National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for optically thin clouds

  1. Thermodynamic phase profiles of optically thin midlatitude cloud and their relation to temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naud, C. M.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Turner, David D.; Lo, Chaomei; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2010-06-03

    Winter cloud phase and temperature profiles derived from ground-based lidar depolarization and radiosonde measurements are analyzed for two midlatitude locations: the United States Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique (SIRTA) in France. Because lidars are attenuated in optically thick clouds, the dataset only includes optically thin clouds (optical thickness < 3). At SGP, 57% of the clouds observed with the lidar in the temperature range 233-273 K are either completely liquid or completely glaciated, while at SIRTA only 42% of the observed clouds are single phase, based on a depolarization ratio threshold of 11% for differentiating liquid from ice. Most optically thin mixed phase clouds show an ice layer at cloud top, and clouds with liquid at cloud top are less frequent. The relationship between ice phase occurrence and temperature only slightly changes between cloud base and top. At both sites liquid is more prevalent at colder temperatures than has been found previously in aircraft flights through frontal clouds of greater optical thicknesses. Liquid in clouds persists to colder temperatures at SGP than SIRTA. This information on the average temperatures of mixed phase clouds at both locations complements earlier passive satellite remote sensing measurements that sample cloud phase near cloud top and for a wider range of cloud optical thicknesses.

  2. Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge Many of the ...

  3. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Thin Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer 2008.01.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Mary Jane Bartholomew For data sets, see below. Abstract The Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband...

  5. ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TWST : Three Waveband Spectrally-agile Technique Sensor WRF-CHEM : Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model Output Value-Added Products LBTM-MINNIS : Minnis Cloud Products...

  6. Thin optical display panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  7. Posters Parameterization of Thin Mid-Level Stratiform Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thickness or its tendency within a GCM layer from the large-scale fields. 5. Develop and test a parameterization of altocumulus cloud layer optical properties (liquid water path...

  8. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  9. Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth W. O'Hirok and P. Ricchiazzi Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography and Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Analysis from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) reveals that the global mean cloud optical depth is surprisingly low (i.e., τ = 3.8).

  10. Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Climate and Clouds. Cloud Optical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A good range of cloud conditions were observed from clear sky to heavy rainfall. Authors: Niple, E. R. 1 ; Scott, H. E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Aerodyne Research, Inc., ...

  11. A Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and high values of this quantity. With the above evidence in mind, we conclude that the empirical method described here is a useful tool for estimating cloud optical thickness at...

  12. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, C. Robert; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Campbell, John H.; Staggs, Michael; Rainer, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold.

  13. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, C.R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Staggs, M.; Rainer, F.

    1995-12-05

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold. 9 figs.

  14. Flat or curved thin optical display panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-01-10

    An optical panel includes a plurality of waveguides stacked together, with each waveguide having a first end and an opposite second end. The first ends collectively define a first face, and the second ends collectively define a second face of the panel. The second face is disposed at an acute face angle relative to the waveguides to provide a panel which is relatively thin compared to the height of the second face. In an exemplary embodiment for use in a projection TV, the first face is substantially smaller in height than the second face and receives a TV image, with the second face defining a screen for viewing the image enlarged. 7 figures.

  15. Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition

  16. Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the

  17. Flat or curved thin optical display panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-01-10

    An optical panel 10 includes a plurality of waveguides 12 stacked together, with each waveguide 12 having a first end 12a and an opposite second end 12b. The first ends 12a collectively define a first face 16, and the second ends 12b collectively define a second face 18 of the panel 10. The second face 18 is disposed at an acute face angle relative to the waveguides 12 to provide a panel 10 which is relatively thin compared to the height of the second face. In an exemplary embodiment for use in a projection TV, the first face 16 is substantially smaller in height than the second face 18 and receives a TV image, with the second face 18 defining a screen for viewing the image enlarged.

  18. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  19. Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MISR, and MODIS Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms

  20. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aylott, Jonathan W.; Chen-Esterlit, Zoe; Friedl, Jon H.; Kopelman, Raoul; Savvateev, Vadim N.; Shinar, Joseph

    2001-12-18

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  1. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  2. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  3. Observations of regional and local variability in the optical properties of maritime clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, A.B.

    1996-04-01

    White and Fairall (1995) calculated the optical properties of the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds observed during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) and compared their results with the results obtained by Fairall et al. for the MBL clouds observed during the First International Satellite Climatology Program (ISSCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE). They found a factor of two difference in the optical depth versus liquid water relationship that applies to the clouds observed in each case. In the present study, we present evidence to support this difference. We also investigate the local variability exhibited in the ASTEX optical properties using measurements of the boundary layer aerosol concentration.

  4. Oriented niobate ferroelectric thin films for electrical and optical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessels, Bruce W.; Nystrom, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Sr.sub.x Ba.sub.1-x Nb.sub.2 O.sub.6, where x is greater than 0.25 and less than 0.75, and KNbO.sub.3 ferroelectric thin films metalorganic chemical vapor deposited on amorphous or cyrstalline substrate surfaces to provide a crystal axis of the film exhibiting a high dielectric susceptibility, electro-optic coefficient, and/or nonlinear optic coefficient oriented preferentially in a direction relative to a crystalline or amorphous substrate surface. Such films can be used in electronic, electro-optic, and frequency doubling components.

  5. Cloud Optical Properties from the Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. ... depths larger than approximately 7. The retrieval assumes a single cloud layer consisting ...

  6. ARM - Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Discovery Channel Earth Live Blog News & Press RACORO Backgrounder (PDF, 528K) ... will obtain representative statistics of cloud microphysical, aerosol, and ...

  7. Cloud Optical Properties from the Multifilter Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSRCLDOD). An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Riihimaki, L.; Shi, Y.; Lo, C.; Min, Q.

    2014-02-01

    The microphysical properties of clouds play an important role in studies of global climate change. Observations from satellites and surface-based systems have been used to infer cloud optical depth and effective radius. Min and Harrison (1996) developed an inversion method to infer the optical depth of liquid water clouds from narrow band spectral Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements (Harrison et al. 1994). Their retrieval also uses the total liquid water path (LWP) measured by a microwave radiometer (MWR) to obtain the effective radius of the warm cloud droplets. Their results were compared with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) retrieved values at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site (Min and Harrison 1996). Min et al. (2003) also validated the retrieved cloud optical properties against in situ observations, showing that the retrieved cloud effective radius agreed well with the in situ forward scattering spectrometer probe observations. The retrieved cloud optical properties from Min et al. (2003) were used also as inputs to an atmospheric shortwave model, and the computed fluxes were compared with surface pyranometer observations.

  8. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  9. Optical limiting effects in nanostructured silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borshch, A A; Starkov, V N; Volkov, V I; Rudenko, V I; Boyarchuk, A Yu; Semenov, A V

    2013-12-31

    We present the results of experiments on the interaction of nanosecond laser radiation at 532 and 1064 nm with nanostructured silicon carbide thin films of different polytypes. We have found the effect of optical intensity limiting at both wavelengths. The intensity of optical limiting at ? = 532 nm (I{sub cl} ? 10{sup 6} W cm{sup -2}) is shown to be an order of magnitude less than that at ? = 1064 nm (I{sub cl} ? 10{sup 7} W cm{sup -2}). We discuss the nature of the nonlinearity, leading to the optical limiting effect. We have proposed a method for determining the amount of linear and two-photon absorption in material media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  10. Thin-Film Fiber Optic Sensors for Power Control and Fault Detection. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Paul Grems

    2003-09-30

    Described is the development of an optical current measurement device, an active power conditioning system, and sol gel type thin films for the detection of magnetic fields.

  11. Cloud Optical Properties from the Multifilter Shadowband Radiometer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Min and Harrison (1996) developed an inversion method to infer the optical depth of liquid ... Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measurements (Harrison et al. 1994). ...

  12. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001),...

  13. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  14. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  15. Silicon-integrated thin-film structure for electro-optic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A crystalline thin-film structure suited for use in any of an number of electro-optic applications, such as a phase modulator or a component of an interferometer, includes a semiconductor substrate of silicon and a ferroelectric, optically-clear thin film of the perovskite BaTiO.sub.3 overlying the surface of the silicon substrate. The BaTiO.sub.3 thin film is characterized in that substantially all of the dipole moments associated with the ferroelectric film are arranged substantially parallel to the surface of the substrate to enhance the electro-optic qualities of the film.

  16. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  17. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds from four ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Winker, D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2010-05-27

    Ground-based lidar and CALIOP datasets gathered over four mid-latitude sites, two US and two French sites, are used to evaluate the consistency of cloud macrophysical and optical property climatologies that can be derived by such datasets. The consistency in average cloud height (both base and top height) between the CALIOP and ground datasets ranges from -0.4km to +0.5km. The cloud geometrical thickness distributions vary significantly between the different datasets, due in part to the original vertical resolutions of the lidar profiles. Average cloud geometrical thicknesses vary from 1.2 to 1.9km, i.e. by more than 50%. Cloud optical thickness distributions in subvisible, semi-transparent and moderate intervals differ by more than 50% between ground and space-based datasets. The cirrus clouds with 2 optical thickness below 0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class. The differences in average cloud base altitude between ground and CALIOP datasets of 0.0-0.1 km, 0.0-0.2 km and 0.0-0.2 km can be attributed to irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without low-level clouds in ground-based data, respectively. The cloud geometrical thicknesses are not affected by irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, while up to 0.0-0.2 km and 0.1-0.3 km differences can be attributed to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without lowlevel clouds in ground-based data, respectively.

  18. H I, CO, and Planck/IRAS dust properties in the high latitude cloud complex, MBM 53, 54, 55 and HLCG 92 – 35. Possible evidence for an optically thick H I envelope around the CO clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, Yasuo; Okamoto, Ryuji; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Torii, Kazufumi; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Okuda, Takeshi; Ohama, Akio; Kuroda, Yutaka; Kuwahara, Toshihisa; Dickey, John M.

    2014-11-20

    We present an analysis of the H I and CO gas in conjunction with the Planck/IRAS submillimeter/far-infrared dust properties toward the most outstanding high latitude clouds MBM 53, 54, 55 and HLCG 92 – 35 at b = –30° to – 45°. The CO emission, dust opacity at 353 GHz (τ{sub 353}), and dust temperature (T {sub d}) show generally good spatial correspondence. On the other hand, the correspondence between the H I emission and the dust properties is less clear than in CO. The integrated H I intensity W{sub H} {sub I} and τ{sub 353} show a large scatter with a correlation coefficient of ∼0.6 for a T {sub d} range from 16 K to 22 K. We find, however, that W{sub H} {sub I} and τ{sub 353} show better correlation for smaller ranges of T {sub d} every 0.5 K, generally with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.9. We set up a hypothesis that the H I gas associated with the highest T {sub d} ≥ 21.5 K is optically thin, whereas the H I emission is generally optically thick for T {sub d} lower than 21.5 K. We have determined a relationship for the optically thin H I gas between atomic hydrogen column density and τ{sub 353}, N{sub H} {sub I} (cm{sup −2})=(1.5×10{sup 26})⋅τ{sub 353}, under the assumption that the dust properties are uniform and we have applied this to estimate N{sub H} {sub I} from τ{sub 353} for the whole cloud. N{sub H} {sub I} was then used to solve for T {sub s} and τ{sub H} {sub I} over the region. The result shows that the H I is dominated by optically thick gas having a low spin temperature of 20-40 K and a density of 40-160 cm{sup –3}. The H I envelope has a total mass of ∼1.2 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}, an order of magnitude larger than that of the CO clouds. The H I envelope properties derived by this method do not rule out a mixture of H I and H{sub 2} in the dark gas, but we present indirect evidence that most of the gas mass is in the atomic state.

  19. Nonlinear optical characterization of ZnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G, Sreeja V; Anila, E. I. R, Reshmi John, Manu Punnan; V, Sabitha P; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-15

    ZnS thin film was prepared by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) method. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction method and Z scan technique. XRD pattern showed that ZnS thin film has hexagonal structure with an average size of about 5.6nm. The nonlinear optical properties of ZnS thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated ZnS thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated.

  20. Influence of sputtering power on the optical properties of ITO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K, Aijo John; M, Deepak T, Manju; Kumar, Vineetha V.

    2014-10-15

    Tin doped indium oxide films are widely used in transparent conducting coatings such as flat panel displays, crystal displays and in optical devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes due to the high electrical resistivity and optical transparency in the visible region of solar spectrum. The deposition parameters have a commendable influence on the optical and electrical properties of the thin films. In this study, ITO thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The properties of the films prepared under varying sputtering power were compared using UV- visible spectrophotometry. Effect of sputtering power on the energy band gap, absorption coefficient and refractive index are investigated.

  1. Progress in Studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crittenden, James; Calvey, Joseph; Dugan, Gerald; Kreinick, David; Leong, Zhidong; Livezey, Jesse; Palmer, Mark; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Furman, Miguel; Penn, Gregory; Venturini, Marco; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low-energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation codes has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photo-electrons on the vacuum chamber wall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  2. Optical method for the determination of stress in thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.

    1999-01-26

    A method and optical system is disclosed for measuring an amount of stress in a film layer disposed over a substrate. The method includes steps of: (A) applying a sequence of optical pump pulses to the film layer, individual ones of said optical pump pulses inducing a propagating strain pulse in the film layer, and for each of the optical pump pulses, applying at least one optical probe pulse, the optical probe pulses being applied with different time delays after the application of the corresponding optical probe pulses; (B) detecting variations in an intensity of a reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses, the variations being due at least in part to the propagation of the strain pulse in the film layer; (C) determining, from the detected intensity variations, a sound velocity in the film layer; and (D) calculating, using the determined sound velocity, the amount of stress in the film layer. In one embodiment of this invention the step of detecting measures a period of an oscillation in the intensity of the reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses, while in another embodiment the step of detecting measures a change in intensity of the reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses and determines a time at which the propagating strain pulse reflects from a boundary of the film layer. 16 figs.

  3. Optical method for the determination of stress in thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.

    1999-01-01

    A method and optical system is disclosed for measuring an amount of stress in a film layer disposed over a substrate. The method includes steps of: (A) applying a sequence of optical pump pulses to the film layer, individual ones of said optical pump pulses inducing a propagating strain pulse in the film layer, and for each of the optical pump pulses, applying at least one optical probe pulse, the optical probe pulses being applied with different time delays after the application of the corresponding optical probe pulses; (B) detecting variations in an intensity of a reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses, the variations being due at least in part to the propagation of the strain pulse in the film layer; (C) determining, from the detected intensity variations, a sound velocity in the film layer; and (D) calculating, using the determined sound velocity, the amount of stress in the film layer. In one embodiment of this invention the step of detecting measures a period of an oscillation in the intensity of the reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses, while in another embodiment the step of detecting measures a change in intensity of the reflection of portions of the optical probe pulses and determines a time at which the propagating strain pulse reflects from a boundary of the film layer.

  4. Thin aerogel films for optical, thermal, acoustic, and electronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Aerogels are a special class of continuously porous solid materials which are characterized by nanometer size particles and pores. Typically, aerogels are made using sol-gel chemistry to form a solvent filled, high porosity gel that is dried by removing the solvent without collapsing the tenuous solid phase. As bulk materials, aerogels are known to have many exceptional, and even some unique physical properties. Aerogels provide the highest thermal insulation and lowest dielectric constant of any other material known. However, some important applications require the aerogels in the form of thin films or sheets. For example, electronic applications require micrometer thin aerogel films bonded to a substrate, and others require thicker films, either on a substrate or as free standing sheets. Special methods are required to make aerogel thin films or sheets. In this paper, the authors discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate thin aerogel films and they describe methods to make films and thin sheets. They also give some specific applications for which aerogel films are being developed.

  5. Structural and optical properties of DC reactive magnetron sputtered zinc aluminum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Rao, T. Subba

    2014-10-15

    Highly transparent conductive Zinc Aluminum Oxide (ZAO) thin films have been deposited on glass substrates using DC reactive magnetron sputtering method. The thin films were deposited at 200 C and post-deposition annealing from 15 to 90 min. XRD patterns of ZAO films exhibit only (0 0 2) diffraction peak, indicating that they have c-axis preferred orientation perpendicular to the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the surface morphology of the films. The grain size obtained from SEM images of ZAO thin films are found to be in the range of 20 - 26 nm. The minimum resistivity of 1.74 10{sup ?4} ? cm and an average transmittance of 92% are obtained for the thin film post annealed for 30 min. The optical band gap of ZAO thin films increased from 3.49 to 3.60 eV with the increase of annealing time due to Burstein-Moss effect. The optical constants refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k) were also determined from the optical transmission spectra.

  6. Oriented niobate ferroelectric thin films for electrical and optical devices and method of making such films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessels, B.W.; Nystrom, M.J.

    1998-05-19

    Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1{minus}x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6}, where x is greater than 0.25 and less than 0.75, and KNbO{sub 3} ferroelectric thin films metalorganic chemical vapor deposited on amorphous or crystalline substrate surfaces to provide a crystal axis of the film exhibiting a high dielectric susceptibility, electro-optic coefficient, and/or nonlinear optic coefficient oriented preferentially in a direction relative to a crystalline or amorphous substrate surface are disclosed. Such films can be used in electronic, electro-optic, and frequency doubling components. 8 figs.

  7. Oriented niobate ferroelectric thin films for electrical and optical devices and method of making such films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessels, Bruce W.; Nystrom, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Sr.sub.x Ba.sub.1-x Nb.sub.2 O.sub.6, where x is greater than 0.25 and less than 0.75, and KNbO.sub.3 ferroelectric thin films metalorganic chemical vapor deposited on amorphous or crystalline substrate surfaces to provide a crystal axis of the film exhibiting a high dielectric susceptibility, electro-optic coefficient, and/or nonlinear optic coefficient oriented preferentially in a direction relative to a crystalline or amorphous substrate surface. Such films can be used in electronic, electro-optic, and frequency doubling components.

  8. Size-effects on the optical properties of zirconium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramana, C. V.; Vemuri, R. S.; Fernandez, I.; Campbell, A. L.

    2009-12-07

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) thin films with an average crystallite-size (L) ranging from 5 to 25 nm were grown by sputter deposition onto optical grade quartz substrates. The optical properties of grown ZrO{sub 2} films were evaluated using optical transmission and reflectance spectroscopic measurements. The size-effects were significant on the optical characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} films. The bandgap energy (E{sub g}) was found to increase from 5.78 to 6.07 eV with decreasing L values from 20 to 7 nm. A direct, linear inverse L-E{sub g} relationship found for ZrO{sub 2} films suggest that tuning optical properties for desired applications can be achieved by controlling the size.

  9. Continuously controlled optical band gap in oxide semiconductor thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herklotz, Andreas; Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-02-02

    The optical band gap of the prototypical semiconducting oxide SnO2 is shown to be continuously controlled through single axis lattice expansion of nanometric films induced by low-energy helium implantation. While traditional epitaxy-induced strain results in Poisson driven multidirectional lattice changes shown to only allow discrete increases in bandgap, we find that a downward shift in the band gap can be linearly dictated as a function of out-of-plane lattice expansion. Our experimental observations closely match density functional theory that demonstrates that uniaxial strain provides a fundamentally different effect on the band structure than traditional epitaxy-induced multiaxes strain effects. In conclusion, chargemore » density calculations further support these findings and provide evidence that uniaxial strain can be used to drive orbital hybridization inaccessible with traditional strain engineering techniques.« less

  10. An improved thin film approximation to accurately determine the optical conductivity of graphene from infrared transmittance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, J. W.; Bol, A. A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-07-07

    This work presents an improved thin film approximation to extract the optical conductivity from infrared transmittance in a simple yet accurate way. This approximation takes into account the incoherent reflections from the backside of the substrate. These reflections are shown to have a significant effect on the extracted optical conductivity and hence on derived parameters as carrier mobility and density. By excluding the backside reflections, the error for these parameters for typical chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene on a silicon substrate can be as high as 17% and 45% for the carrier mobility and density, respectively. For the mid- and near-infrared, the approximation can be simplified such that the real part of the optical conductivity is extracted without the need for a parameterization of the optical conductivity. This direct extraction is shown for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmittance measurements of CVD graphene on silicon in the photon energy range of 3707000?cm{sup ?1}. From the real part of the optical conductivity, the carrier density, mobility, and number of graphene layers are determined but also residue, originating from the graphene transfer, is detected. FTIR transmittance analyzed with the improved thin film approximation is shown to be a non-invasive, easy, and accurate measurement and analysis method for assessing the quality of graphene and can be used for other 2-D materials.

  11. Synthesis of Cu{sub 2}O from CuO thin films: Optical and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murali, Dhanya S. Jain, Mahaveer K.; Subrahmanyam, A.; Kumar, Shailendra; Choudhary, R. J.; Wadikar, Avinash D.

    2015-04-15

    Hole conducting, optically transparent Cu{sub 2}O thin films on glass substrates have been synthesized by vacuum annealing (5×10{sup −6} mbar at 700 K for 1 hour) of magnetron sputtered (at 300 K) CuO thin films. The Cu{sub 2}O thin films are p-type and show enhanced properties: grain size (54.7 nm), optical transmission 72% (at 600 nm) and Hall mobility 51 cm{sup 2}/Vs. The bulk and surface Valence band spectra of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO thin films are studied by temperature dependent Hall effect and Ultra violet photo electron Spectroscopy (UPS). CuO thin films show a significant band bending downwards (due to higher hole concentration) than Cu{sub 2}O thin films.

  12. Method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Ruth, M.R.

    1985-08-16

    A method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides.

  13. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The

  14. Optical and structural properties of sputtered CdS films for thin film solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Donguk; Park, Young; Kim, Minha; Choi, Youngkwan; Park, Yong Seob; Lee, Jaehyoeng

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Photo current–voltage curves (a) and the quantum efficiency (QE) (b) for the solar cell with CdS film grown at 300 °C. - Highlights: • CdS thin films were grown by a RF magnetron sputtering method. • Influence of growth temperature on the properties of CdS films was investigated. • At higher T{sub g}, the crystallinity of the films improved and the grains enlarged. • CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies of 9.41% were prepared at 300 °C. - Abstract: CdS thin films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at various temperatures. The effects of growth temperature on crystallinity, surface morphology and optical properties of the films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectra, UV–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. As the growth temperature was increased, the crystallinity of the sputtered CdS films was improved and the grains were enlarged. The characteristics of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell appeared to be significantly influenced by the growth temperature of the CdS films. Thin film CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies of 9.41% were prepared at a growth temperature of 300 °C.

  15. Method of synthesizing a plurality of reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Ruth, Marta R.

    1987-01-01

    A method of synthesizing electro-optically active reaction products from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of electro-optically active transition metal oxides.

  16. Development and Testing of a Life Cycle Model and a Parameterization of Thin Mid-level Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    2008-03-03

    We used a cloud-resolving model (a detailed computer model of cloud systems) to evaluate and improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models used for numerical weather prediction and climate modeling. We also used observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, made at DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Climate Research Facility located in the Southern Great Plains (Kansas and Oklahoma) during Intensive Observation Periods to evaluate our detailed computer model as well as a single-column version of a global atmospheric model used for numerical weather prediction (the Global Forecast System of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction). This so-called Single-Column Modeling approach has proved to be a very effective method for testing the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models. The method relies on detailed observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, in an atmospheric column comparable in size to a grid column used in a global atmospheric model. The required observations are made by a combination of in situ and remote sensing instruments. One of the greatest problems facing mankind at the present is climate change. Part of the problem is our limited ability to predict the regional patterns of climate change. In order to increase this ability, uncertainties in climate models must be reduced. One of the greatest of these uncertainties is the representation of clouds and cloud processes. This project, and ARM taken as a whole, has helped to improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models.

  17. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  18. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan

    2014-05-05

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  19. Method for optical pumping of thin laser media at high average power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zapata, Luis E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2004-07-13

    A thin, planar laser material is bonded to a light guide of an index-matched material forming a composite disk. Diode array or other pump light is introduced into the composite disk through the edges of the disk. Pump light trapped within the composite disk depletes as it multi-passes the laser medium before reaching an opposing edge of the disk. The resulting compound optical structure efficiently delivers concentrated pump light and to a laser medium of minimum thickness. The external face of the laser medium is used for cooling. A high performance cooler attached to the external face of the laser medium rejects heat. Laser beam extraction is parallel to the heat flux to minimize optical distortions.

  20. Structural and optical properties of CdO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, G. Anil Reddy, M. V. Ramana; Reddy, Katta Narasimha

    2014-04-24

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by r.f. magnetron sputtering technique using a high purity (99.99%) Cd target of 2-inch diameter and 3 mm thickness in an Argon and oxygen mixed atmosphere with sputtering power of 50W and sputtering pressure of 2×10{sup −2} mbar. The prepared films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD analysis reveals that the films were polycrystalline with cubic structure. The visible range transmittance was found to be over 70%. The optical band gap increased from 2.7 eV to2.84 eV with decrease of film thickness.

  1. Structural and optical studies of chemically deposited Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gneri, Emine; Gde, Fatma; Boyarbay, Behiye; Gm?, Cebrail

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were deposited at 30 C by chemical bath deposition. ? The deposition time of the chemical bath was adjusted to 20 h, 22 h, and 24 h. ? Effect of deposition time on structural and optical properties of Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were investigated. ? The presence of characteristic bonds of Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} was observed from Raman shift experiment. ? The direct band gap of thin films constant were calculated. -- Abstract: Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were grown on commercial glass substrates by chemical bath deposition at room temperature. The structural and optical properties of Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were studied as a function of deposition time. The thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UVvis spectroscopy. The XRD pattern showed that the Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films had an orthorhombic polycrystalline structure. The lattice constants of the thin films were a = 8.741 ?, b = 14.034 ? and c = 3.728 ?. The characteristic bonds of Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} were observed at 66.3, 111.7, 224.7 and 308.9 cm{sup ?1} using Raman shift experiment. The optical energy band gap of the thin films decreased from 2.12 eV to 2.03 eV with increasing deposition time from 20 to 24 h. The optical constants of the thin films were obtained using the experimentally recorded transmission data as a function of the wavelength.

  2. Studies of thin films and surfaces with optical harmonic generation and electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum frequency generation (SFG) were used to study C{sup 60} thin solid films (low energy ED forbidden electronic excitations), and electron spectroscopy was used to study organic overlayers (xylenes) on Pt(111). Theory of SHG from a thin film is described in terms of surface and bulk contributions as well as local and nonlocal contributions to the optical nonlinearities. (1)In situ SHG data on C{sub 60} films during UHV film growth can be described in terms of only nonlocal contributions to both surface and bulk nonlinear susceptibilities. Microscopic origin of SHG response is discussed in terms of electric quadrupole and ED transitions of C{sub 60}. (2)Adsorption and thermal decomposition of ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111) is studied using HREELS, LEED, AES, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. We have observed preferential decomposition of the methyl groups which leads to distinct decomposition pathways for ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111).

  3. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  4. ON THE DISTANCE OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS USING CEPHEID NIR AND OPTICAL-NIR PERIOD-WESENHEIT RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inno, L.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R.; Genovali, K.; Matsunaga, N.; Caputo, F.; Laney, C. D.; Marconi, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2013-02-10

    We present the largest near-infrared (NIR) data sets, JHKs, ever collected for classical Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). We selected fundamental (FU) and first overtone (FO) pulsators, and found 4150 (2571 FU, 1579 FO) Cepheids for Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 3042 (1840 FU, 1202 FO) for Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Current sample is 2-3 times larger than any sample used in previous investigations with NIR photometry. We also discuss optical VI photometry from OGLE-III. NIR and optical-NIR Period-Wesenheit (PW) relations are linear over the entire period range (0.0 < log P {sub FU} {<=} 1.65) and their slopes are, within the intrinsic dispersions, common between the MCs. These are consistent with recent results from pulsation models and observations suggesting that the PW relations are minimally affected by the metal content. The new FU and FO PW relations were calibrated using a sample of Galactic Cepheids with distances based on trigonometric parallaxes and Cepheid pulsation models. By using FU Cepheids we found a true distance moduli of 18.45 {+-} 0.02(random) {+-} 0.10(systematic) mag (LMC) and 18.93 {+-} 0.02(random) {+-} 0.10(systematic) mag (SMC). These estimates are the weighted mean over 10 PW relations and the systematic errors account for uncertainties in the zero point and in the reddening law. We found similar distances using FO Cepheids (18.60 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.10(systematic) mag (LMC) and 19.12 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.10(systematic) mag (SMC)). These new MC distances lead to the relative distance, {Delta}{mu} = 0.48 {+-} 0.03 mag (FU, log P = 1) and {Delta}{mu} = 0.52 {+-} 0.03 mag (FO, log P = 0.5), which agrees quite well with previous estimates based on robust distance indicators.

  5. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm at 5 K was obtained. Magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  6. Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2013-12-02

    Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

  7. Effect of defects on long-pulse laser-induced damage of two kinds of optical thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Bin; Qin Yuan; Ni Xiaowu; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian

    2010-10-10

    In order to study the effect of defects on the laser-induced damage of different optical thin films, we carried out damage experiments on two kinds of thin films with a 1ms long-pulse laser. Surface-defect and subsurface-defect damage models were used to explain the damage morphology. The two-dimensional finite element method was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal-stress fields of these two films. The results show that damages of the two films are due to surface and subsurface defects, respectively. Furthermore, the different dominant defects for thin films of different structures are discussed.

  8. Optical properties of amorphous and crystalline Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} thin films studied with spectroscopic ellipsometry: Optical gap energy and effective mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So, Hyeon Seob; Park, Jun-Woo; Jung, Dae Ho; Ko, Kun Hee; Lee, Hosun

    2015-08-28

    We investigated the optical properties of amorphous and crystalline antimony (Sb)-doped tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films grown using the co-sputtering deposition method at room temperature. We used undoped and Sb-doped (8 wt. %) SnO{sub 2} targets. Varying the relative power ratio of the two targets, we controlled the Sb-composition of the SnO{sub 2}:Sb thin films up to 2.3 at. % of Sb contents. Through annealing, the as-grown amorphous SnO{sub 2}:Sb thin films were transformed to crystalline thin films. Dielectric functions were obtained from the measured ellipsometry angles, Ψ and Δ, using the Drude and parametric optical constant models. We determined the absorption coefficients and optical gap energies of the SnO{sub 2}:Sb thin films from the dielectric functions. We found increasing optical gap energy with increasing Sb composition. Increases in the Drude tail amplitudes, a signature of free carrier concentrations, were found in annealed, crystalline thin films with increasing Sb composition. The increase in the optical gap energy with increasing Sb composition was mainly attributed to the Burstein-Moss effect. Using Hall effect measurements, we obtained Hall carrier concentrations (N{sub Hall}) and electron Hall mobilities (μ{sub Hall}). The carrier concentrations and mobilities increased from 2.6 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} and 1.0 cm{sup 2}/(V s) to 2.0 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −1} and 7.2 cm{sup 2}/(V s), respectively, with increasing Sb contents. This result suggests that the nominally undoped SnO{sub 2} films are unintentionally n-type doped. Assuming that the N{sub Hall} and optical carrier concentrations (N{sub opt}) were the same, we obtained the effective masses of the SnO{sub 2}:Sb thin films with increasing Sb compositions. The effective masses of the SnO{sub 2}:Sb thin films increased from 0.245 m{sub 0} to 0.4 m{sub 0} with increasing Sb doping contents, and the nonparabolicity of the conduction band was estimated. We

  9. MAGIC Cloud Properties from Zenith Radiance Data Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: MAGIC Cloud Properties from Zenith Radiance Data Final Campaign Summary Cloud droplet size and optical depth are the most fundamental properties for understanding cloud ...

  10. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Frank; Goodfellow, John; Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Hoffman, Matthias; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaohang; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Rappe, Andrew; et al

    2015-09-21

    In this article, terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric thin-film BiFeO3 while monitoring the time-dependent ferroelectric polarization through its nonlinear optical response. Modulations in the intensity of the second harmonic light generated by the film correspond to on–off ratios of 220 × gateable on femtosecond timescales. Polarization modulations comparable to the built-in static polarization are observed.

  11. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Frank; Goodfellow, John; Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Hoffmann, Matthias; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Zhu, Yi; Zalden, Peter; Zhang, Xiaohang; Takeuchi, Ichiro; et al

    2015-09-21

    Terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric thin-film BiFeO3 while monitoring the time-dependent ferroelectric polarization through its nonlinear optical response. Modulations in the intensity of the second harmonic light generated by the film correspond to on–off ratios of 220× gateable on femtosecond timescales. Lastly, polarization modulations comparable to the built-in static polarization are observed.

  12. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited undermore » higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.« less

  13. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited under higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.

  14. Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud

  15. Investigation of the nonlocal nonlinear optical response of copper nanostructured thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmanfarmaei, B; RashidianVaziri, M R; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F

    2014-11-30

    Nanostructured copper thin films have been prepared using the pulsed laser deposition method. Optical absorption spectra of these films exhibit plasmonic absorption peaks around 619 nm, which suggests the formation of copper nanoparticles on their surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs of the films confirm the nanoparticle formation on the films surfaces. After laser beam passing through the thin films, the observed diffraction rings on a far-field screen have been recorded. Despite the smallness of the maximal axial phase shifts of the films, which have been obtained using the nonlocal z-scan theory, a series of low-intensity rings can be observed on the far field screen for some specific positions of the thin films from the focal point. It is shown that the best approach to determining the sign and magnitude of the nonlinear refractive index of thin samples is the application of the conventional closeaperture z-scan method. (nanostructures)

  16. Nano-indentation of single-layer optical oxide thin films grown by electron-beam deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrotra, K.; Oliver, J. B.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of optical oxide thin films is performed using nano-indentation, and the results are explained based on the deposition conditions used. These oxide films are generally deposited to have a porous microstructure that optimizes laser induced damage thresholds, but changes in deposition conditions lead to varying degrees of porosity, density, and possibly the microstructure of the thin film. This can directly explain the differences in the mechanical properties of the film studied here and those reported in literature. Of the four single-layer thin films tested, alumina was observed to demonstrate the highest values of nano-indentation hardness and elastic modulus. This is likely a result of the dense microstructure of the thin film arising from the particular deposition conditions used.

  17. Brush-Coated Nanoparticle Polymer Thin Films: structure-mechanical-optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Peter F.

    2015-01-13

    Executive Summary Our work was devoted to understanding the structure and properties of a class of thin film polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). PNCs are composed of polymer hosts into which nanoparticles (metallic nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods, C60, nanotubes) are incorporated. PNCs exhibit a diverse range of functional properties (optical, electronic, mechanical, biomedical, structural), determined in part by the chemical composition of the polymer host and the type of nanoparticle. The properties PNCs rely not only on specific functional, size-dependent, behavior of the nanoparticles, but also on the dispersion, and organizational order in some cases, inter-nanoparticle separation distances, and on relative interactions between the nanoparticles and the host. Therefore the scientific challenges associated with understanding the interrelations between the structure and function/properties of PNCs are far more complex than may be understood based only on the knowledge of the compositions of the constituents. The challenges of understanding the structure-function behavior of PNCs are further compounded by the fact that control of the dispersion of the nanoparticles within the polymer hosts is difficult; one must learn how to disperse inorganic particles within an organic host. The goal of this proposal was to develop an understanding of the connection between the structure and the thermal (glass transition), mechanical and optical properties of a specific class of PNCs. Specifically PNCs composed of polymer chain grafted gold nanoparticles within polymer hosts. A major objective was to understand how to develop basic principles that enable the fabrication of functional materials possessing optimized morphologies and combinations of materials properties. Accomplishments: We developed: (1) fundamental principles that enabled the creation of thin film PNCs possessing more complex morphologies of homopolymers and block copolymer micellar systems [1-6]; (2) a new

  18. Final Report on the Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative ... integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds ...

  19. Optical Thin Films for Gas Sensing in Advanced Coal Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohodnicki, Paul; Brown, Thomas; Baltrus John; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2012-08-09

    Even for existing coal based plants, the opportunity for sensors and controls to improve efficiency is great. A wide range of gas species are of interest for relevant applications. Functional sensor layers for embedded sensing must be compatible with extreme conditions (temperature, pressure, corrosive). Au incorporated metal oxides have been looked at by a number of other authors previously for gas sensing, but have often focused on temperatures below 500{degree}C. Au nanoparticle incorporated metal oxide thin films have shown enhanced gas sensing response. In prior work, we have demonstrated that material systems such as Au nanoparticle incorporated TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a potentially useful optical response to changing gas atmospheres at temperatures up to ~800-850{degree}C. Current work is focused on sputter-deposited Au/TiO{sub 2} films. Au and Ti are multi-layered sputter deposited, followed by a 950{degree}C oxidation step. Increasing Au layer thickness yields larger particles. Interband electronic transitions significantly modify the optical constants of Au as compared to the damped free electron theory. A high temperature oxidation (20%O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) treatment was performed at 700{degree}C followed by a reduction (4%H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) treatment to illustrate the shift in both absorption and scattering with exposure to reducing gases. Shift of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak in changing gas atmospheres is well documented, but shift in the peak associated with diffuse scattering is a new observation. Increasing Au layer-thickness results in an increase in LSPR absorption and a shift to longer wavelengths. Diffuse scattering associated with the LSPR resonance of Au shows a similar trend with increasing Au thickness. To model the temperature dependence of LSPR, the modification to the plasmon frequency, the damping frequency, and the dielectric constant of the oxide matrix must be accounted for. Thermal expansion of Au causes

  20. Giant optical enhancement of strain gradient in ferroelectric BiFeO3 thin films and its physical origin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yuelin; Adamo, C.; Chen, Pice; Evans, Paul G.; Nakhmanson, Serge M.; Parker, William; Rowland, Clare E.; Schaller, Richard D.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Walko, Donald A.; et al

    2015-11-20

    Through mapping of the spatiotemporal strain profile in ferroelectric BiFeO3 epitaxial thin films, we report an optically initiated dynamic enhancement of the strain gradient of 105–106 m-1 that lasts up to a few ns depending on the film thickness. Correlating with transient optical absorption measurements, the enhancement of the strain gradient is attributed to a piezoelectric effect driven by a transient screening field mediated by excitons. In conclusion, these findings not only demonstrate a new possible way of controlling the flexoelectric effect, but also reveal the important role of exciton dynamics in photostriction and photovoltaic effects in ferroelectrics.

  1. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties from AERI Lidar Observations: Algorithm and Results from SHEBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to retrieve microphysical properties from mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented. This mixed-phase cloud property retrieval algorithm (MIXCRA) retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective radius of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance and lidar cloud boundary observations. The theoretical basis for this technique is that the absorption coefficient of ice is greater than that of liquid water from 10 to 13 ?m, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16 to 25 ?m. MIXCRA retrievals are only valid for optically thin (?visible < 6) single-layer clouds when the precipitable water vapor is less than 1 cm. MIXCRA was applied to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data that were collected during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment from November 1997 to May 1998, where 63% of all of the cloudy scenes above the SHEBA site met this specification. The retrieval determined that approximately 48% of these clouds were mixed phase and that a significant number of clouds (during all 7 months) contained liquid water, even for cloud temperatures as low as 240 K. The retrieved distributions of effective radii for water and ice particles in single-phase clouds are shown to be different than the effective radii in mixed-phase clouds.

  2. Structural characterization and novel optical properties of defect chalcopyrite ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, S.S.; Sakr, G.B.; Yahia, I.S.; Basset, D.M. Abdel

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Preparation and characterization of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} in powder and thin film forms. {yields} Structure properties such as XRD and EDX. {yields} Optical constant of the as-deposited ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} for the first time. {yields} Extraction of the optical parameters of the studied films. -- Abstract: Stoichiometric thin film samples of the ternary ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} defect chalcopyrite compound were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique. The elemental chemical composition of the prepared bulk material as well as of the as-deposited film was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin films were deposited, by conventional thermal evaporation technique onto highly cleaned glass substrates. The X-ray and electron diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited and the annealed ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} films at annealing temperature t{sub a} {<=} 548 K are amorphous, while those annealed at t{sub a} {>=} 573 K (for 1 h), are polycrystalline. The optical properties of the as-deposited films have been investigated for the first time at normal incidence in the spectral range from 500 to 2500 nm. The refractive index dispersion in the transmission and low absorption region is adequately described by the Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator model, whereby, the values of the oscillator parameters have been calculated. The analysis of the optical absorption coefficient revealed an in-direct optical transition with energy of 1.33 eV for the as-deposited sample. This work suggested that ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} is a good candidate in solar cell devices as an absorbing layer.

  3. Investigation of the optical properties of MoS{sub 2} thin films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ellipsometry Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By...

  4. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. ...

  5. Spectral behavior of the optical constants in the visible/near infrared of GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films grown at glancing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Palma, R. J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pantano, C. G.

    2007-04-23

    GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films were deposited using glancing angle deposition onto transparent glass substrates for the determination of the spectral behavior of the optical constants (index of refraction n and extinction coefficient k) in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-2500 nm) as a function of the deposition angle. Computational simulations based on the matrix method were employed to determine the values of the optical constants of the different films from the experimental reflectance and transmittance spectra. A significant dependence of the overall optical behavior on the deposition angle is found. Furthermore, the band gap of the GeSbSe thin films was calculated. The accurate determination of the optical constants of films grown at glancing angle will enable the development of sculptured thin film fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors.

  6. Influence of baking method and baking temperature on the optical properties of ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Zi-Neng; Chan, Kah-Yoong

    2015-04-24

    In this work, sol-gel spin coating technique was utilised to coat ZnO thin films on glass substrates. During the intermediate 3 minutes baking process, either hotplate or convection oven was employed to bake the samples. The temperature for the baking process was varied from 150°C to 300°C for both instruments. Avantes Optical Spectrophotometer was used to characterise the optical property. The optical transmittances of hotplate-baked and oven-baked samples showed different trends with increasing baking temperatures, ranging from below 50% transmittance to over 90% transmittance in the visible range of wavelength. The difference in baking mechanisms using hotplate and convection oven will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  8. Optical properties and defect levels in a surface layer found on CuInSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulfotuh, F.; Wangensteen, T.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors have used photoluminescence (PL) and wavelength scanning ellipsometry (WSE) to clarify the relationship among the electro-optical properties of copper indium diselenide (CIS) thin films, the type and origin of dominant defect states, and device performance. The PL study has revealed several shallow acceptor and donor levels dominating the semiconductor. PL emission from points at different depths from the surface of the CIS sample has been obtained by changing the angle of incidence of the excitation laser beam. The resulting data were used to determine the dominant defect states as a function of composition gradient at the surface of the chalcopyrite compound. The significance of this type of measurement is that it allowed the detection of a very thin layer with a larger bandgap (1.15-1.26 eV) than the CIS present on the surface of the CIS thin films. The presence of this layer has been correlated by several groups to improvement of the CIS cell performance. An important need that results from detecting this layer on the surface of the CIS semiconductor is the determination of its thickness and optical constants (n, k) as a function of wavelength. The thickness of this surface layer is about 500 {Angstrom}.

  9. Influence of structural disorder on soft x-ray optical behavior of NbC thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Amol E-mail: rrcat.amol@gmail.com; Modi, Mohammed H.; Sinha, A. K.; Lodha, G. S.; Rajput, Parasmani

    2015-05-07

    Structural and chemical properties of compound materials are modified, when thin films are formed from bulk materials. To understand these changes, a study was pursued on niobium carbide (NbC) thin films of different thicknesses deposited on Si (100) substrate using ion beam sputtering technique. Optical response of the film was measured in 4–36 nm wavelength region using Indus-1 reflectivity beamline. A discrepancy in soft x-ray performance of NbC film was observed which could not be explained with Henke's tabulated data (see http://henke.lbl.gov/optical{sub c}onstants/ ). In order to understand this, detailed structural and chemical investigations were carried out using x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption near edge structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. It was found that the presence of unreacted carbon and Nb deficiency due to reduced Nb-Nb coordination are responsible for lower soft x-ray reflectivity performance. NbC is an important material for soft x-ray optical devices, hence the structural disorder need to be controlled to achieve the best performances.

  10. “Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David

    2015-01-13

    Project goals; Characterize the aerosol and ice vertical distributions over the ARM NSA site, and in particular to discriminate between elevated aerosol layers and ice clouds in optically thin scattering layers; Characterize the water vapor and aerosol vertical distributions over the ARM Darwin site, how these distributions vary seasonally, and quantify the amount of water vapor and aerosol that is above the boundary layer; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds; and Use the high temporal Raman lidar data to continue to characterize the turbulence within the convective boundary layer and how the turbulence statistics (e.g., variance, skewness) is correlated with larger scale variables predicted by models.

  11. How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jethva, Hiren T.; Torres, Omar; Waquet, Fabien; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

    2014-01-15

    We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

  12. Comparative studies of optical and elastic properties of ZrO{sub 2} thin films prepared under normal and oblique incidence deposition geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, P. Tokas, R. B. Jena, S. Thakur, S. Sahoo, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    Oblique angle deposited optical thin films have attracted recent researcher’s interest because of their attractive optical, micro-structural, mechanical properties and more importantly because of their great potential in achieving tunability in refractive index. These properties in turn make it important in case of designing different optical devices. In the present work, ZrO{sub 2} thin films have been deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporation technique in normal as well as oblique angle deposition configurations. Optical properties, especially refractive index of the films have been estimated by fitting the measured transmission spectra with suitable theoretical dispersion models. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of samples. The elastic properties of both the films are estimated by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy, a new and highly sensitive technique for thin films.

  13. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compared with bulk crystals, FeTeSe thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications. Authors: Sun, Yue 1 ...

  14. Optical absorption in epitaxial La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scafetta, M D.; Xie, Y. J.; Torres, M.; Spanier, J. E.; May, S. J.

    2013-02-25

    We report the dependence of optical absorption on Sr concentration in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (LSFO) (x{<=}0.4) perovskite thin films. Strained epitaxial films were deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using oxide molecular beam epitaxy. We find systematic changes in the optical absorption spectra with increasing x including a red-shift of transition energies and the increasing presence of a lower energy transition within the fundamental gap of pure LaFeO{sub 3}. These results serve as a demonstration of the complex manner in which absorption spectra can be altered in complex oxides via heterovalent A-site substitution.

  15. Infrared-optical spectroscopy of transparent conducting perovskite (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Dongmin; Yu, Kwangnam; Jun Chang, Young; Choi, E. J.; Sohn, Egon; Hoon Kim, Kee

    2014-01-13

    We have performed optical transmission, reflection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and Hall effect measurements on the electron-doped La{sub x}Ba{sub 1x}SnO{sub 3} (x?=?0.04) transparent thin films. From the infrared Drude response and plasma frequency analysis we determine the effective mass of the conducting electron m*?=?0.35m{sub 0}. In the visible-UV region the optical band gap shifts to high energy in (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} by 0.18?eV compared with undoped BaSnO{sub 3} which, in the context of the Burstein-Moss analysis, is consistent with the infrared-m*. m* of BaSnO{sub 3} is compared with other existing transparent conducting oxides (TCO), and implication on search for high-mobility TCO compounds is discussed.

  16. The influence of Cd doping on the microstructure and optical properties of nanocrystalline copper ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Hagary, M.; Matar, A.; Shaaban, E.R.; Emam-Ismail, M.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? The structural and optical properties of Cu{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were studied. ? The micro structural parameters of the films have been determined. ? The room temperature reflectance and transmittance data are analyzed. ? The refractive index and energy gap are determined. ? The single oscillator parameters were calculated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline thin films of mixed CuCd ferrites, Cu{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1), were deposited by electron beam evaporation technique. The films were annealed at 450 C for 1 h. The effect of Cd doping on the structural and optical properties of the deposited films has been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical spectrophotometry. XRD patterns of the annealed films show spinal cubic structure. The lattice parameter was found to increase with the increase of cadmium concentration. The crystallite size of the films was found to vary from 8 nm to 30 nm. The optical transition was found to be direct and indirect transitions with energy gaps decrease from 2.466 (x = 0) to 2.00 (x = 1) eV and from 2.148 (x = 0) to 1.824 (x = 1) eV, respectively. The refractive index dispersion of the films was found to increase with Cd content and discussed in terms of the WempleDiDomenico single oscillator model.

  17. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF-driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Pegon, P.M.; Guerain, J.

    1996-12-31

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors` opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the sol-gel thin film work carried out at CEA Limeil-Valenton and concerning the technology for high power lasers. The authors will briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol-gel process, the production of optical coatings and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes performance of sol-gel optical coatings the authors have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 1.8 MJ / 500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called << LMJ >> (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for their national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology, and that exciting developments in other areas than high power laser technology are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  18. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF-driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors` opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the sol-gel thin film work carried out at Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) and concerning the technology for high power lasers. The authors will briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol-gel process, the production of optical coatings and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes the preparation and performance of sol-gel optical coatings they have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 2 MJ/500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called LMJ (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for their national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology, and that exciting developments in other areas are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  19. Microstructure, optical property, and electronic band structure of cuprous oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jun-Woo; Jang, Hyungkeun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Lee, Hosun; Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2011-11-15

    Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) thin films were grown via radio frequency sputtering deposition at various temperatures. The dielectric functions and luminescence properties of the Cu{sub 2}O thin films were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence, respectively. High-energy peaks were observed in the photoluminescence spectra. Several critical points (CPs) were found using second derivative spectra of the dielectric functions and the standard critical point model. The electronic band structure and the dielectric functions were calculated using density functional theory, and the CP energies were estimated to compare with the experimental data. We identified the high-energy photoluminescence peaks to quasi-direct transitions which arose from the granular structures of the Cu{sub 2}O thin films.

  20. Optically activated sub-millimeter dielectric relaxation in amorphous thin film silicon at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Rezwanur; Ohno, Tim R.; Taylor, P. C.; Scales, John A.

    2014-05-05

    Knowing the frequency-dependent photo-induced complex conductivity of thin films is useful in the design of photovoltaics and other semi-conductor devices. For example, annealing in the far-infrared could in principle be tailored to the specific dielectric properties of a particular sample. The frequency dependence of the conductivity (whether dark or photo-induced) also gives insight into the effective dimensionality of thin films (via the phonon density of states) as well as the presence (or absence) of free carriers, dopants, defects, etc. Ultimately, our goal is to make low-noise, phase-sensitive room temperature measurements of the frequency-dependent conductivity of thin films from microwave frequencies into the far-infrared; covering, the frequency range from ionic and dipole relaxation to atomic and electronic processes. To this end, we have developed a high-Q (quality factor) open cavity resonator capable of resolving the complex conductivity of sub-micron films in the range of 100350?GHz (0.10.35 THz, or 0.41?meV). In this paper, we use a low-power green laser to excite bound charges in high-resistivity amorphous silicon thin film. Even at room temperature, we can resolve both the dark conductivity and photo-induced changes associated with dielectric relaxation and possibly some small portion of free carriers.

  1. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm²

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2014-12-03

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin films grown on LaAlO₃ (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10⁶ A/cm² at 5 K was obtained. In this study, magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals,more » FeTe₀̣₅Se₀̣₅ thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.« less

  2. Effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap of Se{sub 66}Te{sub 25}In{sub 9} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwivedi, D. K.; Pathak, H. P.; Shukla, Nitesh; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-05-15

    Thin films of a-Se{sub 66}Te{sub 25}In{sub 9} have been deposited onto a chemically cleaned glass substrate by thermal evaporation technique under vacuum. Glassy nature of the films has been ascertained by X-ray diffraction pattern. The analysis of absorption spectra, measured at normal incidence, in the spectral range 400-1100 nm has been used for the optical characterization of thin films under investigation. The effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap (E{sub g}) of a-Se{sub 66}Te{sub 25}In{sub 9} have been studied.

  3. Growth mechanism and optical properties of Ti thin films deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einollahzadeh-Samadi, Motahareh; Dariani, Reza S.

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a detailed study of the influence of the thickness on the morphological and optical properties of titanium (Ti) thin films deposited onto rough fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by d.c. magnetron sputtering is carried out. The films were characterized by several methods for composition, crystallinity, morphology, and optical properties. Regardless of the deposition time, all the studied Ti films of 400, 1500, 2000, and 2500?nm in thickness were single crystalline in the ?-Ti phase and also very similar to each other with respect to composition. Using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, the authors analyzed the roughness evolution of the Ti films characteristics as a function of the film thickness. By applying the dynamic scaling theory to the AFM images, a steady growth roughness exponent ??=?0.72??0.02 and a dynamic growth roughness exponent ??=?0.22??0.02 were determined. The value of ? and ? are consistent with nonlinear growth model incorporating random deposition with surface diffusion. Finally, measuring the reflection spectra of the samples by a spectrophotometer in the spectral range of 3001100?nm allowed us to investigate the optical properties. The authors observed the increments of the reflection of Ti films with thickness, which by employing the effective medium approximation theory showed an increase in thickness followed by an increase in the volume fraction of metal.

  4. Discrimination between thin cirrus and and tropospheric aerosol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discrimination between thin cirrus and and tropospheric aerosol using multiple measurements from Darwin ARCS Mitchell, Ross CSIRO Category: Aerosols Thin cirrus cloud occurs...

  5. Ultrafast terahertz gating of the polarization and giant nonlinear optical response in BiFeO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Frank; Goodfellow, John; Liu, Shi; Grinberg, Ilya; Hoffman, Matthias; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaohang; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Rappe, Andrew; Martin, Lane W.; Wen, Haidan; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2015-09-21

    In this article, terahertz pulses are applied as an all-optical bias to ferroelectric thin-film BiFeO3 while monitoring the time-dependent ferroelectric polarization through its nonlinear optical response. Modulations in the intensity of the second harmonic light generated by the film correspond to on–off ratios of 220 × gateable on femtosecond timescales. Polarization modulations comparable to the built-in static polarization are observed.

  6. Optical, electrical and surface properties of annealed CdO:Mg thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakaya, Seniye E-mail: oozbas@ogu.edu.tr; Ozbas, Omer E-mail: oozbas@ogu.edu.tr

    2013-12-16

    The use of transparent conducting oxides in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices has encouraged research on this field in recent years. Especially, cadmium oxide is a promising material for solar cell application but also for photodiodes and gas sensors. Mg doped CdO (CdO:Mg) films have been prepared on glass substrates by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique. After the production, the films have been annealed in air atmosphere at 475C and half hour. Results on surface, optical and electrical properties of the films as a function of the thermal annealing have been reported. Thicknesses of the films have been determined by the filmetrics thin film measurement system. Transmission and absorbance spectra have been taken by UV-vis spectrophotometer. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis indicates that the roughness of the surface decreases upon increasing Mg concentration. The minimum resistivity value of the films was 210{sup ?3} ? cm.

  7. Theoretical simulations of protective thin film Fabry-Pérot filters for integrated optical elements of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarrie, L. E-mail: lindsay.o.quarrie@gmail.com

    2014-09-15

    The lifetime of Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) is limited by damage initiated by reaction of the glass envelope of its gain medium with rubidium vapor. Rubidium is absorbed into the glass and the rubidium cations diffuse through the glass structure, breaking bridging Si-O bonds. A damage-resistant thin film was developed enhancing high-optical transmission at natural rubidium resonance input and output laser beam wavelengths of 780 nm and 795 nm, while protecting the optical windows of the gain cell in a DPAL. The methodology developed here can be readily modified for simulation of expected transmission performance at input pump and output laser wavelengths using different combination of thin film materials in a DPAL. High coupling efficiency of the light through the gas cell was accomplished by matching the air-glass and glass-gas interfaces at the appropriate wavelengths using a dielectric stack of high and low index of refraction materials selected to work at the laser energies and protected from the alkali metal vapor in the gain cell. Thin films as oxides of aluminum, zirconium, tantalum, and silicon were selected allowing the creation of Fabry-Perot optical filters on the optical windows achieving close to 100% laser transmission in a solid optic combination of window and highly reflective mirror. This approach allows for the development of a new whole solid optic laser.

  8. Optical spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in ultra-thin metasurfaces with arbitrary topological charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Frdric; De Leon, Israel; Schulz, Sebastian A.; Upham, Jeremy; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-09-08

    Orbital angular momentum associated with the helical phase-front of optical beams provides an unbounded space for both classical and quantum communications. Among the different approaches to generate and manipulate orbital angular momentum states of light, coupling between spin and orbital angular momentum allows a faster manipulation of orbital angular momentum states because it depends on manipulating the polarisation state of light, which is simpler and generally faster than manipulating conventional orbital angular momentum generators. In this work, we design and fabricate an ultra-thin spin-to-orbital angular momentum converter, based on plasmonic nano-antennas and operating in the visible wavelength range that is capable of converting spin to an arbitrary value of orbital angular momentum ?. The nano-antennas are arranged in an array with a well-defined geometry in the transverse plane of the beam, possessing a specific integer or half-integer topological charge q. When a circularly polarised light beam traverses this metasurface, the output beam polarisation switches handedness and the orbital angular momentum changes in value by ?=2q? per photon. We experimentally demonstrate ? values ranging from 1 to 25 with conversion efficiencies of 8.6%??0.4%. Our ultra-thin devices are integratable and thus suitable for applications in quantum communications, quantum computations, and nano-scale sensing.

  9. Investigation of size dependent structural and optical properties of thin films of CdSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Madhulika; Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 ; Sharma, A.B.; Mishra, N.; Pandey, R.K.

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} CdSe q-dots have been synthesized using simple chemical synthesis route. {yields} Thin film of CdSe quantum dots exhibited self-organized growth. {yields} Size dependent blue shift observed in the absorption edge of CdSe nanocrystallites. {yields} PL emission band corresponds to band edge luminescence and defect luminescence. {yields} Organized growth led to enhancement in luminescence yield of smaller size Q-dots. -- Abstract: Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots were grown on indium tin oxide substrate using wet chemical technique for possible application as light emitting devices. The structural, morphological and luminescence properties of the as deposited thin films of CdSe Q-dot have been investigated, using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical and luminescence spectroscopy. The quantum dots have been shown to deposit in an organized array on ITO/glass substrate. The as grown Q-dots exhibited size dependent blue shift in the absorption edge. The effect of quantum confinement also manifested as a blue shift of photoluminescence emission. It is shown that the nanocrystalline CdSe exhibits intense photoluminescence as compared to the large grained polycrystalline CdSe films.

  10. ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 1630: J. Comstock - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depth (CLOWD) 1630 to 1645: B. Albrecht - Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CLAP-MBL) 1645 to ...

  11. Synthesis, structural and optical characterization of undoped, N-doped ZnO and co-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pathak, Trilok Kumar Kumar, R.; Purohit, L. P.

    2015-05-15

    ZnO, N-doped ZnO and Al-N co-doped ZnO thin films were deposited on ITO coated corning glass by spin coater using sol-gel method. The films were annealed in air at 450°C for one hour. The crystallographic structure and morphology of the films were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The X-ray diffraction results confirm that the thin films are of wurtzite hexagonal with a very small distortion. The optical properties were investigated by transmission spectra of different films using spectrophotometer (Shimadzu UV-VIS-NIR 3600). The results indicate that the N doped ZnO thin films have obviously enhanced transmittance in visible region. Moreover, the thickness of the films has strong influences on the optical constants.

  12. Research on the electronic and optical properties of polymer and other organic molecular thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The main goal of the work is to find materials and methods of optimization of organic layered electroluminescent cells and to study such properties of polymers and other organic materials that can be used in various opto-electronic devices. The summary of results obtained during the first year of work is presented. They are: (1) the possibility to produce electroluminescent cells using a vacuum deposition photoresist technology for commercial photoresists has been demonstrated; (2) the idea to replace the polyaryl polymers by other polymers with weaker hole conductivity for optimization of electroluminescent cells with ITO-Al electrodes has been suggested. The goal is to obtain amorphous processable thin films of radiative recombination layers in electroluminescent devices; (3) procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum-deposited poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) films on various substrates have been developed; (4) it was found for the first time that the fluorescence intensity of PPP films depends on the degree of polymerization; (5) the role of interfaces between organic compounds, on one side, and metals or semiconductors, on the other side, has been studied and quenching of the fluorescence caused by semiconductor layer in thin sandwiches has been observed; (6) studies of the dynamics of photoexcitations revealed the exciton self-trapping in quasi-one-dimensional aggregates; and (7) conditions for preparation of highly crystalline fullerene C{sub 60} films by vacuum deposition have been found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers have been prepared.

  13. Structural and optical properties of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin film alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J. H.; Shafarman, W. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; McCandless, B. E.

    2014-06-14

    The structural and optical properties of pentenary alloy (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin films were characterized over the entire compositional range at a fixed (Cu + Ag)/(In + Ga) ratio. Films deposited at 550 °C on bare and molybdenum coated soda-lime glass by elemental co-evaporation in a single-stage process with constant incident fluxes exhibit single phase chalcopyrite structure, corresponding to 122 spacegroup (I-42d) over the entire compositional space. Unit cell refinement of the diffraction patterns show that increasing Ag substitution for Cu, the refined a{sub o} lattice constant, (Ag,Cu)-Se bond length, and anion displacement increase in accordance with the theoretical model proposed by Jaffe, Wei, and Zunger. However, the refined c{sub o} lattice constant and (In,Ga)-Se bond length deviated from theoretical expectations for films with mid-range Ag and Ga compositions and are attributed to influences from crystallographic bond chain ordering or cation electronegativity. The optical band gap, derived from transmission and reflection measurements, widened with increasing Ag and Ga content, due to influences from anion displacement and cation electronegativity, as expected from theoretical considerations for pseudo-binary chalcopyrite compounds.

  14. Multiband Optical Absorption Controlled by Lattice Strain in Thin-Film LaCrO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sushko, Peter; Qiao, Liang; Bowden, Mark E.; Varga, Tamas; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Urban, III, Frank K.; Barton, David; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-02-11

    Experimental measurements and ab initio modeling of the optical transitions in strained G-type antiferromagnetic LaCrO3 resolve two decades of debate regarding the magnitude of the optical band gap and the character of the corresponding transitions in this material. Using time-dependent density functional theory and accounting for thermal disorder effects, we demonstrate that the fourmost prominent low-energy absorption features are due to intra-Cr t2g {eg (2.4, 3.6 eV), inter-Crt2g {t2g (4.4 eV), and inter-ion O 2p { Cr 3d (from ?5 eV) transitions and show that the excitation energies of the latter type can be strongly affected by the lattice strain.

  15. Polar self-assembled thin films for non-linear optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, XiaoGuang; Swanson, Basil I.; Li, DeQuan

    2000-01-01

    The design and synthesis of a family of calix[4]arene-based nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores are discussed. The calixarene chromophores are macrocyclic compounds consisting of four simple D-.pi.-A units bridged by methylene groups. These molecules were synthesized such that four D-.pi.-A units of the calix[4]arene were aligned along the same direction with the calixarene in a cone conformation. These nonlinear optical super-chromophores were subsequently fabricated into covalently bound self-assembled monolayers on the surfaces of fused silica and silicon. Spectroscopic second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements were carried out to determine the absolute value of the dominant element of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility, d.sub.33, and the average molecular alignment, .PSI.. A value of d.sub.33 =60 pm/V at a fundamental wavelength of 890 nm, and .PSI..about.36.degree. was found with respect to the surface normal.

  16. Broadening of optical transitions in polycrystalline CdS and CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jian; Chen Jie; Collins, R. W.

    2010-11-01

    The dielectric functions {epsilon} of polycrystalline CdS and CdTe thin films sputter deposited onto Si wafers were measured from 0.75 to 6.5 eV by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. Differences in {epsilon} due to processing variations are well understood using an excited carrier scattering model. For each sample, a carrier mean free path {lambda} is defined that is found to be inversely proportional to the broadening of each of the band structure critical points (CPs) deduced from {epsilon}. The rate at which broadening occurs with {lambda}{sup -1} is different for each CP, enabling a carrier group speed {upsilon}{sub g} to be identified for the CP. With the database for {upsilon}{sub g}, {epsilon} can be analyzed to evaluate the quality of materials used in CdS/CdTe photovoltaic heterojunctions.

  17. Influence of Ag doping concentration on structural and optical properties of CdS thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pragati; Saxena, Nupur; Gupta, Vinay; Agarwal, Avinash

    2015-05-15

    This work shows the influence of Ag concentration on structural properties of pulsed laser deposited nanocrystalline CdS thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirm the dopant concentration in CdS films and atomic concentration of elements. XPS studies show that the samples are slightly sulfur deficient. GAXRD scan reveals the structural phase transformation from cubic to hexagonal phase of CdS without appearance of any phase of CdO, Ag{sub 2}O or Ag{sub 2}S suggesting the substitutional doping of Ag ions. Photoluminescence studies illustrate that emission intensity increases with increase in dopant concentration upto 5% and then decreases for higher dopant concentration.

  18. Experimental correlation between nonlinear optical and magnetotransport properties observed in Au-Co thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kaida; Kryutyanskiy, Victor; Kolmychek, Irina; Murzina, Tatiana V.; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic materials where at least one dimension is in the nanometer scale typically exhibit different magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetooptical properties compared to bulk materials. Composite magnetic thin films where the matrix composition, magnetic cluster size, and overall composite film thickness can be experimentally tailored via adequate processing or growth parameters offer a viable nanoscale platform to investigate possible correlations between nonlinear magnetooptical and magnetotransport properties, since both types of properties are sensitive to the local magnetization landscape. As a result, it has been shown that the local magnetization contrast affects the nonlinear magnetooptical properties as well as the magnetotransport properties in magnetic-metal/nonmagnetic metal multilayers; thus, nanocomposite films showcase another path to investigate possible correlations between these distinct properties which may prove useful for sensing applications.

  19. Experimental correlation between nonlinear optical and magnetotransport properties observed in Au-Co thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Kaida; Kryutyanskiy, Victor; Kolmychek, Irina; Murzina, Tatiana V.; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic materials where at least one dimension is in the nanometer scale typically exhibit different magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetooptical properties compared to bulk materials. Composite magnetic thin films where the matrix composition, magnetic cluster size, and overall composite film thickness can be experimentally tailored via adequate processing or growth parameters offer a viable nanoscale platform to investigate possible correlations between nonlinear magnetooptical and magnetotransport properties, since both types of properties are sensitive to the local magnetization landscape. As a result, it has been shown that the local magnetization contrast affects the nonlinear magnetooptical properties as well as the magnetotransport propertiesmore » in magnetic-metal/nonmagnetic metal multilayers; thus, nanocomposite films showcase another path to investigate possible correlations between these distinct properties which may prove useful for sensing applications.« less

  20. Plasmonic excitation-assisted optical and electric enhancement in ultra-thin solar cells: the influence of nano-strip cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad Heydari, Mehdi; Ajamgard, Narges

    2015-08-15

    The effects of Ag nano-strips with triangle, rectangular and trapezoid cross sections on the optical absorption, generation rate, and short-circuit current density of ultra-thin solar cells were investigated. By putting the nano-strips as a grating structure on the top of the solar cells, the waveguide, surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes, which are excited with the assistance of nano-strips, were evaluated in TE and TM polarizations. The results show, firstly, the TM modes are more influential than TE modes in optical and electrical properties enhancement of solar cell, because of plasmonic excitations in TM mode. Secondly, the trapezoid nano-strips reveal noticeable impact on the optical absorption, generation rate, and short-circuit current density enhancement than triangle and rectangular ones. In particular, the absorption of long wavelengths which is a challenge in ultra-thin solar cells is significantly improved by using Ag trapezoid nano-strips.

  1. Cloud properties derived from two lidars over the ARM SGP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Morille, Y.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-02-16

    [1] Active remote sensors such as lidars or radars can be used with other data to quantify the cloud properties at regional scale and at global scale (Dupont et al., 2009). Relative to radar, lidar remote sensing is sensitive to very thin and high clouds but has a significant limitation due to signal attenuation in the ability to precisely quantify the properties of clouds with a 20 cloud optical thickness larger than 3. In this study, 10-years of backscatter lidar signal data are analysed by a unique algorithm called STRucture of ATmosphere (STRAT, Morille et al., 2007). We apply the STRAT algorithm to data from both the collocated Micropulse lidar (MPL) and a Raman lidar (RL) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 1998 and 2009. Raw backscatter lidar signal is processed and 25 corrections for detector deadtime, afterpulse, and overlap are applied. (Campbell et al.) The cloud properties for all levels of clouds are derived and distributions of cloud base height (CBH), top height (CTH), physical cloud thickness (CT), and optical thickness (COT) from local statistics are compared. The goal of this study is (1) to establish a climatology of macrophysical and optical properties for all levels of clouds observed over the ARM SGP site 30 and (2) to estimate the discrepancies induced by the two remote sensing systems (pulse energy, sampling, resolution, etc.). Our first results tend to show that the MPLs, which are the primary ARM lidars, have a distinctly limited range where all of these cloud properties are detectable, especially cloud top and cloud thickness, but even actual cloud base especially during summer daytime period. According to the comparisons between RL and MPL, almost 50% of situations show a signal to noise ratio too low (smaller than 3) for the MPL in order to detect clouds higher than 7km during daytime period in summer. Consequently, the MPLderived annual cycle of cirrus cloud base (top) altitude is

  2. X-shaped Electro-Optic Chromophore with Remarkably Blue-Shifted Optical Absorption. Synthesis, Characterization, Linear/Nonlinear Optical Properties, Self-Assembly, and Thin Film Microstructural Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang,H.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; Clays, K.; Song, K.; Marks, T.

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of 'X-shaped' two-dimensional electro-optic (EO) chromophore with extended conjugation has been synthesized and characterized. This chromophore is found to exhibit a remarkably blue-shifted optical maximum (357 nm in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) while maintaining a very large first hyperpolarizability ({beta}). Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) measurements at 800 nm provide a {beta}{sub zzz} value of 1840 x 10{sup -30} esu. Self-assembled thin films of this chromophore were fabricated via a layer-by-layer chemisorptive siloxane-based approach. The chromophoric multilayers have been characterized by transmission optical spectroscopy, advancing contact angle measurements, synchrotron X-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, and angle-dependent polarized second harmonic generation spectroscopy. The self-assembled chromophoric films exhibit a dramatically blue-shifted optical maximum (325 nm) while maintaining a large EO response ({chi}({sup 2}){sub 333} {approx} 232 pm/V at 1064 nm; r{sub 33} {approx} 45 pm/V at 1310 nm). This work demonstrates an attractive approach to developing EO materials offering improved nonlinearity-transparency trade-offs.

  3. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  4. Apparatus and method for characterizing thin film and interfaces using an optical heat generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J; Stoner, Robert J

    1998-01-01

    An optical heat generation and detection system generates a first non-destructive pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation that is directed upon a sample containing at least one interface between similar or dissimilar materials. The first pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation, a pump beam (21a), produces a non-uniform temperature change within the sample. A second non-destructive pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation, a probe beam (21b), is also directed upon the sample. Physical and chemical properties of the materials, and of the interface, are measured by observing changes in a transient optical response of the sample to the probe beam, as revealed by a time dependence of changes in, by example, beam intensity, direction, or state of polarization. The system has increased sensitivity to interfacial properties including defects, contaminants, chemical reactions and delaminations, as compared to conventional non-destructive, non-contact techniques. One feature of this invention is a determination of a Kapitza resistance at the interface, and the correlation of the determined Kapitza resistance with a characteristic of the interface, such as roughness, delamination, the presence of contaminants, etc.

  5. Apparatus and method for characterizing thin film and interfaces using an optical heat generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-05-05

    An optical heat generation and detection system generates a first non-destructive pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation that is directed upon a sample containing at least one interface between similar or dissimilar materials. The first pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation, a pump beam, produces a non-uniform temperature change within the sample. A second non-destructive pulsed beam of electromagnetic radiation, a probe beam, is also directed upon the sample. Physical and chemical properties of the materials, and of the interface, are measured by observing changes in a transient optical response of the sample to the probe beam, as revealed by a time dependence of changes in, by example, beam intensity, direction, or state of polarization. The system has increased sensitivity to interfacial properties including defects, contaminants, chemical reactions and delaminations, as compared to conventional non-destructive, non-contact techniques. One feature of this invention is a determination of a Kapitza resistance at the interface, and the correlation of the determined Kapitza resistance with a characteristic of the interface, such as roughness, delamination, the presence of contaminants, etc. 31 figs.

  6. Electronic structure, surface doping, and optical response in epitaxial WSe2 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yi; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Jin, Chenhao; Shi, Su -Fei; Bradley, Aaron J.; Martin-Recio, Ana; Ryu, Hyejin; Kim, Jonghwan; Tang, Shujie; Kim, Yeongkwan; et al

    2016-03-14

    High quality WSe2 films have been grown on bilayer graphene (BLG) with layer-by-layer control of thickness using molecular beam epitaxy. The combination of angle-resolved photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and optical absorption measurements reveal the atomic and electronic structures evolution and optical response of WSe2/BLG. We observe that a bilayer of WSe2 is a direct bandgap semiconductor, when integrated in a BLG-based heterostructure, thus shifting the direct–indirect band gap crossover to trilayer WSe2. In the monolayer limit, WSe2 shows a spin-splitting of 475 meV in the valence band at the K point, the largest value observed among all the MX2 (Mmore » = Mo, W; X = S, Se) materials. The exciton binding energy of monolayer-WSe2/BLG is found to be 0.21 eV, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional three-dimensional semiconductors, yet small as compared to other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogennides (TMDCs) semiconductors. Lastly, our finding regarding the overall modification of the electronic structure by an alkali metal surface electron doping opens a route to further control the electronic properties of TMDCs.« less

  7. RACORO long-term, systematic aircraft observations of boundary layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; McFarquhar, G.; Ogren, J.; Turner, D. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Feingold, G.; Long, C. N.; Jonsson, H. H.; Bucholtz, A.; Collins, D. R.; Diskin, G.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, R. P.; Woods, R. K.; Hubbe, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Schmid, B.

    2010-06-27

    Our knowledge of boundary layer cloud processes is insufficient to resolve pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 gm{sup 2}, which are defined here as being 'thin' Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes in their optical properties. However, it is difficult to retrieve accurately their cloud properties via remote sensing because they are tenuous and often occur in partly cloudy skies. This interferes with our ability to obtain the routine, long-term statistics needed to improve their representation in climate models. To address this problem, in-situ data are needed to investigate cloud processes and to evaluate and refine existing retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign conducted long-term, systematic flights in boundary layer, liquid-water clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 22 January and 30 June 2009. This was the first time that a long-term aircraft campaign was undertaken for systematic in-situ sampling of cloud properties. Using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a comprehensive set of instruments to measure solar and thermal radiation, cloud microphysics, aerosol properties and atmospheric state, the RACORO team logged an unprecedented 59 flights and 259 research hours above the SGP site. Data gathered during the RACORO campaign will provide researchers with a statistically relevant data set of boundary-layer cloud and aerosol properties for future study. These data can be used to validate retrieval algorithms and support process studies and model simulations of boundary layer clouds and, in particular, CLOWD-type clouds. In addition to cloud observations, complementary clear-sky flight patterns were conducted to map the surface

  8. Optically Transparent, Mechanically Durable, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces Enabled by Spinodally Phase-Separated Glass Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Hunter, Scott Robert; Ivanov, Ilia N; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Trejo, Rosa M; Winters, Kyle O.; Haynes, James A; Simpson, John T

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by highly non-wetting natural biological surfaces (e.g., lotus leaves and water strider legs), artificial superhydrophobic surfaces that exhibit water droplet contact angles exceeding 150o have previously been constructed by utilizing various synthesis strategies.[ , , ] Such bio-inspired, water-repellent surfaces offer significant potential for numerous uses ranging from marine applications (e.g., anti-biofouling, anti-corrosion), anti-condensation (e.g., anti-icing, anti-fogging), membranes for selective separation (e.g., oil-water, gas-liquid), microfluidic systems, surfaces requiring reduced maintenance and cleaning, to applications involving glasses and optical materials.[ ] In addition to superhydrophobic attributes, for integration into device systems that have extended operational limits and overall improved performance, surfaces that also possess multifunctional characteristics are desired, where the functionality should match to the application-specific requirements.

  9. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths CLOWD Optical Radiative ... droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the ...

  10. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North ...

  11. In-situ characterization of the optical and electronic properties in GeTe and GaSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velea, A.; Popescu, M.; Galca, A. C.; Socol, G.

    2015-10-07

    GeTe and GaSb thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry at controlled temperatures. The GeTe films were fully amorphous, while the GaSb films were partially crystalized in the as-deposited state. The Tauc-Lorentz model was employed to fit the experimental data. From the temperature study of the optical constants, it was observed the crystallization in the 150–160 °C range of GeTe amorphous films and between 230 and 240 °C of GaSb amorphous phase. A second transition in the resonance energy and the broadening parameter of the Lorentz oscillator was observed due to the crystallization of Sb after 250 °C. The temperatures of 85 °C and 130 °C are noticed as the start of the relaxation of the amorphous GeTe phase and as-deposited GaSb. The peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function red shifted after the phase change, while the variation with temperature of the crystalline phase follows the Varshni law. The electron-phonon coupling constants are 2.88 and 1.64 for c-GeTe and c-GaSb, respectively. An optical contrast up to 60% was obtained for GeTe films and a maximum value of 7.5% is revealed in the case GaSb, which is altered by the partial crystallinity of the as-deposited films.

  12. Morphology, electrical, and optical properties of heavily doped ZnTe:Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Akkad, Fikry; Abdulraheem, Yaser

    2013-11-14

    We report on a study of the physical properties of ZnTe:Cu films with Cu content up to ∼12 at. % prepared using rf magnetron sputtering. The composition and lateral homogeneities are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy measurements on films deposited at different substrate temperatures (up to 325 °C) yielded activation energy of 12 kJ/mole for the grains growth. The results of XPS and electrical and optical measurements provide evidence for the formation of the ternary zinc copper telluride alloy in films containing Cu concentration above ∼4 at. %. The XPS results suggest that copper is incorporated in the alloy with oxidation state Cu{sup 1+} so that the alloy formula can be written Zn{sub 1−y}Cu{sub y} Te with y = 2−x, where x is a parameter measuring the stoichiometry in the Cu site. The formation of this alloy causes appreciable shift in the binding energies of the XPS peaks besides an IR shift in the energy band gap. Detailed analysis of the optical absorption data revealed the presence of two additional transitions, besides the band gap one, originating from the Γ{sub 8} and Γ{sub 7} (spin-orbit) valence bands to a donor level at ∼0.34 eV below the Γ{sub 6} conduction band. This interpretation yields a value for the valence band splitting energy Δ≅ 0.87 eV independent of copper concentration. On the other hand, the mechanism of formation of the alloy is tentatively explained in terms of a point defect reaction in which substitutional Cu defect Cu{sub Zn} is also created. Assuming that substitutional Cu is the dominant acceptor in the Zn rich alloy as in ZnTe, its formation energy was determined to be 1.7 eV close to the theoretical value (1.41 eV) in ZnTe.

  13. Nanocomposite thin films for high temperature optical gas sensing of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-04-02

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for H.sub.2 sensing in a gas stream at temperatures greater than about 500.degree. C. utilizing a hydrogen sensing material. The hydrogen sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. At high temperatures, blue shift of the plasmon resonance optical absorption peak indicates the presence of H.sub.2. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  14. Fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor: Detection of volatile chlorinated compounds in air and water using ultra-thin membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; Olsen, K.B.; Osantowski, R.E.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Griffin, J.W.

    1993-05-01

    Prior work on the fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor called HaloSnif{trademark} has been extended to include an ultra-thin membrane which allows passage of volatile organic chlorinated compounds (VOCl). The membrane has been demonstrated to exclude H{sub 2}O during VOCl monitoring. The system is capable of measuring VOCl in gas-phase samples or aqueous solutions over a wide linear dynamic range. The lower limit of detection for trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), and other related compounds in the gas-phase is 1 to 5 ppm{sub v/v}, and in the aqueous-phase is 5 to 10 mg/L. Waste site characterization and remediation activities often require chemical analysis in the vadose zone and in groundwater. These analyses are typically performed in analytical laboratories using widely accepted standardized methods such as gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The new developments with HaloSnif provide rapid field screening which can augment the standardized methods.

  15. Glancing angle deposition of SiO{sub 2} thin film microstructures: Investigations of optical and morphological properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokas, R. B. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Jena, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sarkar, P. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Thakur, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sahoo, N. K. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com

    2014-04-24

    In present work, the optical and the morphological properties of micro-structured SiO{sub 2} thin films fabricated by using glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique has been carried out. The results are compared with the normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films for the gained advantages. The influence of the glancing angle on the refractive index of porous SiO{sub 2} film was investigated by the spectral transmission measurement in 400–950 nm wavelength regimes. The refractive index has been found to be 1.14@532 nm for the porous SiO{sub 2} film deposited at a glancing angle of 85°. The density and surface qualities of these samples were primarily investigated by using grazing angle X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. Results indicate a substantial decrease in film density and refractive index and increase in surface roughness and grain size for GLAD SiO{sub 2} compared to normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films.

  16. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by  ∼  0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from  ∼ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  17. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ~0.2 and 0.05, respectively. Furthermore, a model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ~0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  18. Precipitating clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A suggestion for a new focus on cloud microphysical process study in the ARM program 1. Retrieving precipitating mixed- phase cloud properties Zhien Wang University of Wyoming zwang@uwyo.edu Retrieving Precipitating Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Global distribution of supercooled water topped stratiform clouds (top > 1 km and length> 14km) Most of them are mixed-phase with precipitation or virga An multiple sensor based approach to provide water phase as well as ice phase properties

  19. Structural and optical properties of Sn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} thin films prepared by flash evaporation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuppan, M. Kaleemulla, S. Rao, N. Madhusudhana Krishna, N. Sai Begam, M. Rigana

    2014-04-24

    Sn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub X}O{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.05) thin films were prepared on glass substrate using the flash evaporation technique. The samples were annealed at 773 K for 2 hrs in air atmosphere. A systematic study was carried out on the structural and optical properties of the as deposited and annealed thin films. From the X-ray diffraction analysis it was found that the Sn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub X}O{sub 2} films deposited at 623 K were amorphous in nature and the Sn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub X}O{sub 2} films annealed at 773 K exhibited the tetragonal structure of the SnO{sub 2}. The optical band gap of the SnO{sub 2} thin films was found to be as 3.17 eV whereas the optical band gap of the Sn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub X}O{sub 2} films was found to be as 3.01 eV after air annealing.

  20. ARM - Measurement - Cloud size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements as cloud thickness, cloud area, and cloud aspect ratio. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  1. Comparison of the structural and optical properties of porous In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N thin films synthesized by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abud, Saleh H.; Hassan, Z.; Yam, F.K.; Ghazai, A.J.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the structural and optical study of porous (1 µm) In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N synthesized by photoelectrochemical etching under various conditions. Field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope images showed that the pre-etched thin films have a sufficiently smooth surface over a large region with wurtzite structure. The roughness increased with an increase in etching duration. The blue shift phenomenon was measured for photoluminescence emission peaks at 300 K. The energy band gap increased to be 3.18 and 3.16 eV for post-etched films at ratios of 1:4 and 1:5, respectively. At the same time, the photoluminescence intensities of the post-etched thin films indicated that the optical properties have been enhanced. - Graphical abstract: PL spectra of the as-grown and porous In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N under various etching duration. - Highlights: • Nanoporous structures of In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N. • The roughness of the porous thin films increased with an increase in etching durations. • No phase segregation in XRD pattern. • Blue shifts were observed in the PL spectra of the post-etched films.

  2. Structural Study And Optical Properties Of TiO{sub 2} Thin Films Elaborated By Thermal Oxidation Of RF Magnetron Sputtered Ti Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guitoume, D.; Achour, S.; Guittoum, A.; Abaidia, S. E. H.

    2008-09-23

    We report on the effect of thickness on the structural and optical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films obtained by direct exposure of Ti metal film to thermal oxidation. Ti thin films with thicknesses ranging from 87 nm to 484 nm were deposited onto glass substrate by RF magnetron sputtering. Thereafter, the as-deposited Ti films were annealed in air at temperature equal to 520 deg. C. The structural evolution and optical properties of obtained TiO{sub 2} films were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The films thicknesses were extracted from RBS spectra. From X-ray diffraction spectra, we can see that all the films present three TiO{sub 2} phases (anatase, rutile and Brookite). The anatase and rutile phases exhibit a strong preferred orientation along (004) and (210) planes respectively. The grain sizes, D (nm), did not change much with increasing thickness. The average value of (nm) was equal to 29 nm for anatase and 26 nm for rutile. The micrographs taken from SEM experiments indicate that the films present a dense micro structure with very small grains. Transmittance spectra show that all the films present a good transparency in the visible region. The dependence of transmittance, optical band gap and refractive index on the thickness of the films was also studied.

  3. Effect of dopent on the structural and optical properties of ZnS thin film as a buffer layer in solar cell application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vashistha, Indu B. Sharma, S. K.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2015-08-28

    In order to find the suitable alternative of toxic CdS buffer layer, deposition of pure ZnS and doped with Al by chemical bath deposition method have been reported. Further as grown pure and doped thin films have been annealed at 150°C. The structural and surface morphological properties have been characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).The XRD analysis shows that annealed thin film has been polycrystalline in nature with sphalerite cubic crystal structure and AFM images indicate increment in grain size as well as growth of crystals after annealing. Optical measurement data give band gap of 3.5 eV which is ideal band gap for buffer layer for solar cell suggesting that the obtained ZnS buffer layer is suitable in a low-cost solar cell.

  4. Femtosecond all-optical parallel logic gates based on tunable saturable to reverse saturable absorption in graphene-oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Sukhdev Yadav, Chandresh

    2013-12-09

    A detailed theoretical analysis of ultrafast transition from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) has been presented in graphene-oxide thin films with femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm. Increase in pulse intensity leads to switching from SA to RSA with increased contrast due to two-photon absorption induced excited-state absorption. Theoretical results are in good agreement with reported experimental results. Interestingly, it is also shown that increase in concentration results in RSA to SA transition. The switching has been optimized to design parallel all-optical femtosecond NOT, AND, OR, XOR, and the universal NAND and NOR logic gates.

  5. Effect of deposition temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdSe thin films synthesised by chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Mudhafer Ali

    2013-12-16

    Cadmium selenide thin films were synthesized on glass substrates using chemical bath technique (CBD) at temperatures 320K, 330K, 340K,and 350K. The polycrystalline nature of the material was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique and various structural parameters such as lattice parameters, grain size, dislocation density, and micro strain. The root mean square (RMS) roughness was obtained by using atomic force microscopy(AFM), which indicated a decreasing average roughness with the decrease of the bath temperature. Optical properties were carried out by UV-Visible transmittance spectra, and the band gap energy was determined.

  6. Giant optical enhancement of strain gradient in ferroelectric BiFeO3 thin films and its physical origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yuelin; Adamo, C.; Chen, Pice; Evans, Paul G.; Nakhmanson, Serge M.; Parker, William; Rowland, Clare E.; Schaller, Richard D.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Walko, Donald A.; Wen, Haidan; Zhang, Qingteng

    2015-11-20

    Through mapping of the spatiotemporal strain profile in ferroelectric BiFeO3 epitaxial thin films, we report an optically initiated dynamic enhancement of the strain gradient of 105–106 m-1 that lasts up to a few ns depending on the film thickness. Correlating with transient optical absorption measurements, the enhancement of the strain gradient is attributed to a piezoelectric effect driven by a transient screening field mediated by excitons. In conclusion, these findings not only demonstrate a new possible way of controlling the flexoelectric effect, but also reveal the important role of exciton dynamics in photostriction and photovoltaic effects in ferroelectrics.

  7. Longwave scattering effects on fluxes in broken cloud fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takara, E.E.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of clouds in the radiative energy balance are important. Most works on the effects of scattering have been in the shortwave; but longwave effects can be significant. In this work, the fluxes above and below a single cloud layer are presented, along with the errors in assuming flat black plate clouds or black clouds. The predicted fluxes are the averaged results of analysis of several fields with the same cloud amount.

  8. Optical response of nongranular high- T sub c Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub minus x superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A. ); Saifi, M.A.; Venkatesan, T.; England, P. ); Wu, X.D.; Inam, A. )

    1990-03-15

    We have investigated the optical response of {ital c}-axis oriented crystalline Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}{ital x}} thin films (bridge and meander devices) on strontium titanate and MgO substrates. cw optical response to a He-Ne laser radiation (wavelength of 0.63 {mu}m) was primarily bolometric. The pulsed optical response was studied with {ital Q}-switched and mode-locked {ital Q}-switched short pulses from a Nd:YAG laser at the wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m. We identify two distinct components contributing to the pulsed optical response: a nonbolometric (as fast as 1 ns) and a bolometric component (several ns). The bolometric component is strong at temperatures in the vicinity of the transition region to the normal state. The nonbolometric component is dominant at temperatures below the transition region showing weak temperature dependence and a linear dependence on the bias current. These results are discussed using the flux motion model and also electron-phonon scattering relaxation dynamics of nonequilibrium superconductors based on the theory of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer. The results suggest that with proper optimization of device parameters (geometry, critical current density, etc.) sensitive bolometers and high-speed detectors covering a broad electromagnetic spectrum (visible and infrared) may be developed.

  9. Structural and optical properties of Ag-doped copper oxide thin films on polyethylene napthalate substrate prepared by low temperature microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sayantan; Alford, T. L.

    2013-06-28

    Silver doped cupric oxide thin films are prepared on polyethylene naphthalate (flexible polymer) substrates. Thin films Ag-doped CuO are deposited on the substrate by co-sputtering followed by microwave assisted oxidation of the metal films. The low temperature tolerance of the polymer substrates led to the search for innovative low temperature processing techniques. Cupric oxide is a p-type semiconductor with an indirect band gap and is used as selective absorption layer solar cells. X-ray diffraction identifies the CuO phases. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry measurements confirm the stoichiometry of each copper oxide formed. The surface morphology is determined by atomic force microscopy. The microstructural properties such as crystallite size and the microstrain for (-111) and (111) planes are calculated and discussed. Incorporation of Ag led to the lowering of band gap in CuO. Consequently, it is determined that Ag addition has a strong effect on the structural, morphological, surface, and optical properties of CuO grown on flexible substrates by microwave annealing. Tauc's plot is used to determine the optical band gap of CuO and Ag doped CuO films. The values of the indirect and direct band gap for CuO are found to be 2.02 eV and 3.19 eV, respectively.

  10. CuAl{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}Se{sub 2} thin films for photovoltaic applications: Optical and compositional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez-Garca, J.; Maffiotte, C.; Guilln, C.; Herrero, J.

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Wide band gap CAGS thin films have been obtained by selenization of evaporated metallic precursors. ? Direct nonlinear dependence of the band gap energy with the Al/(Al + Ga) ratio is found. ? The bowing parameter decreases when the CAGS film thickness increases. ? The Cu at% remains constant in depth, together with some Al, Ga and Se gradients. ? Surface is strongly oxidized but the oxidation is relatively low in bulk. - Abstract: Wide-band gap chalcopyrite semiconductors have a great interest due to their potential application in multi-junction thin film solar cells or as window layers. Polycrystalline CuAl{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}Se{sub 2} (CAGS) thin films have been prepared by selenization of evaporated metallic precursor layers on bare and Mo-coated soda lime glass substrates. The optical properties of CAGS films of 2 thicknesses have been analyzed by spectrophotometry in the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) and the compositional characteristics have been studied by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical transmission increases and the band gap energy shifts toward higher values as the Al content increases, which indicates the partial substitution of Ga by Al. The dependence of the band gap with the composition has resulted to be nonlinear and a bowing parameter of b = 0.62 and b = 0.54 for 0.6 ?m and 1.1 ?m-CAGS samples, respectively, has been obtained. XPS data have shown an Al, Ga and Se composition gradient in depth and a surface strongly oxidized. However, XPS reveals that the Cu composition remains constant in depth and the oxidation is relatively low in bulk increasing slightly in the interface with Mo/SLG. Moreover, samples with high Al content reveal a higher contribution of CuO in depth.

  11. Zinc concentration effect on structural, optical and electrical properties of Cd{sub 1?x}Zn{sub x}Se thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akaltun, Yunus; Y?ld?r?m, M. Ali; Ate?, Aytun; Y?ld?r?m, Muhammet

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Cd{sub 1?x}Zn{sub x}Se thin films were deposited using SILAR method. ? The electron effective mass, refractive index, dielectric constant values were calculated by using the energy bandgap values as a function of the zinc concentration (x). ? The resistivity and activation energy changed as a function of the zinc concentration (x). -- Abstract: Cd{sub 1?x}Zn{sub x}Se thin films with different compositions (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) were deposited on glass substrates using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature and ambient pressure. The zinc concentration (x) effect on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of Cd{sub 1?x}Zn{sub x}Se thin films were investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that all the films exhibited polycrystalline nature and were covered well on glass substrates. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis confirmed nearly stoichiometric deposition of the films. The energy bandgap values were changed from 1.99 to 2.82 eV depending on the zinc concentration. Bowing parameter was calculated as 0.08 eV. The electron effective mass (m{sub e}*/m{sub o}), refractive index (n), optical static and high frequency dielectric constants (?{sub o}, ?{sub ?}) values were calculated by using the energy bandgap values as a function of the zinc concentration. The resistivity values of the films changed between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} ? cm with increasing zinc concentration at room temperature.

  12. Detecting and Evaluating the Effect of Overlaying Thin Cirrus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thin cirrus clouds and examining their potential effects on the DER retrievals (King et al. 1992; 2003). Case studies are presented here using MODIS data to investigate the...

  13. ARM - Measurement - Cloud type

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as cirrus, stratus, cumulus etc Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  14. Electronic structure and optical properties of ?-(Fe{sub 1-x}V{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} solid-solution thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlin, S. E.; Nayyar, I. H.; Kaspar, T. C.; Sushko, P. V.; Chambers, S. A.

    2015-01-26

    We have examined the effect of V doping on the electronic and optical properties of epitaxial hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films, by employing several characterization techniques and computational modeling. The conductivity of ?-(Fe{sub 1-x}V{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} (0???x????0.5) is enhanced by several orders of magnitude as x is increased, as evidenced by electrical resistivity measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra. Optical absorption shows a reduction in the direct band gap by as much as 0.64?eV for x?=?0.53 (E{sub g}?=?1.46?eV) relative to that of ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (E{sub g}?=?2.10?eV). Detailed understanding of the character of the optical transitions in the alloys is achieved using first-principles calculations of the ground and excited states. These calculations reveal that V doping results in occupied V 3d orbitals hybridized with Fe orbitals and located at approximately mid-gap in ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The lowest energy transitions involve charge transfer from occupied V 3d to unoccupied Fe 3d* orbitals. With a low band gap and high conductivity, ?-(Fe{sub 1-x}V{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} is a promising material for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  15. Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds and Retrieving their Optical Properties Using MODIS Data F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College...

  16. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  17. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  18. Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, part 1: feature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-11-01

    A Feature detection and EXtinction retrieval (FEX) algorithm for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar (RL) has been developed. Presented here is part 1 of the FEX algorithm: the detection of features including both clouds and aerosols. The approach of FEX is to use multiple quantities— scattering ratios derived using elastic and nitro-gen channel signals from two fields of view, the scattering ratio derived using only the elastic channel, and the total volume depolarization ratio— to identify features using range-dependent detection thresholds. FEX is designed to be context-sensitive with thresholds determined for each profile by calculating the expected clear-sky signal and noise. The use of multiple quantities pro-vides complementary depictions of cloud and aerosol locations and allows for consistency checks to improve the accuracy of the feature mask. The depolarization ratio is shown to be particularly effective at detecting optically-thin features containing non-spherical particles such as cirrus clouds. Improve-ments over the existing ARM RL cloud mask are shown. The performance of FEX is validated against a collocated micropulse lidar and observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. While we focus on a specific lidar system, the FEX framework presented here is suitable for other Raman or high spectral resolution lidars.

  19. Optical orientation of azo dye molecules in a thin solid film upon nonlinear excitation by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongseok, Jung; Kozenkov, V M; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Nagorskiy, Nikolay M

    2006-11-30

    The orientation of molecules in an amorphous pure azo dye film upon nonlinear excitation is detected for the first time. The simultaneous increase and decrease in the film transmission by a factor of 2.5 for orthogonal polarisations of probe radiation indicated the appearance of orientation order in the film caused by the reorientation of azo dye molecules. Due to a high photostability of the AD-1 azo dye demonstrated in single-photon experiments and a high efficiency of nonlinear orientation obtained in experiments with femtosecond pulses, this dye can be widely used in three-dimensional nanophotonic devices such as photonic crystals, optical computers, and optical memory. (letters)

  20. The role of cobalt doping on magnetic and optical properties of indium oxide nanostructured thin film prepared by sol–gel method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baqiah, H.; Ibrahim, N.B.; Halim, S.A.; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Abdi, M.H.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Cobalt doped indium oxide thin films have been prepared by a sol–gel method. • The films have a thickness less than 100 nm and grain size less than 10 nm. • The lattice parameters and grain size of films decrease as Co content increase. • The optical band gap of films increases as the grain size decrease. • The films' magnetic behaviour is sensitive to ratio of oxygen defects per Co ions. - Abstract: The effect of Co doping concentration, (x = 0.025–0.2), in In{sub 2−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} thin film was investigated by X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ultraviolet visible spectrophotometer (UV–vis) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). All films were prepared by sol–gel technique followed by spin coating process. The XRD and XPS measurements indicate that Co{sup +2} has been successfully substituted in In{sup +3} site. The TEM measurement shows nanostructure morphology of the films. The doping of Co in indium oxide resulted in a decrease in the lattice parameters and grain size while the band gap increased with increasing Co concentration. Further, by comparing VSM and XPS results, the magnetic behaviour of the films were found to be sensitive to Co concentrations, oxygen vacancies and ratio of oxygen defects to Co concentrations. The magnetic behaviour of the prepared films was explained using bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model.

  1. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  2. Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken Scattering Cloud Fields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken Scattering Cloud Fields E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland To simplify the analysis, we made several assumptions: the clouds were cuboidal; they were all identically sized and shaped; and they had constant optical properties. Results and Discussion The model was run for a set of cloud fields with clouds of varying optical thickness and scattering albedo. The predicted effective cloud

  3. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rourke, D; Ahn, S; Nardes, AM; van de Lagemaat, J; Kopidakis, N; Park, W

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer: fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  4. Electronic and optical device applications of hollow cathode plasma assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolat, Sami Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices, namely, thin film transistors (TFTs) and metalsemiconductormetal (MSM) photodetectors, based on GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) are demonstrated. Resistivity of GaN thin films and metal-GaN contact resistance are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Effect of the plasma gas and postmetallization annealing on the performances of the TFTs as well as the effect of the annealing on the performance of MSM photodetectors are studied. Dark current to voltage and responsivity behavior of MSM devices are investigated as well. TFTs with the N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} PA-ALD based GaN channels are observed to have improved stability and transfer characteristics with respect to NH{sub 3} PA-ALD based transistors. Dark current of the MSM photodetectors is suppressed strongly after high-temperature annealing in N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} ambient.

  5. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  6. Optical Absorption and Spectral Photoconductivity in ?-(Fe1-xCrx)2O3 Solid-Solution Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlin, Sara E.; Wang, Yong; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Cohn, Alicia; Gamelin, Daniel R.; Govind, Niranjan; Sushko, P. V.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-09-04

    Hematite, ?-Fe2O3, is an attractive narrow gap oxide for consideration as an efficient visible light photocatalyst, with significant potential for band gap engineering via doping. We examine optical absorption in ? (Fe1 xCrx)2O3 epitaxial films and explain the observed excitations, and the nature of the band gap dependence on x, through first principles calculations. The calculated and measured optical band gap becomes smaller than that of the bulk ?-Fe2O3 and reaches a minimum as the Cr mole fraction increases to 50%. The lowest energy transitions in the mixed-metal alloys involve electron excitation from occupied Cr 3d orbitals to unoccupied Fe 3d orbitals, and they result in a measureable photocurrent. The onset of ?-Fe2O3 photoconductivity can be reduced by nearly ~0.5 eV through addition of Cr.

  7. Electronic structure and optical properties of ?-(Fe1-xVx)2O3 solid-solution thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlin, Sara E.; Nayyar, Iffat H.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Sushko, Petr; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-01-26

    We have examined the effect of V doping on the electronic and optical properties of hematite (?-Fe2O3) by means of ?-(Fe1-xVx)2O3 (0 ? x ? ~0.5) epitaxial films and theoretical modeling. The conductivity is enhanced by several orders of magnitude as x is increased, and this enhancement is manifested in x-ray photoelectron spectra by a growing Doniach-Sunjic tail on the O 1s peak, as well as by increasing intensity at the Fermi level in valence band spectra. Optical absorption shows a reduction in direct band gap by as much as 0.64 eV for x = 0.53 (Eg = 1.46 eV) relative to that of ?-Fe2O3 (Eg = 2.10 eV). Detailed understanding of the character of the optical transitions in the alloys is achieved using first-principles calculations of the ground and excited states. These calculations reveal that V doping results in localized, occupied V 3d states which are hybridized with Fe states and located at approximately mid-gap in ? Fe2O3. The lowest energy transitions involve electronic excitations from occupied V 3d orbitals to unoccupied Fe 3d* orbitals.

  8. Strategies for Electrooptic Film Fabrication. Influence of Pyrrole-Pyridine-Based Dibranched Chromophore Architecture on Covalent Self-Assembly, Thin-Film Microstructure, and Nonlinear Optical Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facchetti,A.; Beverina, L.; van der Boom, M.; Shukla, A.; Dutta, P.; Evmenenko, G.; Marks, T.; Pagani, G.

    2006-01-01

    The new dibranched, heterocyclic 'push-pull' chromophores bis{l_brace}1-(pyridin-4-yl)-2-[2-(N-methylpyrrol-5-yl)]ethane{r_brace}methane (1), 1-(pyrid-4-yl)-2-(N-methyl-5-formylpyrrol-2-yl)ethylene (2), {l_brace}1-(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-2-[2-(N-methylpyrrol-5-yl)]ethane{r_brace}{l_brace}[1-(pyridin-4-yl)-2-[2-(N-methylpyrrol-5-yl)]ethane]{r_brace}methane (3), N-methyl-2-[1-(N-methylpyrid-4-yl)ethen-2-yl]-5-[pyrid-4-yl]ethen-2-yl-pyrrole iodide (4), bis{l_brace}1-(N-methyl-4-pyridinio)-2-[2-(N-methylpyrrol-5-yl)]ethane{r_brace}methane iodide (5), and N-methyl-2,5-[1-(N-methylpyrid-4-yl)ethen-2-yl]pyrrole iodide (6) have been synthesized and characterized. The neutral (1 and 2) and monomethyl salts (3 and 4) undergo chemisorptive reaction with iodobenzyl-functionalized surfaces to afford chromophore monolayers SA-1/SA-2 and SA-3/SA-4, respectively. Molecular structures and other physicochemical properties have been defined by 1H NMR, optical spectroscopy, and XRD. Thin-film characterization by a variety of techniques (optical spectroscopy, specular X-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and angle-dependent polarized second harmonic generation) underscore the importance of the chromophore molecular architecture as well as film growth method on film microstructure and optical/electrooptic response.

  9. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M.

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  10. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-04-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer 'Core to Disk' (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; {approx}79% in Lupus V and {approx}87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A{sub V} {approx} 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  11. Polarization selecting optical element using a porro prism incorporating a thin film polarizer in a single element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrix, James Lee

    2001-05-08

    A Porro prism and a light polarizer are combined in a single optical element termed a Hendrix Prism. The design provides retro-reflection of incoming light of a predetermined polarization in a direction anti-parallel to the direction of light incidence, while reflecting undesired light, i.e., that having a polarization orthogonal to the predetermined polarization, from the surface of the light polarizer. The undesired light is reflected in a direction that does not interfere with the intended operation of the device in which the Hendrix Prism is installed yet provides feedback to the system in which it is used.

  12. Bandgap widening in thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} thin films: Quantitative data based on optical absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shu-Yi; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.; Mlyuka, Nuru R.; Department of Physics, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35063, Dar es Salaam ; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Possnert, Gran; Halln, Anders

    2013-10-14

    Thermochromic Mg-doped VO{sub 2} films were deposited by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering onto heated glass and carbon substrates. Elemental compositions were inferred from Rutherford backscattering. Optical bandgaps were obtained from spectral transmittance and reflectance measurementsfrom both the film side and the back side of the samplesand ensuing determination of absorption coefficients. The bandgap of Mg-doped films was found to increase by 3.9 0.5 eV per unit of atom ratio Mg/(Mg + V) for 0 < Mg/(Mg + V) < 0.21. The presence of ?0.45 at. % Si enhanced the bandgap even more.

  13. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine

    2014-04-10

    This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

  14. Influence of growth time on crystalline structure, morphologic and optical properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attaf, A. Bouhdjar, A.; Saidi, H.; Benkhetta, Y.; Bendjedidi, H.; Nouadji, M.; Lehraki, N.

    2015-03-30

    Indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films are successfully deposited on glass substrate at different deposition timings by ultrasonic spray technique using Indium chloride (InCl{sub 3}) material source witch is prepared with dissolvent Ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-OH), the physical properties of these films are characterized by XRD, MEB,UV-visible. XRD analysis revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature having centered cubic crystal structure and symmetry space group I2{sub 1}3 with a preferred grain orientation along to (222) plane when the deposition time changes from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min, especially when t = 13 min we found that the majority of grains preferred the plane (400). The maximum value of grain size D = 61,51 nm is attained for In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at t =10 min. the average transmittance is about 72%, The optical gap energy is found to decrease from 3.8 to 3.66 eV with growth time Increased from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min the value of E{sub g} will increase to 3.72 eV. A systematic study on the influence of growth time on the properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films deposited by ultrasonic spray at 400 °C has been reported.

  15. Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical

  16. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.

    2015-04-15

    Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel) detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY) if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals.

  17. A study on dependence of the structural, optical and electrical properties of cadmium lead sulphide thin films on Cd/Pb ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, Sinitha B. E-mail: anithakklm@gmail.com; Abraham, Anitha E-mail: anithakklm@gmail.com; Philip, Rachel Reena; Pradeep, B.; Shripathi, T. E-mail: vganesancsr@gmail.com; Ganesan, V. E-mail: vganesancsr@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Cadmium Lead Sulphide thin films with systematic variation in Cd/Pb ratio are prepared at 333K by CBD, adjusting the reagent-molarity, deposition time and pH. XRD exhibits crystalline-amorphous transition as Cd% exceeds Pb%. AFM shows agglomeration of crystallites of size ∼50±5 nm. EDAX assess the composition whereas XPS ascertains the ternary formation, with binding energies of Pb4f{sub 7/2} and 4f{sub 5/2}, Cd3d{sub 5/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} and S2p at 137.03, 141.606, 404.667, 412.133 and 160.218 eV respectively. The optical absorption spectra reveal the variance in the direct allowed band gaps, from 1.57eV to 2.42 eV as Cd/Pb ratio increases from 0.2 to 2.7, suggesting possibility of band gap engineering in the n-type films.

  18. Optical characteristics of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N thin films deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenberg, Eda; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Kemal Okyay, Ali

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films have been deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition at 200?C on c-plane sapphire and Si substrates. The dependence of film structure, absorption edge, and refractive index on postdeposition annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, respectively. Well-adhered, uniform, and polycrystalline wurtzite (hexagonal) GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films were prepared at low deposition temperature. As revealed by the x-ray diffraction analyses, crystallite sizes of the films were between 11.7 and 25.2?nm. The crystallite size of as-deposited GaN film increased from 11.7 to 12.1 and 14.4?nm when the annealing duration increased from 30?min to 2?h (800?C). For all films, the average optical transmission was ?85% in the visible (VIS) and near infrared spectrum. The refractive indices of AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N were lower compared to GaN thin films. The refractive index of as-deposited films decreased from 2.33 to 2.02 (??=?550?nm) with the increased Al content x (0???x???1), while the extinction coefficients (k) were approximately zero in the VIS spectrum (>400?nm). Postdeposition annealing at 900?C for 2?h considerably lowered the refractive index value of GaN films (2.331.92), indicating a significant phase change. The optical bandgap of as-deposited GaN film was found to be 3.95?eV, and it decreased to 3.90?eV for films annealed at 800?C for 30?min and 2?h. On the other hand, this value increased to 4.1?eV for GaN films annealed at 900?C for 2?h. This might be caused by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation and following phase change. The optical bandgap value of as-deposited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N films decreased from 5.75 to 5.25?eV when the x values decreased from 1 to 0.68. Furthermore, postdeposition annealing did not affect the bandgap of Al-rich films.

  19. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  20. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Cloud location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    point in space and time, typically expressed as a binary cloud mask. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  2. Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST during the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor ... performance of a real-time cloud optical depth (COD) sensor (dubbed three-waveband ...

  3. Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene Title: Optical ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud ...

  4. Intermixing at the absorber-buffer layer interface in thin-film...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... DOPED MATERIALS; IMPURITIES; INTERFACES; LAYERS; PASSIVATION; PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECT; RECOMBINATION; SOLAR CELLS; THIN FILMS; TRAPS; ZINC SULFIDES Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  5. Finite-element analysis of the deformation of thin Mylar films...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 ... INDEX; SHRINKAGE; SIMULATION; SOLVENTS; TESTING; THICKNESS; THIN FILMS Word Cloud More ...

  6. FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The

  7. Science Cloud 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Cloud 2011 Science Cloud 2011 June 17, 2011 The Magellan teams at NERSC and Argonne recently presented a joint paper detailing their progress and conclusions. At Science Cloud 2011: The Second Workshop on Scientific Cloud Computing, in a paper titled "Magellan: Experiences from a Science Cloud" (PDF, 320KB), lead author Lavanya Ramakrishnan outlined the groups' most recent achievements and conclusions, including a successful run of real-time data analysis for the STAR

  8. MAGIC Cloud Properties from Zenith Radiance Data Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, J. -Y.C.; Gregory, L.; Wagener, R.

    2016-01-01

    Cloud droplet size and optical depth are the most fundamental properties for understanding cloud formation, dissipation and interactions with aerosol and drizzle. They are also a crucial determinant of Earth’s radiative and water-energy balances. However, these properties are poorly predicted in climate models. As a result, the response of clouds to climate change is one of the major sources of uncertainty in climate prediction.

  9. Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPACE Cloud properties derived from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar during MPACE Eloranta, Edwin University of Wisconsin Category: Field Campaigns Cloud properties were derived from data acquired with University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar during its 6-week MPACE deployment. This poster presents statistics on: 1) the altitude and temperature distribution of optical depth and cloud phase. 2) the dependence of lidar depolarization and backscatter phase function on

  10. Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR)

  11. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 m) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 m), known as the small mode. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud

  12. Nonlinear optical absorption tuning in Bi{sub 3.15}Nd{sub 0.85}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} ferroelectric thin films by thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Zhong, X. L. E-mail: jbwang@xtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. B. E-mail: jbwang@xtu.edu.cn; Song, H. J.; Tan, C. B.; Li, B.; Cheng, G. H.; Liu, X.

    2015-04-06

    The tunability of nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption in Bi{sub 3.15}Nd{sub 0.85}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BNT) ferroelectric thin films was investigated through the open aperture Z-scan method with femtosecond laser pulses at the wavelength of 800 nm. NLO absorption responses of the BNT films were observed to be highly sensitive to the film thickness. As the film thickness increases from 106.8 to 139.7 nm, the NLO absorption changes from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA). When the film thickness further increases to 312.9 nm, the RSA effect is enhanced. A band-gap-related competition between the ground-state excitation and the two-photon absorption is responsible for the absorption switching behavior. Such a tunable NLO absorption can widen the photonic application of the BNT thin films.

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud products and the ARM SGP observation for individual cirrus cloud and stratus cloud cases. At the same time, statistical comparison of optically thin cirrus clouds is also...

  14. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  15. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  16. ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption andor ...

  17. Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions Scientific Cloud Computing Misconceptions July 1, 2011 Part of the Magellan project was to understand both the possibilities and the limitations of cloud computing in the pursuit of science. At a recent conference, Magellan investigator Shane Canon outlined some persistent misconceptions about doing science in the cloud - and what Magellan has taught us about them. » Read the ISGTW story. » Download the slides (PDF, 4.1MB

  18. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B.

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  19. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Heng, Kevin; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Gillon, Michael; Barclay, Thomas; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-10-20

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  20. Near-Field Magneto-Optical Microscope (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; FIBER OPTICS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MICROSCOPES; POLARIZATION; RESOLUTION; DESIGN; OPERATION Word Cloud...

  1. Tuning of in-plane optical anisotropy by inserting ultra-thin InAs layer at interfaces in (001)-grown GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, J. L.; Cheng, S. Y.; Lai, Y. F.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-01-07

    The in-plane optical anisotropy (IPOA) in (001)-grown GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) with different well widths varying from 2?nm to 8?nm has been studied by reflectance difference spectroscopy. Ultra-thin InAs layers with thickness ranging from 0.5 monolayer (ML) to 1.5 ML have been inserted at GaAs/AlGaAs interfaces to tune the asymmetry in the QWs. It is demonstrated that the IPOA can be accurately tailored by the thickness of the inserted ultra-thin InAs layer at the interfaces. Strain-induced IPOA has also been extracted by using a stress apparatus. We find that the intensity of the strain-induced IPOA decreases with the thickness of the inserted InAs layer, while that of the interface-induced IPOA increases with the thickness of the InAs layer. Theoretical calculations based on 6 band k ? p theory have been carried out, and good agreements with experimental results are obtained. Our results demonstrate that, the IPOA of the QWs can be greatly and effectively tuned by inserting an ultra-thin InAs layer with different thicknesses at the interfaces of QWs, which does not significantly influence the transition energies and the transition probability of QWs.

  2. Evolution of structural and optical properties of photocatalytic Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, Prabitha B. Maneeshya, L. V. Justinvictor, V. B. Daniel, Georgi P. Joy, K. Thomas, P. V.

    2014-01-28

    Undoped and Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. Pure TiO{sub 2} thin film exhibited an amorphous-like nature. With increase in iron concentration (0–0.1 at%), the films exhibited better crystallization to anatase phase . Red shift of absorption edge was observed in the UV-vis transmittance spectra . At higher Fe concentration (0.5 at%), onset of phase transformation to rutile is noticed. Photocatalytic properties of pure and 0.1 at% Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films were investigated by degradation of methylene blue in UV light, visible light and light from Hg vapor lamp. 70% degradation of methylene blue was observed in the presence of Fe doped film in comparison with 3% degradation in presence of pure TiO{sub 2} film when irradiated using visible light for 2 h.

  3. Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

    2008-11-20

    The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

  4. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Abstract A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance

  5. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Wednesday, 21 November 2012 12:18 Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, ...

  6. ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flux Analysis SWFLUXANAL : Shortwave Flux Analysis TSI : Total Sky Imager UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett WSI : Whole Sky Imager WSICLOUD : Whole Sky Imager Cloud Products ...

  7. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  8. ARM - Measurement - Cloud phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that involves property descriptors such as stratus, cumulus, and cirrus. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  9. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics Virendra Ghate Bruce Albrecht Parameter Observational Readiness (/10) Modeling Need (/10) Cloud Boundaries 9 9 Cloud Fraction Variance Skewness Up/Downdraft coverage Dominant Freq. signal Dissipation rate ??? Observation-Modeling Interface

  10. Study of optical properties of asymmetric bipolar pulse DC magnetron sputtered Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin film as a function of oxygen content in deposition ambient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haque, S. Maidul Shinde, D. D. Misal, J. S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    Tantalum penta-oxide thin films have been deposited by reactive sputtering technique using asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC source at various oxygen percentage viz. 0 to 50 %. The optical properties of the films have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. It has been observed that compact films with low void fraction, high refractive index and band gap can be obtained by the above technique with oxygen percentage in the range of 30–40%. The films deposited with zero or very low oxygen content have high deposition rate and yield metal rich films with large voids, defects, low band gap and high refractive index. Similarly films deposited with >40% oxygen content again contain voids and defects due to the presence of large amount of gas molecules in the sputtering ambient.

  11. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  12. Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds" Project ID: 0011106 ... measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well ...

  13. TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intensity (e.g. May and Ballinger, 2007) Resulting Cloud Properties Examine rain DSD using polarimetric radar Examine ice cloud properties using MMCR and MPL Expect...

  14. ARM - Measurement - Cloud effective radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the number size distribution of cloud particles, whether liquid or ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  15. A framework for modeling the detailed optical response of thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO, INST, OPTICS Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View ...

  16. Impact of cloud microphysics on squall line organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Observations to Validate and Improve Cloud Micrfophysical Schemes Wojciech Grabowski (PI) Hugh Morrison, Sally McFarlane (Co-PIs) Hanna Pawlowska (Co-I) CMWG Breakout, ARM STM 2008 Two major efforts of project * Warm clouds. We will use microphysical retrievals from Nauru and SGP (including CLASIC), together with aircraft observations (RICO) to assess model simulations of shallow cumulus. * Focus is on treatment of turbulent- microphysical interactions and impact on optical properties. *

  17. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-11

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on ?100? Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000?C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of ?101{sup }0? and ?101{sup }3? peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the ?0002? peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15?K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic excitonexciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45?eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic excitonexciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  18. Observation of fast nonbolometric optical response of nongranular high T/sub c/ Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A.; Saifi, M.A.; Venkatesan, T.; Lin, C.; Wu, X.D.; Inam, A.

    1989-04-17

    We report fast optical response measurements in predominantly c-axis oriented crystalline Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ superconducting thin films at the wavelength of 1.06 ..mu..m. We identify two distinct components contributing to the optical response: a nonbolometric (as fast as 1 ns) and a bolometric component (several ns). The bolometric component is stronger at temperatures in the vicinity of the transition region to the normal state. The nonbolometric component is dominant at temperatures below the transition region showing weak temperature dependence and a linear dependence on the bias current. This nonbolometric component may be evidence for nonequilibrium effects (e.g., breaking of Cooper pairs and generation of quasiparticles or other mechanisms). These results suggest that with proper optimization of device parameters (its geometry, critical current density, etc.) high-speed detectors with reasonable sensitivity covering a broad electromagnetic spectrum (visible and infrared) may be developed.

  19. Structural characterization of thin film photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramania, G.; Biswas, R.; Constant, K.; Sigalas, M. M.; Ho, K. M.

    2001-06-15

    We quantitatively analyze the structure of thin film inverse-opal photonic crystals composed of ordered arrays of air pores in a background of titania. Ordering of the sphere template and introduction of the titania background were performed simultaneously in the thin film photonic crystals. Nondestructive optical measurements of backfilling with high refractive index liquids, angle-resolved reflectivity, and optical spectroscopy were combined with band-structure calculations. The analysis reveals a thin film photonic crystal structure with a very high filling fraction (92{endash}94%) of air and a substantial compression along the c axis ({similar_to}22{endash}25%).

  20. Water clouds in Y dwarfs and exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana; Greene, Tom; Saumon, Didier; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-05-20

    The formation of clouds affects brown dwarf and planetary atmospheres of nearly all effective temperatures. Iron and silicate condense in L dwarf atmospheres and dissipate at the L/T transition. Minor species such as sulfides and salts condense in mid- to late T dwarfs. For brown dwarfs below T {sub eff} ∼ 450 K, water condenses in the upper atmosphere to form ice clouds. Currently, over a dozen objects in this temperature range have been discovered, and few previous theoretical studies have addressed the effect of water clouds on brown dwarf or exoplanetary spectra. Here we present a new grid of models that include the effect of water cloud opacity. We find that they become optically thick in objects below T {sub eff} ∼ 350-375 K. Unlike refractory cloud materials, water-ice particles are significantly nongray absorbers; they predominantly scatter at optical wavelengths through the J band and absorb in the infrared with prominent features, the strongest of which is at 2.8 μm. H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} CIA are dominant opacity sources; less abundant species may also be detectable, including the alkalis, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3}. PH{sub 3}, which has been detected in Jupiter, is expected to have a strong signature in the mid-infrared at 4.3 μm in Y dwarfs around T {sub eff} = 450 K; if disequilibrium chemistry increases the abundance of PH{sub 3}, it may be detectable over a wider effective temperature range than models predict. We show results incorporating disequilibrium nitrogen and carbon chemistry and predict signatures of low gravity in planetary mass objects. Finally, we make predictions for the observability of Y dwarfs and planets with existing and future instruments, including the James Webb Space Telescope and Gemini Planet Imager.

  1. Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magellan News & Announcements Archive Petascale Initiative Exascale Computing APEX Home » R & D » Archive » Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed Magellan: A Cloud Computing Testbed Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists? That was one of the questions NERSC's Magellan cloud computing testbed explored between 2009 and 2011. The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oce

  2. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  3. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  4. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  5. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Stoner, Robert J

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects.

  6. Optical stress generator and detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a system for the characterization of thin films and interfaces between thin films through measurements of their mechanical and thermal properties. In the system light is absorbed in a thin film or in a structure made up of several thin films, and the change in optical transmission or reflection is measured and analyzed. The change in reflection or transmission is used to give information about the ultrasonic waves that are produced in the structure. The information that is obtained from the use of the measurement methods and apparatus of this invention can include: (a) a determination of the thickness of thin films with a speed and accuracy that is improved compared to earlier methods; (b) a determination of the thermal, elastic, and optical properties of thin films; (c) a determination of the stress in thin films; and (d) a characterization of the properties of interfaces, including the presence of roughness and defects. 32 figs.

  7. Optical-Fiber-Based, Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Spectrometer for Thin-Film Absorber Characterization and Analysis of TRPL Data for CdS/CdTe Interface: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuciauskas, D.; Duenow, J. N.; Kanevce, A.; Li, J. V.; Young, M. R.; Dippo, P.; Levi, D. H.

    2012-06-01

    We describe the design of a time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectrometer for rapid semiconductor absorber characterization. Simplicity and flexibility is achieved by using single optical fiber to deliver laser pulses and to collect photoluminescence. We apply TRPL for characterization of CdS/CdTe absorbers after deposition, CdCl2 treatment, Cu doping, and back contact formation. Data suggest this method could be applied in various stages of PV device processing. Finally, we show how to analyze TRPL data for CdS/CdTe absorbers by considering laser light absorption depth and intermixing at CdS/CdTe interface.

  8. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  9. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (first echo). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  10. The Calculation Of Absorbing Thin Film Optical Constants And Electronic Structure From Photometric Measures On Domain IR-VIS-UV Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourouis, Chahrazed; Meddour, Ahcene; Moussaoui, Abdelkrim

    2008-09-23

    In this paper a new method using the combination of Neural Networks and the Newton-Raphson algorithm is developped. The technique consists of the use of the solution obtained by Newton-Raphson algorithm between 0.5 and 2.1eV for pure manganese (Mn) and for the amorphous metallic alloy Al{sub 88}Mn{sub 12}, to construct two parts of datasets; the first one is used for training the neural network and the second one for the validation tests. The validated neural network model is applied to the determination of optical constants of the two materials Mn and Al{sub 88}Mn{sub 12} in the range of 0.5 and 6.2eV (IR-VIS-UV). The results obtained over all the studied energy range are used to trace back to dielectric function, optical absorption and electronic structure of the same material. By using the partial solution obtained by Newton-Raphson as a database of the neural network prediction model, it is shown that the obtained results are in accordance with those of the literature which consolidate the efficiency of the suggested approach.

  11. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  12. Evaluation of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties and Dynamical Processes Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground Based Mea...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties and Dynamical Processes Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground-Based Measurements Over Nauru Island J. M. Comstock and J. H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia Introduction Identifying the mechanisms responsible for the formation of cirrus clouds is important in understanding the role of cirrus in the tropical atmosphere. Thin cirrus clouds near the tropical

  13. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and

  14. Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN number concentrations at all latitudes while changes in cloud amount and cloud properties are mainly seen in high latitudes and middle latitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in mid-level clouds and a decrease in low clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and the large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path due to the slow-down of the Bergeron-Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low cloud simulations over most of the Arctic, but produces too many mid-level clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low clouds and their properties when compared to Arctic ground-based measurements. Issues with the observations and the model-observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  15. Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane cloud hunting Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting Los Alamos researchers go ... Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting When our team from Los Alamos National ...

  16. Optical and local structural study of Gd doped ZrO{sub 2} thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haque, S. Maidul Shinde, D. D.; Misal, J. S.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-06-24

    ZrO{sub 2} samples with 0, 7, 9, 11, 13 % Gd doping have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique for solid oxide fuel cell application. The optical properties of the samples have been studied by transmission spectrophotometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry while the local structure surrounding Zr sites has been characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement at Zr K edge with synchrotron radiation. It has been observed that beyond 11% Gd doping, band gap decreases and refractive index increases significantly and also oxygen and Zr coordinations surrounding Zr sites increase which indicates the formation of Gd clustering in ZrO{sub 2} matrix beyond this doping concentration.

  17. Electronic and optical properties of ScN and (Sc,Mn)N thin films deposited by reactive DC-magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Bivas; Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 ; Naik, Gururaj; Boltasseva, Alexandra; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 ; Drachev, Vladimir P.; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 ; Marinero, Ernesto E.; Sands, Timothy D.; Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

    2013-08-14

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a rocksalt semiconductor that has attracted significant attention from various researchers for a diverse range of applications. Motivated by the prospect of using its interesting electronic structure for optoelectronic and dilute magnetic semiconductor applications, we present detailed studies of the electronic transport and optical properties of ScN and its alloys with manganese nitride (MnN). Our results suggest (a) dilute manganese doping in ScN compensates for the high n-type carrier concentrations arising due to oxygen impurities and (b) an n-type to p-type carrier type transition occurs at a composition between 5.8% and 11% Mn on Sc sites. In terms of its optical properties, our analysis clearly indicates direct and indirect bandgap absorption edges of ScN located at 2.04 eV and 1.18 eV, respectively. In addition to the direct gap absorption edge, (Sc,Mn)N samples also show Mn-defect induced electronic absorption. Photoluminescence measurements at room temperature from ScN films exhibit a yellowish-green emission corresponding to direct gap radiative recombination. Direct gap recombination is not expected given the smaller indirect gap. A possible role of high excitation intensities in suppressing relaxation and recombination across the indirect bandgap is suspected. Raman spectroscopic and ellipsometric characterization of the dielectric permittivities of ScN and (Sc,Mn)N are also presented to assist in understanding the potential of ScN for optoelectronic applications.

  18. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  19. Evaluation of high‐level clouds in cloud resolving model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model 10.10022015MS000478 simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations Key Points: * Two-moment microphysics improves simulated ...

  20. Numerical simulations of altocumulus with a cloud resolving model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.; Krueger, S.K.

    1996-04-01

    Altocumulus and altostratus clouds together cover approximately 22% of the earth`s surface. They play an important role in the earth`s energy budget through their effect on solar and infrared radiation. However, there has been little altocumulus cloud investigation by either modelers or observational programs. Starr and Cox (SC) (1985a,b) simulated an altostratus case as part of the same study in which they modeled a thin layer of cirrus. Although this calculation was originally described as representing altostratus, it probably better represents altocumulus stratiformis. In this paper, we simulate altocumulus cloud with a cloud resolving model (CRM). We simply describe the CRM first. We calculate the same middle-level cloud case as SC to compare our results with theirs. We will look at the role of cloud-scale processes in response to large-scale forcing. We will also discuss radiative effects by simulating diurnal and nocturnal cases. Finally, we discuss the utility of a 1D model by comparing 1D simulations and 2D simulations.

  1. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K.

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  2. Bringing Clouds into Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bringing Clouds into Focus Bringing Clouds into Focus A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the Uncertainty of Climate Forecasting May 11, 2010 Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 Randall-fig4.png The large data sets generated by the GCRM require new analysis and visualization capabilities. This 3D plot of vorticity isosurfaces was developed using VisIt, a 3D visualization tool with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used

  3. Deriving Arctic Cloud Microphysics at Barrow, Alaska. Algorithms, Results, and Radiative Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Zwink, Alexander; Thieman, Mandana M.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shippert, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    Cloud phase and microphysical properties control the radiative effects of clouds in the climate system and are therefore crucial to characterize in a variety of conditions and locations. An Arctic-specific, ground-based, multi-sensor cloud retrieval system is described here and applied to two years of observations from Barrow, Alaska. Over these two years, clouds occurred 75% of the time, with cloud ice and liquid each occurring nearly 60% of the time. Liquid water occurred at least 25% of the time even in the winter, and existed up to heights of 8 km. The vertically integrated mass of liquid was typically larger than that of ice. While it is generally difficult to evaluate the overall uncertainty of a comprehensive cloud retrieval system of this type, radiative flux closure analyses were performed where flux calculations using the derived microphysical properties were compared to measurements at the surface and top-of-atmosphere. Radiative closure biases were generally smaller for cloudy scenes relative to clear skies, while the variability of flux closure results was only moderately larger than under clear skies. The best closure at the surface was obtained for liquid-containing clouds. Radiative closure results were compared to those based on a similar, yet simpler, cloud retrieval system. These comparisons demonstrated the importance of accurate cloud phase classification, and specifically the identification of liquid water, for determining radiative fluxes. Enhanced retrievals of liquid water path for thin clouds were also shown to improve radiative flux calculations.

  4. Enhanced Thin Film Organic Photovoltaic Devices - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Enhanced Thin Film Organic Photovoltaic Devices Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology An Embodiment of the Optical Field Confinement Device An Embodiment of the Optical Field Confinement Device Technology Marketing Summary A novel structure design for thin film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices provides a system for increasing the optical absorption in the active layer. The waveguided structure

  5. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  6. TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These island cloud trails have been observed from both the islands of Nauru and Manus, Papua New Guinea. Figure 2 shows an island cloud at Manus observed from MTI and from the ...

  7. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  8. ARM - Measurement - Images of Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsImages of Clouds ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Images of Clouds Digital images of cloud scenes (various formats) from satellite, aircraft, and ground-based platforms. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a

  9. ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a

  10. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, Michael A.; Land, Cecil E.; Martin, Stephen J.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    1993-01-01

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

  11. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  12. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore » and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  13. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G Satyanarayana, M. Krishnakumar, V. Dhaman, Reji k.

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  14. Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on

  15. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations: HIGH CLOUD IN CRM Authors: Liu, Zheng 1 ; Muhlbauer, Andreas 2 ; ...

  16. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  17. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer I. Genkova and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington T. Besnard ATMOS SARL Le Mans, France D. Gillotay Institute d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique Brussels, Belgium Introduction In the effort to resolve uncertainties about global climate change, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) is improving the treatment of cloud radiative forcing and feedbacks in general

  18. A characteristic scale in radiation fields of fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, W.; Cahalan, R.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A.

    1996-04-01

    The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine stratocumulus cloud shows a scale break when plotted on a double log plot. We offer an explanation of this scale break in terms of smoothing by horizontal radiative fluxes, which is parameterized and incorporated into an improved pixel approximation. We compute the radiation fields emerging from cloud models with horizontally variable optical depth fractal models. We use comparative spectral and multifractal analysis to qualify the validity of the independent pixel approximation at the largest scales and demonstrate it`s shortcomings on the smallest scales.

  19. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator ...

  20. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  1. Satellite and Surface Data Synergy for Developing a 3D Cloud Structure and Properties Characterization Over the ARM SGP. S...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Satellite and Surface Data Synergy for Developing a 3D Cloud Structure and Properties Characterization Over the ARM SGP Site Stage 1: Cloud Amounts, Optical Depths, and Cloud Heights Reconciliation I. Genkova and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction One of the primary Atmospheric

  2. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems Research Instrumentation HI-SCALE will utilize the ARM Aerial Facility's Gulfstream-159 (G-1), as well as ground instrumentation located at the SGP megasite. 7e G-1 will complete transects over the site at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds. 7e payload on the G-1 includes: * high frequency meteorological and radiation (both up and downwelling) measurements that also permit computing

  3. Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar

  4. Nanocomposite thin films for optical gas sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohodnicki, Paul R; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-06-03

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for gas sensing in a gas stream utilizing a gas sensing material. In an embodiment the gas stream has a temperature greater than about 500.degree. C. The gas sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. Changes in the chemical composition of the gas stream are detected by changes in the plasmon resonance peak. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  5. ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics ... particle imager MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation UAV-PROTEUS : UAV Proteus

  6. ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park ...

  7. ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AMT : Aerosol Modeling...

  8. ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RUC : Rapid Update Cycle Model Data Field Campaign Instruments CO2LIDAR : Carbon Dioxide Doppler Lidar MPLCMASK : Cloud mask from Micropulse Lidar VARANAL : Constrained...

  9. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2015-12-28

    We proposed to analyze in-situ cloud data collected during ARM/ASR field campaigns to create databases of cloud microphysical properties and their uncertainties as needed for the development of improved cloud parameterizations for models and remote sensing retrievals, and for evaluation of model simulations and retrievals. In particular, we proposed to analyze data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North Slope of Alaska during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), and over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) during The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), to meet the following 3 objectives; derive statistical databases of single ice particle properties (aspect ratio AR, dominant habit, mass, projected area) and distributions of ice crystals (size distributions SDs, mass-dimension m-D, area-dimension A-D relations, mass-weighted fall speeds, single-scattering properties, total concentrations N, ice mass contents IWC), complete with uncertainty estimates; assess processes by which aerosols modulate cloud properties in arctic stratus and mid-latitude cumuli, and quantify aerosol’s influence in context of varying meteorological and surface conditions; and determine how ice cloud microphysical, single-scattering and fall-out properties and contributions of small ice crystals to such properties vary according to location, environment, surface, meteorological and aerosol conditions, and develop parameterizations of such effects.In this report we describe the accomplishments that we made on all 3 research objectives.

  10. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of...

  11. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10

    cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

  12. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bismuth doped iron garnet thin films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron ...

  13. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

    2012-06-30

    A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

  14. Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For example: Widget:LogoCloud Retrieved from "http:...

  15. [Multifractal cloud properties data assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautier, C.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Peterson, P.; Lavallee, D. ); Frouin, R.; Lubin, D. ); Lovejoy, S. ); Schertzer, D. )

    1992-05-06

    Our group has been very active over the last year, analyzing a number of data sets to characterize multifractal cloud properties and assess the effects of clouds on surface radiation properties (spectral and broadband). The data sets analyzed include: AVHRR observations of clouds over the ocean, SPOT observations of clouds over the ocean, SSM/I observations of clouds over the ocean, pyranometer data with all-sky photographs, pyrgeometer data all-sky photographs, and spectral surface irradiance all-sky photographs. A number of radiative transfer computations have been performed to help in the interpretation of these observations or provide theoretical guidance for their analysis. Finally 4 number of radiative transfer models have been acquired and tested to prepare for the interpretation of ARM/CART data.

  16. Satellite determination of stratus cloud microphysical properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of liquid water path from SSMI, broadband albedo from ERBE, and cloud characteristics from ISCCP are used to study stratus regions. An average cloud liquid water path of ...

  17. Clouds Environmental Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clouds Environmental Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clouds Environmental Ltd Place: Portsmouth, United Kingdom Zip: PO3 5EG Product: Independent consultancy specialising in...

  18. Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ackerman et al. 1999), to develop cloud statistics and improve the treatment of subgrid ... and Curry 1989; Liang and Wang 1997). Statistics of Subgrid Cloud Variability We have ...

  19. Influence of Arctic cloud thermodynamic phase on surface shortwave flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, D.; Vogelmann, A.

    2010-03-15

    As part of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer was deployed at the Barrow NSA site during April and May of 2008, and in April-October of 2009. This instrument recorded one-minute averages of surface downwelling spectral flux in the wavelength interval 350-2200 nm, thus sampling the two major near infrared windows (1.6 and 2.2 microns) in which the flux is influenced by cloud microphysical properties including thermodynamic phase and effective particle size. Aircraft in situ measurements of cloud properties show mostly mixed-phase clouds over Barrow during the campaign, but with wide variability in relative liquid versus ice water content. At fixed total optical depth, this variability in phase composition can yield of order 5-10 Watts per square meter in surface flux variability, with greater cloud attenuation of the surface flux usually occurring under higher ice water content. Thus our data show that changes in cloud phase properties, even within the 'mixed-phase' category, can affect the surface energy balance at the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas increases. Analysis of this spectral radiometric data provides suggestions for testing new mixed-phase parameterizations in climate models.

  20. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  1. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  2. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  3. Individual identification of free hole and electron dynamics in CuIn{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films by simultaneous monitoring of two optical transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Makoto; Hagiya, Hideki; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-05-04

    The photocarrier dynamics of CuIn{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films were studied using white-light transient absorption (TA) measurements, as an understanding of this behavior is essential for improving the performance of solar cells composed of CIGS thin films. A characteristic double-peak structure due to the splitting of the valence bands in the CIGS was observed in the TA spectra under near-band-gap resonant excitation. From a comparison of the TA decay dynamics monitored at these two peaks, it was found that the slow-decay components of the electron and hole relaxation are on the nanosecond timescale. This finding is clear evidence of the long lifetimes of free photocarriers in polycrystalline CIGS thin films.

  4. cloud | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 13:42 How cleantech-as-a-service will drive renewable energy adoption 2015 adoption Big Data clean tech clean-tech cleantech cleantech forum cleantech-as-a-service cloud...

  5. A large catalog of accurate distances to molecular clouds from PS1 photometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlafly, E. F.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Green, G.; Finkbeiner, D. P.; Bell, E. F.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Distance measurements to molecular clouds are important but are often made separately for each cloud of interest, employing very different data and techniques. We present a large, homogeneous catalog of distances to molecular clouds, most of which are of unprecedented accuracy. We determine distances using optical photometry of stars along lines of sight toward these clouds, obtained from PanSTARRS-1. We simultaneously infer the reddenings and distances to these stars, tracking the full probability distribution function using a technique presented in Green et al. We fit these star-by-star measurements using a simple dust screen model to find the distance to each cloud. We thus estimate the distances to almost all of the clouds in the Magnani et al. catalog, as well as many other well-studied clouds, including Orion, Perseus, Taurus, Cepheus, Polaris, California, and Monoceros R2, avoiding only the inner Galaxy. Typical statistical uncertainties in the distances are 5%, though the systematic uncertainty stemming from the quality of our stellar models is about 10%. The resulting catalog is the largest catalog of accurate, directly measured distances to molecular clouds. Our distance estimates are generally consistent with available distance estimates from the literature, though in some cases the literature estimates are off by a factor of more than two.

  6. UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Demory, Brice-Olivier E-mail: demory@mit.edu

    2013-11-10

    Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and characterized by considerable scatter. In the limit of vertically uniform populations of scatterers and absorbers, we use an analytical model and scaling relations to relate the temperature-pressure profile of an irradiated atmosphere and the photon deposition layer and to estimate whether a cloud particle will be lofted by atmospheric circulation. We derive an analytical formula for computing the albedo spectrum in terms of the cloud properties, which we compare to the measured albedo spectrum of HD 189733b by Evans et al. Furthermore, we show that whether an optical phase curve is flat or sinusoidal depends on whether the particles are small or large as defined by the Knudsen number. This may be an explanation for why Kepler-7b exhibits evidence for the longitudinal variation in abundance of condensates, while Kepler-12b shows no evidence for the presence of condensates despite the incident stellar flux being similar for both exoplanets. We include an 'observer's cookbook' for deciphering various scenarios associated with the optical phase curve, the peak offset of the infrared phase curve, and the geometric albedo.

  7. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  8. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass. 6 figs.

  9. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass.

  10. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of high-level clouds in ...

  11. CHEMISTRY IN INFRARED DARK CLOUD CLUMPS: A MOLECULAR LINE SURVEY AT 3 mm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Finn, Susanna C.; Garay, Guido; Silva, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), containing a total of 159 clumps, in high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm using the 22 m ATNF Mopra Telescope located in Australia. After determining kinematic distances, we eliminated clumps that are not located in IRDCs and clumps with a separation between them of less than one Mopra beam. Our final sample consists of 92 IRDC clumps. The most commonly detected molecular lines are (detection rates higher than 8%) N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HNC, HN{sup 13}C, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, HCN, C{sub 2}H, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO. We investigate the behavior of the different molecular tracers and look for chemical variations as a function of an evolutionary sequence based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission. We find that the molecular tracers behave differently through the evolutionary sequence and some of them can be used to yield useful relative age information. The presence of HNC and N{sub 2}H{sup +} lines does not depend on the star formation activity. On the other hand, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO are predominantly detected in later stages of evolution. Optical depth calculations show that in IRDC clumps the N{sub 2}H{sup +} line is optically thin, the C{sub 2}H line is moderately optically thick, and HNC and HCO{sup +} are optically thick. The HCN hyperfine transitions are blended, and, in addition, show self-absorbed line profiles and extended wing emission. These factors combined prevent the use of HCN hyperfine transitions for the calculation of physical parameters. Total column densities of the different molecules, except C{sub 2}H, increase with the evolutionary stage of the clumps. Molecular abundances increase with the evolutionary stage for N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HNC abundance ratios act as chemical clocks, increasing with the evolution of the clumps.

  12. Apparatus and method for the determination of grain size in thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J

    2001-01-01

    A method for the determination of grain size in a thin film sample comprising the steps of measuring first and second changes in the optical response of the thin film, comparing the first and second changes to find the attenuation of a propagating disturbance in the film and associating the attenuation of the disturbance to the grain size of the film. The second change in optical response is time delayed from the first change in optical response.

  13. Apparatus and method for the determination of grain size in thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maris, Humphrey J

    2000-01-01

    A method for the determination of grain size in a thin film sample comprising the steps of measuring first and second changes in the optical response of the thin film, comparing the first and second changes to find the attenuation of a propagating disturbance in the film and associating the attenuation of the disturbance to the grain size of the film. The second change in optical response is time delayed from the first change in optical response.

  14. Flexible cadmium telluride thin films grown on electron-beam-irradiated graphene/thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Won-Oh; Kim, Jihyun; Koo, Yong Hwan; Kim, Byungnam; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the close-spaced sublimation growth of polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films on a flexible graphene electrode/thin glass substrate structure. Prior to the growth of CdTe films, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene was transferred onto a flexible glass substrate and subjected to electron-beam irradiation at an energy of 0.2 MeV in order to intentionally introduce the defects into it in a controlled manner. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and sheet resistance measurements were employed to monitor the damage and disorder in the electron-beam irradiated graphene layers. The morphology and optical properties of the CdTe thin films deposited on a graphene/flexible glass substrate were systematically characterized. The integration of the defective graphene layers with a flexible glass substrate can be a useful platform to grow various thin-film structures for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM ... A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been ...

  16. A novel approach for introducing cloud spatial structure into...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A novel approach for introducing cloud spatial structure into cloud radiative transfer ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United Kingdom Language: English Word Cloud ...

  17. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in these Arctic clouds, which affect modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. ...

  18. Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Transfer Model and ARM Data Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model and ARM Data Yue, Qing Dept. of Atomspheric & Oceanic Sciences, UCLA Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA Ou, Szu-cheng University of California, Los Angeles Kahn, Brian Jet Propulsion Laboratory Yang, Ping Texas A&M Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Radiation A thin cirrus cloud thermal infrared radiative transfer model has been developed to interpret AIRS

  19. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  20. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-17

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasingmore » scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.« less

  1. Porous thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Ting

    2015-11-17

    Compositions of porous thin films and methods of making are provided. The methods involve self-assembly of a cyclic peptide in the presence of a block copolymer.

  2. Cloud Classes and Radiative Heating profiles at the Manus and Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James H.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-10-07

    The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) is a convective regime; however, the frequency and depth of convection is dependant on dynamical forcing which exhibits variability on a range of temporal scales and also on location within the region. Manus Island, Papua New Guinea lies in the heart of the western Pacific warm pool region and exhibits frequent deep convection much of the time while Nauru, which lies approximately 20 degrees to the East of Manus, lies in a transition zone where the frequency of convection is dependent on the phase of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. Because of this difference in dynamical regime, the distribution of clouds and the associated radiative heating is quite different at the two sites. Individual cloud types: boundary layer cumulus, thin cirrus, stratiform convective outflow, do occur at both sites – but with different frequencies. In this study we compare cloud profiles and heating profiles for specific cloud types at these two sites using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). Results of this comparison indicate that, while the frequency of specific cloud types differ between the two sites as one would expect, the characteristics of individual cloud classes are remarkably similar. This information could prove to be very useful for applying tropical ARM data to the broader region.

  3. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  4. Final Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    final optics Final Optics Schematic layout of NIF's final optics assembly (FOA). The suite of optics for one beamline is on the right. The final optics assemblies (FOAs) are the last element of the main laser system and the first of the target area systems. Each FOA contains four integrated optics modules (IOMs) that incorporate beam conditioning, frequency conversion, focusing, diagnostic sampling, and debris shielding capabilities into a single compact assembly. These optics are shown in the

  5. Researching Impact of Clouds on Solar Plants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) researchers developed a new system to monitor how clouds affect large-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) power plants. By observing cloud shape, size and movement, the...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The primary objective of the Cloud IOP was to generate a multi-platform data set that can ... Given the diversity of cloud types sampled during the IOP, the analysis of this data set ...

  7. Evaluating the MMF Using CloudSat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its cloud Evaluate the MMF and improve its cloud simulations simulations Borrowed from Dave Randall, CSU The big picture The big picture ... ... . . Data ARM A-Train, MISR etc. ...

  8. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air...

  9. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle number concentration The total number of cloud particles present in any given volume...

  10. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Wednesday, 21 November 2012 12:18 Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of science. If nanoparticles could be coaxed into routinely assembling themselves into predictable complex structures and hierarchical patterns, devices could be mass-produced that are one thousand times smaller than today's microtechnologies.

  11. Simple flash evaporator for making thin films of compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemanadhan, M.; Bapanayya, Ch.; Agarwal, S. C. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2010-07-15

    A simple and compact arrangement for flash evaporation is described. It uses a cell phone vibrator for powder dispensing that can be incorporated into a vacuum deposition chamber without any major alterations. The performance of the flash evaporation system is checked by making thin films of the optical memory chalcogenide glass Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Energy dispersive x-ray analysis shows that the flash evaporation preserves the stoichiometry in thin films.

  12. What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die? What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die? Simulations Show Raindrops Physics May Affect Climate Model Accuracy February 19, 2015 thunderstorm Brazil shuttle NASA 1984 540 PNNL scientists used real-world observations to simulate how small clouds are likely to stay shallow, while larger clouds grow deeper because they mix with less dry air. Pictured are small and large thunderstorms growing over southern Brazil, taken from the space shuttle. Image: NASA Johnson Space

  13. ARM Data for Cloud Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-10-02

    The PI's ARM investigation (DE-IA02-02ER633 18) developed a physically-based subgrid-scale saturation representation that fully considers the direct interactions of the parameterized subgrid-scale motions with subgrid-scale cloud microphysical and radiative processes. Major accomplishments under the support of that interagency agreement are summarized in this paper.

  14. Unlocking the Secrets of Clouds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds may look soft, fluffy and harmless to the untrained eye, but to an expert climate model scientist they represent great challenges. Fortunately the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate and Research Facility is kicking off a five-month study which should significantly clear the air.

  15. Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers: Solid-State Lighting Science Center for Frontiers of ... Quantum Optics HomeEnergy ResearchEFRCsSolid-State Lighting Science EFRCQuantum Optics ...

  16. Cloud Optical Properties from the Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Min and Harrison algorithm has been incorporated into an ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) ... As specified by Min and Harrison (1996), the wavelength at 415 nm was chosen due to the ...

  17. Interannual variation of cloud optical properties at ACRF Manus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 153; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-4073 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and ...

  18. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operational VAP run at other sites, MFRSRCLDOD is based on the algorithm by Min and Harrison (1996). Users are referred to that documentation for more details: http:...

  19. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  20. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  1. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  2. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  3. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus in the pilot radiation observation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.; Patterson, G.R.

    1996-04-01

    The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported. The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical properties by the lidar/radiometer, or LIRAD, method was described by Platt et al.; the latter paper also describes a year`s data on mid-latitude cirrus. The optical properties of equatorial cirrus (i.e., cirrus within a few degrees of the equator) have hardly been studied at all. The same is true of tropical cirrus, although a few observations have been reported by Davis and Platt et al.This paper describes obersvations performed on cirrus clouds, analysis methods used, and results.

  4. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  5. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ?}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 ?G, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup 4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  6. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation,

  7. Stability Issues of Transparent Conducting Oxides (TCOs) for Thin-Film Photovoltaics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, J.

    2008-12-01

    Study of stability issues of TCOs for thin-film PV, including degradation of optical, electrical, and structural properties of TCOs in damp heat and required encapsulation to prevent moisture egress.

  8. A SEARCH FOR EXOZODIACAL CLOUDS WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Jackson, Brian K.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Johnson, Marshall; Caldwell, Caroline; Agol, Eric; Ford, Eric B.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.

    2013-02-20

    Planets embedded within dust disks may drive the formation of large scale clumpy dust structures by trapping dust into resonant orbits. Detection and subsequent modeling of the dust structures would help constrain the mass and orbit of the planet and the disk architecture, give clues to the history of the planetary system, and provide a statistical estimate of disk asymmetry for future exoEarth-imaging missions. Here, we present the first search for these resonant structures in the inner regions of planetary systems by analyzing the light curves of hot Jupiter planetary candidates identified by the Kepler mission. We detect only one candidate disk structure associated with KOI 838.01 at the 3{sigma} confidence level, but subsequent radial velocity measurements reveal that KOI 838.01 is a grazing eclipsing binary and the candidate disk structure is a false positive. Using our null result, we place an upper limit on the frequency of dense exozodi structures created by hot Jupiters. We find that at the 90% confidence level, less than 21% of Kepler hot Jupiters create resonant dust clumps that lead and trail the planet by {approx}90 Degree-Sign with optical depths {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, which corresponds to the resonant structure expected for a lone hot Jupiter perturbing a dynamically cold dust disk 50 times as dense as the zodiacal cloud.

  9. Multifunctional thin film surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  10. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  11. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud

  12. Optical microspectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2004-05-25

    An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

  13. An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Category: Aerosols Continuing observations of aerosol and cloud optical property have been made using MFRSR and MWR at the ARM SGP site since

  14. Evaluation of Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Sa...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Satellite and Cloud Radar Y. Luo and S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Because of both the various effects clouds exert on the earth-atmospheric system and the cloud feedback, correct representations of clouds in numerical models are critical for accurate climate modeling and weather forecast. Unfortunately, determination of clouds and their radiative

  15. Spectral observations of Ellerman bombs and fitting with a two-cloud model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D.; Li, Ying; Fang, Cheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-09-01

    We study the Hα and Ca II 8542 Å line spectra of four typical Ellerman bombs (EBs) in the active region NOAA 11765 on 2013 June 6, observed with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. Considering that EBs may occur in a restricted region in the lower atmosphere, and that their spectral lines show particular features, we propose a two-cloud model to fit the observed line profiles. The lower cloud can account for the wing emission, and the upper cloud is mainly responsible for the absorption at line center. After choosing carefully the free parameters, we get satisfactory fitting results. As expected, the lower cloud shows an increase of the source function, corresponding to a temperature increase of 400-1000 K in EBs relative to the quiet Sun. This is consistent with previous results deduced from semi-empirical models and confirms that local heating occurs in the lower atmosphere during the appearance of EBs. We also find that the optical depths can increase to some extent in both the lower and upper clouds, which may result from either direct heating in the lower cloud, or illumination by an enhanced radiation on the upper cloud. The velocities derived from this method, however, are different from those obtained using the traditional bisector method, implying that one should be cautious when interpreting this parameter. The two-cloud model can thus be used as an efficient method to deduce the basic physical parameters of EBs.

  16. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day∙km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by

  17. Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterizaton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization in NCAR CCM3 D. Zurovac-Jevtic, G. J. Zhang, and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institute of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cirrus cloud cover and ice water content (IWC) are the two most important properties of cirrus clouds. However, in general circulation models (GCMs), their treatment is very crude. For example, in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3), IWC is

  18. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective Despite improvements in computing power, current weather and climate models are unable to accurately reproduce the formation, growth, and decay of clouds and precipitation associated with storm systems. Not only is this due to a lack of data about precipitation, but also about the 3-dimensional environment of the surrounding clouds, winds, and moisture, and how that affects the transfer of energy between the sun and Earth. To

  19. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites

  20. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E.; McLean, II, William

    1996-01-01

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

  1. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; McLean, W. II

    1996-02-13

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus. 9 figs.

  2. Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National ...

  3. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Classification VAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties includes cloud boundaries, thickness, phase, type, and precipitation information, and hence provides a useful tool for evaluation of model simulations and...

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scmforcing) Title: ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scmforcing) The constrained variational ...

  5. Characterizing Arctic Mixed-phase Cloud Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have two distinguished cloud base heights (CBHs) that can be defined by both ceilometer (black dots) and micropulse lidar (MPL; pink dots) measurements (Figure 1). For a...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud Radar IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aerosol properties during clear-sky conditions. The ETL Radar Meteorology and Oceanography Division will field their NOAAK scanning cloud radar near the new ARM millimeter...

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  9. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Tag Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database Tag Cloud This tag cloud is a specific type of weighted list that provides a quick look at the content of the DOE R&D Accomplishments database. It can be easily browsed because terms are in alphabetical order. With this tag cloud, there is a direct correlation between font size and quantity. The more times a term appears in the bibliographic citations, the larger the font size. This tag cloud is also interactive. Clicking on a term will activate a search for that term. Search

  10. The LANL Cloud-Aerosol Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that incorporates two unique aspects in its formulation. First, the model employs a nonlinear solver that requires cloud-aerosol parameterizations be smooth or contain reasonable...

  11. Fragmentation in rotating isothermal protostellar clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Tohline, J.E.; Black, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an extensive set of 3-D hydrodynamic calculations that have been performed to investigate the susceptibility of rotating clouds to gravitational fragmentation are presented. (GHT)

  12. Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations, and NIF Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and NIF Experiments You are ...

  13. What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were born and grew. Those formulas did not always reflect reality. With more advanced computers came the ability to explicitly simulate large-cloud systems instead of approximating...

  14. Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe & Tompkins 2003) - Horizontal...

  15. Mountain-induced Dynamics Influence Cloud Phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-2011 via coordinated projects targeting clouds, precipitation, and dynamics in the Park Range of Colorado. The National Science Foundation sponsored aircraft measurements as...

  16. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  17. Method for making surfactant-templated thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Lu, Yunfeng; Fan, Hong You

    2010-08-31

    An evaporation-induced self-assembly method to prepare a porous, surfactant-templated, thin film by mixing a silica sol, a solvent, a surfactant, and an interstitial compound, evaporating a portion of the solvent to form a liquid, crystalline thin film mesophase material, and then removal of the surfactant template. Coating onto a substrate produces a thin film with the interstitial compound either covalently bonded to the internal surfaces of the ordered or disordered mesostructure framework or physically entrapped within the ordered or disordered mesostructured framework. Particles can be formed by aerosol processing or spray drying rather than coating onto a substrate. The selection of the interstitial compound provides a means for developing thin films for applications including membranes, sensors, low dielectric constant films, photonic materials and optical hosts.

  18. Method for making surfactant-templated thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Lu, Yunfeng (San Jose, CA); Fan, Hongyou (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An evaporation-induced self-assembly method to prepare a porous, surfactant-templated, thin film by mixing a silica sol, a solvent, a surfactant, and an interstitial compound, evaporating a portion of the solvent to form a liquid, crystalline thin film mesophase material, and then removal of the surfactant template. Coating onto a substrate produces a thin film with the interstitial compound either covalently bonded to the internal surfaces of the ordered or disordered mesostructure framework or physically entrapped within the ordered or disordered mesostructured framework. Particles can be formed by aerosol processing or spray drying rather than coating onto a substrate. The selection of the interstitial compound provides a means for developing thin films for applications including membranes, sensors, low dielectric constant films, photonic materials and optical hosts.

  19. Durable silver thin film coating for diffraction gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Komashko, Aleksey M.

    2006-05-30

    A durable silver film thin film coated non-planar optical element has been developed to replace Gold as a material for fabricating such devices. Such a coating and resultant optical element has an increased efficiency and is resistant to tarnishing, can be easily stripped and re-deposited without modifying underlying grating structure, improves the throughput and power loading of short pulse compressor designs for ultra-fast laser systems, and can be utilized in variety of optical and spectrophotometric systems, particularly high-end spectrometers that require maximized efficiency.

  20. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  1. Optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  2. Optical keyboard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  3. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.

    2014-02-28

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  4. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Catalano, Anthony W.; Bhushan, Manjul

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids.

  5. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Catalano, A.W.; Bhushan, M.

    1982-08-03

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids. 5 figs.

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Measuring Clouds at SGP with Stereo Photogramme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the form of the Point Cloud of Cloud Points Product (PCCPP). The PCCPP will: provide context on life-cycle stage and cloud position for vertically pointing radars, lidars, and...

  7. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study () | Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Title: VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international ...

  8. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud Citation Details In-Document ...

  9. Optical Switch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seven wonders / optical switch Optical Switch A key component in the laser chain, an optical switch called a plasma electrode Pockels cell (PEPC), was invented and developed at LLNL. A Pockels cell rotates the polarization of a laser beam when a voltage is applied across an electro-optic crystal. Depending on the voltage applied, the Pockels cell either allows light to pass through or to reflect off a polarizer, creating an optical switch. For each of NIF's 192 beamlines, a PEPC allows the laser

  10. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W.

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  11. Epitaxial thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Andrew Tye; Deshpande, Girish; Lin, Wen-Yi; Jan, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2006-04-25

    Epitatial thin films for use as buffer layers for high temperature superconductors, electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), gas separation membranes or dielectric material in electronic devices, are disclosed. By using CCVD, CACVD or any other suitable deposition process, epitaxial films having pore-free, ideal grain boundaries, and dense structure can be formed. Several different types of materials are disclosed for use as buffer layers in high temperature superconductors. In addition, the use of epitaxial thin films for electrolytes and electrode formation in SOFCs results in densification for pore-free and ideal gain boundary/interface microstructure. Gas separation membranes for the production of oxygen and hydrogen are also disclosed. These semipermeable membranes are formed by high-quality, dense, gas-tight, pinhole free sub-micro scale layers of mixed-conducting oxides on porous ceramic substrates. Epitaxial thin films as dielectric material in capacitors are also taught herein. Capacitors are utilized according to their capacitance values which are dependent on their physical structure and dielectric permittivity. The epitaxial thin films of the current invention form low-loss dielectric layers with extremely high permittivity. This high permittivity allows for the formation of capacitors that can have their capacitance adjusted by applying a DC bias between their electrodes.

  12. Thin film photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meakin, John D.; Bragagnolo, Julio

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

  13. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  14. Effective Radius of Cloud Droplets Derived from Ground-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which could eventually facilitate aerosol-cloud interactions. (Kim, Klein, Norris, JGR, 2005) SD z (m) SD LWP (g m -2 ) Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions - ...

  15. 915 MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory M Jensen MJ ... Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory M Jensen, ...

  16. ARM: AOS: Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (Dataset) | Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: AOS: Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter AOS: Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter Authors: Scott Smith ; Cynthia Salwen ; Janek Uin ; Gunnar Senum ; Stephen Springston ; ...

  17. ARM - Evaluation Product - CMWG Data - SCM-Forcing Data, Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data. Cloud microphysical properties derived from Mace's data of atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates are regridded to a...

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation Collapse PI Name:...

  19. The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these fields include cloud altitude, cloud amount, liquid and ice content, particle size spectra, and radiative fluxes at the surface and the TOA. Comparisons with Atmospheric...

  20. City of Red Cloud, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Red Cloud, Nebraska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Red Cloud Municipal Power Place: Nebraska Phone Number: 402-746-2215 Website: www.redcloudnebraska.comgover...

  1. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining ... Title: Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface ...

  2. ARM: Aerosol Observing System (AOS): cloud condensation nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: Aerosol Observing System (AOS): cloud condensation nuclei data Aerosol Observing System (AOS): cloud condensation nuclei data Authors: Scott Smith ; Cynthia Salwen ; ...

  3. Cloud microphysical relationships and their implication on entrainment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cloud microphysical relationships and their implication on entrainment and mixing mechanism for the stratocumulus clouds measured during the VOCALS project Citation Details ...

  4. Summary of workshop session F on electron-cloud instabilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Summary of workshop session F on electron-cloud instabilities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of workshop session F on electron-cloud instabilities ...

  5. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM ... as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. ...

  6. Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave ... used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). ...

  7. Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave Measurements G. Liu ... A better understanding of cloud water content and its large-scale distribution ...

  8. ARM: Microwave Radiometer Retrievals (MWRRET) of Cloud Liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microwave Radiometer Retrievals (MWRRET) of Cloud Liquid Water and Precipitable Water Vapor Title: ARM: Microwave Radiometer Retrievals (MWRRET) of Cloud Liquid Water and ...

  9. ARM: Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR): transmitted RF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transmitted RF power Title: ARM: Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR): transmitted RF power Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR): transmitted RF power Authors: Karen ...

  10. USING CLOUD CLASSIFICATION TO MODEL SOLAR VARIABILITY Matthew...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hourly cloud classified satellite images are compared to multiple years of ground measured ... type of cloud or weather pattern, as classified by NOAA. Instinctively, the type of ...

  11. Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manual classification of cloud phase. Using collocated cloud radar and depolarization lidar observations, it is shown that mixed-phase conditions have a high correlation with a...

  12. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles Title: Tropical Cloud Properties ... in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. ...

  13. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. ...

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. ... Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the ...

  15. Positive low cloud and dust feedbacks amplify tropical North...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    amplify tropical North Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: CLOUD AND DUST FEEDBACK AND AMO Title: Positive low cloud and dust feedbacks amplify tropical North Atlantic ...

  16. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-06-10

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  17. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  18. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  19. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  20. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras, energy harvesting, and radar systems June 5, 2013 A burst of laser energy 50 times greater than the worldwide output of electrical power slams into an extremely thin foil target to produce neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRIDENT laser facility during a recent experiment, which proved that laser-driven

  1. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E.

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  2. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  3. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-06-18

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  6. HOT HYDROGEN IN DIFFUSE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Duley, Walt W.; Williams, David A. E-mail: wwduley@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-08-20

    Laboratory evidence suggests that recombination of adsorbed radicals may cause an abrupt temperature excursion of a dust grain to about 1000 K. One consequence of this is the rapid desorption of adsorbed H{sub 2} molecules with excitation temperatures of this magnitude. We compute the consequences of injection of hot H{sub 2} into cold diffuse interstellar gas at a rate of 1% of the canonical H{sub 2} formation rate. We find that the level populations of H{sub 2} in J = 3, 4, and 5 are close to observed values, and that the abundances of CH{sup +} and OH formed in reactions with hot hydrogen are close to the values obtained from observations of diffuse clouds.

  7. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prather, M. J.

    2015-05-27

    A new approach for modeling photolysis rates (J values) in atmospheres with fractional cloud cover has been developed and implemented as Cloud-J – a multi-scattering eight-stream radiative transfer model for solar radiation based on Fast-J. Using observed statistics for the vertical correlation of cloud layers, Cloud-J 7.3 provides a practical and accurate method for modeling atmospheric chemistry. The combination of the new maximum-correlated cloud groups with the integration over all cloud combinations represented by four quadrature atmospheres produces mean J values in an atmospheric column with root-mean-square errors of 4% or less compared with 10–20% errors using simpler approximations. Cloud-Jmore » is practical for chemistry-climate models, requiring only an average of 2.8 Fast-J calls per atmosphere, vs. hundreds of calls with the correlated cloud groups, or 1 call with the simplest cloud approximations. Another improvement in modeling J values, the treatment of volatile organic compounds with pressure-dependent cross sections is also incorporated into Cloud-J.« less

  8. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prather, M. J.

    2015-08-14

    A new approach for modeling photolysis rates (J values) in atmospheres with fractional cloud cover has been developed and is implemented as Cloud-J – a multi-scattering eight-stream radiative transfer model for solar radiation based on Fast-J. Using observations of the vertical correlation of cloud layers, Cloud-J 7.3c provides a practical and accurate method for modeling atmospheric chemistry. The combination of the new maximum-correlated cloud groups with the integration over all cloud combinations by four quadrature atmospheres produces mean J values in an atmospheric column with root mean square (rms) errors of 4 % or less compared with 10–20 % errorsmore » using simpler approximations. Cloud-J is practical for chemistry–climate models, requiring only an average of 2.8 Fast-J calls per atmosphere vs. hundreds of calls with the correlated cloud groups, or 1 call with the simplest cloud approximations. Another improvement in modeling J values, the treatment of volatile organic compounds with pressure-dependent cross sections, is also incorporated into Cloud-J.« less

  9. Evaluation of high-level clouds in cloud resolving model simulations with ARM and KWAJEX observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zheng; Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we evaluate high-level clouds in a cloud resolving model during two convective cases, ARM9707 and KWAJEX. The simulated joint histograms of cloud occurrence and radar reflectivity compare well with cloud radar and satellite observations when using a two-moment microphysics scheme. However, simulations performed with a single moment microphysical scheme exhibit low biases of approximately 20 dB. During convective events, two-moment microphysical overestimate the amount of high-level cloud and one-moment microphysics precipitate too readily and underestimate the amount and height of high-level cloud. For ARM9707, persistent large positive biases in high-level cloud are found, which are not sensitivemore » to changes in ice particle fall velocity and ice nuclei number concentration in the two-moment microphysics. These biases are caused by biases in large-scale forcing and maintained by the periodic lateral boundary conditions. The combined effects include significant biases in high-level cloud amount, radiation, and high sensitivity of cloud amount to nudging time scale in both convective cases. The high sensitivity of high-level cloud amount to the thermodynamic nudging time scale suggests that thermodynamic nudging can be a powerful ‘‘tuning’’ parameter for the simulated cloud and radiation but should be applied with caution. The role of the periodic lateral boundary conditions in reinforcing the biases in cloud and radiation suggests that reducing the uncertainty in the large-scale forcing in high levels is important for similar convective cases and has far reaching implications for simulating high-level clouds in super-parameterized global climate models such as the multiscale modeling framework.« less

  10. Absorption of solar radiation in broken clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.; Zhuravleva, T.B.

    1996-04-01

    It is recognized now that the plane-parallel model unsatisfactorily describes the transfer of radiation through broken clouds and that, consequently, the radiation codes of general circulation models (GCMs) must be refined. However, before any refinement in a GCM code is made, it is necessary to investigate the dependence of radiative characteristics on the effects caused by the random geometry of cloud fields. Such studies for mean fluxes of downwelling and upwelling solar radiation in the visible and near-infrared (IR) spectral range were performed by Zuev et al. In this work, we investigate the mean spectral and integrated absorption of solar radiation by broken clouds (in what follows, the term {open_quotes}mean{close_quotes} will be implied but not used, for convenience). To evaluate the potential effect of stochastic geometry, we will compare the absorption by cumulus (0.5 {le} {gamma} {le} 2) to that by equivalent stratus ({gamma} <<1) clouds; here {gamma} = H/D, H is the cloud layer thickness and D the characteristic horizontal cloud size. The equivalent stratus clouds differ from cumulus only in the aspect ratio {gamma}, all the other parameters coinciding.

  11. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  12. Thin film composite electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schucker, Robert C. (The Woodlands, TX)

    2007-08-14

    The invention is a thin film composite solid (and a means for making such) suitable for use as an electrolyte, having a first layer of a dense, non-porous conductive material; a second layer of a porous ionic conductive material; and a third layer of a dense non-porous conductive material, wherein the second layer has a Coefficient of thermal expansion within 5% of the coefficient of thermal expansion of the first and third layers.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Cloud Infrared Imaging Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging 2012.07.16 - 2014.07.31 Lead Scientist : Joseph Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract The 3rd-generation Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) instrument was deployed close to the Great White facility at the North Slope of Alaska site and operated as

  14. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollias, P.; Luke, E.; Rmillard, J.; Szyrmer, W.

    2011-07-02

    Several aspects of spectral broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloud-scale observations of microphysics and dynamics are essential to guide and evaluate corresponding modeling efforts. Profiling, millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three moments of the recorded cloud radar Doppler spectra, the radar reflectivity, mean Doppler velocity, and spectrum width, are often used to retrieve cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. Such retrievals are subject to errors introduced by the assumptions made in the inversion process. Here, we introduce two additional morphological parameters of the radar Doppler spectrum, the skewness and kurtosis, in an effort to reduce the retrieval uncertainties. A forward model that emulates observed radar Doppler spectra is constructed and used to investigate these relationships. General, analytical relationships that relate the five radar observables to cloud and drizzle microphysical parameters and cloud turbulence are presented. The relationships are valid for cloud-only, cloud mixed with drizzle, and drizzle-only particles in the radar sampling volume and provide a seamless link between observations and cloud microphysics and dynamics. The sensitivity of the five observed parameters to the radar operational parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio and Doppler spectra velocity resolution are presented. The predicted values of the five observed radar parameters agree well with the output of the forward model. The novel use of the skewness of the radar Doppler spectrum as an early qualitative predictor of drizzle onset in clouds is introduced. It is found that skewness is a parameter very sensitive to early drizzle generation. In addition, the significance of the five parameters of the cloud radar Doppler spectrum for constraining drizzle microphysical retrievals is discussed.

  15. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings October 21, 2014 - 1:53pm Addthis DOE's cloud based transportation management system (ATLAS) offers dramatically enhanced capabilities and modernization. ATLAS provides a powerful user-friendly system built to allow access to information to meet transportation needs. Its processes promote regulatory compliance, while providing access to qualified carriers and

  16. Fabrication of optically reflecting ohmic contacts for semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided to produce a low-resistivity ohmic contact having high optical reflectivity on one side of a semiconductor device. The contact is formed by coating the semiconductor substrate with a thin metal film on the back reflecting side and then optically processing the wafer by illuminating it with electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength and energy level through the front side of the wafer for a predetermined period of time. This method produces a thin epitaxial alloy layer between the semiconductor substrate and the metal layer when a crystalline substrate is used. The alloy layer provides both a low-resistivity ohmic contact and high optical reflectance.

  17. X.509 Authentication/Authorization in FermiCloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyunwoo; Timm, Steven

    2014-11-11

    We present a summary of how X.509 authentication and authorization are used with OpenNebula in FermiCloud. We also describe a history of why the X.509 authentication was needed in FermiCloud, and review X.509 authorization options, both internal and external to OpenNebula. We show how these options can be and have been used to successfully run scientific workflows on federated clouds, which include OpenNebula on FermiCloud and Amazon Web Services as well as other community clouds. We also outline federation options being used by other commercial and open-source clouds and cloud research projects.

  18. Developing and Evaluating Ice Cloud Parameterizations by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by remote sensing is that the transfer functions which relate the observables (e. g., radar Doppler spectrum) to cloud properties (e. g., ice water content, or IWC) are not...

  19. QER- Comment of Cloud Peak Energy Inc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Dear Ms Pickett Please find attached comments from Cloud Peak Energy as input to the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If possible I would appreciate a confirmation that this email has been received Thank you.

  20. Building a private cloud with Open Nebula

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Short Ryan Glenn Ross Nordeen Mentors: Andree Jacobson ISTI-OFF David Kennel DCS-1 LA-UR 10-05197 Why use Virtualized Cloud Computing for HPC? * Support Legacy Software Stacks *...

  1. HPC CLOUD APPLIED TO LATTICE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; Nishimura, Hiroshi; James, Susan; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Qin, Yong

    2011-03-18

    As Cloud services gain in popularity for enterprise use, vendors are now turning their focus towards providing cloud services suitable for scientific computing. Recently, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) introduced the new Cluster Compute Instances (CCI), a new instance type specifically designed for High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. At Berkeley Lab, the physicists at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) have been running Lattice Optimization on a local cluster, but the queue wait time and the flexibility to request compute resources when needed are not ideal for rapid development work. To explore alternatives, for the first time we investigate running the Lattice Optimization application on Amazon's new CCI to demonstrate the feasibility and trade-offs of using public cloud services for science.

  2. Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Takahashi, T., and K. Kuhara. 1993. Precipitation mechanisms of cumulonimbus clouds at Pohnpei, Micronesia. Meteor. Soc. Japan 71:21-31. Takano, Y., and K. N. Liou. 1989. Radiative ...

  3. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest ... 1977 and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000. ...

  4. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  5. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  6. Science on the Hill: Methane cloud hunting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane cloud hunting Methane cloud hunting Los Alamos researchers go hunting for methane gas over the Four Corners area of northwest New Mexico and find a strange daily pattern. July 12, 2015 methane map Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is also a potent greenhouse gas, trapping energy in the atmosphere. Last year NASA released satellite images showing a hot spot in the area where New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Arizona meet, prompting scientists to go in search of the sources.

  7. Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

    2010-04-07

    Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

  8. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-06-18

    I present a summary of topics relevant to the electron-cloud build-up and dissipation that were presented at the International Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects 'ECLOUD 07' (Daegu, S. Korea, April 9-12, 2007). This summary is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the talks. Rather, I focus on those developments that I found, in my personal opinion, especially interesting. The contributions, all excellent, are posted in http://chep.knu.ac.kr/ecloud07/.

  9. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  10. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  11. Magellan Explores Cloud Computing for DOE's Scientific Mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explores Cloud Computing for DOE's Scientific Mission Magellan Explores Cloud Computing for DOE's Scientific Mission March 30, 2011 Cloud Control -This is a picture of the Magellan management and network control racks at NERSC. To test cloud computing for scientific capability, NERSC and the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) installed purpose-built testbeds for running scientific applications on the IBM iDataPlex cluster. (Photo Credit: Roy Kaltschmidt) Cloud computing is gaining

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Campaign Links Final Campaign Summary BAECC Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2014.06.15, Scott, AMF Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Extended Radiosonde IOP 2014.05.01, Nicoll, AMF Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: FIGAERO-ToF-CIMS Instrument in Hyytiala with AMF-2 2014.04.01, Thornton, AMF Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Day and Night cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fraction - Cloud Inter-Compariosn IOP results Day and Night cloud fraction - Cloud Inter-Compariosn IOP results Genkova, Iliana University of Illinois-Champaign Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David Pacific Northwest National Laboratory We present results from the CIC IOP from March-may, 2003. Day time and night time cloud fraction retrieval algorithms have been presented and intercompared. Amount of low, middle and high cloud have been estimated and compared to

  14. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  15. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  16. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium structure and mass of filamentary isothermal cloud threaded by lateral magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2014-04-10

    Herschel observations have recently revealed that interstellar molecular clouds consist of many filaments. Polarization observations in optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that the magnetic field often runs perpendicular to the filament. In this article, we study the magnetohydrostatic configuration of isothermal gas in which the thermal pressure and the Lorentz force are balanced against the self-gravity, and the magnetic field is globally perpendicular to the axis of the filament. The model is controlled by three parameters: center-to-surface density ratio (? {sub c}/? {sub s}), plasma ? of surrounding interstellar gas (?{sub 0}), and the radius of the hypothetical parent cloud normalized by the scale-height (R{sub 0}{sup ?}), although there remains freedom in how the mass is distributed against the magnetic flux (mass loading). In the case where R{sub 0}{sup ?} is small enough, the magnetic field plays a role in confining the gas. However, the magnetic field generally has the effect of supporting the cloud. There is a maximum line-mass (mass per unit length) above which the cloud is not supported against gravity. Compared with the maximum line-mass of a nonmagnetized cloud (2c{sub s}{sup 2}/G, where c{sub s} and G represent, respectively, the isothermal sound speed and the gravitational constant), that of the magnetized filament is larger than the nonmagnetized one. The maximum line-mass is numerically obtained as ?{sub max}?0.24?{sub cl}/G{sup 1/2}+1.66c{sub s}{sup 2}/G, where ?{sub cl} represents one half of the magnetic flux threading the filament per unit length. The maximum mass of the filamentary cloud is shown to be significantly affected by the magnetic field when the magnetic flux per unit length exceeds ?{sub cl} ? 3 pc ?G (c{sub s} /190 m s{sup 1}){sup 2}.

  17. Understanding Ice Supersaturation, Particle Growth, and Number Concentration in Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O.; Yang, P.

    2008-12-10

    Many factors control the ice supersaturation and microphysical properties in cirrus clouds. We explore the effects of dynamic forcing, ice nucleation mechanisms, and ice crystal growth rate on the evolution and distribution of water vapor and cloud properties in cirrus clouds using a detailed microphysical model and remote sensing measurements obtained at the Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, OK. To help understand dynamic scales important in cirrus formation, we force the model using both large-scale forcing derived using ARM variational analysis, and mean mesoscale velocity derived from radar Doppler velocity measurements. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation processes are explored, where we have implemented a rigorous classical theory heterogeneous nucleation scheme to compare with empirical representations. We evaluate model simulations by examining both bulk cloud properties and distributions of measured radar reflectivity, lidar extinction, and water vapor profiles, as well as retrieved cloud microphysical properties. This approach allows for independent verification of both the large and small particle modes of the particle size distribution. Our results suggest that mesoscale variability is the primary mechanism needed to reproduce observed quantities, while nucleation mechanism is secondary. Slow ice crystal growth tends to overestimate the number of small ice crystals, but does not seem to influence bulk properties such as ice water path and cloud thickness. The most realistic simulations as compared with observations are forced using mesoscale waves, include fast ice crystal growth, and initiate ice by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Ice crystal number concentrations on the order of 10-100 L-1 produce results consistent with both lidar and radar observations during a cirrus event observed on 7 December 1999, which has an optical depth range typical of

  18. Method for thinning specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  19. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  20. GREEN FUNCTIONS FOR MULTIPLE SCATTERING AS MATHEMATICAL TOOLS FOR DENSE CLOUD REMOTE SENSING: THEORY, WITH PASSIVE AND ACTIVE APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. B.; Marshak, A.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    We survey radiative Green function theory (1) in linear transport theory where numerical procedures are required to obtain specific results and (2) in the photon diffusion limit (large optical depths) where it is analytically tractable, at least for homogeneous plane-parallel media. We then describe two recent applications of Green function theory to passive cloud remote sensing in the presence of strong three-dimensional transport effects. Finally, we describe recent instrumental breakthroughs in 'off-beam' cloud lidar which is based on direct measurements of radiative Green functions with special attention to the data collected during the Shuttle-based Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission.

  1. Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satelliteretrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirecteffect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Del Genio, A.D.; Kaufman, Y.; Bennartz, R.; Koch, D.; Loeb, N.; Orlikowski, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evidence of aerosol-cloud interactions are evaluated using satellite data from MODIS, CERES, AMSR-E, reanalysis data from NCEP and data from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model. We evaluate a series of model simulations: (1) Exp N- aerosol direct radiative effects; (2) Exp C- Like Exp N but with aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus and stratus clouds; (3) Exp CN- Like Exp C but with model wind fields nudged to reanalysis data. Comparison between satellite-retrieved data and model simulations for June to August 2002, over the Atlantic Ocean indicate the following: a negative correlation between aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and cloud droplet effective radius (R{sub eff}) for all cases and satellite data, except for Exp N; a weak but negative correlation between liquid water path (LWP) and AOT for MODIS and CERES; and a robust increase in cloud cover with AOT for both MODIS and CERES. In all simulations, there is a positive correlation between AOT and both cloud cover and LWP (except in the case of LWP-AOT for Exp CN). The largest slopes are obtained for Exp N, implying that meteorological variability may be an important factor. The main fields associated with AOT variability in NCEP/MODIS data are warmer temperatures and increased subsidence for less clean cases, not well captured by the model. Simulated cloud fields compared with an enhanced data product from MODIS and AMSR-E indicate that model cloud thickness is over-predicted and cloud droplet number is within retrieval uncertainties. Since LWP fields are comparable this implies an under-prediction of R{sub eff} and thus an over-prediction of the indirect effect.

  2. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of science. If nanoparticles could be coaxed into routinely assembling themselves into predictable complex structures and hierarchical patterns, devices could be mass-produced that are one thousand times smaller than today's microtechnologies. Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists have made progress toward this goal,

  3. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of science. If nanoparticles could be coaxed into routinely assembling themselves into predictable complex structures and hierarchical patterns, devices could be mass-produced that are one thousand times smaller than today's microtechnologies. Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists have made progress toward this goal,

  4. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of science. If nanoparticles could be coaxed into routinely assembling themselves into predictable complex structures and hierarchical patterns, devices could be mass-produced that are one thousand times smaller than today's microtechnologies. Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists have made progress toward this goal,

  5. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films Print Nanoparticles-man-made atoms with unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties-have become key components in many fields of science. If nanoparticles could be coaxed into routinely assembling themselves into predictable complex structures and hierarchical patterns, devices could be mass-produced that are one thousand times smaller than today's microtechnologies. Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley scientists have made progress toward this goal,

  6. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be

  7. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  8. A comparison of cloud properties at a coastal and inland site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    have examined differences in cloud liquid water paths (LWPs) at a coastal (Barrow) and an ... KEYWORDS: arctic clouds, cloud liquid water, microwave radiometer, ECMWF model, ...

  9. CO J = 1-0 AND J = 2-1 LINE OBSERVATIONS OF THE MOLECULAR-CLOUD-BLOCKED SUPERNOVA REMNANT 3C434.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Il-Gyo; Koo, Bon-Chul; Cho, Wan-Kee; Kramer, Carsten; Stutzki, Juergen; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-20

    We present the results of CO emission line observations toward the semicircular Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) 3C434.1 (G94.0+1.0). We mapped an area covering the whole SNR in the {sup 12}CO J = 1-0 emission line using the Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory 6 m telescope and found a large molecular cloud superposed on the faint western part of the SNR. The cloud was elongated along the north-south direction and showed a very good spatial correlation with the radio features of the SNR. We carried out {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 line observations of this cloud using the Koelner Observatorium fuer Sub-Millimeter Astronomie 3 m telescope and found a region in which the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 to J = 1-0 ratio was high ({approx}1.6). This higher excitation, together with the morphological relation, strongly suggested that the molecular cloud was interacting with the SNR. The systemic velocity of the molecular cloud (-13 km s{sup -1}) gave a kinematic distance of 3.0 kpc to the SNR-molecular cloud system. We derived the physical parameters of the SNR based on this new distance. We examined the variation of the radio spectral index over the remnant and found that it was flatter in the western part, wherein the SNR was interacting with the molecular cloud. We therefore propose that 3C434.1 is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occurred just outside the boundary of a relatively thin, sheet-like molecular cloud. We present a hydrodynamic model showing that its asymmetric radio morphology can result from its interaction with this blocking molecular cloud.

  10. Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes based on measured data from real cloud scenes. These renderings will provide the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here uses binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud features vectors.

  11. Simulations of the Electron Cloud Builld Up and Instabilities for Various ILC Damping Ring Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Wang, Lanfa; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2007-03-12

    In the beam pipe of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an electron cloud may be first produced by photoelectrons and ionization of residual gases and then increased by the secondary emission process. This paper reports the assessment of electron cloud effects in a number of configuration options for the ILC baseline configuration. Careful estimates were made of the secondary electron yield (sometimes in the literature also referred as secondary emission yield SEY or {delta}, with a peak value {delta}{sub max}) threshold for electron cloud build-up, and the related single- and coupled-bunch instabilities, as a function of beam current and surface properties for a variety of optics designs. When the configuration for the ILC damping rings was chosen at the end of 2005, the results from these studies were important considerations. On the basis of the joint theoretical and experimental work, the baseline configuration currently specifies a pair of 6 km damping rings for the positron beam, to mitigate the effects of the electron cloud that could present difficulties in a single 6 km ring. However, since mitigation techniques are now estimated to be sufficiently mature, a reduced single 6-km circumference is presently under consideration so as to reduce costs.

  12. Tunable electrical and optical properties of hafnium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, I. L.; Reeves, R. J.; Preston, A. R. H.; Ludbrook, B. M.; Ruck, B. J.; Downes, J. E.; Durbin, S. M.

    2010-02-15

    We report structural and electronic properties of epitaxial hafnium nitride films grown on MgO by plasma-assisted pulsed laser deposition. The electronic structure measured using soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is in excellent agreement with the results of a band structure calculation. We show that by varying the growth conditions we can extend the films' reflectance further toward the UV, and we relate this observation to the electronic structure.

  13. Characterization of Monolayer Formation on Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes,C.; Lappi, S.; Fischer, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Genzer, J.; Franzen, S.

    2008-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films on a glass substrate are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Optical studies with coupling in the Kretschmann configuration reveal an angle-dependent plasma frequency in the mid-IR for p-polarized radiation, suggestive of the detection of a Drude plasma frequency. These studies are complemented by oxygen depletion density functional theory studies for the calculation of the charge carrier concentration and plasma frequency for bulk AZO. In addition, we report on the optical and physical properties of thin film adlayers of n-hexadecanethiol (HDT) and n-octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on AZO surfaces using reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Our characterization of the SAM deposition onto the AZO thin film reveals a range of possible applications for this conducting metal oxide.

  14. The diverse use of clouds by CMS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andronis, Anastasios; Bauer, Daniela; Chaze, Olivier; Colling, David; Dobson, Marc; Fayer, Simon; Girone, Maria; Grandi, Claudio; Huffman, Adam; Hufnagel, Dirk; et al

    2015-01-01

    The resources CMS is using are increasingly being offered as clouds. In Run 2 of the LHC the majority of CMS CERN resources, both in Meyrin and at the Wigner Computing Centre, will be presented as cloud resources on which CMS will have to build its own infrastructure. This infrastructure will need to run all of the CMS workflows including: Tier 0, production and user analysis. In addition, the CMS High Level Trigger will provide a compute resource comparable in scale to the total offered by the CMS Tier 1 sites, when it is not running as part of themore » trigger system. During these periods a cloud infrastructure will be overlaid on this resource, making it accessible for general CMS use. Finally, CMS is starting to utilise cloud resources being offered by individual institutes and is gaining experience to facilitate the use of opportunistically available cloud resources. Lastly, we present a snap shot of this infrastructure and its operation at the time of the CHEP2015 conference.« less

  15. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Haas, Terry; Wong, Kwok-Keung; Seward, George

    1989-01-01

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  16. A cloud detection algorithm using the downwelling infrared radiance measured by an infrared pyrometer of the ground-based microwave radiometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, M. H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, Victor R.

    2015-02-03

    For better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two-step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear-sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperaturemore » and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of clear-sky conditions. It is designated as cloud-free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm cloud-free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully detected by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are detected by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for six months, from January to June 2013. The overall proportion of correctness is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8%, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of discrepancies occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud-base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.« less

  17. A cloud detection algorithm using the downwelling infrared radiance measured by an infrared pyrometer of the ground-based microwave radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, M. H.; Han, D.; Won, H. Y.; Morris, Victor R.

    2015-02-03

    For better utilization of the ground-based microwave radiometer, it is important to detect the cloud presence in the measured data. Here, we introduce a simple and fast cloud detection algorithm by using the optical characteristics of the clouds in the infrared atmospheric window region. The new algorithm utilizes the brightness temperature (Tb) measured by an infrared radiometer installed on top of a microwave radiometer. The two-step algorithm consists of a spectral test followed by a temporal test. The measured Tb is first compared with a predicted clear-sky Tb obtained by an empirical formula as a function of surface air temperature and water vapor pressure. For the temporal test, the temporal variability of the measured Tb during one minute compares with a dynamic threshold value, representing the variability of clear-sky conditions. It is designated as cloud-free data only when both the spectral and temporal tests confirm cloud-free data. Overall, most of the thick and uniform clouds are successfully detected by the spectral test, while the broken and fast-varying clouds are detected by the temporal test. The algorithm is validated by comparison with the collocated ceilometer data for six months, from January to June 2013. The overall proportion of correctness is about 88.3% and the probability of detection is 90.8%, which are comparable with or better than those of previous similar approaches. Two thirds of discrepancies occur when the new algorithm detects clouds while the ceilometer does not, resulting in different values of the probability of detection with different cloud-base altitude, 93.8, 90.3, and 82.8% for low, mid, and high clouds, respectively. Finally, due to the characteristics of the spectral range, the new algorithm is found to be insensitive to the presence of inversion layers.

  18. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  19. Ferromagnetic thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishnan, K.M.

    1994-12-20

    A ferromagnetic [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] thin film having perpendicular anisotropy is described which comprises: (a) a GaAs substrate, (b) a layer of undoped GaAs overlying said substrate and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 50 to about 100 nanometers, (c) a layer of [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] overlying said layer of undoped GaAs and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 20 to about 30 nanometers, and (d) a layer of GaAs overlying said layer of [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 2 to about 5 nanometers, wherein x is 0.4[+-]0.05. 7 figures.

  20. Hand portable thin-layer chromatography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Bushman, John F.; Wiefel, Michael H.; Jensen, Wayne A.

    2000-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  1. ThinSilicon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ThinSilicon Place: California Product: US-based developer of thin-film PV module manufacturing technology. References: ThinSilicon1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  2. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya; Zbiegel, Piotr; Campbell, Scott; Bradshaw, Rick; Canon, Richard; Coghlan, Susan; Sakrejda, Iwona; Desai, Narayan; Declerck, Tina; Liu, Anping

    2011-02-02

    Cloud resources promise to be an avenue to address new categories of scientific applications including data-intensive science applications, on-demand/surge computing, and applications that require customized software environments. However, there is a limited understanding on how to operate and use clouds for scientific applications. Magellan, a project funded through the Department of Energy?s (DOE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program, is investigating the use of cloud computing for science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Facility (NERSC). In this paper, we detail the experiences to date at both sites and identify the gaps and open challenges from both a resource provider as well as application perspective.

  3. NEW X-RAY-SELECTED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE MEMBERS OF THE SERPENS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Isa; Van der Laan, Margriet; Brown, Joanna M.

    2013-11-01

    The study of young stars no longer surrounded by disks can greatly add to our understanding of how protoplanetary disks evolve and planets form. We have used VLT/FLAMES optical spectroscopy to confirm the youth and membership of 19 new young diskless stars in the Serpens Molecular Cloud, identified at X-ray wavelengths. Spectral types, effective temperatures, and stellar luminosities were determined using optical spectra and optical/near-infrared photometry. Stellar masses and ages were derived based on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks. The results yield remarkable similarities for age and mass distribution between the diskless and disk-bearing stellar populations in Serpens. We discuss the important implications these similarities may have on the standard picture of disk evolution.

  4. Characterization of Polarizing Splitter Optics in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Ryand; Olson, Matthew; Morelli, Gregg

    2013-01-04

    Development of laser systems capable of surviving extreme conditions experienced in military applications requires mounts and components that are able to survive these conditions. The characterization of mounted and/or bonded optical assemblies in harsh environments is critical for the development of laser and optical systems for functionality in these extreme conditions. Customized mounts, bonding assemblies and packaging strategies are utilized to develop and field reliable and robust optical subassemblies. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o and polarizing beam splitter cubes were chosen for initial testing based on past experiences, advancements in optical coating and construction technologies and material properties. Shock, vibration, shear strength, tensile strength and temperature testing are performed on mounted polarizing beam splitter cubes and thin film polarizers from two manufacturers. Previous testing showed that polarizing beam splitter cubes constructed using epoxy would become damaged in the laser resonator. The cubes being tested in this report are constructed using epoxy- free direct optical contact bonding. Thin film polarizers operating at 45o are chosen opposed to Brewster’s angle thin film polarizers to reduce the size and simplify design and construction since an optical wedge is not required. The components and mounts are each environmentally tested beyond the manufacturers’ specifications for shock, vibration, and temperature. Component functionality is monitored during and after the environmental testing. Experimental results from the testing will be discussed as will the impact on future laser resonator designs.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at

  6. Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vang, Leng; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis

    2014-09-01

    In collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared of information documents, software tools and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. A new cloud-based environment would be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available of Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report reviews development of a Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities (CAC) as a web portal for PRA tools.

  7. Optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  8. Optical analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  9. Optical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  10. Innovative Thin Films LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thin Films LLC Place: Toledo, Ohio Zip: 43607 Product: Provider of altnernative energy thin film deposition technology. Coordinates: 46.440613, -122.847838 Show Map Loading...

  11. Thin Film Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    help OpenEI by expanding it. Thin Film Solar Technologies is a company located in South Africa . References "Thin Film Solar Technologies" Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:49 Generic silicon solar cells showing +45, -45, and ...

  13. Optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  14. Optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  15. Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-02-17

    Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction

  16. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of ... layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. ...

  17. Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud Microphysics from M...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cloud Microphysics from M-PACE Final Report, DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud ...

  18. W-Band ARM Cloud Radar - Specifications and Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W-Band ARM Cloud Radar - Specifications and Design K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest ... to develop and deploy the W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) at the SGP central facility. ...

  19. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) ...

  20. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and ... cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g ...

  1. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-05-01

    We simulate electron cloud build-up in a grooved vacuumchamber including the effect of space charge from the electrons. Weidentify conditions for e-cloud suppression and make contact withprevious estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for groovedsurfaces.

  2. Treatments of Inhomogeneous Clouds in a GCM Column Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fractal stratocumulus clouds. J. Atmos. Sci., 51, 2434 -2455. Chou, M.-D., M. J. Suarez, C.-H. Ho, M. M.-H. Yan, and K.-T. Lee, 1998: Parameterizations for cloud...

  3. ARM - Evaluation Product - ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud microphysical property ensemble data set created by assembling existing ARM cloud ... One purpose of developing such an ensemble data set is to provide a rough estimate of the ...

  4. Biogenic Aerosols„Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogenic Aerosols-Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) Final Campaign Summary T Petj ... DOESC-ARM-15-051 Biogenic Aerosols-Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) Final Campaign ...

  5. Simulation of E-Cloud Driven Instability And Its Attenuation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulation of E-Cloud Driven Instability And Its Attenuation Using a Feedback System in the CERN SPS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation of E-Cloud Driven ...

  6. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Chen; Zelinka, Mark D.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2015-12-11

    The analyses of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 simulations suggest that climate models with more positive cloud feedback in response to interannual climate fluctuations also have more positive cloud feedback in response to long-term global warming. Ensemble mean vertical profiles of cloud change in response to interannual and long-term surface warming are similar, and the ensemble mean cloud feedback is positive on both timescales. However, the average long-term cloud feedback is smaller than the interannual cloud feedback, likely due to differences in surface warming pattern on the two timescales. Low cloud cover (LCC) change in response to interannual and long-term global surface warming is found to be well correlated across models and explains over half of the covariance between interannual and long-term cloud feedback. In conclusion, the intermodel correlation of LCC across timescales likely results from model-specific sensitivities of LCC to sea surface warming.

  7. Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Table 3. SHEBA domain cloud statistics from the polar cloud mask for January-March 1998. ... Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and NOAA-9 AVHRR data from 1986 were matched to ...

  8. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud ...

  9. Observations of the Madden Julian Oscillation for Cloud Modeling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dyn.) Manus MJO signal in downwelling SW cloud radiative forcing GRL paper submitted Y. Wang, C. Long, and J. Mather Manus MJO signal in retrieved cloud amount GRL paper...

  10. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  11. LES Modeling of High Resolution Satellite Cloud Spatial and Thermal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure at ARM-SGP site: How well can we Simulate Clouds from Space? LES Modeling of High Resolution Satellite Cloud Spatial and Thermal Structure at ARM-SGP site: How well can we Simulate Clouds from Space? Dubey, Manvendra DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory Chylek, Petr DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory Reisner, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory Porch, William Los Alamos National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties We report high fidelity observations of the spatial and thermal

  12. Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets.

  13. ARM - PI Product - Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsTropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al.,

  14. The dependence of cloud particle size and precipitation probability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effect Hongfei Shao and Guosheng Liu Meteorology Department, Florida State University INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic aerosols enhance cloud reflectance of solar...

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collapse | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Initiation of cloud cavitation collapse for 50,000 bubbles Initiation of cloud cavitation collapse for 50,000 bubbles. Jonas Sukys, ETH Zurich Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation Collapse PI Name: Petros Koumoutsakos PI Email: petros@ethz.ch Institution: ETH Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 72 Million Year: 2016 Research Domain: Engineering Cloud cavitation collapse-the evolution

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMarine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Campaign Links MAGIC Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC): Measuring the Composition of Aerosol Particles 2013.07.01, Lewis, AMF Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC): Shortwave Hyperspectral Observations 2013.07.01, McBride, AMF Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC): Marine Ice Nuclei Collections 2013.06.01, DeMott, AMF Marine ARM GPCI

  17. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  18. Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Feingold, Graham NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Frisch, Shelby NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties We will present an analysis of the effect of aerosol on clouds at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. New methods for retrieving cloud droplet effective radius with radar (MMCR), multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and microwave

  19. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for

  20. To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge To the Cloud! Apidae Helps Modelers Turn Information into Knowledge October 26, 2015 - 2:41pm Addthis Apidae is a collection of cloud-based simulation and data analysis tools that help modelers better understand their models. Image credit: BUILDlab. Apidae is a collection of cloud-based simulation and data analysis tools that help modelers better understand their models. Image credit: BUILDlab. Apidae