ?50% Yb filling and a slightly lower than nominal Fe content.

Dong, Yongkwan [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Puneet, Pooja; Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Nolas, George S., E-mail: gnolas@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Inverter Eligibility Listing Procedure for Solar Electric Incentive Programs Updated 6/2/14 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and inverters must be listed on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Maximum Continuous Output Power, Conversion Efficiency, and Tare Losses) and weighted inverter efficiencyInverter Eligibility Listing Procedure for Solar Electric Incentive Programs Updated 6/2/14 Senate Bill 1 (SB1) defines the solar incentive programs for California, and inverters must be listed

385

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

Homuth, E.F.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Quantum Gravitational Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In quantum theory, the curved spacetime of Einstein's general theory of relativity acts as a dispersive optical medium for the propagation of light. Gravitational rainbows and birefringence replace the classical picture of light rays mapping out the null geodesics of curved spacetime. Even more remarkably, {\\it superluminal} propagation becomes a real possibility, raising the question of whether it is possible to send signals into the past. In this article, we review recent developments in the quantum theory of light propagation in general relativity and discuss whether superluminal light is compatible with causality.

Graham M Shore

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spatial optic multiplexer/diplexer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for simultaneous transmission of optic signals having different wavelengths over a single optic fiber. Multiple light signals are transmitted through optic fibers that are formed into a circumference surrounding a central core fiber. The multiple light signals are directed by a lens into a single receiving fiber where the light combines and is then focused into the central core fiber which transmits the light to a wavelength discriminating receiver assembly.

Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

390

Bundled monocapillary optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plurality of glass or metal wires are precisely etched to form the desired shape of the individual channels of the final polycapillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of a group of wires from an etchant bath. The etched wires undergo a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation being used. This reflective surface may be a single layer of material, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The collection of individual wires is assembled into a close-packed multi-wire bundle, and the wires are bonded together in a manner which preserves the close-pack configuration, irrespective of the local wire diameter. The initial wires are then removed by either a chemical etching procedure or mechanical force. In the case of chemical etching, the bundle is generally segmented by cutting a series of etching slots. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary array is typically bonded to a support substrate. The result of the process is a bundle of precisely oriented radiation-reflecting hollow channels. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the radiation from a source of radiation which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, a synchrotron radiation source, a reactor or spallation source of neutrons, or some other source.

Hirsch, Gregory (1277 Linds Mar Center, Suite 128, Pacifica, CA 94044)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low noise optical position sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Low noise optical position sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

Spear, J.D.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optical imaging of Rydberg atoms .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present an experiment exploring electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rydberg atoms in order to observe optical nonlinearities at the single photon level. ??Rb atoms… (more)

Mazurenko, Anton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fiber optic diffraction grating maker  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fiber optic diffraction grating maker  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EMSL - Quasi-optical bridge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

quasi-optical-bridge en Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

399

Efficiencies of Quantum Optical Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

Daniel Hogg; Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Intrinsic Rashba-like splitting in asymmetric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} heterogeneous topological insulator films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show by density functional theory calculations that asymmetric hetero-stacking of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films can modulate the topological surface states. Due to the structure inversion asymmetry, an intrinsic Rashba-like splitting of the conical surface bands is aroused. While such splitting in homogeneous Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-class topological insulators can be realized in films with more than three quintuple layers under external electric fields, the hetero-stacking breaks the limit of thickness for preserving the topological nature into the thinnest two quintuple layers. These results indicate that the hetero-stacking can serve as an efficient strategy for spin-resolved band engineering of topological insulators.

Liu, Xiaofei; Guo, Wanlin, E-mail: wlguo@nuaa.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control for Mechanical Structures and Key Laboratory for Intelligent Nano Materials and Devices (MOE), Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Growth, steady-state, and time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) are grown on InSb substrates using molecular beam epitaxy and reveal strong photoluminescence with over double the intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs DH with an identical layer structure design grown on GaAs. Time-resolved photoluminescence of the CdTe/MgCdTe DH gives a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination lifetime of 86 ns, which is more than one order of magnitude longer than that of typical polycrystalline CdTe films. These findings indicate that monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe DHs effectively reduce surface recombination, have limited nonradiative interface recombination, and are promising for solar cells that could reach power conversion efficiencies similar to that of GaAs.

DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Kirk, Alexander P.; Zhang, Yong-Hang [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhao, Xin-Hao [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States) [Center for Photonics Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Neutron Scattering Investigation of Phonon Scattering Rates in Ag1-xSb1+xTe2+x (x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phonon dispersions and scattering rates of the thermoelectric material AgSbTe$_{2}$ were measured as a function of temperature with inelastic neutron scattering. The results show that phonon scattering rates are large and weakly dependent on temperature. The lattice thermal conductivity was calculated from the measured phonon lifetimes and group velocities, providing good agreement with bulk transport measurements. The measured phonon scattering rates and their temperature dependence are compared with models of phonon scattering by anharmonicity and point defect. We find that these processes cannot account for the large total phonon scattering rates observed, and their lack of temperature dependence. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements on single crystals revealed an extensive nanostructure from cation ordering, which is likely responsible for the strong phonon scattering.

Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evguenia A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ma, Jie [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 Ã? 4 square array

Grier, David

405

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using di#ractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 Ã? 4 square array

Grier, David

406

CHARACTERISATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIERS FOR ALL-OPTICAL REGENERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical pumping, broad spectral range and opportunities for integration and mass production. Among these components, the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with gain saturation, low optical and electrical power Various SOAs from Alcatel-Thales III-V lab were characterized in the framework of the French project FUTUR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

Previous Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons: · Dickinson et al., 1986, compared low-altitude satellite particle data to ground-based images · Northern hemisphere aurora poleward of southern aurora · Technique only sensitive to shifts in latitude · Mende et al., 1990, compared ground

Fillingim, Matthew

408

Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

Sopori, Bhushan L.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Quantum Optical Version of Classical Optical Transformations and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By the newly developed technique of integration within an ordered product (IWOP) of operators, we explore quantum optical version of classical optical transformations such as optical Fresnel transform, Hankel transform, fractional Fourier transform, Wigner transform, wavelet transform and Fresnel-Hadmard combinatorial transform etc. In this way one may gain benefit for developing classical optics theory from the research in quantum optics, or vice-versa. We can not only find some new quantum mechanical unitary operators which correspond to the known optical transformations, deriving a new theorem for calculating quantum tomogram of density operators, but also can reveal some new classical optical transformations. We derive GFO's normal product form and its canonical coherent state representation and find that GFO is the loyal representation of symplectic group multiplication rule. We show that GFT is just the transformation matrix element of GFO in the coordinate representation such that two successive GFTs is still a GFT. The ABCD rule of the Gaussian beam propagation is directly demonstrated in the context of quantum optics. Especially, the introduction of quantum mechanical entangled state representations opens up a new area to finding new classical optical transformations. The complex wavelet transform and the condition of mother wavelet are studied in the context of quantum optics too. Throughout our discussions, the coherent state, the entangled state representation of the two-mode squeezing operators and the IWOP technique are fully used. All these confirms Dirac's assertion: " ... for a quantum dynamic system that has a classical analogue, unitary transformation in the quantum theory is the analogue of contact transformation in the classical theory".

Hong-yi Fan; Li-yun Hu

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics OpticalEngineeringand OpticalInstrumentDesign Certificate and optical systems. These are essential to virtually every industry including defense, medical, clean energy. The Optical Engineering Certificate Program addresses the growing demand for skilled professionals who can

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

411

Integrated optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Integrated optical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bi-stable optical actuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye Abstract The eye is a complex optical system that, like other still being in its infancy. Introduction The eye consists of many parts. · Sclera: The majority of the eye, it forms the white shell and the basic shape of the eyeball. · Cornea: The frontal 1/6 of the eye

La Rosa, Andres H.

415

Optical forces and optical torques on various materials arising from optical lattices in the Lorentz-Mie regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By combining the Maxwell stress tensor with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we calculate the optical force and optical torque on particles from optical lattices. We compare our method to the two-component ...

Jia, Lin

416

Microstructural and thermoelectric properties of p-type Te-doped Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} and n-type SbI{sub 3}-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.85}Se{sub 0.15} compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The p-type Te-doped Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} and n-type SbI{sub 3}-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.85}Se{sub 0.15} thermoelectric compounds were fabricated by hot pressing in the temperature range of 380 to 440 C under 200 MPa in Ar. Both the compounds were highly dense and showed high crystalline quality. The grains of the compounds were preferentially oriented and contained many dislocations through the hot pressing. The fracture path followed the transgranular cleavage planes, which are perpendicular to the c-axis. In addition, with increasing the pressing temperature, the figure of merit was increased. The highest values of figure of merit for the p- and n-type compounds, which were obtained at 420 C, were 2.69 x 10{sup {minus}3}/K and 2.35 x 10{sup {minus}3}/K, respectively.

Seo, J.; Park, K.; Lee, C.; Kim, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Optical Approach to Gravitational Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optical approach begins by interpreting the gravitational redshift resulting to a change in the relative velocity of light due to the medium of propagation in the gravitational field. The discussion continues by pointing out an agreement in structure between the equation for rays in geometrical optics and the geodesic equation of general relativity. From their comparison we learn that the path of rays should be given by the relation $ds^2=n^2(r)dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, not by $ds^2=dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, in a medium with spherical symmetry of refractive index $n(r)$. The development of an optical analogy suggests introducing $n^2(r)$ in place of $g_{rr}$ as an optical version of the Schwarzschild metric. In form and content, $n^2(r)$ is different from $g_{rr}$. The optical point of view replaces the general-relativity explanations in terms of time and gravitation.

Y. G. Yi

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Optical set-reset latch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

Skogen, Erik J.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo Department@ece.ucdavis.edu, Abstract: This paper discusses important signal processing functions in all-optical packet routing systems. We will pay special attention to all-optical time-to-live, optical performance monitoring, optical

Kolner, Brian H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of optical field emitter arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical field emitters are electron emission sources actuated by incident light. Optically actuated field emitters may produce ultrafast pulses of electrons when excited by ultrafast optical pulses, thus making them of ...

Yang, Yujia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Polyhedral integrated and free space optical interconnection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical communication system uses holographic optical elements to provide guided wave and non-guided communication, resulting in high bandwidth, high connectivity optical communications. Holograms within holographic optical elements route optical signals between elements and between nodes connected to elements. Angular and wavelength multiplexing allow the elements to provide high connectivity. The combination of guided and non-guided communication allows compact polyhedral system geometries. Guided wave communications provided by multiplexed substrate-mode holographic optical elements eases system alignment. 7 figs.

Erteza, I.A.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Power inverter with optical isolation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras,...

425

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK FOR THE TEACHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE TEACHER INTRODUCTION What is Science Optics and You? ...................................................... Using Centers to Teach Science Organizers ........................................................................... Integrating Science

Weston, Ken

426

Science, Optics and You: Mirror and Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

opticstutorialsindex.html INTRODUCTION MIRRORS AND IMAGES MODULE m3 SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 44 - SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 45 - m3: Mirrors and...

427

Science, Optics and You: Light and Colors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

opticstutorialsindex.html INTRODUCTION LIGHT AND COLORS MODULE m4 SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 62 - SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - 63 - m4: Light &...

428

Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

Campbell, James Kyle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols....

430

Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

integrated with optical communications to provide a strong, innate, security foundation at the photonic layer for optical fiber networks. July 10, 2013 Quantum Enabled...

432

Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of Sputter-deposited Germanium Cxide (GeOx) Films . Correlation Between Optical Properties And Chemical Composition Of...

433

Optical sedimentation recorder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robotic optical sedimentation recorder is described for the recordation of carbon flux in the oceans wherein both POC and PIC particles are captured at the open end of a submersible sampling platform, the captured particles allowed to drift down onto a collection plate where they can be imaged over time. The particles are imaged using three separate light sources, activated in sequence, one source being a back light, a second source being a side light to provide dark field illumination, and a third source comprising a cross polarized light source to illuminate birefringent particles. The recorder in one embodiment is attached to a buoyancy unit which is capable upon command for bringing the sedimentation recorder to a programmed depth below the ocean surface during recordation mode, and on command returning the unit to the ocean surface for transmission of recorded data and receipt of new instructions. The combined unit is provided with its own power source and is designed to operate autonomously in the ocean for extended periods of time.

Bishop, James K.B.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Polyplanar optical display electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thin-film optical initiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

Erickson, Kenneth L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optic probe for semiconductor characterization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Optical analog-to-digital converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM); Raring, James (Goleta, CA); Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Scintillator fiber optic long counter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optics sb ras" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Scintillator fiber optic long counter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electrically-driven optical antennas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike radiowave antennas, optical nanoantennas so far cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or via optically active materials in their proximity. Here, we demonstrate direct electrical driving of an optical nanoantenna featuring an atomic-scale feed gap. Upon applying a voltage, quantum tunneling of electrons across the feed gap creates broadband quantum shot noise. Its optical frequency components are efficiently converted into photons by the antenna. We demonstrate that the properties of the emitted photons are fully controlled by the antenna architecture, and that the antenna improves the quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude with respect to a non-resonant reference system. Our work represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometer scale, e.g. for on-chip wireless data communication, electrically driven single- and multiphoton sources, as well as for background-free linear and nonlinear spectroscopy and sensing with nanometer...

Kern, Johannes; Prangsma, Jord C; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Bio-inspired optical components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guiding electro-magnetic radiation is fundamental to optics. Lenses, mirrors, and photonic crystals all accomplish this task by different routes. Understanding the interaction of light with materials is fundamental to ...

Walish, Joseph John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

Olivier, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Geometrical optics in general relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

A. Loinger

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Stochastic Physical Optics & Bell's correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the use of classical statistical argumentation similar to the one used in e.g. statistical optics, it is demonstrated that in entanglement of photons, a classical realist explanation cannot be excluded by the CHSH measure in experiment.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

448

New optical materials containing isobenzofuran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isobenzofuran, a member of the benzo[c]heterocycles, is an extremely reactive molecule with unusual electronic properties. In this thesis we investigate the integration of isobenzofuran subunits into conjugated optical ...

Meek, Scott Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Construction integrity assessment report (ETN-98-0005) S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) system valve pit 241-S-B to valve pit 241-S-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The S-Farm overground transfer (OGT) line will bypass the existing line(s), between valve pits 241-S-B and 241-S-D that no longer meet system requirements. The new OGT line will provide a waste transfer pipeline between these valve pits in support of saltwell pumping activities. The length of the OGT line is approximately 180 ft from pit to pit. The primary pipe is nominal 1-in. diameter stainless steel (SST) braided Ethylene-propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) hose. The encasement pipe is a nominal 3-in., flanged, SST pipe made up of several different length pipe spool pieces (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 1 and sh. 2). The OGT line slopes from valve pit 241-S-B toward valve pit 241-S-D. At each end, the primary and encasement pipe connect to a pit entry spool piece. The pit entry spool pieces are constructed of prefabricated SST materials. These spool pieces allow for the separation of the primary and encasement pipelines after the pipes have entered the valve pits (drawing H-2-818280, sh. 2). The pit entry spool pieces also allow for leak detection of the encasement pipe at each end (drawing H-2-829564, sh. 2). The OGT encasement pipeline is supported above ground by adjustable height unistrut brackets and precast concrete bases (drawing H-2-829654, sh. 1). The pipeline is heat-traced and insulated. The heat tracing and insulation supply and retain latent heat that prevents waste solidification during transfers and provides freeze protection. The total length of the pipeline is above ground, thereby negating the need for cathodic corrosion protection. This Construction Integrity Assessment Report (CIAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest for Numatec Hanford Corporation/Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, the operations contractor, and the U. S. Department of Energy, the system owner. The CIAR is intended to verify that construction was performed in accordance with the provisions of Washington Administrative Code, WAC-173-303-640 (3) (c), (e), (f) and (h).

HICKS, D.F.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

450

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS The plurality of optical singularities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL The plurality of optical singularities Guest Editors Michael Berry (Co-Director of NATO ARW) H H Wills Physics, Kiev, Ukraine This collection of papers arose from an Advanced Research Workshop on Singular Optics

Berry, Michael Victor

451

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Optical Conductivity with Holographic Lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We add a gravitational background lattice to the simplest holographic model of matter at finite density and calculate the optical conductivity. With the lattice, the zero frequency delta function found in previous calculations (resulting from translation invariance) is broadened and the DC conductivity is finite. The optical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak with a cross-over to power-law behavior at higher frequencies. Surprisingly, these results bear a strong resemblance to the properties of some of the cuprates.

Gary T. Horowitz; Jorge E. Santos; David Tong

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

453

Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of the skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x{<=}0.4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} (0{<=}x{<=}0.4) have been prepared by solid-state reaction and characterised by powder X-ray diffraction. The compounds crystallise in the cubic space group Im3{sup Macron} (a Almost-Equal-To 9.1 A) with Yb atoms partially filling the voids in the skutterudite framework. A neutron time-of-flight diffraction experiment for Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} confirms the disorder of Fe and Ni atoms on the transition-metal site. Electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements indicate that the thermoelectric performance of the skutterudites shows a marked dependence on the Yb content. Magnetic measurements over the temperature range 2{<=}T/K{<=}300 show paramagnetic behaviour for all compounds. Decomposition studies under an oxidising atmosphere at elevated temperatures have also been carried out by thermogravimetric analysis. - Graphical abstract: The filled skutterudites Yb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12} have been prepared by solid-state reaction and characterised by powder X-ray diffraction. The thermoelectric performance depends strongly on the Yb content. The physical properties and thermal stability of the compounds are further discussed in comparison with the current state-of-the art thermoelectric skutterudites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new series of skutterudites has been prepared and characterised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical properties are affected by the degree of Yb filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest thermoelectric performance is found for Yb{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sb{sub 12}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The skutterudites decompose in air above 550 K.

Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Vaqueiro, Paz [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Knight, Kevin S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0OX (United Kingdom)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0OX (United Kingdom); Powell, Anthony V., E-mail: a.v.powell@hw.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

GaSb molecular beam epitaxial growth on p-InP(001) and passivation with in situ deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integration of high carrier mobility materials into future CMOS generations is presently being studied in order to increase drive current capability and to decrease power consumption in future generation CMOS devices. If III-V materials are the candidates of choice for n-type channel devices, antimonide-based semiconductors present high hole mobility and could be used for p-type channel devices. In this work we first demonstrate the heteroepitaxy of fully relaxed GaSb epilayers on InP(001) substrates. In a second part, the properties of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface have been studied by in situ deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} gate dielectric. The interface is abrupt without any substantial interfacial layer, and is characterized by high conduction and valence band offsets. Finally, MOS capacitors show well-behaved C-V with relatively low D{sub it} along the bandgap, these results point out an efficient electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb interface.

Merckling, C.; Brammertz, G.; Hoffmann, T. Y.; Caymax, M.; Dekoster, J. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Sun, X. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8284 (United States); Alian, A.; Heyns, M. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium); Afanas'ev, V. V. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Metal-insulator transitions induced by doping in LaNiO{sub 3}: LaNi{sub 0.95}M{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (M = Mo, W, Sb, Ti, Cu, Zn) perovskites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural characterization and electronic properties of the LaNi{sub 0.95}M{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (M = Mo, W, Sb, Ti, Cu, Zn) perovskite-like system are reported. These compounds can be regarded as being derived from LaNiO{sub 3} by partial substitution of Ni{sup 3+} in this material by M{sup 6+}, M{sup 5+}, M{sup 4+}, or M{sup 2+} formal cations, with a partial reduction of Ni{sup 3+} to Ni{sup 2+} taking place. X-ray powder diffraction data were analyzed by means of the Rietveld method and show that all the title materials present perovskite-type structure with a rhombohedral (S.G. R{bar 3}c) or orthorhombic (S.G. Pbnm) symmetry, depending on the nature of the M cation. In all cases, Ni and M cations are placed at random in octahedral B-sites of perovskite structure. Electrical resistivity measurements (four probe method) show metal-to-insulator (M-I) transitions for M = Mo, W, Ti, Cu, Zn at temperatures of about 50K and a semiconductor behavior for the Sb sample in the whole temperature range explored. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show the presence of weak ferromagnetic interactions for M = Sb and Pauli paramagnetism for the remaining compounds.

Alvarez, I.; Veiga, M.L.; Pico, C. [Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)] [Univ. Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fiber optic sensor and method for making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

459

BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIO-OPTICAL PRESENTATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 Armstrong, R.A., F. Gilbes, R. Guerrero. Lopez, and F. Gilbes, 2000, "Apparent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Station", Ocean Optics XV, Monaco. Gilbes, F., and R.A. Armstrong, 2000, "Inherent Optical Properties at the Caribbean Time Series

Gilbes, Fernando

460

Optical feedback structures and methods of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

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461

CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

Rubin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z