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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

An Evaluation of Depth Resolution Requirements for Optical Profiling in Coastal Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave perturbations induce uncertainties in subsurface quantities determined from the extrapolation of optical measurements taken at different depths. An analysis of these uncertainties was made using data collected in the northern Adriatic Sea ...

Giuseppe Zibordi; Davide D'Alimonte; Jean-François Berthon

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

On Rayleigh Optical Depth Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used for the calculation of Rayleigh optical depth in the atmosphere. In some cases differences among these techniques can be important, especially in the UV region of the spectrum and under clean atmospheric ...

Barry A. Bodhaine; Norman B. Wood; Ellsworth G. Dutton; James R. Slusser

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

4

Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.  

SciTech Connect

At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

6

Optical Depth Measurements of Aerosol Cloud, and Water Vapor Using Sun Photometers during FIRE Cirrus IFO II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depths in the visible to infrared spectral region were obtained from solar extinction measurements with two sun photometers during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment Phase II Cirrus Intensive Field Observation in Kansas.

Masataka Shiobara; James D. Spinhirne; Akihiro Uchiyama; Shoji Asano

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Photometric Investigations of Precipitable Water and Optical Depth Wavelength Exponents in an Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel Volz sunphotometer was used in the St. Louis urban area during Project METROMEX 1976 to monitor aerosol loading and atmospheric precipitable water. A weighted least-square fit of photometric observations to spatially and temporarily ...

Tom Yoksas

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

SciTech Connect

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, ...

M. J. Bartholomew; R. M. Reynolds; A. M. Vogelmann; Q. Min; R. Edwards; S. Smith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Radiative Impact of Clouds of the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth W. O'Hirok and P. Ricchiazzi Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography and Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Analysis from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) reveals that the global mean cloud optical depth is surprisingly low (i.e., Ï„ = 3.8). While this value is probably dominated by extensive fields of cirrus, the average for liquid water clouds is also likely smaller than expected. It is in this regime (Ï„ <10) where remote measurements of cloud optical thickness or liquid water path (LWP)

11

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2008 . The Gulf of Mexico Federal ...

12

Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions  

SciTech Connect

Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Instrumentation and Technique for Deducing Cloud Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a photodiode radiometer to infer optical depth of thin clouds from solar intensity measurements is examined. Data were collected by a photodiode radiometer which measured incident radiation at angular fields of view of 2, ...

R. A. Raschke; S. K. Cox

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

15

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

16

Inferring Optical Depth of Broken Clouds from Landsat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depths ?pp for broken, shallow clouds over ocean were inferred from Landsat cloud reflectances Rcld (0.83 ?m) with horizontal resolution of 28.5 m. The values ?pp were obtained by applying an inverse, homogeneous, plane-parallel radiance ...

Howard W. Barker; Damin Liu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Retrieval of Optical Depth for Heavy Smoke Aerosol Plumes: Uncertainties and Sensitivities to the Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with uncertainties in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based retrieval of optical depth for heavy smoke aerosol plumes generated from forest fires that occurred in Canada due to a lack of knowledge on ...

Jeff Wong; Zhanqing Li

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves from the GOM Fed have gradually diminished, both volumetrically and as a percentage of overall U.S. proved reserves. The latter is especially true in recent years as onshore additions (particularly those associated with shale gas activity) have increased considerably. Proved oil reserves from

19

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) 1999.05.01 - 2004.05.14 Site(s) SGP General Description The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001), which retrieves visible optical depth and layer average backscatter-to-extinction ratio (k) at the lidar wavelength for each backscatter profile. Data Information Data Directory Contacts Principal Investigator Jennifer Comstock (509) 372-424

20

An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Optically thin clouds (e.g. optical depth < 3) can have a significant impact on radiative heating in the atmosphere, particularly in the cold upper troposphere. Currently, there is no value-added product (VAP) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program archive that produces thin cloud optical depth, particularly at the Tropical Western Pacific and North Slope of Alaska sites. A VAP is under development to obtain the cirrus cloud visible optical depth from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized

22

Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces: A Parameterization in Terms of Optical Depth, Solar Zenith Angle, and Surface Albedo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilevel spectral radiative transfer model is used to develop simple but accurate parameterizations for cloud transmittance as a function of cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle, and surface albedo, for use over snow, ice, and water ...

Melanie F. Fitzpatrick; Richard E. Brandt; Stephen G. Warren

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Estimating Snow Water Equivalent Using Snow Depth Data and Climate Classes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical applications snow depth is known, but snow water equivalent (SWE) is needed as well. Measuring SWE takes 20 times as long as measuring depth, which in part is why depth measurements outnumber SWE measurements worldwide. Here a ...

Matthew Sturm; Brian Taras; Glen E. Liston; Chris Derksen; Tobias Jonas; Jon Lea

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Contrails of Small and Very Large Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work deals with two kinds of contrails. The first comprises a large number of optically thin contrails near the tropopause. They are mapped geographically using a lidar to obtain their height and a camera to obtain azimuth and elevation. ...

David Atlas; Zhien Wang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, for the RSS 103 instrument in Barrow, Alaska Gianelli, Scott Columbia University - NASA/GISS Lacis, Andrew NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Carlson, Barbara NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Category: Aerosols Bimodal aerosol retrievals, and high-resolution retrevals of nitrogen dioxide, are performed on the Langley optical depth data from the RSS 103 device that was situated in Barrow, Alaska between March and August in 1999. The results show a higher fine mode aerosol optical depth on average than was retrieved by the RSS 102 at the SGP site. The seasonal cycle is also reversed with high values at Barrow occurring in the spring and low values in the summer. The fine mode effective radius also appears to

27

Influence of Filter Band Function on Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth from Sunphotometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beer’s attenuation law is the basis for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from sunphotometer data. However, the filter band function causes uncertainty during the retrieval of AOD from sunphotometer data, particularly for channels ...

Hao Zhang; Bing Zhang; Dongmei Chen; Junsheng Li; Guangning Zhao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inference of Cloud Optical Depth from Aircraft-Based Solar Radiometric Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is introduced for inferring cloud optical depth ? from solar radiometric measurements made on an aircraft at altitude z. It is assessed using simulated radiometric measurements produced by a 3D Monte Carlo algorithm acting on fields of ...

H. W. Barker; A. Marshak; W. Szyrmer; J-P. Blanchet; A. Trishchenko; Z. Li

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Methodology for Measuring Cirrus Cloud Visible-to-Infrared Spectral Optical Depth Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of cirrus cloud optical depths is necessary to understand the earth’s current climate and to model the cloud radiation impact on future climate. Cirrus clouds, depending on the ratio of their shortwave “visible” to longwave “infrared” ...

Daniel H. DeSlover; William L. Smith; Paivi K. Piironen; Edwin W. Eloranta

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inferring Optical Depth of Broken Clouds above Green Vegetation Using Surface Solar Radiometric Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for inferring cloud optical depth ? is introduced and assessed using simulated surface radiometric measurements produced by a Monte Carlo algorithm acting on fields of broken, single-layer, boundary layer clouds derived from Landsat ...

Howard W. Barker; Alexander Marshak

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Interannual Variations of Aerosol Optical Depth over Coastal India: Relation to Synoptic Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual variations in spectral aerosol optical depths (AOD) were examined using the data obtained from a chain of ground-based multiwavelength solar radiometers from various locations of the Indian peninsula during the dry winter season (...

Auromeet Saha; K. Krishna Moorthy; K. Niranjan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Estimating Cloud Field Albedo Using One-Dimensional Series Of Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the ability to estimate regional cloud albedo using 1D series of cloud optical depth ? similar to those inferred from ground-based microwave radiometers. The investigation has two facets: use of appropriate radiative transfer ...

Howard W. Barker

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Impact of Precipitation on Aerosol Spectral Optical Depth and Retrieved Size Distributions: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented on the impact of two isolated, strong thundershowers during a prevailing dry, sunny season on the spectral optical depths and inferred columnar size characteristics of atmospheric aerosols at a tropical station. Results ...

Auromeet Saha; K. Krishna Moorthy

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Comparison of Cirrus Height and Optical Depth Derived from Satellite and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of Cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA ...

M. Kästner; K. T. Kriebel; R. Meerkötter; W. Renger; G. H. Ruppersberg; P. Wendling

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Comparison and Uncertainty of Aerosol Optical Depth Estimates Derived from Spectral and Broadband Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental comparison of spectral aerosol optical depth ?a,? derived from measurements by two spectral radiometers [a LI-COR, Inc., LI-1800 spectroradiometer and a Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SPM2000 sun ...

Thomas Carlund; Tomas Landelius; Weine Josefsson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Broadband Extinction Method to Determine Aerosol Optical Depth from Accumulated Direct Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two important problems in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from hourly/daily/monthly accumulated pyrheliometer data, that is, how to select a suitable cosine of the solar zenith angle (?0) and how to eliminate or minimize ...

Jinhuan Qiu

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Potential for Improved Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals from the Multiple Directions of MISR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) views the earth with nine cameras, ranging from a 70° zenith angle viewing forward through nadir to 70° viewing aft. MISR does not have an operational cloud optical depth retrieval algorithm, but ...

K. Franklin Evans; Alexander Marshak; Tamás Várnai

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Particle Size and Optical Depth Using Polarimetric Sensor Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a conceptual approach toward the remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using the degree of polarization and polarized reflectance associated with the first three Stokes parameters, I, Q, and U, for the ...

S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou; Y. Takano; R. L. Slonaker

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Application of Sun/star photometry to derive the aerosol optical depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the radiative transfer and chemical processes that control the Earth's climate. Aerosol optical depth and other related aerosol characteristics are widely known during daytime through Sun photometers, and so ...

D. Perez-Ramirez; B. Ruiz; J. Aceituno; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Spatial Inhomogeneities and the Spectral Behavior of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth over the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the results of investigations into atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Atlantic Ocean are discussed. The data were collected during five shipboard expeditions that took place between 1989 and 1996. Measurements were ...

Sergey M. Sakerin; Dmitry M. Kabanov

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Optical Depth of Overcast Cloud across Canada: Estimates Based on Surface Pyranometer and Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overcast cloud optical depths ? are inferred from hourly, broadband surface pyranometer measurements of global irradiance for 21 Canadian stations. A radiative transfer model that treats the atmosphere as plane-parallel and horizontally ...

H. W. Barker; T. J. Curtis; E. Leontieva; K. Stamnes

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

43

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

44

Depth profiling the optical absorption and thermal reflection coefficient via an analysis based on the method of images (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of depth profiling optical absorption in a thermally depth variable solid is a problem of direct interest for the analysis of complex structured materials. In this work

J. F. Power

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dust Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over a Desert Surface Using the SEVIRI Window Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a new algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a desert using the window channels centered at 8.7, 10.8, and 12.0 ?m of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on board the Meteosat ...

Bart De Paepe; Steven Dewitte

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An Evaluation of Radiometric Products from Fixed-Depth and Continuous In-Water Profile Data from Moderately Complex Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiometric products determined from fixed-depth and continuous in-water profile data collected at a coastal site characterized by moderately complex waters were compared to investigate differences and limitations between the two measurement ...

Giuseppe Zibordi; Jean-François Berthon; Davide D’Alimonte

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Increase of Cloud Droplet Size with Aerosol Optical Depth: An Observational and Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect

Cloud droplet effective radius (DER) is generally negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a proxy of cloud condensation nuclei. In this study, cases of positive correlation were found over certain portions of the world by analyzing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite products, together with a general finding that DER may increase or decrease with aerosol loading depending on environmental conditions. The slope of the correlation between DER and AOD is driven primarily by water vapor amount, which explains 70% of the variance in our study. Various potential artifacts that may cause the positive relation are investigated including water vapor swelling, partially cloudy, atmospheric dynamics, cloud three-dimensional (3-D) and surface influence effects. None seems to be the primary cause for the observed phenomenon, although a certain degree of influence exists for some of the factors. Analyses are conducted over seven regions around the world representing different types of aerosols and clouds. Only two regions show positive dependence of DER on AOD, near coasts of the Gulf of Mexico and South China Sea, which implies physical processes may at work. Using a 2-D spectral-bin microphysics Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) which incorporated a reformulation of the Köhler theory, two possible physical mechanisms are hypothesized. They are related to the effects of slightly soluble organics (SSO) particles and giant CCNs. Model simulations show a positive correlation between DER and AOD, due to a decrease in activated aerosols with an increasing SSO content. Addition of a few giant CCNs also increases the DER. Further investigations are needed to fully understand and clarify the observed phenomenon.

Yuan, Tianle; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Renyi; Fan, Jiwen

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Retrievals of Thick Cloud Optical Depth from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) by Calibration of Solar Background Signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser beams emitted from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), as well as other spaceborne laser instruments, can only penetrate clouds to a limit of a few optical depths. As a result, only optical depths of thinner clouds (< about 3 for ...

Yuekui Yang; Alexander Marshak; J. Christine Chiu; Warren J. Wiscombe; Stephen P. Palm; Anthony B. Davis; Douglas A. Spangenberg; Louis Nguyen; James D. Spinhirne; Patrick Minnis

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Intrusion Depth of Density Currents Flowing into Stratified Water Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theory and laboratory experiments are presented describing the depth at which a density current intrudes into a linearly stratified water column, as a function of the entrainment ratio E, the buoyancy flux in the dense current B, and the ...

Mathew Wells; Parthiban Nadarajah

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Wave- and Wind-Driven Flow in Water of Finite Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors first derive both Coriolis-induced and viscosity-induced stresses for arbitrary water depth and arbitrary wave direction. Opportunity is taken here to succinctly and rigorously derive the Longuet-Higgins virtual tangential stress due ...

Zhigang Xu; A. J. Bowen

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Assessing a Cloud Optical Depth Retrieval Algorithm with Model-Generated Data and the Frozen Turbulence Assumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud optical depth retrieval algorithm that utilizes time series of solar irradiance and zenith downwelling radiance data collected at a fixed surface site is assessed using model-generated cloud fields and simulated radiation measurements. To ...

H. W. Barker; C. F. Pavloski; M. Ovtchinnikov; E. E. Clothiaux

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aerosol optical depth of the atmosphere over the ocean in the wavelength range 0.37-4 µm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At least two problems, the climatic impact of aerosols and improvement in techniques for space-borne sensing, require investigation of the spatiotemporal variability of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the ocean. The marine atmosphere covers an area ...

S. M. Sakerin; D. M. Kabanov; A. V. Smirnov; B. N. Holben

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aerosol Optical Depth over Oceans: High Space- and Time-Resolution Retrieval and Error Budget from Satellite Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to retrieve aerosol vertical optical depth at 0.64 ?m from satellite observations of cloud-free scenes over oceans with high spatial resolution (1°) and instantaneous temporal resolution is described and evaluated. The observed radiance ...

Richard Wagener; Seth Nemesure; Stephen E. Schwartz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aerosol Optical Depth and the Global Brewer Network: A Study Using U.K.- and Malaysia-Based Brewer Spectrophotometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols play an important role in attenuating solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and are thus important inputs to climate models. Aerosol optical depth is routinely measured in the visible range but little data in the ultraviolet (UV) ...

Wilawan Kumharn; John S. Rimmer; Andrew R. D. Smedley; Toh Ying Ying; Ann R. Webb

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to ...

Timothy A. Berkoff; Mikail Sorokin; Tom Stone; Thomas F. Eck; Raymond Hoff; Ellsworth Welton; Brent Holben

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Detailed Aerosol Optical Depth Intercomparison between Brewer and Li-Cor 1800 Spectroradiometers and a Cimel Sun Photometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) using different instruments during three short and intensive campaigns carried out from 1999 to 2001 at El Arenosillo in Huelva, Spain, are presented and compared. The specific aim of this study is to determine the ...

V. E. Cachorro; A. Berjón; C. Toledano; S. Mogo; N. Prats; A. M. de Frutos; J. M. Vilaplana; M. Sorribas; B. A. De La Morena; J. Gröbner; N. Laulainen

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Using hydrodynamic modeling for estimating flooding and water depths in grand bay, alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for using hydrodynamic modeling to estimate inundation areas and water depths during a hurricane event. The Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC) is used in this research. EFDC is one of the most commonly applied models ... Keywords: EFDC, flooding, grand bay, grid generation, hydrodynamics, inundation, modeling

Vladimir J. Alarcon; William H. McAnally

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nonlinear Properties of Random Gravity Waves in Water of Finite Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear theory for a stationary and homogeneous field of random gravity waves in water of finite depth is developed to the third order. This describes the second-order nonlinearities as a bound wavefield that can be expressed in ...

A. K. Laing

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An Integrated System for the Study of Wind-Wave Source Terms in Finite-Depth Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment to study the spectral balance of the source terms for wind-generated waves in finite water depth was carried out in Lake George, Australia. The measurements were made from a shore-connected platform at varying water depths from ...

Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner; Mark A. Donelan; Cyril McCormick; Alexander V. Babanin; W. Kendall Melville; Fabrice Veron

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Potential of Infrared Satellite Data for the Retrieval of Saharan-Dust Optical Depth over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depth of Saharan dust derived from photometric measurements made during the dry season at a Sahelian site (Niamey, Republic of Niger) is compared with METEOSAT-2 radiance in the 10.5–12.5 ?m channel for different times of the daily cycle. ...

M. Legrand; J. J. Bertrand; M. Desbois; L. Menenger; Y. Fouquart

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [ed.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloud-screening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun's elevation is greater than 9.25{sup o}. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month-by-month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, J.; Schwartz, S.; Denn, F.; Flynn, C.; Hodges, G.; Kiedron, P.; Koontz, A.; Schlemmer, J., and Schwartz, S. E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Anthropogenic and natural contributions to regional trends in aerosol optical depth, 1980-2006.  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the roles of human and natural sources in contributing to aerosol concentrations around the world is an important step toward developing efficient and effective mitigation measures for local and regional air quality degradation and climate change. In this study we test the hypothesis that changes in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over time are caused by the changing patterns of anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursors. We present estimated trends of contributions to AOD for eight world regions from 1980 to 2006, built upon a full run of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model for the year 2001, extended in time using trends in emissions of man-made and natural sources. Estimated AOD trends agree well (R > 0.5) with observed trends in surface solar radiation in Russia, the United States, south Asia, southern Africa, and East Asia (before 1992) but less well for Organization for Economic Co-operative Development (OECD) Europe (R < 0.5). The trends do not agree well for southeast Asia and for East Asia (after 1992) where large-scale inter- and intraannual variations in emissions from forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and dust storms confound our approach. Natural contributions to AOD, including forest and grassland fires, show no significant long-term trends (<1%/a), except for a small increasing trend in OECD Europe and a small decreasing trend in South America. Trends in man-made contributions to AOD follow the changing patterns of industrial and economic activity. We quantify the average contributions of key source types to regional AOD over the entire time period.

Streets, D. G.; Yan, F.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Mahowald, N.; Schultz, M.; Wild, M.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois; NASA; Cornell Univ.; Forschungszentrum; Inst.for Atmospheric and Climate Science; Tsinghua Univ.

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radiative kernels and histograms of cloud fraction, both as functions of cloud-top pressure and optical depth, are used to quantify cloud amount, altitude, and optical depth feedbacks. The analysis is applied to doubled-CO2 simulations from ...

Mark D. Zelinka; Stephen A. Klein; Dennis L. Hartmann

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Retrieval of Tropical Cirrus Thermal Optical Depth, Crystal Size, and Shape Using a Dual-View Instrument at 3.7 and 10.8 ?m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors derive thermal optical depth at 3.7 and 10.8 ?m for tropical cirrus utilizing Along Track Scanning Radiometer data under nighttime conditions. By analytically solving the equation of radiative transfer, inclusive of ...

A. J. Baran; S. J. Brown; J. S. Foot; D. L. Mitchell

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of the Hydrometeor Layers in the East and West Pacific Within ISCCP Cloud Top Pressure-Optical Depth Bins Using Merged CloudSat and CALIPSO Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISCCP provides a multi-decadal and global description of cloud properties that are often grouped into joint histograms of column visible optical depth (?) and effective cloud top pressure (Ptop). It has not been possible until recently to know the ...

Gerald G. Mace; Forrest J. Wrenn

68

A Multichannel, Multiangle Method for the Determination of Infrared Optical Depth of Semitransparent High Cloud from an Orbiting Satellite. Part I: Formulation and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the infrared optical depth of semitransparent clouds from satellite measurements. The technique employs cloud measurements at two infrared wavelengths and two angles. Using a simple but accurate model it is ...

A. J. Prata; I. J. Barton

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Study of Air Quality in the Southeastern Hampton–Norfolk–Virginia Beach Region with Airborne Lidar Measurements and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of air quality was performed using a compact, aircraft aerosol lidar designed in the Science Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. ...

Jasper Lewis; Russell De Young; D. Allen Chu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

RECONSTRUCTING THE {gamma}-RAY PHOTON OPTICAL DEPTH OF THE UNIVERSE TO z {approx} 4 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH GALAXY SURVEY DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reconstruct the {gamma}-ray opacity of the universe out to z {approx}gamma}{gamma} optical depth out to several TeV. Here, we use the same database as Helgason et al. where the extragalactic background light was reconstructed from LFs out to 4.5 {mu}m and was shown to recover observed galaxy counts to high accuracy. We extend our earlier library of LFs to 25 {mu}m such that it covers the energy range of pair production with {gamma}-rays (1) in the entire Fermi/LAT energy range, and (2) at higher TeV energies probed by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. In the absence of significant contributions to the cosmic diffuse background from unknown populations, such as the putative Population III era sources, the universe appears to be largely transparent to {gamma}-rays at all Fermi/LAT energies out to z {approx} 2 whereas it becomes opaque to TeV photons already at z {approx}gamma-ray burst and blazar data shows that there is room for significant emissions originating in the first stars era.

Helgason, Kari [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kashlinsky, Alexander, E-mail: kari@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

A strip theory approximation for wave forces on submerged vehicles in finite depth water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) are becoming of increasing use in shallow waters for oceanographic data collection, coastal mapping, and military operations such as mine surveillance along enemy coastlines. Currently ...

Rybka Jan A. (Jan Andrzej)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NEUTRAL HYDROGEN OPTICAL DEPTH NEAR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 2.4 IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2.4. Our sample consists of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters fall within the redshift range of its Ly{alpha} forest. We present the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies, plotting the median Ly{alpha} pixel optical depth as a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The Ly{alpha} optical depths are measured using an automatic algorithm that takes advantage of all available Lyman series lines. The median optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the >3{sigma} level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e., >9 comoving Mpc), but the scatter at a given distance is large compared with the median excess optical depth, suggesting that the gas is clumpy. Within 100 (200) kpc, and over {+-}165 km s{sup -1}, the covering fraction of gas with Ly{alpha} optical depth greater than unity is 100{sup +0}{sub -32}% (66% {+-} 16%). Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 0.1 are typically closer to galaxies than random. The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 1 reside in regions where the galaxy number density is close to the cosmic mean on scales {>=}0.25 Mpc. We clearly detect two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales 3{sigma} significance), an effect that we attribute to large-scale infall (i.e., the Kaiser effect).

Rakic, Olivera; Schaye, Joop [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C. [California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Shallow water rogue wavetrains in nonlinear optical fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition to deep-water rogue waves which develop from the modulation instability of an optical CW, wave propagation in optical fibers may also produce shallow water rogue waves. These extreme wave events are generated in the modulationally stable normal dispersion regime. A suitable phase or frequency modulation of a CW laser leads to chirp-free and flat-top pulses or flaticons which exhibit a stable self-similar evolution. Upon collision, flaticons at different carrier frequencies, which may also occur in wavelength division multiplexed transmission systems, merge into a single, high-intensity, temporally and spatially localized rogue pulse.

Wabnitz, Stefan; Fatome, Julien; Millot, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of artificial neural network and combined models in estimating spatial distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent in Samsami basin of Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is a key parameter in hydrological cycle, and information on regional SWE is required for various hydrological and meteorological applications, as well as for hydropower production and flood forecasting. This study compares ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Combined methods, Snow depth, Spatial distribution

Hossein Tabari; S. Marofi; H. Zare Abyaneh; M. R. Sharifi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A New Algorithm for Finding Mixed Layer Depths with Applications to Argo Data and Subantarctic Mode Water Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new hybrid method for finding the mixed layer depth (MLD) of individual ocean profiles models the general shape of each profile, searches for physical features in the profile, and calculates threshold and gradient MLDs to assemble a suite of ...

James Holte; Lynne Talley

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are dominated by the effects of aerosols, both in relation to the direct absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols and also with respect to aerosol-related changes in cloud formation, longevity, and microphysics (See Figure 1; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Assessment Report 4, 2008). Moreover, the Arctic region in particular is especially sensitive to changes in climate with the magnitude of temperature changes (both observed and predicted) being several times larger than global averages (Kaufman et al. 2009). Recent studies confirm that aerosol-cloud interactions in the arctic generate climatologically significant radiative effects equivalent in magnitude to that of green house gases (Lubin and Vogelmann 2006, 2007). The aerosol optical depth is the most immediate representation of the aerosol direct effect and is also important for consideration of aerosol-cloud interactions, and thus this quantity is essential for studies of aerosol radiative forcing.

C Flynn; AS Koontz; JH Mather

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Determination of Precipitable Water from Solar Transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of determining precipitable water to within 10% from solar radiometer data has been developed. The method uses a modified Langley technique to obtain the water vapor optical depth, and a model developed at the University of Arizona is ...

K. J. Thome; B. M. Herman; J. A. Reagan

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN COASTAL WATERS OF THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a data acquisition assembly that takes advantage of the optical fiber and network communication systems Optical Oceanography Group, with sensors mounted on their "Slowdrop" profiling system. Two separate ac-9's vehicle configuration and optical sensor acquisition system has been successfully tested on a recent

Sosik, Heidi

79

Extending Depth of Field via Multifocus Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In digital imaging systems, due to the nature of the optics involved, the depth of field is constricted in the field of view. Parts of… (more)

Hariharan, Harishwaran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Temperature and Water Depth Monitoring Within Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat Below Bonneville Dam : Annual Report October 2007-September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project described in this report is to provide a sound scientific basis for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance chum salmon populations - a species listed in March 1999 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The study objective during fiscal year 2008 was to provide real-time data on Ives Island area water temperature and water surface elevations from the onset of chum salmon spawning through the end of chum salmon emergence. Sampling locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. In these locations, hydrosystem operation caused large, frequent changes in river discharge that affected salmon habitat by dewatering redds and altering egg pocket temperatures. The 2008 objective was accomplished using temperature and water-level sensors deployed inside piezometers. Sensors were integrated with a radio telemetry system such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely and posted hourly on the Internet. During our overall monitoring period (October 2007 through June 2008), mean temperature in chum spawning areas was nearly 2 C warmer within the riverbed than in the overlying river. During chum salmon spawning (mid-November 2007 through December2007), mean riverbed temperature in the Ives Island area was 14.5 C, more than 5 C higher than in the river, where mean temperature was 9.4 C. During the incubation period (January 2008 through mid-May 2008), riverbed temperature was approximately 3 C greater than in the overlying river (10.5 C and 7.2 C, respectively). Chum salmon preferentially select spawning locations where riverbed temperatures are elevated; consequently the incubation time of alevin is shortened before they emerge in the spring.

Arntzen, E.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Offshore Tower Shading Effects on In-Water Optical Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was performed to estimate the shading effect induced on in-water irradiance and radiance measurements taken in the immediate vicinity of the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT), located in the northern Adriatic Sea, which is ...

Giuseppe Zibordi; John Piero Doyle; Stanford B. Hooker

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics A computer program to calculate the optical properties of glazing systems and laminates. The program can be used to construct new laminates from existing components and...

83

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Doped, porous iron oxide films and their optical functions and anodic photocurrents for solar water splitting  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication and morphological, optical, and photoelectrochemical characterization of doped iron oxide films is presented. The complex index of refraction and absorption coefficient of polycrystalline films are determined through measurement and modeling of spectral transmission and reflection data using appropriate dispersion relations. Photoelectrochemical characterization for water photo-oxidation reveals that the conversion efficiencies of electrodes are strongly influenced by substrate temperature during their oblique-angle physical vapor deposition. These results are discussed in terms of the films' morphological features and the known optoelectronic limitations of iron oxide films for application in solar water splitting devices.

Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Mao, Samuel S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Antoun, Bonnie R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Depth and temporal variations in water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In-situ measurements of the specific conductance and temperature of ground water in the Snake River Plain aquifer were collected in observation well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These parameters were monitored at various depths in the aquifer from October 1994 to August 1995. The specific conductance of ground water in well USGS-59, as measured in the borehole, ranged from about 450 to 900 {micro}S/cm at standard temperature (25 C). The pumping cycle of the production wells at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant causes changes in borehole circulation patterns, and as a result the specific conductance of ground water at some depths in the well varies by up to 50% over a period of about 14 hours. However, these variations were not observed at all depths, or during each pumping cycle. The temperature of ground water in the well was typically between 12.8 and 13.8 C. The results of this study indicate that temporal variations in specific conductance of the ground water at this location are caused by an external stress on the aquifer--pumping of a production well approximately 4,000 feet away. These variations are believed to result from vertical stratification of water quality in the aquifer and a subsequent change in intrawell flow related to pumping. When sampling techniques that do not induce a stress on the aquifer (i.e., thief sampling) are used, knowledge of external stresses on the system at the time of sampling may aid in the interpretation of geochemical data.

Frederick, D.B. [Idaho INEL Oversight Program, Boise, ID (United States); Johnson, G.S. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Testing and Performance of Two-Dimensional Optical Array Spectrometers with Greyscale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two laboratory optical array spectrometers with greyscale were evaluated for their sizing, depth of field and timing performance; these three factors are necessary to calculate concentrations and liquid water contents. The probes were of 10 and ...

Paul Joe; Roland List

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect

A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky; A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CMB Optical Depth Measurements: Past, Present, Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is encoded with exactly the same cosmic information as the CMB's temperature anistropy. However, polarization has the additional promise of accurately probing the reionization history of the universe and potentially constraining, or detecting, the primordial background of gravitational waves produced by inflation. We demonstrate that these two CMB polarization goals are mutually compatible. A polarimeter optimized to detect the inflationary gravitational wave background signature in the polarization of the CMB is well situated to detect the signatures of realistic first-light scenarios. We also discuss current results and prospects for future CMB polarization experiments.

Brian Keating; Nathan Miller

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Optical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Optical fiber-based single-shot picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy Andrew R. Cook a͒ and Yuzhen Shen Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA ͑Received 27 January 2009; accepted 29 May 2009; published online 17 July 2009͒ A new type of single-shot transient absorption apparatus is described based on a bundle of optical fibers. The bundle contains 100 fibers of different lengths, each successively giving ϳ15 ps longer optical delay. Data are collected by imaging light from the exit of the bundle into a sample where it is overlapped with an electron pulse or laser excitation pulse, followed by imaging onto a charge coupled device ͑CCD͒ detector where the intensity of light from each fiber is measured simultaneously. Application to both ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis is demonstrated. For pulse

91

Total instantaneous energy transport in polychromatic fluid gravity waves at finite depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total instantaneous energy transport can be found for polychromatic waves when using the deep water approximation. Expanding this theory to waves in waters of finite depth

J. Engström; J. Isberg; M. Eriksson; M. Leijon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

acre feet (af) -A quantity of volume of water that covers one acre to a depth of one foot; equal to 43,560 cubic feet or 325,851 gallons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is not hydrostatically connected. per capita water use - Water produced by or introduced into the system of a water of a fluid into, through, or from a porous medium. self-produced water - Water supply (usually from wells) developed and used by an individual or entity. Also called self-produced water. self-supplied water - Water

Lund, Jay R.

93

Determining Bottom Reflectance and Water Optical Properties Using Unmanned Underwater Vehicles under Clear or Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with hyperspectral optical sensors that measure downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance was deployed over sandy bottoms, sea grass patches, and coral reefs near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, during the ...

David C. English; Kendall L. Carder

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

How Does Solar Attenuation Depth Affect the Ocean Mixed Layer? Water Turbidity and Atmospheric Forcing Impacts on the Simulation of Seasonal Mixed Layer Variability in the Turbid Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-resolution (?3.2 km) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation attenuation with depth on the predictions of monthly mean sea surface height (SSH), mixed layer depth (MLD), buoyancy and heat ...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Property:Depth(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Depth(m) Depth(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Depth(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 1.8 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.0 + Alden Small Flume + 1.8 + Alden Tow Tank + 1.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.2 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.8 + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 0.6 + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.6 + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.7 + Carderock Circulating Water Channel + 2.7 +

96

Radar Reflectivity–Based Estimates of Mixed Layer Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential for estimating mixed layer depth by taking advantage of the radial gradients in the radar reflectivity field produced by the large vertical gradients in water vapor mixing ratio that are characteristic of the ...

P. L. Heinselman; P. L. Spencer; K. L. Elmore; D. J. Stensrud; R. M. Hluchan; P. C. Burke

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Autonomous Depth Adjustment for Underwater Sensor Networks: Design and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To fully understand the ocean environment requires sensing the full water column. Utilizing a depth adjustment system on an underwater sensor network provides this while also improving global sensing and communications. ...

Detweiler, Carrick

98

Synthesis, Optical properties and Applications of Water Soluble Conjugated PPPs for Biosensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, application of fluorescent conjugated polymers to sense chemical and biological analytes has received much attention owing to its technological significance. Water soluble conjugated polymers are interesting ...

Vetrichelvan, Muthalagu

99

A Finite-Depth Wind-Wave Model. Part I: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parametric windsea model for arbitrary water depths is presented. The model is derived from a conservation of energy flux formulation and includes shoaling, refraction, dissipation by bottom friction, as well as finite-depth modifications of ...

Hans C. Graber; Ole S. Madsen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Influence of Linear Depth Variation on Poincaré, Kelvin, and Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exact solutions to the linearized shallow-water equations in a channel with linear depth variation and a mean flow are obtained in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions. These solutions are the generalization to finite s (depth variation ...

A. N. Staniforth; R. T. Williams; B. Neta

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

102

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

103

Characterization of the Immersion Factor for a Series of In-Water Optical Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral immersion factors, If(?), account for the difference between the in-air and in-water absolute response of submersible radiometers and are required to properly apply the in-air absolute calibration of the sensor when used underwater. The ...

G. Zibordi; S. B. Hooker; J. Mueller; G. Lazin

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

105

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Southern Walker Lake Basin, situated in the Walker Lake structural domain, consists of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada showed elevated temperatures. Two recent drill holes reaching downhole depths of more than 4000 ft give some insight to the geologic picture, but more information

106

Trap-depth determination from residual gas collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present a method for determining the depth of an atomic or molecular trap of any type. This method relies on a measurement of the trap loss rate induced by collisions with background gas particles. Given a fixed gas composition, the loss rate uniquely determines the trap depth. Because of the ''soft'' long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction, these collisions transfer kinetic energy to trapped particles across a broad range of energy scales, from room temperature to the microkelvin energy scale. The resulting loss rate therefore exhibits a significant variation over an enormous range of trap depths, making this technique a powerful diagnostic with a large dynamic range. We present trap depth measurements of a Rb magneto-optical trap using this method and a different technique that relies on measurements of loss rates during optical excitation of colliding atoms to a repulsive molecular state. The main advantage of the method presented here is its large dynamic range and applicability to traps of any type requiring only knowledge of the background gas density and the interaction potential between the trapped and background gas particles.

Van Dongen, J.; Zhu, C.; Clement, D.; Dufour, G.; Madison, K. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Booth, J. L. [Physics Department, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5G 3H2 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE  

SciTech Connect

Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ground-based retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

m & 0.675 m R2 (hashed) R1 (gray) 500 m Backtrajectories over Niamey in 2006 Pre-monsoon Early monsoon Late monsoon Post-monsoon Distribution of Dust Composition Dependence...

109

Assimilation of MODIS Cloud Optical Depths in the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), a large effort has recently been devoted to define and implement moist physics schemes for variational assimilation of rain- and cloud-affected brightness temperatures. This study ...

Angela Benedetti; Marta Janisková

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Subcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single-mode telecommunications fiber to the rest of the optical ranging system. This type of detector of of the reflected laser sig- nal, which is focused into a multimode optical fiber. An in-line bandpass interferenceSubcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging system

Buller, Gerald S.

111

Human activities recognition using depth images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new method to classify human activities by leveraging on the cues available from depth images alone. Towards this end, we propose a descriptor which couples depth and spatial information of the segmented body to describe a human pose. Unique ... Keywords: depth image segmentation, human activity detection

Raj Gupta; Alex Yong-Sang Chia; Deepu Rajan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF 3 {mu}m WATER ICE IN SILHOUETTE DISKS IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER AND M43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the near-infrared images and spectra of four silhouette disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (M42) and M43 using the Subaru Adaptive Optics system. While d053-717 and d141-1952 show no water ice feature at 3.1 {mu}m, a moderately deep ({tau}{sub ice} {approx} 0.7) water ice absorption is detected toward d132-1832 and d216-0939. Taking into account the water ice so far detected in the silhouette disks, the critical inclination angle to produce a water ice absorption feature is confirmed to be 65 Degree-Sign -75 Degree-Sign . As for d216-0939, the crystallized water ice profile is exactly the same as in the previous observations taken 3.63 years ago. If the water ice material is located at 30 AU, then the observations suggest it is uniform at a scale of about 3.5 AU.

Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Takami, Hideki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ito, Meguru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Iye, Masanori, E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Improved Detection of Optically Thin Cirrus Clouds in Nighttime Multispectral Meteorological Satellite Imagery Using Total Integrated Water Vapor Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accurate identification of optically thin cirrus clouds in global meteorological satellite imagery by automated cloud analysis algorithms is critical to environmental remote sensing studies, such as those related to climate change. While ...

Keith D. Hutchison; Kenneth R. Hardy; Bo-Cai Gao

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Uterine caliper and depth gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

King, Loyd L. (Benton City, WA); Wheeler, Robert G. (Richland, WA); Fish, Thomas M. (Kennewick, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

Ahsen, Osman Oguz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mapping the Interior of Nanocrystals in Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Nanocrystals in Depth Complex, three-dimensional images of the interior of a nanocrystal have, for the first time, been obtained by researchers employing a new technique:...

117

Bottom Stress in Wind-Driven Depth-Averaged Coastal Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between depth-averaged velocity and bottom stress for purely wind-driven flows in unstratified coastal waters is examined using a one-dimensional (vertically resolving) current model. Results indicate that conventional drag laws ...

Harry L. Jenter; Ole Secher Madsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Crosstalk due to optical demultiplexing in subcarrier multiplexed systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report an in-depth investigation of the inter-modulation crosstalk in subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) systems with optical demultiplexing (ODeMux). Both theoretical derivations and numerical simulations show that the crosstalk in ODeMux systems mainly ... Keywords: Crosstalk analysis, Optical communications, Optical signal processing, Optical-label switching (OLS), Passive optical networks (PON), Subcarrier multiplexing (SCM)

Zuqing Zhu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies May 2006 Prepared by Idaho National Laboratory Recommended Best Practice: Defense in Depth 2 Table of Contents Keywords............................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 Background ......................................................................................................................... 3 Overview of Contemporary Control System Architectures................................................. 4 Security Challenges in Control Systems .............................................................................

120

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Revisiting the Thermocline Depth in the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermocline depth is defined as the depth of the maximum vertical temperature gradient. In the equatorial Pacific, the depth of 20°C isotherm is widely used to represent the thermocline depth. This work proposes that under the circumstance of ...

Haijun Yang; Fuyao Wang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Relationship between Ice Water Path and Downward Longwave Radiation for Clouds Optically Thin in the Infrared: Observations and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically pointing 3.2-cm radar is used to observe altostratus and cirrus clouds as they pass overhead. Radar reflectivities are used in combination with an empirical Zi-IWC (ice water content) relationship developed by Sassen (1987) to ...

Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Jack B. Snider; Robert A. Kropfli

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Practical Conversion of Pressure to Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conversion formula between pressure and depth is obtained employing the recently adopted equation of state for seawater (Millero et al., 1980). Assuming the ocean of uniform salinity 35 NSU and temperature 0°C the following equation is proposed,...

Peter M. Saunders

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Underway Conductivity–Temperature–Depth Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Underway Conductivity–Temperature–Depth (UCTD) instrument is motivated by the desire for inexpensive profiles of temperature and salinity from underway vessels, including volunteer observing ships (VOSs) and research ...

Daniel L. Rudnick; Jochen Klinke

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow depth and density were measured at Soviet drifting stations on multiyear Arctic sea ice. Measurements were made daily at fixed stakes at the weather station and once- or thrice-monthly at 10-m intervals on a line beginning about 500 m from ...

Stephen G. Warren; Ignatius G. Rigor; Norbert Untersteiner; Vladimir F. Radionov; Nikolay N. Bryazgin; Yevgeniy I. Aleksandrov; Roger Colony

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Depth estimation for ranking query optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relational ranking query uses a scoring function to limit the results of a conventional query to a small number of the most relevant answers. The increasing popularity of this query paradigm has led to the introduction of specialized rank join operators ... Keywords: DEEP, Data statistics, Depth estimation, Query optimization, Relational ranking query, Top-k

Karl Schnaitter; Joshua Spiegel; Neoklis Polyzotis

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Stereoscopic optical viewing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

Tallman, C.S.

1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microsoft Word - defense_in_depth_fanning.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Engineering and Systems Analysis What is Defense in Depth? Defense in Depth is a safety philosophy that guides the design, construction, inspection, operation, and...

130

Method and apparatus for recovering geopressured methane gas from ocean depths  

SciTech Connect

A suggested method for recovering the estimated 50,000 trillion CF of methane that is dissolved in areas of the Gulf of Mexico at depths of 15,000 ft involves liberating the methane molecules by means of an electrolytic process. Electrodes lowered to the desired depth and insulated from the overlying saltwater establish an electrical circuit with the methane-laden water acting as the electrolyte. The a-c current density causes dissociation of the water molecules, freeing the methane gas, which rises to the ocean surface. A tent-like structure lying on the surface traps the gas for transfer to a storage facility.

Carpenter, N.

1982-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydraulic frac sets Rockies depth record  

SciTech Connect

A depth record for massive hydraulic fracture in the Rocky Mt. region was set April 22 with the treatment of a central Wyoming gas well. The No. 1-29 Moneta Hills Well was treated through perforations at 19,838 to 19,874 ft and 20,064 to 20,100 ft. Soon after, another well in the Madden Deep Field was subject to hydraulic fracture through perforations a

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unknown bridge foundations pose a significant safety risk due to stream scour and erosion. Records from older structures may be non-existent, incomplete, or incorrect. Nondestructive and inexpensive geophysical methods have been identified as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain water and land environments with rough topography. A conventional resistivity survey procedure is used with the electrodes installed on the stream banks. However, some electrodes must be adapted for underwater use. Tests were conducted in one laboratory experimentation and at five field experimentations located at three roadway bridges, a geotechnical test site, and a railway bridge. The first experimentation was at the bridges with the smallest foundations, later working up in size to larger drilled shafts and spread footings. Both known to unknown foundations were investigated. The geotechnical test site is used as an experimental site for 2D and 3D ERI. The data acquisition is carried out along 2D profile with a linear array in the dipole-dipole configuration. The data collections have been carried out using electrodes deployed directly across smaller foundations. Electrodes are deployed in proximity to larger foundations to image them from the side. The 2D ERI can detect the presence of a bridge foundation but is unable to resolve its precise shape and depth. Increasing the spatial extent of the foundation permits better image of its shape and depth. Using electrode < 1 m to detect a slender foundation < 1 m in diameter is not feasible. The 2D ERI method that has been widely used for land surface surveys presently can be adapted effectively in water-covered environments. The method is the most appropriate geophysical method for determination of unknown bridge foundations. Fully 3D ERI method at bridge sites is labor intensive, time consuming, and does not add enough value over 2D ERI to make it worthwhile.

Arjwech, Rungroj

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Defence-In-Depth: Application firewalls in a defence-in-depth design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known and accepted by most security professionals that defence-in-depth is an important security principle: the age-old saying of ''don't put all your eggs in one basket'' applies just as much here as elsewhere. The wise assume that any part ...

Paul Byrne

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind ...

137

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture John Hackworth Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration ... In Response to Price, ...

138

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

139

Progress in short period multilayer coatings for water window applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mirrors for the water window,” Optics Letters, Volume 28,K alpha Line in the Water Window Region,” Applied Optics,coatings for water window applications E.M. Gullikson, F.

Gullikson, E.M.; Salmassi, F.; Aquila, A.L.; Dollar, F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

OPTICS5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Last Updated: 09/11/13 Table of Contents INSTALLATION EXECUTION bullet ** Operating Systems -- Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista 64 bit ** Optics5 may not work correctly with regional/locale settings using "," as a decimal separator. bullet Which Windows operating systems can be used to run Optics? "Class Does Not Support Automation or Expected Interface" error message bullet How much hard disk space should be available to install Optics? Optics user manual bullet I receive a virus warning (nimda-virus) when installing Optics. What should I do? NFRC Procedure for Applied Films bullet I have installed Optics but I can't find the program or the icon.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DISCOVERY OF CRYSTALLIZED WATER ICE IN A SILHOUETTE DISK IN THE M43 REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.9-4.2 {mu}m spectra of the five bright (L {<=} 11.2) young stars associated with silhouette disks with a moderate to high inclination angle of 39 Degree-Sign -80 Degree-Sign in the M42 and M43 regions. The water ice absorption is seen toward d121-1925 and d216-0939, while the spectra of d182-316, d183-405, and d218-354 show no water ice feature around 3.1 {mu}m within the detection limits. By comparing the water ice features toward nearby stars, we find that the water ice absorption toward d121-1925 and d216-0939 most likely originates from the foreground material and the surrounding disk, respectively. The angle of the disk inclination is found to be mainly responsible for the difference of the optical depth of the water ice among the five young stars. Our results suggest that there is a critical inclination angle between 65 Degree-Sign and 75 Degree-Sign for the circumstellar disk where the water ice absorption becomes strong. The average density at the disk surface of d216-0939 was found to be 6.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} g cm{sup -3}. The water ice absorption band in the d216-0939 disk is remarkable in that the maximum optical depth of the water ice band is at a longer wavelength than detected before. It indicates that the primary carrier of the feature is purely crystallized water ice at the surface of the d216-0939 disk with characteristic size of {approx}0.8 {mu}m, which suggests grain growth. This is the first direct detection of purely crystallized water ice in a silhouette disk.

Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T., E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu 96822 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Integrated optical filters using Bragg gratings and resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides an in-depth study of optical filters made using integrated Bragg gratings and Bragg resonators. Various topologies for making add/drop filters using integrated gratings are outlined. Each class of ...

Khan, Mohammad Jalal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Diver-Operated Optical and Physical Profiling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument package for measuring physical (temperature, salinity, and depth) as well as optical (absorption and attenuation at nine wavelength) parameters using SCUBA is described. The package is attached to the SCUBA bottle and allows for ...

J. Ronald V. Zaneveld; Emmanuel Boss; Casey M. Moore

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Interferometric measurement of melt depth in silicon using femtosecond infrared Cr:forsterite laser  

SciTech Connect

Interferometric microscopy technique combined with high power infrared Cr:forsterite laser system was applied to investigate femtosecond laser induced melting of silicon. Optically polished wafer of single crystalline silicon of 400 {mu}m thickness was irradiated with 100 fs pump pulses at second harmonic wavelength of 620 nm. We used infrared probe pulses at main wavelength of 1240 nm, whose photon energy was less than the band gap width E{sub g} = 1.12eV of silicon, and the penetration depth of probe essentially exceeded the sample thickness. Unlike many previous experiments with Ti:sapphire lasers it allowed us to probe the heated area from the rear side of the sample and obtain the data on melt depth after laser irradiation.

Ashitkov, Sergey I.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Agranat, Mikhail B. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Optical keyboard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY); Feichtner, John D. (Fiddletown, CA); Phillips, Thomas E. (San Diego, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Clinical prototype of a plastic water-equivalent scintillating fiber dosimeter array for QA applications  

SciTech Connect

A clinical prototype of a scintillating fiber dosimeter array for quality assurance applications is presented. The array consists of a linear array of 29 plastic scintillation detectors embedded in a water-equivalent plastic sheet coupled to optical fibers used to guide optical photons to a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The CCD is packaged in a light-tight, radiation-shielded housing designed for convenient transport. A custom designed connector is used to ensure reproducible mechanical positioning of the optical fibers relative to the CCD. Profile and depth dose characterization measurements are presented and show that the prototype provides excellent dose measurement reproducibility ({+-}0.8%) in-field and good accuracy ({+-}1.6% maximum deviation) relative to the dose measured with an IC10 ionization chamber.

Lacroix, Frederic; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Guillot, Mathieu; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Average depth may ...

148

Flexible finite-element modeling of global geomagnetic depth sounding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling in 2D and 3D for Geomagnetic Depth Sounding (31, 16610. Banks, R. , 1969: Geomagnetic variations and the1997: Introduction to geomagnetic fields. Cambridge Univ Pr.

Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and direction for developing 'defense-in-depth' strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture. Control...

150

Adiabatic loading of bosons into optical lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entropy-temperature curves are calculated for non-interacting bosons in a 3D optical lattice and a 2D lattice with transverse harmonic confinement for ranges of depths and filling factors relevant to current experiments. We demonstrate regimes where the atomic sample can be significantly heated or cooled by adiabatically changing the lattice depth. We indicate the critical points for condensation in the presence of a lattice and show that the system can be reversibly condensed by changing the lattice depth. We discuss the effects of interactions on our results and consider non-adiabatic processes.

P. B. Blakie; J. V. Porto

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

152

Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

154

Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation: Kokanee Depth Distribution in Dworshak Reservoir and Implications Toward Minimizing Entrainment, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors measured the day and night depth distribution of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi directly upstream of Dworshak Dam from October 1993 to December 1994 using split-beam hydroacoustics. At night most kokanee (70%) were distributed in a diffuse layer about 10 m thick. The depth of the layer varied with the season and ranged from 30 to 40 m deep during winter and from 15 to 25 m deep during summer. Nighttime depth of the kokanee layer during summer roughly corresponded to a zone where water temperatures ranged from 7 C to 12 C. Daytime kokanee distribution was much different with kokanee located in dense schools. Most kokanee (70%) were found in a 5--15 m thick layer during summer. Daytime depth distribution was also shallowest during fall and deepest during winter. Dworshak Dam has structures which can be used for selective water withdrawal and can function in depth ranges that will avoid the kokanee layer. Temperature constraints limit the use of selective withdrawal during the spring, summer, and fall, but in the winter, water is nearly isothermal and the full range of selector gate depths may be utilized. From October 1993 to February 1994, selector gates were positioned to withdraw water from above the kokanee layer. The discharge pattern also changed with more water being released during May and July, and less water being released during fall and winter. A combination of these two changes is thought to have increased kokanee densities to a record high of 69 adults/ha.

Maiolie, Melo; Elam, Steve

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

OPTICS 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) Release notes NOTE: See the Optics Knowledge Base for how to run this version of Optics on the Microsoft Vista and Microsoft Windows 7 operating systems March 5, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 2 New ! January 7, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 1 October 23, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.01 September 27, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.00 (only released on CDs at NFRC Annual Fall Meeting) Release notes Maintenance Pack 2 Bug fixes: New features: bullet Applied films that were created could not be saved or exported. This has been fixed. bullet Exporting glazing systems generated a message that the operation failed because the glazing system type is unknown. Glazing systems can now be exported to file (e.g. to view the spectral data), but the structure information will be lost.

156

Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument. A method of measuring a radius of curvature of an unknown surface includes positioning the spherometer on a surface between the surface and a depth measuring optical instrument. As the spherometer is frontally illuminated, the distance from the depth measuring instrument to the fiducial mark and the underlying surface are alternately measured and the difference in these measurements is used as the sagittal height to calculate a radius of curvature.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Optical engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

Saito, T T

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass in the mega-ton scale will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. In addition to the physics justification there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake, and the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. The depth requirements associated with the various physics processes are reported for water Cherenkov and liquid argon detector technologies. While some of these physics processes can be adequately studied at shallower depths, none of them require a depth greater than 4300 mwe which corresponds to the 4850 ft level at Homestake. It is very important to note that the scale of the planned detector is such that even for accelerator neutrino detection (which allows one to use the accelerator duty factor to eliminate cosmics) a minimum depth is needed to reduce risk of contamination from cosmic rays. After consideration of the science and the practical issues regarding the Homestake site, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850ft level in a timely manner.

Adam Bernstein; Mary Bishai; Edward Blucher; David B. Cline; Milind V. Diwan; Bonnie Fleming; Maury Goodman; Zbigniew J. Hladysz; Richard Kadel; Edward Kearns; Joshua Klein; Kenneth Lande; Francesco Lanni; David Lissauer; Steve Marks; Robert McKeown; William Morse; Regina Rameika; William M. Roggenthen; Kate Scholberg; Michael Smy; Henry Sobel; James Stewart; Gregory Sullivan; Robert Svoboda; Mark Vagins; Brett Viren; Christopher Walter; Robert Zwaska

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Comparison of Model- and Satellite-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth and Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of an accurate quantitative understanding of the role of tropospheric aerosols in the earth's radiation budget is extremely important because forcing by anthropogenic aerosols presently represents one of the most uncertain ...

Joyce E. Penner; Sophia Y. Zhang; Mian Chin; Catherine C. Chuang; Johann Feichter; Yan Feng; Igor V. Geogdzhayev; Paul Ginoux; Michael Herzog; Akiko Higurashi; Dorothy Koch; Christine Land; Ulrike Lohmann; Michael Mishchenko; Teruyuki Nakajima; Giovanni Pitari; Brian Soden; Ina Tegen; Lawrence Stowe

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using polarimetric sensor measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Pelon, 1999b: Remote sensing of cirrus radiativepar- ticles: Remote sensing and climatic implications.S. C. Tsay, 1999: Remote sensing of cirrus cloud parameters

Ou, Szu-cheng C; Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Slonaker, R L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using polarimetric sensor measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Cai, 1991: Scattering phase matrices of ice crystals with44 For nonspherical ice crystals, the phase function, P 11 ,hexagonal ice crystals and compared phase-matrix elements

Ou, Szu-cheng C; Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Slonaker, R L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

163

A Method to Estimate Aerosol Radiative Forcing from Spectral Optical Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative forcing of aerosols is much more difficult to estimate than that of well-mixed gases due to the large spatial variability of aerosols and the lack of an adequate database on their radiative properties. Estimation of aerosol radiative ...

S. K. Satheesh; J. Srinivasan

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Spectral Variation of Optical Depth at Tucson, Arizona between August 1975 and December 1977  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-wavelength solar radiometer has been used to monitor the directly transmitted solar radiation at discrete wavelengths spaced through the visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. The relative irradiance of the directly transmitted ...

Michael D. King; Dale M. Byrne; John A. Reagan; Benjamin M. Herman

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evaluating the Potential for Retrieving Aerosol Optical Depth over Land from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmosphere Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of numerous studies on the remote sensing of aerosols from satellites, the magnitude of aerosol climate forcing remains uncertain. However, data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder-Atmosphere (PATMOS) ...

Kenneth R. Knapp; Larry L. Stowe

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-133 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research B Ermold, September 2013, DOESC-ARM-133 Contents 1.0 Introduction ......

167

Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal ...

Omar Torres; Hiren Jethva; P. K. Bhartia

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Improving satellite-based convective cloud growth monitoring with visible optical depth retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geostationary satellites for monitoring the development of deep convective clouds has been recently well documented. One such approach, the University of Wisconsin Cloud-Top Cooling Rate (CTC) algorithm utilizes frequent GOES ...

Justin M. Sieglaff; Lee M. Cronce; Wayne F. Feltz

169

An Evaluation of Above- and In-Water Methods for Determining Water-Leaving Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-quality dataset collected at an oceanographic tower was used to compare water-leaving radiances derived from simultaneous above- and in-water optical measurements. The former involved two different above-water systems and four different ...

Stanford B. Hooker; Gordana Lazin; Giuseppe Zibordi; Scott McLean

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Ensemble-Based Data Assimilation for Estimation of River Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating bathymetry in a river, based on observations of depth-averaged velocity during steady flow. The estimator minimizes a cost function that combines known information in the form of a prior estimate and measured ...

Greg Wilson; H. Tuba Özkan-Haller

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Global Datasets of Rooting Zone Depth Inferred from Inverse Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two inverse methods are applied to a land surface model to infer global patterns of the hydrologically active depth of the vegetation's rooting zone. The first method is based on the assumption that vegetation is optimally adapted to its ...

Axel Kleidon

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Non-contact system for measuring tillage depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microprocessor-based non-contact ultrasonic sensor for tillage depth was evaluated. The sensor was tested on concrete, grass, wheat stubble, lightly disked wheat stubble (semi-stubble) and disked surfaces. The grass surface gave a higher variation ...

M. Yasin; R. D. Grisso; G. M. Lackas

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Estimating Mixed Layer Depth from Oceanic Profile Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of mixed layer depth are important to a wide variety of oceanic investigations including upper-ocean productivity, air–sea exchange processes, and long-term climate change. In the absence of direct turbulent dissipation measurements, ...

Richard E. Thomson; Isaac V. Fine

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluation of Boundary Layer Depth Estimates at Summit Station, Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer conditions in polar regions have been shown to have a significant impact on the levels of trace gases in the lower atmosphere. The ability to properly describe boundary layer characteristics (e.g., stability, depth, and variations ...

B. Van Dam; D. Helmig; W. Neff; L. Kramer

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

Fabbri, Filippo

177

Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FirstWellDepth FirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name FirstWellDepth Property Type Quantity Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "FirstWellDepth" Showing 5 pages using this property. B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + 672 m0.672 km 0.418 mi 2,204.724 ft 734.906 yd + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + 1,968 m1.968 km

178

Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. This dissertation does not exceed the regulation length of 60 000 words... -step pipeline that aligns the video streams, efficiently removes and fills invalid and noisy geometry, and finally uses a spatiotemporal filter to increase the spatial resolution of the depth data and strongly reduce depth measurement noise. I show...

Richardt, Christian

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

2 Vertical migration of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis 3 and the impact on ocean optical properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, World Precision 113 Instruments, Inc.) coupled to a fiber-optic spectrometer 114 (S2000, Ocean Optics, Inc.) and a fiber-optic xenon flash- 115 lamp (PS-2, Ocean Optics, Inc.). Water was pumped by 116 optical weight and fluorescence diverged was in the near- 326 shore surface waters during the daylight

Moline, Mark

180

The Oceanic Remote Chemical/Optical Analyzer (ORCA)—An Autonomous Moored Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An autonomous, moored profiler [the Oceanic Remote Chemical/Optical Analyzer (ORCA)] was developed to sense a variety of chemical and optical properties in the upper water column. It is presently used to monitor water quality parameters in South ...

John P. Dunne; Allan H. Devol; Steven Emerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fiber-Optic Long-Line Position Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

Description Large-scale rotary drilling for oil and gas, minerals, and water wells have a need for measuring the depth of drill bits and pipe segments.

184

Depth profiling of tritium by neutron time-of-flight  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed to measure the depth profile of tritium implanted or absorbed in materials. The sample to be analyzed is bombarded with a pulsed proton beam and the energy of neutrons produced by the T(p,n) reaction is measured by the time-of-flight technique. From the neutron energy the depth in the target of the T atoms may be inferred. A sensitivity of 0.1 at. percent T or greater is possible. The technique is non-destructive and may be used with thick or radioactive host materials. Samples up to 20 $mu$m in thickness may be profiled with resolution limited by straggling of the proton beam for depths greater than 1 $mu$m. Deuterium depth profiling has been demonstrated using the D(d,n) reaction. The technique has been used to observe the behavior of an implantation spike of T produced by a 400 keV T$sup +$ beam stopping at a depth of 3 $mu$m in 11 $mu$m thick layers of Ti and TiH. The presence of H in the Ti lattice is observed to inhibit the diffusion of T through the lattice. Effects of the total hydrogen concentration (H + T) being forced above stoichiometry at the implantation site are suggested by the shapes of the implanation spikes. (auth)

Davis, J.C.; Anderson, J.D.; Lefevre, H.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Glass and Optical Materials: Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses Program Organizers: Jincheng Du, University of North Texas; John Kieffer, ...

186

The Effect of Sintering Techniques on the Mechanical and Optical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1500C on the densification and optical properties of multiphase ceramics. ... Structure and Transport Properties of Nanoconfined Water in Porous Silica and ...

187

Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Heat Flow At Standard Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow At Standard Depth Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface temperature cause perturbations to the geothermal gradient which may be significant to depths of at least 1000 m, and major corrections are required to determine absolute values of heat flow from the Earth's interior. However, detailed climatic models remain contentious and estimates of error in geothermal gradients differ widely. Consequently, regions of anomalous heat flow which

188

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Depth recovery using an adaptive color-guided auto-regressive model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an adaptive color-guided auto-regressive (AR) model for high quality depth recovery from low quality measurements captured by depth cameras. We formulate the depth recovery task into a minimization of AR prediction errors subject ... Keywords: AR model, depth camera, depth recovery, nonlocal filtering

Jingyu Yang; Xinchen Ye; Kun Li; Chunping Hou

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Optical memory  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Simulated Water Table and Soil Moisture Climatology Over North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the link between two terrestrial water reservoirs: the root-zone soil moisture and the groundwater, and contribute our simulated climatologic water table depth and soil moisture fields over North America to the community. Because ...

Gonzalo Miguez-Macho; Haibin Li; Ying Fan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Viscous Sublayer Below a Wind-Disturbed Water Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drift currents immediately below the water surface were systematically measured in a circulating wind-wave tank. The results confirmed the existence of a viscous sublayer at the air–water interface, with the current varying linearly with depth ...

Jin Wu

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exchange flow between open water and floating vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes the exchange flow between a region with open water and a region with a partial-depth porous obstruction, which represents the thermally-driven exchange that occurs between open water and floating ...

Zhang, Xueyan

194

Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

Reedy, Robert P. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

Reedy, R.P.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Ocean general circulation near 1000 m depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean Ocean circulation near 1000 m depth is estimated with a 100 km resolution from the Argo float displacements collected before January 1 2010. After a thorough validation, the 400 000 or so displacements found in the [950, 1150] dbar layer ...

Michel Ollitrault; Alain Colin de Verdière

198

Computational depth complexity of measurement-based quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that one-way quantum computations have the same computational power as quantum circuits with unbounded fan-out. It demonstrates that the one-way model is not only one of the most promising models of physical realisation, but also a very powerful model of quantum computation. It confirms and completes previous results which have pointed out, for some specific problems, a depth separation between the one-way model and the quantum circuit model. Since one-way model has the same computational power as unbounded quantum fan-out circuits, the quantum Fourier transform can be approximated in constant depth in the one-way model, and thus the factorisation can be done by a polytime probabilistic classical algorithm which has access to a constant-depth one-way quantum computer. The extra power of the one-way model, comparing with the quantum circuit model, comes from its classical-quantum hybrid nature. We show that this extra power is reduced to the capability to perform unbounded classical parity gates in constant depth.

Dan E. Browne; Elham Kashefi; Simon Perdrix

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Interactions in the air: adding further depth to interactive tabletops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although interactive surfaces have many unique and compelling qualities, the interactions they support are by their very nature bound to the display surface. In this paper we present a technique for users to seamlessly switch between interacting on the ... Keywords: 3D, 3D graphics, computer vision, depth-sensing cameras, holoscreen, interactive surfaces, surfaces, switchable diffusers, tabletop

Otmar Hilliges; Shahram Izadi; Andrew D. Wilson; Steve Hodges; Armando Garcia-Mendoza; Andreas Butz

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Depth enhancement techniques for the in situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

In-situ vitrification (ISV) is a process by which electrical energy is supplied to a soil/waste matrix. The resulting Joule heat raises the temperature of the soil/waste matrix, producing a pool of molten soil. Since its inception, there have been many successful applications of the technology to both staged and actual waste sites. However, there has been some difficulty in extending the attainable treatment melt depth to levels greater than 5 m. Results obtained from application of two novel approaches for extending the ultimate treatment depth attainable with in-situ vitrification (ISV) are presented. In the first, the electrode design is modified to concentrate the Joule heat energy delivered to the soil/waste matrix in the lower region of the target melt zone. This electrode design has been dubbed the hot-tip electrode. Results obtained from both computational and experimental investigations of this design concept indicate that some benefit toward ISV depth enhancement was realized with these hot-tip electrodes. A second, alternative approach to extending process depth with ISV involves initiating the melt at depth and propagating it in either vertical direction (e.g., downward, upward, or both) to treat the target waste zone. A series of engineering-scale experiments have been conducted to assess the benefits of this approach. The results from these tests indicate that ISV may be effectively initiated and sustained using this subsurface start-up technique. A survey of these experiments and the associated results are presented herein, together with brief discussion of some considerations regarding setup and implementation of this subsurface start-up technique.

Lowery, P.S.; Luey, J.; Seiler, D.K.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Timmerman, C.L. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Properties of Sharav (Khamsin) Dust–Comparison of Optical and Direct Sampling Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of optical depth and Size distribution in a dust storm are presented. The measured and derived properties of the aerosol are compared with each other and with other results published in the scientific literature. We ...

Zev Levin; Joachim H. Joseph; Yuri Mekler

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Remote Sensing of Cloud Optical Properties from Ground-Based Measurements of Transmittance: A Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a retrieval technique for the inference of cloud optical depth from data obtained by a ground-based multichannel radiometer for use in climate-related studies. The basic steps of the analysis procedure are considered, ...

E. Leontieva; K. Stamnes

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Optical and Physical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Bay of Bengal during ICARB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous and collocated measurements of total and hemispherical backscattering coefficients (? and ?, respectively) at three wavelengths, mass size distributions, and columnar spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) were made onboard an ...

Vijayakumar S. Nair; K. Krishna Moorthy; S. Suresh Babu; S. K. Satheesh

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optical humidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

Tarvin, J.A.

1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optical humidity sensor  

SciTech Connect

An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Using depth-normalized coordinates to examine mass transport residual circulation in estuaries with large tidal amplitude relative to the mean depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual (subtidal) circulation profiles in estuaries with a large tidal amplitude to depth ratio often are quite complex and do not resemble the traditional estuarine gravitational circulation profile. In this paper we show how a depth-normalized,...

Sarah N. Giddings; Stephen G. Monismith; Derek A. Fong; Dr. Mark T. Stacey

207

Spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing in summer 2006: 2. Local and column aerosol optical properties  

SciTech Connect

Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-chem model calculations were conducted to study aerosol optical properties around Beijing, China, during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) period. In this paper, we interpret aerosol optical properties in terms of aerosol mass concentrations and their chemical compositions by linking model calculations with measurements. In general, model calculations reproduced observed features of spatial and temporal variations of various surface and column aerosol optical parameters in and around Beijing. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and extinction coefficient corresponded well to those of elemental carbon (primary aerosol), sulfate (secondary aerosol), and the total aerosol mass concentration, respectively. These results show that spatial and temporal variations of the absorption coefficient are controlled by local emissions (within 100 km around Beijing during the preceding 24 h), while those of the scattering coefficient are controlled by regional-scale emissions (within 500 km around Beijing during the preceding 3 days) under synoptic-scale meteorological conditions, as discussed in our previous study of aerosol mass concentration. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction revealed that the contribution of secondary aerosols and their water uptake increased with altitude within the planetary boundary layer, leading to a considerable increase in column aerosol optical depth (AOD) around Beijing. These effects are the main factors causing differences in regional and temporal variations between particulate matter (PM) mass concentration at the surface and column AOD over a wide region in the northern part of the Great North China Plain.

Matsui, Hitoshi; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Fast, Jerome D.; Poschl, U.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Wiedensohler, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Zhu, T.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Campbell penetration depth of a superconductor in the critical state.  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic penetration depth {lambda}(T,H{sub J}) was measured in the presence of a slowly relaxing supercurrent j. In single crystal Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} below approximately 25 K, {lambda}(T,H{sub J}) is strongly hysteretic. We propose that the irreversibility arises from a shift of the vortex position within its pinning well as j changes. The Campbell length depends upon the ratio j/j{sub c} where j{sub c} is the critical current defined through the Labusch parameter. Similar effects were observed in other cuprates and in an organic superconductor.

Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Tamegai, T.; Schlueter, J.; Kini, A. M.; Fournier, P.; Greene, R. L.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of South Carolina; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Sherbrooke; Univ. of Maryland

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The ending of optical lithography and the prospects of its successors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation starts from recounting the history of optical lithography since its >2@mm days until the sub-100nm era. To increase resolution and keep depth of focus in check, the wavelength has been shortened from 436, to 365, 248, and 193nm, numerical ... Keywords: Direct write lithography, E-beam lithography, EUV lithography, Immersion lithography, Microlithography, Optical lithography

Burn J. Lin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

211

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Insights into Structure and Stratigraphy of the Northern Gulf of Mexico from 2D Pre-Stack Depth Migration Imaging of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insights into Structure and Stratigraphy of the Northern Gulf of Mexico from 2D Pre-Stack Depth water of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and displays distinct, large-scale structural styles and salt established in the northern Gulf of Mexico that substantial deformation in the form of linked proxi- mal

Connors, Christopher D.

213

Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plegchart

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada...

215

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optical data latch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Optical absorption measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

Draggoo, V.G.; Morton, R.G.; Sawicki, R.H.; Bissinger, H.D.

1986-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Optical absorption measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA); Morton, Richard G. (San Diego, CA); Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Bissinger, Horst D. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

Truett, LF

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Correlated k-Distribution Treatment of Cloud Optical Properties and Related Radiative Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new scheme of water cloud optical properties is proposed for correlated k-distribution (CKD) models, in which the correlation in spectral distributions between the gaseous absorption coefficient and cloud optical properties is maintained. This ...

Peng Lu; Hua Zhang; Jiangnan Li

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

224

Interpolation Scheme for Standard Depth Data Applicable for Areas with a Complex Hydrographical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanographic datasets, which are arranged for standard depths, have many applications for various users. However, oceanic observations are not always conducted exactly at standard depths, especially in the case of historical bottle observations. ...

Sachiko Oguma; Toru Suzuki; Yutaka Nagata; Hidetoshi Watanabe; Hatsuyo Yamaguchi; Kimio Hanawa

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nonlinear Energy Transfer through the Spectrum of Gravity Waves for the Finite Depth Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for calculation of the nonlinear kinetic integral is described for the case of finite depth. The use of an effective approximation of the exact dispersion relationship for gravity waves in finite depth permits modification of the ...

V. G. Polnikov

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Photon-limited time of flight depth acquisition : new parametric model and its analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As 3-D imaging systems become more popular, the depth estimation which is their core component should be made as accurate as possible at low power levels. In this thesis, we consider the time of flight depth acquisition ...

Montazerhodjat, Vahid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interannual Consistency in Fractal Snow Depth Patterns at Two Colorado Mountain Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractal dimensions derived from log–log variograms are useful for characterizing spatial structure and scaling behavior in snow depth distributions. This study examines the temporal consistency of snow depth scaling features at two sites using ...

Jeffrey S. Deems; Steven R. Fassnacht; Kelly J. Elder

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optical NAND gate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

Skogen, Erik J. (Albuquerque, NM); Raring, James (Goleta, CA); Tauke-Pedretti, Anna (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Optical extensometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical extensometer is described using sequentially pulsed light beams for measuring the dimensions of objects by detecting two opposite edges of the object without contacting the object. The light beams may be of different distinguishable light characteristics, such as polarization or wave length, and are time modulated in an alternating manner at a reference frequency. The light characteristics are of substantially the same total light energy and are distributed symmetrically. In the preferred embodiment two light beam segments of one characteristic are on opposite sides of a middle segment of another characteristic. As a result, when the beam segments are scanned sequentially across two opposite edges of the object, they produce a readout signal at the output of a photoelectric detector that is compared with the reference signal by a phase comparator to produce a measurement signal with a binary level transition when the light beams cross an edge. The light beams may be of different cross sectional geometries, including two superimposed and concentric circular beam cross sections of different diameter, or two rectangular cross sections which intersect with each other substantially perpendicular so only their central portions are superimposed. Alternately, a row of three light beams can be used including two outer beams on opposite sides and separate from a middle beam. The three beams may all be of the same light characteristic. However it is preferable that the middle beam be of a different characteristic but of the same total energy as the two outer beams.

Walker, Ray A. (Kennewick, WA); Reich, Fred R. (Richland, WA); Russell, James T. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EBT2 film as a depth-dose measurement tool for radiotherapy beams over a wide range of energies and modalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: One of the fundamental parameters used for dose calculation is percentage depth-dose, generally measured employing ionization chambers. There are situations where use of ion chambers for measuring depth-doses is difficult or problematic. In such cases, radiochromic film might be an alternative. The EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film was investigated as a potential tool for depth-dose measurement in radiotherapy beams over a broad range of energies and modalities. Methods: Pieces of the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film were exposed to x-ray, electron, and proton beams used in radiotherapy. The beams employed for this study included kilovoltage x-rays (75 kVp), {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, megavoltage x-rays (18 MV), electrons (7 and 20 MeV), and pristine Bragg-peak proton beams (126 and 152 MeV). At each beam quality, film response was measured over the dose range of 0.4-8.0 Gy, which corresponds to optical densities ranging from 0.05 to 0.4 measured with a flat-bed document scanner. To assess precision in depth-dose measurements with the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film, uncertainty in measured optical density was investigated with respect to variation in film-to-film and scanner-bed uniformity. Results: For most beams, percentage depth-doses measured with the EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film show an excellent agreement with those measured with ion chambers. Some discrepancies are observed in case of (i) kilovoltage x-rays at larger depths due to beam-hardening, and (ii) proton beams around Bragg-peak due to quenching effects. For these beams, an empirical polynomial correction produces better agreement with ion-chamber data. Conclusions: The EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film is an excellent secondary dosimeter for measurement of percentage depth-doses for a broad range of beam qualities and modalities used in radiotherapy. It offers an easy and efficient way to measure beam depth-dose data with a high spatial resolution.

Arjomandy, Bijan; Tailor, Ramesh; Zhao Li; Devic, Slobodan [Department of Radiation Oncology, McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

4D frequency analysis of computational cameras for depth of field extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth of field (DOF), the range of scene depths that appear sharp in a photograph, poses a fundamental tradeoff in photography---wide apertures are important to reduce imaging noise, but they also increase defocus blur. Recent advances in computational ... Keywords: Fourier analysis, computational camera, depth of field, light field

Anat Levin; Samuel W. Hasinoff; Paul Green; Frédo Durand; William T. Freeman

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for factoring in polylogarithmic depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We contribute a 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for Shor's algorithm to factor an n-bit number in O(log3 n) depth. Our implementation uses parallel phase estimation, constant-depth fanout and teleportation, and constant-depth ... Keywords: Shor's algorithm, carry-save addition, nearest-neighbor, prime factorization, quantum architecture

Paul Pham, Krysta M. Svore

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Multirate depth control of an AUV by neurocontroller for enhanced situational awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on a critical component of the situational awareness (SA), the neural control of depth flight of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Constant depth flight is a challenging but important task for AUVs to achieve high level of autonomy ... Keywords: autonomous underwater vehicle, depth flight, multirate system, neurocontroller, simulation, situational awareness

Igor Astrov; Andrus Pedai

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean water clarity affects the distribution of shortwave heating in the water column. In a one-dimensional time-mean sense, increased clarity would be expected to cool the surface and heat subsurface depths as shortwave radiation penetrates ...

Anand Gnanadesikan; Whit G. Anderson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation of Pressure Transducers under Turbid Natural Waters*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure measurements made in two turbid natural waters have led to the inference that the effective depth-mean in situ density values, ?eff, of these waters are less than (?2.70%–6.5%) their bulk densities (i.e., densities of water–sediment ...

Antony Joseph; Ehrlich Desa; Elgar Desa; David Smith; Vani B. Peshwe; Vijaykumar; J. A. Erwin Desa

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Calculation of the Effect of Random Superfluid Density on the Temperature Dependence of the Penetration Depth  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic variations in composition or structure can lead to nanoscale inhomogeneity in superconducting properties such as the magnetic penetration depth, but measurements of these properties are usually made on longer length scales. We solve a generalized London equation with a non-uniform penetration depth {lambda}(r), obtaining an approximate solution for the disorder-averaged Meissner screening. We find that the effective penetration depth is different from the average penetration depth and is sensitive to the details of the disorder. These results indicate the need for caution when interpreting measurements of the penetration depth and its temperature dependence in systems which may be inhomogeneous.

Lippman, Thomas; Moler, Kathryn A.

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

Trimodal steady water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dipolar bosons on an optical lattice ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider an ultrasmall system of polarized bosons on an optical lattice with a ring topology, interacting via long-range dipole-dipole interactions. Dipoles polarized perpendicular to the plane of the ring reveal sharp transitions between different density-wave phases. As the strength of the dipolar interactions is varied, the behavior of the transitions is first-order-like. For dipoles polarized in the plane of the ring, the transitions between possible phases show pronounced sensitivity to the lattice depth. The abundance of possible configurations may be useful for quantum-information applications.

Maik, Michal [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Buonsante, Pierfrancesco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Viale G.P. Usberti n.7/A, IT-43100 Parma (Italy); Vezzani, Alessandro [Centro S3, CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/a, IT-41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Viale G.P. Usberti n.7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Center, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Study on the Effect of Energy Parameter of Electron on the Percentage Depth Dose of Electron Beam Using Monte Carlo Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In medical linear accelerator, the energy parameter of electron plays important role to produce electron beam. The percentage depth dose of electron beams takes account not only on the value of electron's energy, but also on the type of electron's energy. The aims of this work are to carry on the effect of energy parameter of electron on the percentage depth dose of electron beam. Monte Carlo method is chosen in this project, due to the superior of this method for simulating the random process such as the transport particle in matter. The DOSXYZnrc usercode was used to simulate the electron transport in water phantom. Two aspects of electron's energy parameter were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. In the first aspect, electron energy's value was varied also its spectrum. In the second aspect, the geometry of electron's energy was taken account on. The parallel beam and the point source were chosen as the geometry of The measurements of percentage depth dose were conducted to compare with its simulation. The ionization chamber was used in these measurements. Presentation of the results of this work is given not only based on the shape of the percentage depth dose from the simulation and measurement, but also on the other aspect in its curve. The result of comparison between the simulation and its measurement shows that the shape of its curve depends on the energy value of electron and the type of its energy. The energy value of electron affected the depth maximum of dose.

Haryanto, Freddy [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Latching micro optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Integrated optical tamper sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of an monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Suborbital Measurements of Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth and Its Variability at Subsatellite Grid Scales in Support of CLAMS 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment, 10 July–2 August 2001, off the central East Coast of the United States, the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was ...

J. Redemann; B. Schmid; J. A. Eilers; R. Kahn; R. C. Levy; P. B. Russell; J. M. Livingston; P. V. Hobbs; W. L. Smith Jr.; B. N. Holben

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Retrieval of Surface Wind Speed and Aerosol Optical Depth over the Oceans from AVHRR Images of Sun Glint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of recovering both the tropospheric aerosol loading and the surface wind speed from satellite measurements of the radiance within cloud free regions of sun glint over the ocean surface. The method relies on ...

D. M. O'Brien; R. M. Mitchell

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Determination of Clear-Sky Radiative Flux Profiles, Heating Rates, and Optical Depths Using Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles as a Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report results obtained using an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV) as an experimental platform for atmospheric radiative transfer research. These are the first ever climate measurements made from a UAV and represent a ...

Francisco P. J. Valero; Shelly K. Pope; Robert G. Ellingson; Anthony W. Strawa; John Vitko Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Long-Term Record of Aerosol Optical Depth from TOMS Observations and Comparison to AERONET Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of backscattered near-ultraviolet radiation from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on board the Nimbus-7 (1979–92) and the Earth Probe (mid-1996 to present) satellites have been used to derive a long-term record of aerosol ...

O. Torres; P. K. Bhartia; J. R. Herman; A. Sinyuk; Paul Ginoux; Brent Holben

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

water from the CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water from the CO water from the CO 2 stream and then compresses the dry CO 2 to a supercritical phase. The compressed CO 2 then travels through a 1 mile- long pipeline to the wellhead where it is injected into the Mt. Simon Sandstone at a depth of about 7,000 feet. November 21, 2011, http:// www.netl.doe.gov/publications/press/2011/111121_co2_injection. html. Fossil Energy Techline, "Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO 2 Emissions." Injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) indicate that their region has the geologic potential to store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions primarily in deep saline formations. The MRCSP Phase II field tests included seven small-scale field validation tests: three

247

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

249

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

250

Optical voltage reference  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Optical voltage reference  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function.

Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DTIRC based optical collimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-imaging optical concentrators have been used in the past to increase the power density of incoming radiation in applications such as photovoltaic (PV) solar and optical wireless communications. This paper explores the use of Dielectric Totally Internally ... Keywords: DTIRC, collimator, concentrator, non-imaging, optical

Roberto Ramirez-Iniguez; Ali Ahmadinia; Hernando Fernandez-Canque

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quantum theory of cold bosonic atoms in optical lattices  

SciTech Connect

Ultracold atoms in optical lattices undergo a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator as the lattice potential depth is increased. We describe an approximate theory of interacting bosons in optical lattices which provides a qualitative description of both superfluid and insulator states. The theory is based on a change of variables in which the boson coherent state amplitude is replaced by an effective potential which promotes phase coherence between different number states on each lattice site. It is illustrated here by applying it to uniform and fully frustrated lattice cases but is simple enough that it can be applied to spatially inhomogeneous lattice systems.

Tilahun, Dagim [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States); Duine, R. A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, NL-3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands); MacDonald, A. H. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

Antarctic Bottom Water Warming and Freshening: Contributions to Sea Level Rise, Ocean Freshwater Budgets, and Global Heat Gain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freshening and warming of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) between the 1980s and 2000s are quantified, assessing the relative contributions of water-mass changes and isotherm heave. The analysis uses highly accurate, full-depth, ship-based, ...

Sarah G. Purkey; Gregory C. Johnson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

CSAMT method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

SciTech Connect

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a CSAMT signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Non-photorealistic camera: depth edge detection and stylized rendering using multi-flash imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a non-photorealistic rendering approach to capture and convey shape features of real-world scenes. We use a camera with multiple flashes that are strategically positioned to cast shadows along depth discontinuities in the scene. The projective-geometric ... Keywords: depth edges, image enhancement, non-photorealistic rendering

Ramesh Raskar; Kar-Han Tan; Rogerio Feris; Jingyi Yu; Matthew Turk

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hurricane-Generated Depth-Averaged Currents and Sea Surface Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of the depth-averaged currents and sea surface elevation generated by a moving hurricane in a stratified ocean with flat bottom is presented. Using a scale analysis of the depth-integrated momentum and continuity equations, it is found ...

Isaac Ginis; Georgi Sutyrin

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Non-photorealistic camera: depth edge detection and stylized rendering using multi-flash imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a non-photorealistic rendering approach to capture and convey shape features of real-world scenes. We use a camera with multiple flashes that are strategically positioned to cast shadows along depth discontinuities in the scene. The projective-geometric ... Keywords: depth edges, image enhancement, non-photorealistic rendering

Ramesh Raskar; Kar-Han Tan; Rogerio Feris; Jingyi Yu; Matthew Turk

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

From PD to Nonlinear Adaptive Depth-Control of a Tethered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From PD to Nonlinear Adaptive Depth-Control of a Tethered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle D and an adaptive nonlinear state feedback one, both applied on a tethered autonomous underwater vehicle. The aim performed using each of the above mentioned control laws. Keywords: Underwater robotics, Depth control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Combining multiple depth cameras and projectors for interactions on, above and between surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumented with multiple depth cameras and projectors, LightSpace is a small room installation designed to explore a variety of interactions and computational strategies related to interactive displays and the space that they inhabit. LightSpace cameras ... Keywords: augmented reality, depth cameras, interactive spaces, surface computing, ubiquitous computing

Andrew D. Wilson; Hrvoje Benko

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Model for hydrogen isotope backscattering, trapping and depth profiles in C and a-Si  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model of low energy hydrogen trapping and backscattering in carbon and a-silicon is described. Depth profiles are calculated and numerical results presented for various incident angular and energy distributions. The calculations yield a relation between depth profiles and the incident ion energy distribution. The use of this model for tokamak plasma diagnosis is discussed.

Cohen, S.A.; McCracken, G.M.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling risk and simulation-based optimization of channel depths at Cam Pha Coal Port  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation-based method and a risk model of ship grounding for a long-term optimization of channel depths. The long-term optimization of channel depths should be considered a two-stage process: Firstly, establishing a ship entrance ... Keywords: entrance channel, risk modeling, ship grounding, simulation

N. M. Quy; J. K. Vrijling; P. H. A. J. M Gelder; R. Groenveld

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Kinect in the kitchen: testing depth camera interactions in practical home environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth cameras have become a fixture of millions of living rooms thanks to the Microsoft Kinect. Yet to be seen is whether they can succeed as widely in other areas of the home. This research takes the Kinect into real-life kitchens, where touchless gestural ... Keywords: cooking, depth camera, gestures, home, joint selection, kinect, kitchen, push gesture, recipes

Galen Panger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A comparison of carbide fracture during fixed depth and fixed load scratch tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to simulate abrasion of dual-phase materials containing large carbides under fixed depth conditions an apparatus has been designed and used to perform scratch tests at a fixed depth of cut on such materials. The scratch test consists of two support arms tipped with small steel balls held in contact with surface by /sup 700/ g, while the scratch tool is mounted on the tip of a central arm whose adjustable length allow control of the depth of cut. The scratch tool does not deflect significant when it encounters a large carbide. Scratch tests with the new apparatus have been performed on Co-base Stellite alloys containing large Cr-rich carbides, using individual particles of alumina as scratch tools to generate fixed depth scratches. A in situ SEM scratch test apparatus has also been used to genrate fixed load scratches. Comparison of the scratches shows that for comparable average scratch depths, under fixed load conditions the scratch tool deflects over the carbides without causing fracture, but that since it cannot deflect under fixed depth conditions it induces gross carbide fracture. Results suggest that the fixed depth scratch test can be successfully employed to simulate fixed depth abrasion, which has been previously shown to generate gross carbide fracture in these alloys. The in situ SEM scratch test simulates fixed load abrasion conditions such as those which occur in rubber wheel abrasion tests. 12 refs., 9 figs

Prasad, S.V.; Kosel, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Retrieval of Atmospheric Optical Depth Profiles from Downward-Looking High-Resolution O2 A-Band Measurements: Optically Thin Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-linear retrieval was developed to profile moderately thin atmospheres using a high-resolution O2 A-band spectrometer. The retrieval is explicitly linear with respect to single scattering; the multiple-scattering contribution is treated as ...

Qilong Min; Lee C. Harrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Scheme for Parameterizing Ice-Cloud Water Content in General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of ice clouds are a primary issue for climate and climate change. Evaluating these optical properties in three-dimensional models for studying climate will require a method to calculate the ice water content of such clouds. ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Leo J. Donner

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

274

FURTHER STUDIES ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPOSURE TIME AND DEPTH OF DAMAGE OF MODERATE AND SEVERE CUTANEOUS BURNS  

SciTech Connect

To extend our earlier studies on the relationship between exposure time and depth of damage of moderate and severe burns, injuries were produced by each of six radiant exposures delivered during varying exposure times. The exposures investigated were: 5, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20 calories per square centimeter. Within this range, as the radiant exposure increased, the exposure time for the production of maximum damage also increased. Injury from a given radiant exposure was less with exposure times either longer or shorter than some immediate time which led to the most severe injury. The relationship between steam bleb formation and decreased depth of injury from short exposure times is pointed out. When the superficial layers of the skin become so hot that vaporization of tissue fluid occurs, energy which might otherwise damage the deep layers is diverted by the conversion of water to steam. For radiant exposures between 8 cal/cm/sup 2/ and 20 cal/cm/sup 2/ delivered with a square pulse, it is possible to predict with fair accuracy the exposure time which will result in the deepest burn. (auth)

Payne, F.W.; Hinshaw, J.R.

1957-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Depth Requirements for a Tonne-scale 76Ge Neutrinoless Double-beta Decay Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments can potentially determine the Majorana or Dirac nature of the neutrino, and aid in understanding the neutrino absolute mass scale and hierarchy. Future 76Ge-based searches target a half-life sensitivity of >10^27 y to explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Reaching this sensitivity will require a background rate of required to reach this background goal in a tonne-scale experiment with a compact (copper and lead) shield based on Monte Carlo calculations of cosmic-ray background rates. We find that, in light of the presently large uncertainties in these types of calculations, a site with an underground depth >~5200 mwe is required for a tonne-scale experiment with a compact shield similar to the planned 40-kg MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The required overburden is highly dependent on the chosen shielding configuration and could be relaxed significantly if, for example, a liquid cryogen and water shield, or an active neutron shield were employed. Operation of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and GERDA detectors will serve to reduce the uncertainties on cosmic-ray background rates and will impact the choice of shielding style and location for a future tonne-scale experiment. 4/2013: The peer review process revealed that one of the veto rejection factors (the factor-of-4 described on p12) needs to be better established. Our reevaluation of this parameter to date has not yielded strong support for the value stated in the manuscript, and we require further study to develop a solid estimate. This further study will supersede the work described in this manuscript, and may or may not lead to the same conclusion regarding the ~>5200 mwe requirement for future tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

The MAJORANA Collaboration; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; H. O. Back; A. S. Barabash; M. Bergevin; F. E. Bertrand; M. Boswell; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; J. I. Collar; D. C. Combs; R. J. Cooper; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Esterline; J. E. Fast; N. Fields; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; V. M. Gehman; G. K. Giovanetti; M. P. Green; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusey; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; R. Henning; A. Hime; E. W. Hoppe; M. Horton; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; R. A. Johnson; K. J. Keeter; M. E. Keillor; C. Keller; J. D. Kephart; M. F. Kidd; A. Knecht; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; B. H. LaRoque; J. Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; S. MacMullin; M. G. Marino; R. D. Martin; D. -M. Mei; J. H. Merriman; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; N. R. Overman; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; G. Perumpilly; G. Prior; D. C. Radford; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; M. C. Ronquest; A. G. Schubert; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; V. Sobolev; D. Steele; J. Strain; K. Thomas; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; I. Vanyushin; R. L. Varner; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; J. F. Wilkerson; B. A. Wolfe; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; C. Zhang

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quantum optical waveform conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

Kielpinski, D; Wiseman, HM

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Multichannel optical sensing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. Misaki; K. S. Lokhtin; N. Takahashi

2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

282

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

283

Optically measuring interior cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

Stone, Gary Franklin (Livermore, CA)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optically measuring interior cavities  

SciTech Connect

A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

Stone, Gary Franklin (Livermore, CA)

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optical linear algebra  

SciTech Connect

Many of the linear algebra operations and algorithms possible on optical matrix-vector processors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the use of direct solutions and their realization on systolic optical processors. As an example, implicit and explicit solutions to partial differential equations are considered. The matrix-decomposition required is found to be the major operation recommended for optical realization. The pipelining and flow of data and operations are noted to be key issues in the realization of any algorithm on an optical systolic array processor. A realization of the direct solution by householder qr decomposition is provided as a specific case study. 19 references.

Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Optical Technology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Could Speed Innovation in Solar Devices Release ... Device Measures Absolute Optical Power in Fiber at ... of Standards and Technology (NIST) have ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Latching Micro Optical Switch  

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a latching switch for optical fibers. One or more fibers are moved by an actuator between two positions, ...

288

Optical Technology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Instruments. Primary optical watt radiometer (POWR) facility ... into the market and it is expected that many of the light sources currently used for ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Glass and Optical Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NMR Insight into Glass Formers and Modifiers · NMR Studies on Biomaterials and Bioactive Glasses · Non-Linear Optical Properties in Glasses.

290

Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

292

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA, but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, it is possible to augment temperature gradient drilling with temperatures measured from a 2-meter depth. We discuss the development of a rapid, efficient, and

293

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

294

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

295

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

296

Depth-Integrated Vorticity Budget of the Southern Ocean from a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the depth-integrated vorticity budget of the U.K. Fine Resolution Antarctic Model is used to investigate the mechanisms that maintain and dissipate vorticity in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and adjacent circulations of ...

N. C. Wells; B. A. De Cuevas

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

298

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

299

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

300

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Comparison of Mixing Depths Observed by Ground-Based Wind Profilers and an Airborne Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare the mixing depths in the daytime convective boundary layers that were observed remotely by wind profilers and an airborne lidar during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study. The comparison is used to determine whether the mixing ...

A. B. White; C. J. Senff; R. M. Banta

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Intermediate-Depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, 306 autonomous floats were deployed in the tropical and South Pacific Ocean and 228 were deployed in the Indian Ocean to observe the basinwide circulation near 900-m depth. Mean velocities, ...

Russ E. Davis

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Analysis of a Method to Estimate Chlorophyll-a Concentration from Irradiance Measurements at Varying Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to estimate chlorophyll-a concentration and yellow substance absorption at 440 nm from irradiance measurements made at varying depths is examined. The derivation of the model, requiring irradiance measurements at three wavebands, is ...

Jasmine S. Nahorniak; Mark R. Abbott; Ricardo M. Letelier; W. Scott Pegau

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Depth-Dependent Studies of Tidally Induced Residual Currents on the Sides of Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a depth-dependent tidal model, the tidally induced residual currents on the northern and southern sections of Georges Bank are computed and the effects of various physical parameters on the current are examined. Because of significant on-...

Kim-Tai Tee

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of changes in shortwave radiation penetration depth on the global ocean circulation and heat transport is studied using the GFDL Modular Ocean Model (MOM4) with two independent parameterizations that use ocean color to estimate the ...

Colm Sweeney; Anand Gnanadesikan; Stephen M. Griffies; Matthew J. Harrison; Anthony J. Rosati; Bonita L. Samuels

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Variations in Mixed-Layer Depths Arising from Inhomogeneous Surface Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current approaches to parameterizations of sub-grid-scale variability in surface sensible heat fluxes in general circulation models normally neglect the associated variability in mixed-layer depths. Observations and a numerical mesoscale model ...

J. C. Doran; S. Zhong

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Laboratory Model of Thermocline Depth and Exchange Fluxes across Circumpolar Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment has been constructed to investigate the possibility that the equilibrium depth of a circumpolar front is set by a balance between the rate at which potential energy is created by mechanical and buoyancy forcing and the ...

Claudia Cenedese; John Marshall; J. A. Whitehead

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

309

Evaluations of Mesoscale Models' Simulations of Near-Surface Winds, Temperature Gradients, and Mixing Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale meteorological models are being used to provide inputs of winds, vertical temperature and stability structure, mixing depths, and other parameters to atmospheric transport and dispersion models. An evaluation methodology is suggested ...

Steven R. Hanna; Ruixin Yang

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Instrumentation to Measure the Depth/Time Fluctuations in Acoustic Pulses Propagated through Arctic Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation for measuring the evolution of volume-scattered acoustic signals in both depth and time is described. Measurements were taken for 12 days during the spring of 1985 with transmitters and receivers suspended beneath arctic pack ice ...

Terry E. Ewart; Stephen A. Reynolds

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Case Study of the Morning Evolution of the Convective Boundary Layer Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the importance of the convective boundary layer depth (CBLD) in determining pollutant concentrations near the surface, a study of the morning evolution of the convective boundary layer was carried out at the Central Nuclear de Almaraz, ...

José A. Garc; Mar L. Cancillo; José L. Cano

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

313

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0...

314

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

315

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

316

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 4,232 ...

317

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

318

Flexible optical panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Optical fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane at a cylindrical outside surface by use of an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image of an encircled cylindrical surface area to a stationary photodiode array.

Kirchner, Tommy L. (Richland, WA); Powers, Hurshal G. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Optical scanning apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation is described.

Villarreal, R.A.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

322

Efficient Depth of Field Rasterization Using a Tile Test Based on Half-Space Culling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For depth of field (DOF) rasterization, it is often desired to have an efficient tile versus triangle test, which can conservatively compute which samples on the lens that need to execute the sample-in-triangle test. We present a novel test for this, ... Keywords: I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism—Visible line/surface algorithms, culling, depth of field, rasterization

Tomas Akenine-Möller; Robert Toth; Jacob Munkberg; Jon Hasselgren

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

325

Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Carderock Circulating Water Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circulating Water Channel Circulating Water Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Circulating Water Channel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 18.3 Beam(m) 6.7 Depth(m) 2.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Circulating Water Channel is a vertical plane, open to the atmosphere test section with a free surface in a closed recirculating water circuit, variable speed, rectangular cross-sectional shape facility. There are 10 large viewing windows on either side of the test section at different elevations and 9 in the bottom; movable bridge spans the test section for ease and versatility in mounting models, rigging bridge is capable of taking towing loads at any one of numerous points up to 35,584 N

327

Anomalous optical nonlinearity of dielectric nanodispersions  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of studying the nonlinear optical response of nanodispersions of semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}, ZnO) and dielectric (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles of spherical, spheroidal and flake shape, suspended in polar and nonpolar dielectric matrices (water, isopropanol, polymethylsiloxane and transformer oil) by means of z-scanning in the field of low-intensity visible laser radiation. It is found that, unlike semiconductor nanoparticles and particles of spherical shape, flake-shaped SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles suspended in nonpolar matrices exhibit nonlinear optical response within the intensity interval from 0 to 500 W cm{sup -2} that vanishes at higher intensities. The diagrams of energy states of the optical electrons in nanoparticles that allow explanation of differences in the nonlinear-optical properties of nanodispersions are proposed. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical dependences of nonlinear refractive indices and absorption coefficients on the intensity of radiation is observed. (optical nanostructures)

Milichko, V A; Dzyuba, V P; Kul'chin, Yurii N

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Influence of Mean Water Depth and a Subsurface Sandbar on the Onset and Strength of Wave Breaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave breaking in the open ocean and coastal zones remains an intriguing yet incompletely understood process, with a strong observed association with wave groups. Recent numerical study of the evolution of fully nonlinear, two-dimensional deep ...

Jin-Bao Song; Michael L. Banner

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

330

Spatial Water Balance in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water availability is critical to the economy in the state of Texas. Numerous reservoirs and conveyance structures have been constructed across the State to meet the water supply needs of farmers, municipalities, industries, and power generating facilities. Despite this extensive water management system, water supply remains a concern because of increasing populations and uncertainties about climate stability. The rainfall map of Texas shown in Figure 1.1 clearly shows that water management is a spatial problem. The State as a whole receives about 711 mm year-1 of rainfall, while the area of the State east of the 100th meridian receives 890 mm year-1 and the area west of the 100th meridian receives only 457 mm year-1. In addition to water supply concerns, the assessment of non-point source pollution is another important issue that is largely dependent on the spatial distribution of runoff. Although, the focus of this report is not to address water supply or pollution issues directly, an improved understanding of the spatial water balance - the partitioning of precipitation between evaporation, runoff, and groundwater recharge at different points in space - will directly benefit those who wish to assess water resource availability and non-point source pollution potential across the State. The goal of this study was to gain an improved understanding of the stocks of water in different components (air, soil, water bodies) of the hydrologic cycle and the fluxes between these components. A basic approach for determining stocks and fluxes involves the calculation of a water balance. A water balance, applied to a particular control volume, is an application of the law of conservation of mass which states that matter cannot be created or destroyed. To achieve a balance, the rate of change of storage of water within the control volume must be equal to the difference between its rates of inflow and outflow across the control surface. In this study, three independent water balance models were constructed to model different components of the hydrologic cycle - an atmospheric water balance, a soil-water balance, and a surface water balance. These models were constructed using a geographic information system (GIS). A GIS provides a framework for storing and manipulating spatial data and facilitates modeling on control volumes of various sizes and shapes. In all three cases, the choice of modeling unit was driven by the resolution and characteristics of the input data. The control volumes for the atmospheric, soil, and surface water balance models respectively are (1) an imaginary column confined horizontally by the boundary of Texas and extending to the 300 mb pressure level, (2) 0.5° cells with a depth equal to the plant-extractable water capacity of the soil, and (3) 166 gaged watersheds of differing sizes and shapes. Neither the atmospheric nor the surface water balance involve any simulation of physical processes and are simply mass balances based on empirical data. The soil-water balance does attempt to simulate evaporation from the soil through the use of a soil-moisture extraction function. Both the atmospheric and soil-water balance models are time-varying models, while the surface water balance model is steady-state and uses an empirical relationship to estimate mean annual runoff and evaporation in ungaged areas. One advantage of making three independent water balance calculations is that checks for consistency can be made among the three models. For example, all three models yield an estimate of actual evapotranspiration which is a difficult quantity to estimate, particularly at the regional scale. Previous studies at the scale of Texas have estimated only evaporation from open water surfaces and potential evapotranspiration from the land surface (TDWR, 1983; Dugas and Ainsworth, 1983).

Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Water Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning EUEC Energy & Environment Conference 2008, EPS,1292008 2 * Water Scarcity Seen Dampening Case...

332

Importance of Using Observations of Mixing Depths in order to Avoid Large Prediction Errors by a Transport and Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing depth of the boundary layer is an input to most atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) models, which obtain mixing depths in one of four ways: 1) observations by radiosondes, sodars, or other devices; 2) simulations by regional or ...

J. M. White; J. F. Bowers; S. R. Hanna; J. K. Lundquist

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Automated Retrievals of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles from an Operational Raman Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated routines have been developed to derive water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient, and linear depolarization profiles, as well as total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical ...

D. D. Turner; R. A. Ferrare; L. A. Heilman Brasseur; W. F. Feltz; T. P. Tooman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients  

SciTech Connect

An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thin display optical projector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Silicon fiber optic sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fiber optic laser rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

Erickson, G.F.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

338

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

339

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters...

340

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK

Miura, T; Ishihama, S; Ohotsuka, N; Kunifuda, T

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple soil heat transfer model is used together with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the daily averaged soil volumetric water contents from diurnal variations of the soil temperatures measured at different depths. In this method, the ...

Shu-Wen Zhang; Chong-Jian Qiu; Qin Xu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Representation of Water Table Dynamics in a Land Surface Scheme. Part II: Subgrid Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped unconfined aquifer model has been developed and interactively coupled to a land surface scheme in a companion paper. Here, the issue of the representation of subgrid variability of water table depths (WTDs) is addressed. A statistical–...

Pat J-F. Yeh; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Simple Method for Specifying Snowpack Water Equivalent in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical regression models were developed to estimate snowpack water equivalent (SWE) using only meteorological variables available at National Co-operative Observer Program (co-op) sites. These include the square root of snow depth, the ...

D. Samelson; D. S. Wilks

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Collection of Water Samples from an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Tracer Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact water sampler rated to full ocean depth has been deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to enable oceanographic tracer measurements. Techniques developed to allow the instrument to collect up to 49 samples of sufficient ...

Paul A. Dodd; Martin R. Price; Karen J. Heywood; Miles Pebody

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage  

SciTech Connect

A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Omnium-G parabolic dish optical efficiency: a comparison of two independent measurement techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements made at SERI of the optical efficiency of the Omnium-G parabolic dish concentrator are described. Two independent techniques were used: the cold-water calorimeter method and the heat of fusion method. Results from both techniques agree quite well and indicate that the optical efficiency for a 10-cm receiver aperture is 25%. Optical efficiency measured in early 1979 was 37%, and in mid 1979 it had degraded to 21%. An optical alignment procedure is described that resulted in the increase in optical efficiency from 21% to the current value of 25%.

Bohn, M.; Gaul, H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Optical Nanomaterials for Photonics/Biophotonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of optical nanoparticles in telecommunications, photodetectors, LED , etc. - Fluorescent Imaging using optical nanolabels (including multiphoton ...

349

Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

Sandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object.  It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of an object. 

350

Integrated optical isolators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Optical isolators are important components in lasers. Their main function is to eliminate noise caused by back-reflections into these lasers. The need for integrated isolators comes from the continuing growth ...

Zaman, Tauhid R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optical fiber switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Optical dynamic circuit services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP service, leased-line service and POTS service have been the three long-standing communication service offerings of providers. Recently, both commercial and research-andeducation network providers have started offering optical dynamic circuit services. ...

Malathi Veeraraghavan; Mark Karol; George Clapp

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electro-Optical Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Electro-Optical Characterization group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use various electrical and optical experimental techniques to relate photovoltaic device performance to the methods and materials used to produce them. The types of information obtained by these techniques range from small-scale atomic-bonding information to large-scale macroscopic quantities such as optical constants and electron-transport properties. Accurate and timely measurement of the electro-optical properties as a function of device processing provides researchers and manufacturers with the knowledge needed to troubleshoot problems and develop the knowledge base necessary for reducing cost, maximizing efficiency, improving reliability, and enhancing manufacturability. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes our primary techniques and capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1, Canada and Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range ...

Refaat Tamer F.; Halama Gary E.; DeYoung Russell J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Prognostic Cloud Water Parameterization for Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient new prognostic cloud water parameterization designed for use in global climate models is described. The scheme allows for life cycle effects in stratiform clouds and permits cloud optical properties to be determined interactively. ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Mao-Sung Yao; William Kovari; Kenneth K-W. Lo

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Relaying an optical wavefront  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Corrales, NM)

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fiber optic detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Optical pumping in a whispering-mode optical waveguide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide are described. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

Kurnit, N.A.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optical access port  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 0.025 m diameter optical access port system is provided for a high-pressure (20.4 bars) and high-temperature (538{degrees}C) fixed-bed coal gasification process stream. A pair of proximal channels lead into the pipe containing the process stream with the proximal channels disposed on opposite sides of the pipe and coaxial. A pair of ball valves are attached to respective ends of proximal channels for fluidly closing the respective channels in a closed position and for providing a fluid and optical aperture in an open position. A pair of distal channels are connected to respective ball valves. These distal channels are also coaxial with each other and with the proximal channels. Each distal channel includes an optical window disposed therein and associated sealing gaskets. A purge gas is introduced into each distal channel adjacent a respective optical window. The purge gas is heated by a heater before entry into the distal channels. Preferably the optical windows are made of fused silica and the seals are Grafoil gaskets which are pressed against the optical window. 3 figs.

Lutz, S.A.; Anderson, R.J.

1988-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fibre optics: Forty years later  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief overview of the state of the art in fibre optics and its main applications: optical fibre communications, fibre lasers and fibre sensors for various physical property measurements. The future of fibre optics and the status of this important area of the modern technology in Russia are discussed. (fiber optics)

Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours of the day by implementing thermal energy storage. CSP with storage provides important benefits to integrate more renewable energy to our electric power supply by mitigating resource variability and satisfying peak demand after sunset. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories.

366

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

367

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

368

Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data scenarios. Relative differences in SWH estimates among the four data scenarios were compared to illustrate estimation ranges.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

A multi-detector, digitizer based neutron depth profiling device for characterizing thin film materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron depth profiling (NDP) is a mature, nondestructive technique used to characterize the concentration of certain light isotopes in a material as a function of depth by measuring the residual energy of charged particles in neutron induced reactions. Historically, NDP has been performed using a single detector, resulting in low intrinsic detection efficiency, and limiting the technique largely to high flux research reactors. In this work, we describe a new NDP instrument design with higher detection efficiency by way of spectrum summing across multiple detectors. Such a design is capable of acquiring a statistically significant charged particle spectrum at facilities limited in neutron flux and operation time.

Mulligan, P. L.; Cao, L. R.; Turkoglu, D. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Transparent electrode for optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Optical key system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Optical key system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radiometric Characterization and Absolute Calibration of the Marine Optical System (MOS) Bench Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marine Optical System (MOS) is a dual charge-coupled device (CCD)-based spectrograph system developed for in-water measurements of downwelling solar irradiance Ed and upwelling radiance Lu. These measurements are currently used in the ...

Catherine Habauzit; Steven W. Brown; Keith R. Lykke; B. Carol Johnson; Michael E. Feinholz; Mark Yarbrough; Dennis K. Clark

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

Southampton, University of

380

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spatial-Temporal Fusion for High Accuracy Depth Maps Using Dynamic MRFs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-of-flight range sensors and passive stereo have complimentary characteristics in nature. To fuse them to get high accuracy depth maps varying over time, we extend traditional spatial MRFs to dynamic MRFs with temporal coherence. This new model allows ... Keywords: Stereo, MRFs, time-of-flight sensor, data fusion, global optimization.

Jiejie Zhu; Liang Wang; Jizhou Gao; Ruigang Yang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh, we examine the interannual variability of the monsoon rains of Bangladesh, an area greatly affected of Bengal storm surge. For the twentieth century, we found Bangladesh monsoon rainfall (BMR

383

A Generalized Depth-Integrated Model of the Oceanic Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized depth-integrated model of the oceanic mixed layer is developed by considering the heat and energy budgets of the upper ocean. Unlike the Kraus–Turner-type bulk models, the assumptions of an a priori well mixed layer and a positive ...

P. Ravindran; Daniel G. Wright; Trevor Platt; Shubha Sathyendranath

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions high-resolution remote sensing video and surface elevation records from fixed, in-situ wave gages. Wave phase speeds are extracted from the remote sensing data using a feature tracking technique, and local

Haller, Merrick

385

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Depth control of remotely operated underwater vehicles using an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sliding mode control, due to its robustness against modelling imprecisions and external disturbances, has been successfully employed to the dynamic positioning of remotely operated underwater vehicles. In order to improve the performance of the complete ... Keywords: Adaptive algorithms, Depth control, Fuzzy logic, Nonlinear control, Remotely operated vehicles, Sliding modes

Wallace M. Bessa; Max S. Dutra; Edwin Kreuzer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low-Frequency Pycnocline Depth Variability at Ocean Weather Station P in the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-frequency variability of the depth of the main pycnocline at Ocean Weather Station P and over the northeast Pacific is examined in terms of the one-dimensional response to local Ekman pumping according to the Hasselmann stochastic climate ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Gary S. E. Lagerloef

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Stable Boundary Layer Depth from High-Resolution Measurements of the Mean Wind Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The depth h of the stable boundary layer (SBL) has long been an elusive measurement. In this diagnostic study the use of high-quality, high-resolution (?z = 10 m) vertical profile data of the mean wind U(z) and streamwise variance ?u2(z) is ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A satisfiability algorithm for constant depth boolean circuits with unbounded fan-in gates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boolean Circuits with Unbounded Fan-In Gates A dissertationAC 0 by allowing unbounded fan-in M OD m 1 , . . . , M OD mSince each gate in ? has fan-in at most k and ? has depth D

Matthews, William Grant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has set the basic criteria for assessing skin dose stemming from hot particle contaminations. Compliance with IO CFR 20. 1 01 requires that exposure to the skin be evaluated over a I CM2 area at a depth of 0.007 cm. Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed between the hot particle source and the skin, and in cases where the hot particle is large in comparison to the range of beta particles. Once the protective clothing layer is thicker than the maximum range of the beta particles, skin dose is due solely to gamma radiation. Charged particle equilibrium is not established at shallow depths. The degree of electronic equilibrium establishment must be assessed for shallow doses to prevent the overassessment of skin dose because conventional fluence-to-dose conversion factors are not applicable. To assess the effect of electronic equilibrium, selected thicknesses of tissue equivalent material were interposed between radiochromic dye film and a 6OCo hot particle source and dose was measured as a function of depth. These measured values were then compared to models which are used to calculate charged particle equilibrium. The Miller-Reece model was found to agree closely with the experimental data while the Lantz-Lambert model overestimated dose at shallow depths.

Myrick, Jo Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Interactive optical panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Optical Learning Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel type of an optical neurochip with learning capability and memory function is reported. The neurochip is a three dimensional optoelectronic integrated circuit consisting of a light emitting diode array and a variable sensitivity photodetector (VSPD) array. The principle of operation and the fundamental characteristics are described. By using the fabricated optical neurochip with 32 neurons and 32\\Theta32 synapses, experiments of on-chip learning based on the backpropagation and Boltzmann machine learning algorithms have successfully been demonstrated. INTRODUCTION Optoelectronics is expected to play an important role in hardware implementation of neural networks because of its innate parallelism, high-density interconnection, and direct image processing abilities [1]. This summary describes an optical learning chip with variable synaptic interconnections developed in our laboratory. This chip enables to perform on-chip learning by using an internal analog memory function. Firs...

Jun Ohta Yoshikazu; Jun Ohta; Yoshikazu Nitta; Kazuo Kyuma

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Full spectrum optical safeguard  

SciTech Connect

An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

Young, I.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, Ian T. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

Winston, R.; Ries, H.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

Winston, R.; Ries, H.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design data brochure for a pyramidal optics solar system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Design Data Brochure provides information on a Pyramidal Optics Solar System for solar heating and domestic hot water. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. Contained in the brochure are such items as system description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Measurement on CO_2 Solution Density by Optical Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical technology based on Mach-Zehnder interferometry was successfully applied to a high-pressure liquid CO_2 and water system to measure CO_2 solution density. Experiments were carried out at a pressure range of from 5.0 to 12.5 MPa, temperatures ... Keywords: CO_2 ocean sequestration, CO_2 solution, Mach-Zehnder Interferometry, density

Y. Song; M. Nishio; B. Chen; S. Someya; T. Ohsumi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Water Boatman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

404

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residentialgas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optical apparatus for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical apparatus is disclosed for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors. The optical apparatus comprises one or more diffractive optical elements formed on a substrate for receiving light from a source and processing the incident light. The optical apparatus includes an addressing element for alternately addressing each diffractive optical element thereof to produce for one unit of time a first correlation with the incident light, and to produce for a different unit of time a second correlation with the incident light that is different from the first correlation. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the optical apparatus is in the form of a correlation spectrometer; and in other embodiments, the apparatus is in the form of an optical processor. In some embodiments, the optical apparatus comprises a plurality of diffractive optical elements on a common substrate for forming first and second gratings that alternately intercept the incident light for different units of time. In other embodiments, the optical apparatus includes an electrically-programmable diffraction grating that may be alternately switched between a plurality of grating states thereof for processing the incident light. The optical apparatus may be formed, at least in part, by a micromachining process. 24 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

406

High throughput optical scanner  

SciTech Connect

A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hybrid Fiber Optics  

SciTech Connect

Instruments and devices based on optical fiber were originally simple and passive. That has changed. A variety of devices uses optical fiber for sensing, communications and various optoelectronic functions. This paper discusses the creation of a hybrid optical fiber that incorporates not just the light transmission function but other types of materials and new multiple fiber arrangements. Recent experiences with a fiber draw tower reveal new possibilities for achieving multifunctional devices able to perform diverse instrumentation sensing applications. This is achievable even with feature sizes, when desired, on the nanoscale. For instance, fiber comprised of one or more light guides and one or more electrically conducting wires is feasible. This combination of optical fiber and metal wire may be termed a wiber . The wiber could determine temperature and proximity to surfaces, detect radio-frequency radiation, and provide electrical power. At the same time, a wiber would have the capability to simultaneously transmit light where the light is utilized to sense temperature and proximity and give illumination. There are many possible uses--depending on design and configuration--cutting across many technologies and programs.

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Simpson, John T [ORNL; Gillies, George [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penn Large Water Tunnel Penn Large Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Large Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 4.3 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 16.8 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments steady 24 bit

409

Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Tunnel Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Small Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 0.8 Beam(m) 0.3 Depth(m) 0.3 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 21 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments dynamic analyzer, 24-bit

410

Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology  

SciTech Connect

This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

Milnes, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optics (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Optics Group is to facilitate the efficient and productive use and operation of APS beamline-based research facilities. In support of this mission, the Optics group:...

413

Parametric Resonance of Optically Trapped Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brownian dynamics of an optically trapped water droplet are investigated across the transition from over to under-damped oscillations. The spectrum of position fluctuations evolves from a Lorentzian shape typical of over-damped systems (beads in liquid solvents), to a damped harmonic oscillator spectrum showing a resonance peak. In this later under-damped regime, we excite parametric resonance by periodically modulating the trapping power at twice the resonant frequency. The power spectra of position fluctuations are in excellent agreement with the obtained analytical solutions of a parametrically modulated Langevin equation.

R. Di Leonardo; G. Ruocco; J. Leach; M. J. Padgett; A. J. Wright; J. M. Girkin; D. R. Burnham; D. McGloin

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ultraviolet laser spectroscopy of neutral mercury in a one-dimensional optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present details on the ultraviolet lattice spectroscopy of the (6s{sup 2}) {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} (6s6p) {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition in neutral mercury, specifically {sup 199}Hg. Mercury atoms are loaded into a one-dimensional vertically aligned optical lattice from a magneto-optical trap with an rms temperature of {approx}60 {mu}K. We describe aspects of the magneto-optical trapping, the lattice cavity design, and the techniques employed to trap and detect mercury in an optical lattice. The clock-line frequency dependence on lattice depth is measured at a range of lattice wavelengths. We confirm the magic wavelength to be 362.51(0.16) nm. Further observations to those reported by Yi et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 073005 (2011)] are presented regarding the laser excitation of a Wannier-Stark ladder of states.

Mejri, S.; McFerran, J. J.; Yi, L.; Le Coq, Y.; Bize, S. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, FR-75014 Paris (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Assess in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3c LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

416

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Effective Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-57441 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. BE12.0201

417

Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

[Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

Blackwell, D.D.

1998-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - i - INTRODUCTION WHAT IS SCIENCE, 0PTICS & YOU? The Science, Optics and You Guidebook is made up as follows: Science, Optics and You is a standards-based interdisciplinary science curriculum package for elementary students and teachers through which they can explore

Weston, Ken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Aerogel-clad optical fiber  

SciTech Connect

An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR FLOOD CONTROL IN THE IOWA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING a popular area of research for >30 years. Yeh (1985) and Wurbs (1993) pre- sented in-depth reviews

Lund, Jay R.

424

Extreme-Value Statistics for Snowpack Water Equivalent in the Northeastern United States Using the Cooperative Observer Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure is developed to estimate extreme-value statistics for snowpack water equivalent (SWE) using historical snow depth measurements at cooperative observer stations in the northeastern United States. The method specifies “pseudodensities” ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Subglacial water presence classification from polar radar data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground and airborne radar depth-sounding of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been used for many years to remotely determine characteristics such as ice thickness, subglacial topography, and mass balance of large bodies of ice. Ice coring efforts ... Keywords: Ensemble classification, Machine learning, Pattern recognition, Radar remote sensing, Subglacial water

Christopher M. Gifford; Arvin Agah

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers: interior dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study small-amplitude steady water waves with multiple critical layers. Those are rotational two-dimensional gravity-waves propagating over a perfect fluid of finite depth. It is found that arbitrarily many critical layers with cat's-eye vortices are possible, with different structure at different levels within the fluid. The corresponding vorticity depends linearly on the stream function.

Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Gabriele Villari

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

EFFECT OF DUST ON Ly{alpha} PHOTON TRANSFER IN AN OPTICALLY THICK HALO  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effects of dust on Ly{alpha} photons emergent from an optically thick medium by solving the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer of resonant photons. To solve the differential equations numerically, we use the weighted essentially non-oscillatory method. Although the effects of dust on radiative transfer are well known, the resonant scattering of Ly{alpha} photons makes the problem non-trivial. For instance, if the medium has an optical depth of dust absorption and scattering of {tau}{sub a} >> 1, {tau} >> 1, and {tau} >> {tau}{sub a}, the effective absorption optical depth in a random walk scenario would be equal to {radical}({tau}{sub a}({tau}{sub a}+{tau})). We show, however, that for a resonant scattering at frequency {nu}{sub 0}, the effective absorption optical depth would be even larger than {tau}({nu}{sub 0}). If the cross section of dust scattering and absorption is frequency-independent, the double-peaked structure of the frequency profile given by the resonant scattering is basically dust-independent. That is, dust causes neither narrowing nor widening of the width of the double-peaked profile. One more result is that the timescales of the Ly{alpha} photon transfer in an optically thick halo are also basically independent of the dust scattering, even when the scattering is anisotropic. This is because those timescales are mainly determined by the transfer in the frequency space, while dust scattering, either isotropic or anisotropic, does not affect the behavior of the transfer in the frequency space when the cross section of scattering is wavelength-independent. This result does not support the speculation that dust will lead to the smoothing of the brightness distribution of a Ly{alpha} photon source with an optically thick halo.

Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Roy, Ishani [Computing Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Fang Lizhi [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Measurement of localized heating in the focus of an optical trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized heating in the focus of an optical trap operating in water can result in a temperature rise of several kelvins. We present spatially resolved measurements of the refractive-index distribution induced by the localized heating produced in an optical trap and infer the temperature distribution. We have determined a peak temperature rise in water of 4 K in the focus of a 985-nm-wavelength 55-mW laser beam. The localized heating is directly proportional to power and the absorption coefficient. The temperature distribution is in excellent agreement with a model based on the heat equation. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

Celliers, Peter M. [Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Conia, Jerome [Cell Robotics, Inc., 2715 Broadbent Parkway NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transect of cores ranging from 798 m to 1585 m water depth in the South Atlantic Ocean document the relative intermediate water mass nutrient geometry and stable isotopic variability of AAIW during the Younger Dryas cooling event. The data reveal concurrent delta^13 C and delta^18 O excursions of 0.59 ppt and 0.37 ppt within the core of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) centered at 11,381 calendar years before present based on radiometric age control. A portion of the delta^1 3C variability (0.22 ppt) can be explained by a shift in thermodynamic equilibrium concurrent with a drop in temperature of 1.8°C at the locus of AAIW formation. The remaining 0.37 ppt increase in delta^13 C most likely resulted from increased wind velocities, and a greater coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere at the locus of AAIW formation (increased efficiency of the thermodynamic process). Deepwater coral mounds are aggregates of corals, other organisms, their skeletal remains, and sediments that occur on the seafloor of the world’s oceans. In the Straits of Florida, these features have been referred to as lithoherms. We use digital, side-scan sonar data collected from the submarine NR-1 from an 10.9 km^2 area at ~650 m water depth to characterize quantitatively aspects of the morphology of 216. Their lengths, widths, heights, areas, orientations and concentration on the seafloor have been determined. Analysis indicates that the outlines of relatively small to medium sized lithoherms can be effectively described with a piriform function. This shape is less applicable to the largest lithoherms because they are aggregates of smaller lithoherms. Nearly all of the lithoherms studied have axes parallel to the northward flowing Florida Current, and the heads of 80 percent of these features face into the current. The shape and orientation of the lithoherms, and evidence of megaripples and scouring in the sonar data suggest that these features are formed by a unidirectional current. Following an extensive investigation of over 200 lithoherms via side-scan sonar imagery and direct observation, we have developed a qualitative model for the formation of the lithoherm type of deep-water coral mounds in the Straits of Florida. Lithoherm formation can be characterized by four main stages of development: nucleating, juvenile, mature singular, and fused. Fused lithoherms can form via transverse and/or longitudinal accretion, however, transverse accretion at the head of the mound is likely the most efficient mechanism. A comparison of lithoherm spatial relationship to local bathymetry agrees with previous observations of deep-water coral mound formations along the levied margins of density flow scour channels.

Brookshire, Brian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bathymetry, water optical properties, and benthic classiWcation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

acquisition of reXectance signatures of the benthic commu- nity end members ..... jected surface area of hard corals, macrophytes, seagrasses, turf algae, sand ...

434

Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations provide procedures to propose a reclassification of State waters for permitting purposes. Requests must address the factual basis for reclassification, including the size, depth, surface area covered, volume, direction and rate of flow, stream gradient and temperature of the water; character of the district bordering said waters and its suitability for

436

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fiber optic moisture sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, R.R.

1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen, CH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nonimaging Optical Illumination System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination or concentration optical device. An optical device is provided having a light source, a light reflecting surface with an opening and positioned partially around the light source which is opposite the opening of the light reflecting surface. The light reflecting surface is disposed to produce a substantially uniform intensity output with the reflecting surface defined in terms of a radius vector R.sub.i in conjunction with an angle .phi..sub.i between R.sub.i, a direction from the source and an angle .theta..sub.i between direct forward illumination and the light ray reflected once from the reflecting surface. R.sub.i varies as the exponential of tan (.phi..sub.i -.theta..sub.i)/2 integrated over .phi..sub.i.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL)

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nonimaging optical illumination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Black optic display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

Neyer, Barry T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Optically pulsed electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Optically pulsed electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Optics upgrade for switchyard  

SciTech Connect

An upgrade of the Switchyard optics is proposed. This upgrade extends the P3 (old Main Ring) lattice through enclosure C. The septa for the 3-way Meson Area split is moved from enclosure F1 to enclosure M01. The functionality of the Meson Target Train is preserved. Finally, for the purpose of demonstrating that the resulting split can be transported, a straw-man lattice is proposed for enclosure M02 and beyond.

Kobilarcik, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Virtual Optical Comparator  

SciTech Connect

The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

Thompson, Greg

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

Moore, F.W.

1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

450

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

Moore, Francis W. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Spatiotemporal Variations in Soil Water: First Results from the ARM SGP CART Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of automated soil water and temperature systems, installed at 21 locations in Oklahoma and Kansas in 1996 and 1997, is providing hourly profiles of soil temperature and water at eight depths, from 0.05 to 1.75 m below the surface, in ...

J. M. Schneider; D. K. Fisher; R. L. Elliott; G. O. Brown; C. P. Bahrmann

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Making 3D work: a classification of visual depth cues, 3D display technologies and their applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D display technologies improve perception and interaction with 3D scenes, and hence can make applications more effective and efficient. This is achieved by simulating depth cues used by the human visual system for 3D perception. The type of employed ... Keywords: 3D display technologies, applications of 3D display technologies, classification, depth cues, stereo perception

Mostafa Mehrabi, Edward M. Peek, Burkhard C. Wuensche, Christof Lutteroth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Enhancing realism of mixed reality applications through real-time depth-imaging devices in X3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, depth sensing cameras have been used almost exclusively in research due to the high costs of such specialized equipment. With the introduction of the Microsoft Kinect device, realtime depth imaging is now available for the ordinary developer ... Keywords: X3D, augmented reality, mixed reality, rendering

Tobias Franke; Svenja Kahn; Manuel Olbrich; Yvonne Jung

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Influence of Unsteady Depths and Currents of Tides on Wind-Wave Propagation in Shelf Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of unsteady depths and currents on wind wave propagation on the scale of shelf seas such as the North Sea is investigated. The attention is focused on depth and current variations due to tides, which are essentially stationary at ...

H. L. Tolman

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a hot-water gas-fired boiler. Figure 1(a) illustratesloads, window type, boiler/furnace efficiency, envelopeenergy use. The High Boiler/Furnace Efficiency cases,

Lin, Hung-Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Decentralized sensor placement and mobile localization on an underwater sensor network with depth adjustment capabilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over 70% of our planet is covered by water. It is widely believed that the underwater world holds ideas and resources that will fuel much… (more)

Detweiler, Carrick (Carrick James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermo-optical Properties of Nanofluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we report thermo-optical properties of nanofluids. Spherical gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in condensed media were characterized using thermal lens spectroscopy in SDS-water solution pumping at 532 nm with a 10 ns pulsed laser-Nd-YAG system. Nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation were stabilized in the time by surfactants (Sodium Dodecyl-Sulfate or SDS) in different molar concentrations. The morphology and size of the gold nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plasmonic resonance bands in gold nanoparticles are responsible of the light optical absorption of this wavelength. The position of the absorption maximum and width band in the UV-Visible spectra is given by the morphological characteristics of these systems. The thermo-optical constant such as thermal diffusion, thermal conductivity and dn/dT are functions of nanoparticles sizes and dielectric constant of the media. The theoretical model existents do not describe completely this relations because is not possible separate the contributions due to nanoparticles size, factor form and dielectric constant. The thermal lens signal obtained is also dependent of nanoparticles sizes. This methodology can be used in order to evaluate nanofluids and characterizing nanoparticles in different media. These results are expected to have an impact in bioimaging, biosensors and other technological applications such as cooler system.

Ortega, Maria Alejandra; Echevarria, Lorenzo [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas 1080-A, AP 89000 (Venezuela); Rodriguez, Luis [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas 1080-A, AP 89000 (Venezuela); Castillo, Jimmy; Fernandez, Alberto [Facultad de Ciencias, Escuela de Quimica, Universidad Central de Venezuela (Venezuela)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Remote Optical Control of an Optical Flip-Flop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate control of a holding-beam–enabled optical flip-flop by means of optical signals that act in a remote fashion. These optical-control signals vary the holding-beam power by means of cross-gain modulation within a remotely located semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The power-modulated holding beam then travels through a resonant-type SOA, where flip-flop action occurs as the holding-beam power falls above and below the switching thresholds of the bistable hysteresis. Control is demonstrated using submilliwatt pulses whose wavelengths are not restricted to the vicinity of the holding beam. Benefits of remote control include the potential for controlling multiple flip-flops with a single pair of optical signals and for realizing all-optical control of any holding-beam–enabled flip-flop.

Maywar, D.N.; Solomon, K.P.; Agrawal, G.P.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optical water depths" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Water-equivalent dosimeter array for small-field external beam radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing complexity of dose patterns external beam radiotherapy, there is a great need for new types of dosimeters. We studied the first prototype of a new dosimeter array consisting of water-equivalent plastic scintillating fibers for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. We found that this array allows precise, rapid dose evaluation of small photon fields. Starting with a dosimeter system constructed with a single scintillating fiber coupled to a clear optical fiber and read using a charge coupled device camera, we looked at the dosimeter's spatial resolution under small radiation fields and angular dependence. Afterward, we analyzed the camera's light collection to determine the maximum array size that could be built. Finally, we developed a prototype made of ten scintillating fiber detectors to study the behavior and precision of this system in simple dosimetric situations. The scintillation detector showed no measurable angular dependence. Comparison of the scintillation detector and a small-volume ion chamber showed agreement except for 1x1 and 0.5x5.0 cm{sup 2} fields where the output factor measured by the scintillator was higher. The actual field of view of the camera could accept more than 4000 scintillating fiber detectors simultaneously. Evaluation of the dose profile and depth dose curve using a prototype with ten scintillating fiber detectors showed precise, rapid dose evaluation even with placement of more than 75 optical fibers in the field to simulate what would happen in a larger array. We concluded that this scintillating fiber dosimeter array is a valuable tool for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. It possesses the qualities necessary to evaluate small and irregular fields with various incident angles such as those encountered in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy.

Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec City (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect on water and gas usage from cross-flow betweencontrols have on water and gas usage over a large number ofsystems, and their water and gas usage. Hourly schedules for

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

2nd Quarterly technical progress report for geothermal system temperature-depth database  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory in Dallas, Texas, the Earth`s surface and internal temperature are studied. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, a data base containing geothermal temperature well information for the United States is being developed. During this calendar quarter, activity with this project has continued involving several different tasks: planning and development of the geothermal system thermal-well data base and temperature-depth data, development of the specifications for the data base, and completion of an initial inventory of the geothermal areas for which data are available.

Blackwell, D.D.

1997-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary...

466

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A white paper describing produced water from production ofCE, Veil JA. 2009. Produced Water Volumes and Managementunderground formations (produced water) are often extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California’s Water Conservation Standards for ResidentialCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council, 2006. http://http://www.nrdc.org/water/conservation/edrain/edrain.pdf

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Texas Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coil hot water storage tank, a backup instantaneous electric water heater, a hydronic fan coil unit for space heating, and an efficient plumbing manifold for domestic hot water...

469

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

470

Optical Surface Metrology and Nano-Structured Optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ultra-precision surfaces and optical elements are essential to product ... Facilities/Tools Used: ... Science and Technology, a world-class facility for the ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nonlinear optical coupler using a doped optical waveguide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical mode coupling apparatus includes an Erbium-doped optical waveguide in which an optical signal at a signal wavelength propagates in a first spatial propagation mode and a second spatial propagation mode of the waveguide. The optical signal propagating in the waveguide has a beat length. The coupling apparatus includes a pump source of perturbational light signal at a perturbational wavelength that propagates in the waveguide in the first spatial propagation mode. The perturbational signal has a sufficient intensity distribution in the waveguide that it causes a perturbation of the effective refractive index of the first spatial propagation mode of the waveguide in accordance with the optical Kerr effect. The perturbation of the effective refractive index of the first spatial propagation mode of the optical waveguide causes a change in the differential phase delay in the optical signal propagating in the first and second spatial propagation modes. The change in the differential phase delay is detected as a change in the intensity distribution between two lobes of the optical intensity distribution pattern of an output signal. The perturbational light signal can be selectively enabled and disabled to selectively change the intensity distribution in the two lobes of the optical intensity distribution pattern.

Pantell, Richard H. (Menlo Park, CA); Sadowski, Robert W. (Stanford, CA); Digonnet, Michel J. F. (Palo Alto, CA); Shaw, Herbert J. (Stanford, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

473

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Integrated optical XY coupler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated optical XY coupler having two converging input waveguide arms meeting in a central section and a central output waveguide arm and two diverging flanking output waveguide arms emanating from the central section. In-phase light from the input arms constructively interfers in the central section to produce a single mode output in the central output arm with the rest of the light being collected in the flanking output arms. Crosstalk between devices on a substrate is minimized by this collection of the out-of-phase light by the flanking output arms of the XY coupler.

Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM); Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Nonimaging Optical Illumination System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing selected intensity output over an angular range. The device includes a light reflecting surface (24, 26) around a light source (22) which is disposed opposite the aperture opening of the light reflecting surface (24, 26). The light source (22) has a characteristic dimension which is small relative to one or more of the distance from the light source (22) to the light reflecting surface (24, 26) or the angle subtended by the light source (22) at the light reflecting surface (24, 26).

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL)

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

System for testing optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector. 2 figs.

Golob, J.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Spatial optic multiplexer/diplexer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for simultaneous transmission of optic signals having different wavelengths over a single optic fiber. Multiple light signals are transmitted through optic fibers that are formed into a circumference surrounding a central core fiber. The multiple light signals are directed by a lens into a single receiving fiber where the light combines and is then focused into the central core fiber which transmits the light to a wavelength discriminating receiver assembly.

Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

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481

An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network  

SciTech Connect

Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

483

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

484

Stopping Light All-Optically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that light pulses can be stopped and stored all-optically, with a process that involves an adiabatic and reversible pulse bandwidth compression occurring entirely in the optical domain. Such a process overcomes the fundamental bandwidth-delay constraint in optics, and can generate arbitrarily small group velocities for light pulses with a given bandwidth, without the use of any coherent or resonant light-matter interactions. We exhibit this process in optical resonator systems, where the pulse bandwidth compression is accomplished only by small refractive index modulations performed at moderate speeds. (Accepted for publication in Phys. Rev. Lett. Submitted on Sept. 10th 2003)

Mehmet Fatih Yanik; Shanhui Fan

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

NIST Optical Frequency Measurements Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In fact, it has been used has a local flywheel to help optical lattice clocks evaluate their systematic uncertainties at the 10 -16 level. ...

486

Water Beetles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

487

Water watch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

489

Tapered capillary optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

Hirsch, Gregory (365 Talbot Ave., Pacifica, CA 94044)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &share some of the water-conservation techniques used at theWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

494

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &we share some of the water-conservation techniques used atWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Time-Dependent Adjustment in a Simple Model of the Mid-Depth Meridional Overturning Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently proposed reduced-gravity model of the warm-water branch of the middepth meridional overturning circulation in a rectangular basin with a circumpolar connection is extended to include time dependence. The model describes the balance ...

R. M. Samelson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Physical Simulation of Maximum Seasonal Soil Freezing Depth in the United States Using Routine Weather Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An existing, physically based soil freezing model applicable to humid climates is modified for use in the central and western United States. Simulations using the state-of-the-art Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model indicated that the ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Michael D. Cameron; Daniel S. Wilks

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

NIST: NIF - Water Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Sensitivity. Neutrons are extremely sensitive to small amounts of water. To quantify and calibrate this sensitivity we ...

498

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

499

Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

500

Modeling water emission from low-mass protostellar envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within low-mass star formation, water vapor plays a key role in the chemistry and energy balance of the circumstellar material. The Herschel Space Observatory will open up the possibility to observe water lines originating from a wide range of excitation energies.Our aim is to simulate the emission of rotational water lines from envelopes characteristic of embedded low-mass protostars. A large number of parameters that influence the water line emission are explored: luminosity, density,density slope and water abundances.Both dust and water emission are modelled using full radiative transfer in spherical symmetry. The temperature profile is calculated for a given density profile. The H2O level populations and emission profiles are in turn computed with a non-LTE line code. The results are analyzed to determine the diagnostic value of different lines, and are compared with existing observations. Lines can be categorized in: (i) optically thick lines, including ground-state lines, mostly sensitive to the cold outer part; (ii) highly excited (E_u>200-250 K) optically thin lines sensitive to the abundance in the hot inner part; and (iii) lines which vary from optically thick to thin depending on the abundances. Dust influences the emission of water significantly by becoming optically thick at the higher frequencies, and by pumping optically thin lines. A good physical model of a source, including a correct treatment of dust, is a prerequisite to infer the water abundance structure and possible jumps at the evaporation temperature from observations. The inner warm (T>100 K) envelope can be probed byhighly-excited lines, while a combination of excited and spectrally resolved ground state lines probes the outer envelope. Observations of H218O lines, although weak, provide even stronger constraints on abundances.

T. A. van Kempen; S. D. Doty; E. F. van Dishoeck; M. R. Hogerheijde; J. K. Joergensen