Sample records for optical depth aod

  1. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  2. Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of large dust particles in the atmosphere around Niamey.

  3. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  4. Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

  5. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  6. aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  7. aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  8. Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  9. Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters, J

  10. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Solmon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F.; Collins, W.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, Vaishali; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatiotemporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust aerosols showing a large vertical spread, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the boundary layer. From this compilation, we propose a 4-D blended product from model and satellite data, consisting in monthly time series of 3-D aerosol distribution at a 50 km horizontal resolution over the Euro-Mediterranean marine and continental region for the 2003–2009 period. The product is based on the total AOD from AQUA/MODIS, apportioned into sulfates, black and organic carbon from the MACC reanalysis, and into dust and sea-salt aerosols from RegCM-4 simulations, which are distributed vertically based on CALIOP climatology.We extend the 2003–2009 reconstruction to the past up to 1979 using the 2003–2009 average and applying the decreasing trend in sulfate aerosols from LMDz-OR-INCA, whose AOD trends over Europe and the Mediterranean are median among the ACCMIP models. Finally optical properties of the different aerosol types in this region are proposed from Mie calculations so that this reconstruction can be included in regional climate models for aerosol radiative forcing and aerosolclimate studies.

  11. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hamadache; L. Le Guillou; P. Tisserand; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. R. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \\deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\\rm d}

  12. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  13. Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter Framework John Barron Julich, 52425 Julich, Germany h.spies@fz-juelich.de Abstract. We present a Kalman lter framework, Depth from Optical Flow, Kalman Filter, 3D Camera Motion, Quantitative Error Analysis 1 Introduction We

  14. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  15. How do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yong X.

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We inter-compare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, and OMI. These sensors have shown independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds--a kind of situation often found over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532-nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is largely underestimated; however, it’s 1064-nm AOD when converted to 500 nm shows closer agreement to the passive sensors. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, the close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to lack of adequate direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD retrievals remains an open challenge. The inter-satellite comparison, however, can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check.

  16. Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    coincident hourly sea ice reports, instantaneous cloud radiative forcing and effective cloud optical depth. "Effective" optical depths (for a radiatively equivalent horizontally homogeneous cloud) are classified a characteristic optical depth of 15 at 47°S, increasing to 24 in the region of maximum cloud cover at 58°S

  17. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi1-minProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth

  18. Index of /research/alcator/documentation/AOD Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News CommunityPortal8 [ICO] Name Last629 RivAOD

  19. Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong wavelength and temperature dependence 5 . In this work a 100 W, pulse width modulated (PWM), CO2Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth techniques for the processing of fibre end face and cladding surfaces using a 9.6 µm CO2 laser. We

  20. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    by a blue light-emitting diode, the x and x depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric

  1. Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [ed.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

  2. Electromagnetically induced transparency and four-wave mixing in a cold atomic ensemble with large optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Geng; G. T. Campbell; J. Bernu; D. Higginbottom; B. M. Sparkes; S. M. Assad; W. P. Zhang; N. P. Robins; P. K. Lam; B. C. Buchler

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the delay of optical pulses using electromagnetically induced transparency in an ensemble of cold atoms with an optical depth exceeding 500. To identify the regimes in which four-wave mixing impacts on EIT behaviour, we conduct the experiment in both rubidium 85 and rubidium 87. Comparison with theory shows excellent agreement in both isotopes. In rubidium 87, negligible four-wave mixing was observed and we obtained one pulse-width of delay with 50% efficiency. In rubidium 85, four-wave-mixing contributes to the output. In this regime we achieve a delay-bandwidth product of 3.7 at 50% efficiency, allowing temporally multimode delay, which we demonstrate by compressing two pulses into the memory medium.

  3. Accretion disks around Black Holes with Advection and Optical Depth Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Artemova; G. S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan; I. V. Igumenshchev; I. D. Novikov

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effects of advection and radial gradients of pressure and radial drift velocity on the structure of accretion disks around black holes with proper description of optically thick/thin transitions. We concentrated our efforts on the models with large accretion rate. Contrary to disk models neglecting advection, we find that continuous solutions extending from the outer disk regions to the inner edge exist for all accretion rates we have considered. We show that the sonic point moves outward with increasing accretion rate, and that in the innermost disk region advection acts as a heating process that may even dominate over dissipative heating. Despite the importance of advection on it's structure, the disk remains geometrically thin. Global solutions of advective accretion disks, which describe continuously the transition between optically thick outer region and optically thin inner region are constructed and analyzed.

  4. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  5. In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence enhanced optical imaging: an analysis of penetration depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Jessica Perea

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . . 60 . . . . . . . 6 I vn Page 3. 2 ICCD system (instrumentation) . . 3. 2. 1 Laser diode and optical filters. . 3. 2. 2 Gain-modulated image intensifier and lenses. . . . . . . . . 3. 2. 3 CCD camera. . 3. 2.... 4 Modulation instrumentation. 3. 3 ICCD system (raw data acquisition and processing). . . . . 3. 3. 1 Data acquisition . . 3. 4 Data acquisition for filter combinations 63 65 . . . 66 67 67 . . . 70 71 74 4. DEVELOPMENT OF THEORETICAL...

  7. The Spectral Signature of Dust Scattering and Polarization in the Near IR to Far UV. I. Optical Depth and Geometry Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Zubko; Ari Laor

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectropolarimetry from the near IR to the far UV of light scattered by dust provides a valuable diagnostic of the dust composition, grain size distribution and spatial distribution. To facilitate the use of this diagnostic, we present detailed calculations of the intensity and polarization spectral signature of light scattered by optically thin and optically thick dust in various geometries. The polarized light radiative transfer calculations are carried out using the adding-doubling method for a plane-parallel slab, and are extended to an optically thick sphere by integrating over its surface. The calculations are for the Mathis, Rumple & Nordsieck Galactic dust model, and cover the range from 1 $\\mu m$ to 500 \\AA. We find that the wavelength dependence of the scattered light intensity provides a sensitive probe of the optical depth of the scattering medium, while the polarization wavelength dependence provides a probe of the grain scattering properties, which is practically independent of optical depth. We provide a detailed set of predictions, including polarization maps, which can be used to probe the properties of dust through imaging spectropolarimetry in the near IR to far UV of various Galactic and extragalactic objects. In a following paper we use the codes developed here to provide predictions for the dependence of the intensity and polarization on grain size distribution and composition.

  8. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  9. The Effect of an Occluder on Near Field Depth Matching in Optical See-Through Augmented Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan II, J. Edward

    ]. We used an AR haploscope, which allows us to independently manipulate accommodative demand the effects of accommodative demand, brightness, and participant age on depth perception. Among the additional of Edwards et al.'s [2] work was brain surgery, and therefore they used a plastic model of a human head

  10. Polarization-dependent all-optical modulator with ultra-high modulation depth based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Fei; Zheng, Bi-cai; Shao, Guang-hao; Ge, Shi-jun; Lu, Yan-qing

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-line polarization-dependent all-optical fiber modulator based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure (GMF) by utilizing the lab-on-rod technique. Owing to the unique spring-like geometry, an ultra-long GMF interaction length can be achieved, and an ultra-high modulation depth (MD) of ~7.5 dB and a high modulation efficiency (ME) of ~0.2 dB/mW were demonstrated for one polarization state. The MD and ME are more than one order larger than those of other graphene-waveguide hybrid all-optical modulators. By further optimizing the transferring and cleaning process, the modulator can quickly switch between transparent and opaque states for both the two polarization states with a maximized MD of tens of decibels. This modulator is compatible with current fiber-optic communication systems and may be applied in the near future to meet the impending need for ultrafast optical signal processing.

  11. The Relationship between the Optical Depth of the 9.7 micron Silicate Absorption Feature and Infrared Differential Extinction in Dense Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Chiar; K. Ennico; Y. J. Pendleton; A. C. A. Boogert; T. Greene; C. Knez; C. Lada; T. Roellig; A. G. G. M. Tielens; M. Werner; D. C. B. Whittet

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the relationship between the optical depth of the 9.7 micron silicate absorption feature (tau_9.7) and the near-infrared color excess, E(J-Ks) in the Serpens, Taurus, IC 5146, Chameleon I, Barnard 59, and Barnard 68 dense clouds/cores. Our data set, based largely on Spitzer IRS spectra, spans E(J-Ks)=0.3 to 10 mag (corresponding to visual extinction between about 2 and 60 mag.). All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. Unlike in the diffuse ISM where a tight linear correlation between the 9.7 micron silicate feature optical depth and the extinction (Av) is observed, we find that the silicate feature in dense clouds does not show a monotonic increase with extinction. Thus, in dense clouds, tau_9.7 is not a good measure of total dust column density. With few exceptions, the measured tau_9.7 values fall well below the diffuse ISM correlation line for E(J-Ks) > 2 mag (Av >12 mag). Grain growth via coagulation is a likely cause of this effect.

  12. Potential-well depth at amorphous-LaAlO{sub 3}/crystalline-SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces measured by optical second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Luca, Gabriele; Rubano, Andrea; Gennaro, Emiliano di; Khare, Amit; Granozio, Fabio Miletto; Uccio, Umberto Scotti di; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Paparo, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.paparo@spin.cnr.it [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II,” Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, v. Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By a combination of optical second harmonic generation and transport measurements, we have investigated interfaces formed by either crystalline or amorphous thin films of LaAlO{sub 3} grown on TiO{sub 2}-terminated SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates. Our approach aims at disentangling the relative role of intrinsic and extrinsic doping mechanisms in the formation of the two-dimensional electron gas. The different nature of the two mechanisms is revealed when comparing the sample response variation as a function of temperature during annealing in air. However, before the thermal treatment, the two types of interfaces show almost the same intensity of the second harmonic signal, provided the overlayer thickness is the same. As we will show, the second harmonic signal is proportional to the depth of the potential well confining the charges at the interface. Therefore, our result demonstrates that this depth is about the same for the two different material systems. This conclusion supports the idea that the electronic properties of the two-dimensional electron gas are almost independent of the doping mechanism of the quantum well.

  13. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhenimage ARM Data Discovery

  14. ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browseoptical

  15. Compact description of substrate-related aberrations in high numerical-aperture optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallinga, Sjoerd

    ) and advanced optical disk4 (AOD) make use of GaN lasers with wavelength 0.405 m, with BD using a numericalCompact description of substrate-related aberrations in high numerical-aperture optical disk) through the substrate. Deviations of the thickness from the nominal value result in spherical aberration

  16. ARM - Campaign Instrument - aod

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearchSOLICITATIONIMODI FICATIONCLASICgovInstrumentsaod Comments? We would love to

  17. ARM - VAP Process - aod

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAPProductsaerosolbe Documentation & Plots Technical ReportProductsaod

  18. ARM - PI Product - Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDAC MicrophysicsProductsNauru

  19. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  20. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  1. Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio- Temporal Analysis of Aerosols Vladan in this study is estimation of an important property of atmosphere, called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Remote of spatio- temporal aerosol patterns on a global scale. Ground-based AOD estimation is more accurate

  2. What controls the recent changes in African mineral dust aerosol across the Atlantic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, David Andrew

    Dust from Africa strongly perturbs the radiative balance over the Atlantic, with emissions that are highly variable from year to year. We show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over the mid-Atlantic observed by ...

  3. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  4. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  5. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  6. Depth Profile Analysis of New Materials in Hollow Cathode Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djulgerova, R.; Mihailov, V.; Gencheva, V.; Popova, L.; Panchev, B. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Michaylova, V. [Technical University of Sofia, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szytula, A.; Gondek, L.; Dohnalik, T.M. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics - Jagellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review the possibility of hollow cathode discharge for depth profile analysis is demonstrated for several new materials: planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange process in glasses, SnO2 thin films for gas sensors modified by hexamethildisilazane after rapid thermal annealing, W- and WC- CVD layers deposited on Co-metalloceramics and WO3- CVD thin films deposited on glass. The results are compared with different standard techniques.

  7. Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsen, Osman Oguz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

  8. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

  9. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Martian clouds and dust play an important part of the radiative transfer and energy balance budget. To assist in fully understanding the impact of clouds and dust, the complete diurnal cycle needs to be characterized. One of the best methods...

  10. Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »EnergyHubs | DepartmentCloudLegacythe

  11. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  12. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  13. Investigation into Spectral Parameters as they Impact CPV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPV industry is well aware that performance of triple junction cells depends on spectral conditions but there is a lack of data quantifying this spectral dependence at the module level. This paper explores the impact of precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and optical air mass on multiple CPV module technologies on-sun in Golden, CO.

  14. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  15. Smoke over haze: Comparative analysis of satellite, surface radiometer, and airborne in situ measurements of aerosol optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over the eastern United States Brian Vant their consistency for application to satellite retrievals of optical depth and radiative forcing. These optical properties were combined with MODIS reflectance observations to calculate optical depth. The use of AERONET

  16. Source depth for solar p-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

  17. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, Clifford S. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  18. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  19. Depth and Depth-Color Coding using Shape-Adaptive Wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Minh N.

    -view autostereoscopic displays, 3D-TV is expected to be the next evolution of television after high definition. Three Abstract We present a novel depth and depth-color codec aimed at free-viewpoint 3D-TV. The proposed codec is implemented by shape-adaptive lifting, which enables fast computations and perfect reconstruction. We derive

  20. RACORO: ROUTINE AERIAL VEHICLE PROGRAM (AVP) CLOUDS WITH LOW OPTICAL WATER DEPTHS (CLOWD) OPTICAL RADIATIVE OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable so, for United States Government purposes. BNL-82213-2009-AB #12;

  1. ARM - Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments RelatedHighlightsNotableRadiative

  2. Depth Profiling Of Small Molecule Ingress Into Planar and Cylindrical Materials Using NRA and PIXE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, Anthony S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a 3He ion micro-beam technique to study the ingress/diffusion of water into a planar fibre optic grade glass and a cylindrical drug-release polymer is described. One-dimensional concentration profiles showing the depth of water ingress were produced. The depth of penetration of water into the glass was measured by fitting a gaussian function to the concentration profile. The ingress of water into the drug-release polymer was found to be Fickian and a cylindrical diffusion model used to obtain a diffusion coefficient.

  3. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  4. Collision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ; compute distances between the obstacles and the robot; optionally project the results in the CartesianCollision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION When humans and robots share the same work space, safety is the primary issue of concern [8]. Secondary but not negligible is to prevent robot damages due

  5. Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics Dr. Palffy-Muhoray Ines Busuladzic Department of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics The University of Akron April 21, 2008 #12;Outline · History of optical fibers · What are optical fibers? · How are optical fibers made? · Light propagation through optical fibers · Application

  6. Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

  7. Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    radiation; effect of cloud cover; and effect of high and low aerosol optical depths (AOD). Results indicateDirect observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different, and croplands) with collocated aerosol and surface radiation measurements were analyzed for high and low diffuse

  8. Brazil's Legal Amazon 5 million km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    effect on atmosphere · Effect cloud formation · Increase cloud cover: aerosols that do not absorb much sunlight · act as seeds for clouds · Decrease cloud cover: aerosols that absorb sunlight · create layer photometer · Direct solar radiation · Calculate columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) · Level 2 data · AOT 500

  9. Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

  10. Monazite Th-Pb age depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, M.; Harrison, T.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significant capabilities of the ion microprobe for thermochronometric investigations of geologic materials remain largely unexploited. Whereas {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th spot analysis allows {approximately} 10-mm-scale imaging of Pb loss profiles or overgrowths in sectioned monazite grains, the spatial resolution offered by depth profiling into the surface region of natural crystals is more than two orders of magnitude higher. The authors document here the ability of the high-resolution ion microprobe to detect {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th age differences of < 1 m.y. with better than 0.05 {micro}m depth resolution in the outer micron of Tertiary monazites from the hanging wall of the Himalayan Main Central thrust. Age gradients on this scale are inaccessible to ion microprobe spot analysis or conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Interpretation of the near-surface {sup 208}Pb distributions with available monazite Pb diffusion data illustrates the potential of the approach for recovering continuous, high-temperature thermal history information not previously available.

  11. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  12. Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consider steady periodic water waves for rotational flows with a specified fixed-depth over a flat bed. We the existence of steady periodic water waves for rotational flows with a specified fixed depth over a flat bedSteady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows David Henry School

  13. Statistical Data Depth and the Graphics Hardware Shankar Krishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Nabil Hassan

    by NSF under grants CCR-00-86013 EIA-98-70724, EIA-99-72879, EIA-01-31905, and CCR-02-04118. 1 #12;Figure). Organization. We first survey various definitions of statistical depth, and the related computa- tional, and the region of all points with depth greater than some integer . Now, we survey various depth measures

  14. Electro-optical Modulation in Graphene Integrated Photonic Crystal Nanocavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Xuetao

    We demonstrate high-contrast electro-optic modulation in a graphene integrated photonic crystal nanocavity, providing a modulation depth of more than 10 dB at telecom wavelengths. This work shows the feasibility of ...

  15. An energy spread correction for ERDA hydrogen depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis called the channel-depth conversion was introduced by Verda, et al.' However, the energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, which causes a broadening in the energy range and leads to errors in depth profiling, was not addressed by this technique. Here we introduce a technique to addresses this problem, called the energy spread correction. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion techniques comprise the depth profiling method presented in this work.

  16. Some intriguing properties of Tukey's half-space depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Probal; 10.3150/10-BEJ322

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For multivariate data, Tukey's half-space depth is one of the most popular depth functions available in the literature. It is conceptually simple and satisfies several desirable properties of depth functions. The Tukey median, the multivariate median associated with the half-space depth, is also a well-known measure of center for multivariate data with several interesting properties. In this article, we derive and investigate some interesting properties of half-space depth and its associated multivariate median. These properties, some of which are counterintuitive, have important statistical consequences in multivariate analysis. We also investigate a natural extension of Tukey's half-space depth and the related median for probability distributions on any Banach space (which may be finite- or infinite-dimensional) and prove some results that demonstrate anomalous behavior of half-space depth in infinite-dimensional spaces.

  17. Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY); Sugavanam, Krishnan (Mahopac, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Seebruck-Seeon, DE)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth dynamically changes the depth of prefetching so that the number of multiple streams as well as the hit rate of a single stream are optimized. The method and apparatus in one aspect monitor a plurality of load requests from a processing unit for data in a prefetch buffer, determine an access pattern associated with the plurality of load requests and adjust a prefetch depth according to the access pattern.

  18. Optical keyboard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY); Feichtner, John D. (Fiddletown, CA); Phillips, Thomas E. (San Diego, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  19. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Other Institutions 13 J1711 HEV & PHEV test procedures In-depth Benchmarking DOE technology evaluation * DOE requests * National Lab requests AVTA (Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  20. aes depth profile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California eScholarship Repository Summary: al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical...

  1. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

    1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument. A method of measuring a radius of curvature of an unknown surface includes positioning the spherometer on a surface between the surface and a depth measuring optical instrument. As the spherometer is frontally illuminated, the distance from the depth measuring instrument to the fiducial mark and the underlying surface are alternately measured and the difference in these measurements is used as the sagittal height to calculate a radius of curvature.

  2. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  4. Depth Camera based Localization and Navigation for Indoor Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    . 1. Snapshot of depth image processing: On the left, the complete 3D point cloud is shown in white cloud by sampling points from the depth image, and classifying local grouped sets of points as belonging. The full sampled point cloud (consisting of both plane filtered as well as outlier points) is processed

  5. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  6. A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

  7. Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

  8. Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over of cloud optical and microphysical properties were made at Taihu, a highly polluted site in the central Yangtze Delta region, during a research campaign from May 2008 to December 2009. Cloud optical depth (COD

  9. Optical pattern recognition architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molley, Perry A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical architecture implementing the mean-square error correlation algorithm, MSE=.SIGMA.[I-R].sup.2 for discriminating the presence of a reference image R in an input image scene I by computing the mean-square-error between a time-varying reference image signal s.sub.1 (t) and a time-varying input image signal s.sub.2 (t) includes a laser diode light source which is temporally modulated by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier source modulation signal I.sub.1 (t) having the form I.sub.1 (t)=A.sub.1 [1+.sqroot.2m.sub.1 s.sub.1 (t)cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t)] and the modulated light output from the laser diode source is diffracted by an acousto-optic deflector. The resultant intensity of the +1 diffracted order from the acousto-optic device is given by: I.sub.2 (t)=A.sub.2 [+2m.sub.2.sup.2 s.sub.2.sup.2 (t)-2.sqroot.2m.sub.2 (t) cos (2.pi.f.sub.o t] The time integration of the two signals I.sub.1 (t) and I.sub.2 (t) on the CCD deflector plane produces the result R(.tau.) of the mean-square error having the form: R(.tau.)=A.sub.1 A.sub.2 {[T]+[2m.sub.2.sup.2.multidot..intg.s.sub.2.sup.2 (t-.tau.)dt]-[2m.sub.1 m.sub.2 cos (2.tau.f.sub.o .tau.).multidot..intg.s.sub.1 (t)s.sub.2 (t-.tau.)dt]} where: s.sub.1 (t) is the signal input to the diode modulation source: s.sub.2 (t) is the signal input to the AOD modulation source; A.sub.1 is the light intensity; A.sub.2 is the diffraction efficiency; m.sub.1 and m.sub.2 are constants that determine the signal-to-bias ratio; f.sub.o is the frequency offset between the oscillator at f.sub.c and the modulation at f.sub.c +f.sub.o ; and a.sub.o and a.sub.1 are constant chosen to bias the diode source and the acousto-optic deflector into their respective linear operating regions so that the diode source exhibits a linear intensity characteristic and the AOD exhibits a linear amplitude characteristic.

  10. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif Akitoshi Yoshida July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec- trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits into an optical

  11. Variations in microbial community composition through two soil depth profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    35% of the total quantity of microbial biomass found in the top 2 m of soil is found below a depth: Microbial diversity; Phospholipid fatty acid; Soil profile; Community composition; Microbial biomass 1

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  13. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  14. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  15. Burial depth and stratigraphic controls on shale diagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, David Wesley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - layer illite/smectite in Gulf Coast sediments at a shallow depth is a randomly-interstratified illite/smectite with proportions of 804 smectite and 20% illite (Perry and Hower, 1972). Many authors (Dunoyer de Segonzac, 1970; Perry and Hower, 1970..., 1972; Hower et al. , 1976; Foscolos and Kodama, 1974) have noted the increase in illite with concurrent decrease of smectite in the mixed-layer illite/smec- tite with increasing depth and temperature. The conversion of smectite into illite resulting...

  16. High-resolution SIMS depth profiling of nanolayers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Peng, Q.; Elam, J. W.; Veryovkin, I. V. (Energy Systems); ( MSD)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the fundamental physical limits for depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry are well understood in theory, the experimental work to achieve and demonstrate them is still ongoing. We report results of high-resolution TOF SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) depth profiling experiments on a nanolayered structure, a stack of 16 alternating MgO and ZnO {approx}5.5 nm layers grown on a Si substrate by atomic layer deposition. The measurements were performed using a newly developed approach implementing a low-energy direct current normally incident Ar{sup +} ion beam for ion milling (250 eV and 500 eV energy), in combination with a pulsed 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at 60{sup o} incidence for TOF SIMS analysis. By this optimized arrangement, a noticeably improved version of the dual-beam (DB) approach to TOF SIMS depth profiling is introduced, which can be dubbed gentleDB. The mixing-roughness-information model was applied to detailed analysis of experimental results. It revealed that the gentleDB approach allows ultimate depth resolution by confining the ion beam mixing length to about two monolayers. This corresponds to the escape depth of secondary ions, the fundamental depth resolution limitation in SIMS. Other parameters deduced from the measured depth profiles indicated that a single layer thickness is equal to 6 nm so that the 'flat' layer thickness d is 3 nm and the interfacial roughness {sigma} is 1.5 nm, thus yielding d + 2{sigma} = 6 nm. We have demonstrated that gentleDB TOF SIMS depth profiling with noble gas ion beams is capable of revealing the structural features of a stack of nanolayers, resolving its original surface and estimating the roughness of interlayer interfaces, information which is difficult to obtain by traditional approaches.

  17. Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardt, Christian

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    . Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. This dissertation does not exceed the regulation length of 60 000 words... -step pipeline that aligns the video streams, efficiently removes and fills invalid and noisy geometry, and finally uses a spatiotemporal filter to increase the spatial resolution of the depth data and strongly reduce depth measurement noise. I show...

  18. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument.

  19. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Fried, Daniel (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  20. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  1. Aerosol radiative forcing and the accuracy of satellite aerosol optical depth retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) is typically between 0.06 and 0.15, while the RMSE between t = 0.1 and t = 0.8. The Department of Energy research satellite instrument, the Multispectral aerosol radiative forcing are known, the predictions of future global warming may remain unacceptably high

  2. Influence of anthropogenic aerosol on cloud optical depth and albedo shown by satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - flux of sulfate aerosol from industrial regions of Europe or North America to remote areas of the North- atmosphere system over the industrial period and a cooling influence on climate. Estimates of the global), the negative sign indicating a cooling influence. Such a global mean forcing would more than offset the warming

  3. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth's radiation budget is one of the biggest challenges of current climate research. To help address profiles, cloud/aerosol properties, or vegetation cover. Achieving accurate estimations is a critical

  4. Ice cloud microphysics retrievals from millimeter radar and visible optical depth using an estimation theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    of the planet. These effects occur as a consequence of the way cloud particles scatter and absorb radiation, 0325); 1655 Global Change: Water cycles (1836); KEYWORDS: ice water content retrieval, cirrus cloud), 4335, doi:10.1029/2002JD002693, 2003. 1. Introduction [2] Clouds profoundly affect the radiation budget

  5. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-133 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL42 ARM15 ARM348923

  6. Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1CompactComparison ofposter,MISR,

  7. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-15022252

  8. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3(SC)

  9. Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization|EnergyAnalysisHeat Ratefor the

  10. Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Optical Expanders with Applications in Optical Computing John H. Reif \\Lambda Akitoshi Yoshida \\Lambda July 20, 1999 Abstract We describe and investigate an optical system which we call an optical expander. An optical expander elec­ trooptically expands an optical boolean pattern encoded in d bits

  11. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  12. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  13. Sensitivity of the Mueller matrix to the optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawless, Ryan Lee

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    by considering four different incident polarization states. The sensitivity of these elements is observed by comparing different ice crystal habits, effective sizes, and optical depth. The Mueller elements are strongly dependent on habit. The three habits...

  14. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hongxuan, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei [Active State Technology Research Group, Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1 Umezono 1-Chome, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke [Nano Characterization Unit, Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  15. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  16. An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. Abstract: Hydrogen depth distributions in silicon, zinc oxide...

  17. Structural Performance of a Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge Deck System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mander, Thomas

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -depth concrete bridge deck overhangs, accelerating the construction of concrete bridge decks, by using full-depth precast prestressed concrete deck panels. Full-depth precast overhang panels in combination with cast-in-place (CIP) reinforced concrete...

  18. Optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  19. Optical analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  20. Optical memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  1. Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance Via Depth From Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasi, Carlo

    Abstract A critical challenge in the creation of autonomous mobile robots is the reliable detection radiation such as direct sunlight. In contrast, vision systems are passive and can provide lateral and depth market. However, our particular embodiment of this concept is remarkable because our focus-based system

  2. WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

  3. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  4. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  5. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    , and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  6. In-Depth Temperature Profiles in Pyrolyzing Wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro

    of experimental in-depth temperature measurements were done in wood samples exposed to various intensities of radiant heat fluxes, with clearly defined boundary conditions that allow a proper input for pyrolysis models. The imposed heat fluxes range from 10 k...

  7. PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgall, Jiri

    PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH MODULAR COUNTING S. Buss (ø) := minfjßj : f(ß) = øg; #12; 2 S. Buss et al. where jßj is the length of the string ß to showing that NP 6= coNP . Despite extensive research (see the expository articles Buss (1995b) , Kraj

  8. accurate hydrogen depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accurate hydrogen depth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Accurate reconstruction of the...

  9. Optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  10. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Optics Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Quantum Optics Quantum OpticsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-30T16:37:03+00:00 Quantum Optics with a Single...

  11. A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING Lai-Man Po School of Peking University, Shenzhen, China ABSTRACT Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) is widely used synthesis with high-quality depth map. Index Terms - Depth-Image-Based-Rendering, DIBR, Hole

  12. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  13. Using the Multi-Depth Deflectometer to study pavement response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Jamshed Iqbal

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Section 11 (Load: 8500 lbs. ) Variation of layer moduli backcalculated from depth deflections - Section 11 (Load: 16000 lbs. ) Measured deflections - Section 12 Moduli values backcalculated from BISAR - Section 12, Infinite subgrade . Moduli values... . Typical N? versus bulk stress (8) relationship for granular materials . MDD deflection basin measured under FWD load- 8500 lb. load level 143 144 145 146 148 149 67 68 NDD deflection basin predicted from BISAR Measured versus predicted...

  14. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  15. Depth dependent dynamics in the hydration shell of a protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Servantie; C. Atilgan; A. R. Atilgan

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of hydration water/protein association in folded proteins, using lysozyme and myoglobin as examples. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to identify underlying mechanisms of the dynamical transition that corresponds to the onset of amplified atomic fluctuations in proteins. The number of water molecules within a cutoff distance of each residue scales linearly with protein depth index and is not affected by the local dynamics of the backbone. Keeping track of the water molecules within the cutoff sphere, we observe an effective residence time, scaling inversely with depth index at physiological temperatures while the diffusive escape is highly reduced below the transition. A depth independent orientational memory loss is obtained for the average dipole vector of the water molecules within the sphere when the protein is functional. While below the transition temperature, the solvent is in a glassy state, acting as a solid crust around the protein, inhibiting any large scale conformational fluctuations. At the transition, most of the hydration shell unfreezes and water molecules collectively make the protein more flexible.

  16. Optical storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold atomic ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Shengwang

    Optical storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold atomic ensemble storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold 85 Rb atomic ensemble. By varying the optical depth (OD) from 0 to 140, we observe that the optimal storage effi- ciency has a saturation value

  17. Manual-scanning optical coherence tomography probe based on position tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Changhuei

    Manual-scanning optical coherence tomography probe based on position tracking Jian Ren,1, * Jigang to reconstruct images for a manual-scanning optical coherence tomog- raphy (OCT) probe is proposed's pose. The continuous device poses tracking, and the collected OCT depth scans can then be combined

  18. Parallel optical sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  19. 350-?m side-view optical probe for imaging the murine brain in vivo from the cortex to the hypothalamus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jun Ki

    Miniature endoscopic probes offer a solution for deep brain imaging by overcoming the limited depth of intravital microscopy. We describe a small-diameter (350 ?m) graded-index optical probe with a side-view design for in ...

  20. Ultrafast optics For optics and photonics course,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    ultrafast and ultrashort generally describe pulses of widths in the nanosecond to femtosecond, or shorterUltrafast optics For optics and photonics course, Spring 2012 By :Alireza Moheghi Ultrafast optics, regimes. · Interest in ultrashort optical pulses began with the invention of the laser, · Ultrashort

  1. RICE UNIVERSITY A New Optical Trap System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.3 Alignment of the loading trap beams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.4 Power locking system for loading trap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2 Loading trap depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1.1 Description of trap optical design and beam profiles . . . . . . 22 3.1.2 Power locking

  2. Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

  3. Optical sedimentation recorder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic optical sedimentation recorder is described for the recordation of carbon flux in the oceans wherein both POC and PIC particles are captured at the open end of a submersible sampling platform, the captured particles allowed to drift down onto a collection plate where they can be imaged over time. The particles are imaged using three separate light sources, activated in sequence, one source being a back light, a second source being a side light to provide dark field illumination, and a third source comprising a cross polarized light source to illuminate birefringent particles. The recorder in one embodiment is attached to a buoyancy unit which is capable upon command for bringing the sedimentation recorder to a programmed depth below the ocean surface during recordation mode, and on command returning the unit to the ocean surface for transmission of recorded data and receipt of new instructions. The combined unit is provided with its own power source and is designed to operate autonomously in the ocean for extended periods of time.

  4. Optical microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  5. Optical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  6. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W. [Molecular Physics Laboratory, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  7. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments on the Site MapDepth of

  8. Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:Information PromotingApplicantAvgReservoirDepth Jump

  9. Property:AvgWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:Information PromotingApplicantAvgReservoirDepth

  10. Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property NameFirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation, search

  11. Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegalHeard County,Grain FuelsDepth Jump

  12. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-21960-2012Mission: Focus onDepth of Crude Oil and

  13. Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

  14. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  15. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

  16. The SLS optics beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLS Optics Beamline U. Flechsig ? , R. Abela ? , R.in the ?eld of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation in-radiation, beamline optics, channel cut monochromator,

  17. Optical manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  18. Numerical simulation of the flow over a coastal structure in depth-limited conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginting, Victor Eralingga

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of detailed measurements of irregular wave transformation in front of the structure in depth-limited conditions. The second data set consists of several test runs to study the irregular wave reflection and runup on the coastal structure in depth...

  19. Digital ultrasonically encoded (DUE) optical focusing into random media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tay, Jian Wei; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing light into opaque random or scattering media such as biological tissue is a much sought-after goal for biomedical applications such as photodynamic therapy, optical manipulation, and photostimulation. However, focusing with conventional lenses is restricted to one transport mean free path in scattering media, limiting both optical penetration depth and resolution. Focusing deeper is possible by using optical phase conjugation or wavefront shaping to compensate for the scattering. For practical applications, wavefront shaping offers the advantage of a robust optical system that is less sensitive to optical misalignment. Here, the phase of the incident light is spatially tailored using a phase-shifting array to pre-compensate for scattering. The challenge, then, is to determine the phase pattern which allows light to be optimally delivered to the target region. Optimization algorithms are typically employed for this purpose, with visible particles used as targets to generate feedback. However, using th...

  20. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA); Morton, Richard G. (San Diego, CA); Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Bissinger, Horst D. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  1. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  2. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  3. In-depth survey report of Scoular Elevator, Salina, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaebst, D.D.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in/depth industrial hygiene survey of exposures to phosphine during the use of aluminum phosphide was conducted as part of a survey on exposure to grain fumigants. Area monitoring and breathing-zone sampling for phosphine were conducted during the addition of aluminum phosphide to grain during turning operations; source samples and peak personal exposures were also analyzed. Major sources of personal exposure included the escape of air from the bin headspace during filling with treated grain, filling and emptying of the phosphide pellet dispenser, and infiltration from the treated grain bin and from the pellet dispenser itself into adjacent air space. Relatively good dust control was indicated by the total dust samples collected during the survey. Measures recommended by the author are in the report.

  4. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  5. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  6. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

  7. Depth of manual dismantling analysis: A cost–benefit approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achillas, Ch., E-mail: c.achillas@ihu.edu.gr [School of Economics and Business Administration, International Hellenic University, 14th km Thessaloniki-Moudania, 57001 Thermi (Greece); Aidonis, D. [Department of Logistics, Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Branch of Katerini, 60100 Katerini (Greece); Vlachokostas, Ch.; Karagiannidis, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Loulos, V. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Box 483, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A mathematical modeling tool for OEMs. ? The tool can be used by OEMs, recyclers of electr(on)ic equipment or WEEE management systems’ regulators. ? The tool makes use of cost–benefit analysis in order to determine the optimal depth of product disassembly. ? The reusable materials and the quantity of metals and plastics recycled can be quantified in an easy-to-comprehend manner. - Abstract: This paper presents a decision support tool for manufacturers and recyclers towards end-of-life strategies for waste electrical and electronic equipment. A mathematical formulation based on the cost benefit analysis concept is herein analytically described in order to determine the parts and/or components of an obsolete product that should be either non-destructively recovered for reuse or be recycled. The framework optimally determines the depth of disassembly for a given product, taking into account economic considerations. On this basis, it embeds all relevant cost elements to be included in the decision-making process, such as recovered materials and (depreciated) parts/components, labor costs, energy consumption, equipment depreciation, quality control and warehousing. This tool can be part of the strategic decision-making process in order to maximize profitability or minimize end-of-life management costs. A case study to demonstrate the models’ applicability is presented for a typical electronic product in terms of structure and material composition. Taking into account the market values of the pilot product’s components, the manual disassembly is proven profitable with the marginal revenues from recovered reusable materials to be estimated at 2.93–23.06 €, depending on the level of disassembly.

  8. Ultrathin optical panel and a method of making an ultrathin optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchogue, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchogue, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated with a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

  9. Ultrathin Optical Panel And A Method Of Making An Ultrathin Optical Panel.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchoque, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchoque, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated with a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

  10. Ultrathin optical panel and a method of making an ultrathin optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchogue, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchogue, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated With a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

  11. Ultrathin optical panel and a method of making an ultrathin optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchogue, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchogue, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2001-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated with a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

  12. Ultrathin Optical Panel And A Method Of Making An Ultrathin Optical Panel.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchogue, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchogue, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated with a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

  13. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  14. Optical XOR gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  15. Optical and mechanical behavior of the optical fiber infrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, Scott

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor . . . . . . .Fiber Infrasound Sensor Optical fibers are well known forSchnidrig. An optical fiber infrasound sensor: A new lower

  16. Latching micro optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateQuantum Optics Quantum Optics videobanner Quantum Optics with a Single Semiconductor Quantum Dot Speaker: Weng Chow, EFRC Scientist Date: September 14, 2011 Event:...

  18. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  19. High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

  20. alluvial basins in-depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of structures requires more accurate design methods. An important variable in the fire performance of timber structures is the in-depth temperature distribution, ......

  1. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is...

  2. Optical films for solar energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of solar energy conversion materials and coatings are considered stratified media. They are generally classified as graded-index media or layered media. With index coatings, two components (such as air and SiO/sub 2/ or Cr and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/) are created in a non-linear fashion with depth into the coating. By simple materials admixing, a coating is formed with varying optical constants (n, k). Layered media generally consist of interference films, films with thicknesses below the wavelength of light, made of alternating dissimilar media such as a dielectric and metal combination. This paper presents details of the properties of stratified coatings. Coatings that serve as antireflection films, transparent optical insulation (silica aerogel), thermal heat mirrors, or selective absorbers are also discussed. Both interference and semiconductor types of heat mirrors are evaluated. Four types of selective absorbers are also covered: dendritic optical trapping, graded composite, metal/dielectric tandems, and optical interference techniques.

  3. A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

  4. High bandwidth optical mount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  5. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland Winston Joseph O'Gallagher

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in 1998 and was incorporated into this project (September, 1998) with the required additional funding provided through this already existing grant.

  6. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  7. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  8. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  9. Microphysical Properties of Clouds with Low Liquid Water Paths: An Update from Clouds with Low Optical (Water) Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.; Flynn, C.; Long, C.; McFarlane, S.; Vogelmann, A.; Johnson, K.; Miller, M.; Chiu, C.; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Clough, S.A.; Heck, P.; Minnis, P.; Liljegren, J.; Min, Q.; O'Hirok, W.; Wang, Z.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play a critical role in the modulation of the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and how clouds interact with radiation is one of the primary uncertainties in global climate models (GCMs). To reduce this uncertainty, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program collects an immense amount of data from its Climate Research Facilities (CRFs); these data include observations of radiative fluxes, cloud properties from active and passive remote sensors, upper atmospheric soundings, and other observations. The program's goal is to use these coincident, longterm observations to improve the parameterization of radiative transfer in clear and cloudy atmospheres in GCMs.

  10. Spatial characteristics of the difference between MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth retrievals over mainland Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Tao

    autoregressive (SAR) model Spatial clustering Data assimilation Mainland Southeast Asia The difference between but a global correction is insufficient and ground observations that could be used for calibration purposes

  11. A Measurement of Time-Averaged Aerosol Optical Depth using Air-Showers Observed in Stereo by HiRes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zvi,5 D.R. Bergman,6 J.H. Boyer,4 C.T. Cannon,1 Z. Cao,1 B.M. Connolly,5 Y. Fedorova,1 C.B. Finley,5 W.FRes R.U. Abbasi,1 T. Abu-Zayyad,1 J.F. Amann,2 G. Archbold,1 R. Atkins,1 K. Belov,1 J.W. Belz,3 S. Ben.6 km. (See Abu-Zayyad (2000) and Boyer (2002).) Each station views nearly the full az- imuth. The Hi

  12. Ground-based retrievals of optical depth, effective radius, and composition of airborne mineral dust above the Sahel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Basedretrievals of

  13. University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    University of Central Florida College of Optics & Photonics Optics Spring 2010 OSE-6432: Principles of guided wave optics; electro -optics, acousto-optics and optoelectronics. Location: CREOL-A-214 or by Appointment Reference Materials: 1. Class Notes. 2. "Fundamentals of Optical Waveguides", K. Okamoto, Academic

  14. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  15. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  16. Robust Head Pose Estimation by Fusing Time-of-Flight Depth and Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    . The key to our method is a model-based approach based on the fusion of color and time-of-flight depth data setup or knowledge of a pre-built model or training data. The use of additional depth data leads of user interaction, or controlling industrial machinery from a distance. Although many different systems

  17. Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

  18. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  19. The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamassian, Pascal

    The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces investigate here how well human observers cope with stereo transparency by comparing their efficiency between transparent and opaque depth judgments. In two experiments, the efficiency measure was computed relative

  20. Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Bernard

    Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine the desired effect. A diagnostic measurement of the distribution of laser energy deposition and ensuing

  1. On the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In nite Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    function which satis#12;ed the correct kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions for water waves of steady water waves on ows with #12;nite depth. The inde- pendent variable was a periodic functionOn the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In#12;nite Depth J.F. Toland 1 Background

  2. A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

  3. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

  4. Prediction of end-depth ratio in open channels using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    (EDR). Further effort is made to verify the applicability and superiority of this expressionD coefficient of determination EDR End-depth ratio (he/hc) GP Genetic Programming MRSS mean root of sum problem and to determine the end-depth ratio (EDR ¼ he/hc) in a wide range of channels. The Boussinesq

  5. Lower Bounds for Bounded Depth Frege Proofs via Pudlak-Buss Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsha, Prahladh

    19 Lower Bounds for Bounded Depth Frege Proofs via Pudl´ak-Buss Games ELI BEN-SASSON Technion. Our method uses the interpretation of proofs as two player games given by Pudl´ak and Buss. Our lower. 2010. Lower bounds for bounded depth Frege proofs via Pudl´ak- Buss games. ACM Trans. Comput. Logic, 11

  6. ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS microwave sounders, snow gauges, or radar are not feasible or not available in Antarctica at the present precipitation, remains largely unknown. Acoustic depth gauges (ADG) provide the only concrete real

  7. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  8. Prompt optical emission from residual collisions in GRB outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li; Eli Waxman

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts is believed to be produced by internal shocks within a relativistic unsteady outflow. The recent detection of prompt optical emission accompanying the prompt gamma-ray emission appears to be inconsistent with this model since the out flowing plasma is expected to be highly optically thick to optical photons. We show here that fluctuations in flow properties on short, ~ 1 ms, time scale, which drive the gamma-ray producing collisions at small radii, are expected to lead to "residual" collisions at much larger radii, where the optical depth to optical photons is low. The late residual collisions naturally account for the relatively bright optical emission. The apparent simultaneity of gamma-ray and optical emission is due to the highly relativistic speed with which the plasma expands. Residual collisions may also account for the X-ray emission during the early "steep decline" phase, where the radius is inferred to be larger than the gamma-ray emission radius. Finally, we point out that inverse-Compton emission from residual collisions at large radii is expected to contribute significantly to the emission at high energy, and may therefore "smear" the pair production spectral cut-off.

  9. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  12. Modular Optical PDV System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araceli Rutkowski, David Esquibel

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular optical photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) detector system has been developed by using readily available optical components with a 20-GHz Miteq optical detector into eight channels of single-wide modules integrated into a 3U rack unit (1U = 1.75 inches) with a common power supply. Optical fibers were precisely trimmed, welded, and timed within each unit. This system has been used to collect dynamic velocity data on various physics experiments. An optical power meter displays the laser input power to the module and optical power at the detector. An adjustable micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) optical attenuator is used to adjust the amount of unshifted light entering the detector. Front panel LEDs show the presence of power to the module. A fully loaded chassis with eight channels consumes 45 watts of power. Each chassis requires 1U spacing above and below for heat management. Modules can be easily replaced.

  13. Depth profile reconstructions of electronic transport properties in H{sup +} MeV-energy ion-implanted n-Si wafers using photocarrier radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai, Rui; Wang, Chinhua, E-mail: chinhua.wang@suda.edu.cn; Hu, Jingpei [Institute of Modern Optical Technologies and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Jiangsu Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies and MOE Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Mandelis, Andreas [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A depth profiling technique using photocarrier radiometry (PCR) is demonstrated and used for the reconstruction of continuously varying electronic transport properties (carrier lifetime and electronic diffusivity) in the interim region between the ion residence layer and the bulk crystalline layer in H{sup +} implanted semiconductor wafers with high implantation energies (?MeV). This defect-rich region, which is normally assumed to be part of the homogeneous “substrate” in all existing two- and three-layer models, was sliced into many virtual thin layers along the depth direction so that the continuously and monotonically variable electronic properties across its thickness can be considered uniform within each virtual layer. The depth profile reconstruction of both carrier life time and diffusivity in H{sup +} implanted wafers with several implantation doses (3?×?10{sup 14}, 3?×?10{sup 15}, and 3?×?10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?2}) and different implantation energies (from 0.75 to 2.0?MeV) is presented. This all-optical PCR method provides a fast non-destructive way of characterizing sub-surface process-induced electronic defect profiles in devices under fabrication at any intermediate stage before final metallization and possibly lead to process correction and optimization well before electrical testing and defect diagnosis becomes possible.

  14. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  15. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  16. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  17. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  18. Entanglement in Classical Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Ghose; Anirban Mukherjee

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The emerging field of entanglement or nonseparability in classical optics is reviewed, and its similarities with and differences from quantum entanglement clearly pointed out through a recapitulation of Hilbert spaces in general, the special restrictions on Hilbert spaces imposed in quantum mechanics and the role of Hilbert spaces in classical polarization optics. The production of Bell-like states in classical polarization optics is discussed, and new theorems are proved to discriminate between separable and nonseparable states in classical wave optics where no discreteness is involved. The influence of the Pancharatnam phase on a classical Bell-like state is deived. Finally, to what extent classical polarization optics can be used to simulate quantum information processing tasks is also discussed. This should be of great practical importance because coherence and entanglement are robust in classical optics but not in quantum systems.

  19. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  20. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Aiello; F. Ameli; M. Anghinolfi; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; B. Bouhadef; C. Bozza; G. Cacopardo; M. Calamai; C. Calì; A. Capone; F. Caruso; A. Ceres; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; R. Cocimano; R. Coniglione; M. Costa; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; V. De Luca; N. Deniskina; G. De Rosa; F. Di Capua; C. Distefano; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; F. Garufi; V. Giordano; A. Gmerk; R. Grasso; G. Grella; C. Hugon; M. Imbesi; V. Kulikovskiy; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; K. P. Leismueller; E. Leonora; P. Litrico; A. Lonardo; F. Longhitano; D. Lo Presti; E. Maccioni; A. Margiotta; A. Martini; R. Masullo; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; R. Papaleo; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; C. Pugliatti; S. Pulvirenti; A. Orselli; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Sanguineti; P. Sapienza; V. Sciacca; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; F. Speziale; M. Spina; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; S. M. Stellacci; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; C. Ventura; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  1. Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media A Comparison of Self-Protecting Digital Content and AACS Independent Security Evaluators www.securityevaluators.com May 3, 2005 Copyright for Optical Media 2 #12;Content Protection for Optical Media Content Protection for Optical Media 3 Executive

  2. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  3. Prismatic optical display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Brewster, Calvin

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A spatially modulated light beam is projected, reflected, and redirected through a prismatic optical panel to form a video image for direct viewing thereon.

  4. Optical theorem and unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy Nazaruk

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that an application of optical theorem for the non-unitary S-matrix can lead to the qualitative error in the result.

  5. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  6. LSST Camera Optics Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  7. THE TURBULENCE POWER SPECTRUM IN OPTICALLY THICK INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 North Charter Street, WI 53711 (United States); Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourier power spectrum is one of the most widely used statistical tools to analyze the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the interstellar medium. Lazarian and Pogosyan predicted that the spectral slope should saturate to -3 for an optically thick medium and many observations exist in support of their prediction. However, there have not been any numerical studies to date for testing these results. We analyze the spatial power spectrum of MHD simulations with a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, which include radiative transfer effects of the {sup 13}CO transition. We numerically confirm the predictions of Lazarian and Pogosyan that the spectral slope of line intensity maps of an optically thick medium saturates to -3. Furthermore, for very optically thin supersonic CO gas, where the density or CO abundance values are too low to excite emission in all but the densest shock compressed gas, we find that the spectral slope is shallower than expected from the column density. Finally, we find that mixed optically thin/thick CO gas, which has average optical depths on the order of unity, shows mixed behavior: for super-Alfvenic turbulence, the integrated intensity power spectral slopes generally follow the same trend with sonic Mach number as the true column density power spectrum slopes. However, for sub-Alfvenic turbulence the spectral slopes are steeper with values near -3 which are similar to the very optically thick regime.

  8. Effective electro-optical modulation with high extinction ratio by a graphene-silicon microring resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yunhong; Xiao, Sanshui; Hu, Hao; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Mortensen, N Asger; Yvind, Kresten

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene opens up for novel optoelectronic applications thanks to its high carrier mobility, ultra-large absorption bandwidth, and extremely fast material response. In particular, the opportunity to control optoelectronic properties through tuning of Fermi level enables electro-optical modulation, optical-optical switching, and other optoelectronics applications. However, achieving a high modulation depth remains a challenge because of the modest graphene-light interaction in the graphene-silicon devices, typically, utilizing only a monolayer or few layers of graphene. Here, we comprehensively study the interaction between graphene and a microring resonator, and its influence on the optical modulation depth. We demonstrate graphene-silicon microring devices showing a high modulation depth of 12.5 dB with a relatively low bias voltage of 8.8 V. On-off electro-optical switching with an extinction ratio of 3.8 dB is successfully demonstrated by applying a square-waveform with a 4 V peak-to-peak voltage.

  9. AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    AN INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM OPTICS... ...the light as you've never seen before... Optics:http://science.howstuffworks.com/laser5.htm #12;5 DEFINITION Quantum Optics: "Quantum optics is a field in quantum physics, dealing OPTICS OPERATORS Light is described in terms of field operators for creation and annihilation of photons

  10. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  11. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

  12. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to...

  13. Depth inversion for nonlinear waves shoaling over a barred-beach 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    and calibrated for mild slopes are applied to the barred-beach. Expectedly, errors on depth prediction occur techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), are still quite problematic under the current state

  14. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    of a passive method (as opposed to active methods such as RADAR or LIDAR) to identify hostile ships, submarines this relative importance [Nealson, 1993]. Therefore the depth distribution of bioluminescent organisms is of eco

  15. PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krajíèek, Jan

    PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH MODULAR COUNTING S. Buss; 2 S. Buss et al. NP 6= coNP . Despite extensive research (see the expository articles Buss (1995b

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  17. Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozada, Anthony David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

  18. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  19. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  20. Flexible optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

  1. Multimode optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  2. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  3. Infrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth profilometry, and scanning imaging of deep subsurface electronic defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    - sorption of the incident beam and nonradiative heating. The PCR theory is presented as infrared depthInfrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth May 2003 Laser-induced infrared photocarrier radiometry PCR is introduced theoretically

  4. Digital optical conversion module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  5. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  6. Optical amplifier-powered quantum optical amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Jeffers

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that an optical amplifier, when combined with photon subtraction, can be used for quantum state amplification, adding noise at a level below the standard minimum. The device could be used to significantly decrease the probability of incorrectly identifying coherent states chosen from a finite set.

  7. Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation through assimilation of swath-altimetry into a raster-based hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation through assimilation of swath water depth and discharge, reducing the discharge RMSE from 23.2% to 10.0% over an 84-day simulation. Clark, D. P. Lettenmaier, and D. E. Alsdorf (2007), Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation

  8. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  9. Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

  10. Projection optics box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry (Tracy, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Parker, John M. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  11. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  12. Optical Quadratic Measure Eigenmodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Mazilu; Joerg Baumgartl; Sebastian Kosmeier; Kishan Dholakia

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a mathematically rigorous technique which facilitates the optimization of various optical properties of electromagnetic fields. The technique exploits the linearity of electromagnetic fields along with the quadratic nature of their interaction with matter. In this manner we may decompose the respective fields into optical quadratic measure eigenmodes (QME). Key applications include the optimization of the size of a focused spot, the transmission through photonic devices, and the structured illumination of photonic and plasmonic structures. We verify the validity of the QME approach through a particular experimental realization where the size of a focused optical field is minimized using a superposition of Bessel beams.

  13. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  14. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  15. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  16. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  17. Experimental investigation of welding penetration-depth in high-purity aluminium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, W. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States). Naval Nuclear Fuel Div.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important parameters in the superconducting splice design is the welding penetration-depth because it determines the electrical resistivity across the welded joints through the high-purity aluminum stabilizers. Highly resistive welds could lead to conductor instability when the superconductor goes normal. In the present investigation, experiments were performed using gas tungsten-arc welding to identify the effects of the welding parameters on the penetration-depth. The experimental results will be applied to the optimization of the superconducting splice design. The mock-up test data and theoretical analysis have shown that the higher energy input and lower welding speed produce the deeper penetration-depth in high-purity aluminum. In order to achieve an approximately uniform penetration-depth, three methods were explored: (i) a starting-delay at the welding start point, (ii) an external cooling, and (iii) staggered overlapping weldments. The experimental results have suggested that a uniform penetration-depth can be obtained under the thermal equilibrium welding conditions.

  18. Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

  19. Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainty, Chris

    Adaptive optics enhanced simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy David Merino and Chris Dainty Applied Optics Group, Department of Experimental Physics, National and Adrian Gh. Podoleanu Applied Optics Group, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent at Canterbury

  20. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Femtosecond Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    as new pulse sequence processing functionalities. #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002 One Guide ­ One PulsePURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002

  1. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform Synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform, Shijun Xiao Funding from ARO, DARPA, and NSF #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER performance (spectral engineering, dispersion compensation) #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL

  2. Absorbance modulation optical lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the concept of absorbance-modulation optical lithography (AMOL) is described, and the feasibility experimentally verified. AMOL is an implementation of nodal lithography, which is not bounded by the diffraction ...

  3. Optical gamma thermometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  4. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  5. Optical Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single photon sources, linear optical elements, and single photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high efficiency single photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  6. Integrated optical isolators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaman, Tauhid R

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Optical isolators are important components in lasers. Their main function is to eliminate noise caused by back-reflections into these lasers. The need for integrated isolators comes from the continuing growth ...

  7. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  8. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  9. Intracoronary Optical Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Harry C.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), is a novel intravascular imaging modality analogous to intravascular ultrasound but uses light instead of sound. This review details the background, development, and status of current ...

  10. Optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction pathlengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  11. Optical pumping in a whispering-mode optical waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for optical pumping in a whispering mode optical waveguide are described. Both a helical ribbon and cylinder are disclosed which incorporate an additional curvature for confining the beam to increase intensity. An optical pumping medium is disposed in the optical path of the beam as it propagates along the waveguide. Optical pumping is enhanced by the high intensities of the beam and long interaction path lengths which are achieved in a small volume.

  12. Quantification of depth of anesthesia by nonlinear time series analysis of brain electrical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Widman; T. Schreiber; B. Rehberg; A. Hoeft; C. E. Elger

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate several quantifiers of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal with respect to their ability to indicate depth of anesthesia. For 17 patients anesthetized with Sevoflurane, three established measures (two spectral and one based on the bispectrum), as well as a phase space based nonlinear correlation index were computed from consecutive EEG epochs. In absence of an independent way to determine anesthesia depth, the standard was derived from measured blood plasma concentrations of the anesthetic via a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for the estimated effective brain concentration of Sevoflurane. In most patients, the highest correlation is observed for the nonlinear correlation index D*. In contrast to spectral measures, D* is found to decrease monotonically with increasing (estimated) depth of anesthesia, even when a "burst-suppression" pattern occurs in the EEG. The findings show the potential for applications of concepts derived from the theory of nonlinear dynamics, even if little can be assumed about the process under investigation.

  13. Investigation of Celotex trademark charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  14. Investigation of Celotex{trademark} charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  15. Optical Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Ralph; G. J. Pryde

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the field of Optical Quantum Computation, considering the various implementations that have been proposed and the experimental progress that has been made toward realizing them. We examine both linear and nonlinear approaches and both particle and field encodings. In particular we discuss the prospects for large scale optical quantum computing in terms of the most promising physical architectures and the technical requirements for realizing them.

  16. Supersymmetric transparent optical intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) optical structures provide a versatile platform to manipulate the scattering and localization properties of light, with potential applications to mode conversion, spatial multiplexing and invisible devices. Here we show that SUSY can be exploited to realize broadband transparent intersections between guiding structures in optical networks for both continuous and discretized light. These include transparent crossing of high-contrast-index waveguides and directional couplers, as well as crossing of guiding channels in coupled resonator lattices.

  17. Integrated Optical Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Frogget, Douglas DeVore, Vincent Romero, David Esquibel, and David Holtkamp

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical probes used in velocimetry measurements have typically been individual probes that collect data for a single diagnostic at a single point. These probes have been used in diagnostics such as VISAR, PDV, and radiometry, which measure surface velocity, temperature, and other characteristics. When separate probes are used for these measurements, the different diagnostic points measured must be significantly separated. We have developed integrated probes that collect data for multiple optical diagnostics; these probes measure points in close proximity.

  18. Optical Solitons and their applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Solitons and their applications By: Mohammad Nopoush Supervisor: Professor Palffy-Muhoray #12;Definition Optical: Non-changing optical field during propagation due to delicate balance between nonlinear and linear effects. Nonlinear effects: Due to the optical Kerr effect (AC Kerr effect

  19. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract In this survey we consider optical computers of such optical computing archi- tectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical

  20. Undergraduate Handbook Dear Optics student,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Undergraduate Handbook Fall 2013 #12;2 Dear Optics student, It is my great pleasure to welcome you to The Institute of Optics. The Institute of Optics has been educating the next generation of leaders in the field since it was founded in 1929 as the first optics department in the country

  1. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK - i - INTRODUCTION WHAT IS SCIENCE, 0PTICS & YOU? The Science, Optics and You Guidebook is made up as follows: Science, Optics and You is a standards light, color, and optics. Activities are designed to engage students in active investigation

  2. Universal Linear Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Carolan; Chris Harrold; Chris Sparrow; Enrique Martín-López; Nicholas J. Russell; Joshua W. Silverstone; Peter J. Shadbolt; Nobuyuki Matsuda; Manabu Oguma; Mikitaka Itoh; Graham D. Marshall; Mark G. Thompson; Jonathan C. F. Matthews; Toshikazu Hashimoto; Jeremy L. O'Brien; Anthony Laing

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear optics underpins tests of fundamental quantum mechanics and computer science, as well as quantum technologies. Here we experimentally demonstrate the longstanding goal of a single reprogrammable optical circuit that is sufficient to implement all possible linear optical protocols up to the size of that circuit. Our six-mode universal system consists of a cascade of 15 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with 30 thermo-optic phase shifters integrated into a single photonic chip that is electrically and optically interfaced for arbitrary setting of all phase shifters, input of up to six photons and their measurement with a 12 single-photon detector system. We programmed this system to implement heralded quantum logic and entangling gates, boson sampling with verification tests, and six-dimensional complex Hadamards. We implemented 100 Haar random unitaries with average fidelity 0.999 $\\pm$ 0.001. Our system is capable of switching between these and any other linear optical protocol in seconds. These results point the way to applications across fundamental science and quantum technologies.

  3. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  4. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in anDepth

  5. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS Polarization Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL Polarization Optics Guest Editors Jari Turunen University of Joensuu, Finland Asher A Friesem Weizmann Institute This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which

  7. Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

  8. Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellström, Thomas

    Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots camera for a stochastic classification system for forestry robots. The images are classified as bush- ject classification system that uses only RGB camera. The system is aimed for a forestry robot

  9. Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shpilka, Amir

    Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure between k poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C(x) using O

  10. Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishai, Yuval

    Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ? Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure distributed between k #21; poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C

  11. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5732E An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Author(s), Hung Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH than 7 trillion Joules of site energy annually [USDOE]. Analyzing building space heating performance

  12. Probabilistic models and reliability analysis of scour depth around bridge piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolduc, Laura Christine

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters suggest that the maximum sour depth predicted by the deterministic HEC-18 Sand and HEC-18 Clay models tend to be conservative. Evidence is also found that the applicability of the HEC-18 Clay method is not limited to clay but can also be used...

  13. Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zefran, Milo?

    Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms Maxim Kolesnikov and Milos Zefran Abstract-- Existing penalty-based haptic rendering ap- proaches of rigid-body motions SE(3). We propose a penalty-based six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) haptic rendering

  14. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  15. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  16. Submission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment on Inheritance Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prechelt, Lutz

    effort that is much more powerful than a model relying on inheritance depth. Keywords: controlled of the key elements that makes object-oriented programming powerful[Meyer, 1997]. Many design problems canSubmission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment

  17. Submission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment on Inheritance Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prechelt, Lutz

    effort that is much more powerful than a model relying on inheritance depth. Keywords: controlledSubmission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment was significantly easier to maintain than the 0­level program. We describe the design and setup of our experiment

  18. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  19. Anytime AND/OR Depth-first Search for Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dechter, Rina

    ] [ ] Decomposition Cache table for F (independent of A) Time and Space: O( n·k w ) Prune based on current best with current child subproblems. 1. Move breadth-first to next open subproblem P . 2. Process P depth-first, until either: P is solved optimally, P decomposes into child subproblems, a predefined threshold

  20. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed crust northeast China USArray a b s t r a c t We observe a clear seismic arrival at $35­45 s after

  1. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed February 2013 Keywords: S to P converted wave mid-mantle reflectors subducted oceanic crust northeast China

  2. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romo, Juan

    Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo Departamento de Estad two simple, computationally fast methods that allow the refinement of the initial points of k-means to cluster a given data set. They are based on alternating k-means and the search of the deepest (most

  4. Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellberg, Michael E.

    Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral Carlos of the candelabrum coral Eunicea flexuosa across the Caribbean. Eunicea is endemic to the Caribbean and all sister: How can new marine species emerge without obvious geographic isolation? Caribbean coral reefs

  5. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  6. The role of nutricline depth in regulating the ocean carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The role of nutricline depth in regulating the ocean carbon cycle Pedro Cermen~ oa , Stephanie, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307; c play key roles in the regulation of atmospheric pCO2 and the maintenance of upper trophic levels (1

  7. Possible overestimation of shallow-depth calcium carbonate dissolution in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Possible overestimation of shallow-depth calcium carbonate dissolution in the ocean K. Friis,1,2 R calcium carbonate (TA*) above the saturation horizon cannot be unambiguously interpreted in terms of local and biogeochemistry with explicit representation of the formation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. In particular

  8. Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

  9. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  10. Numerical Simulation of Impact Rollers for Estimating the Influence Depth of Soil Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kukjoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    will estimate more precisely the depth of influence for impact rollers. To do so, the general purpose finite element computer program LS-DYNA is used for numerical predictions. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models. A simplified...

  11. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BY NOL RING TESTS UNDER CREEP LOADING C. Devilliers 1), 2), 3) , L. Laiarinandrasana 1) , B. Fayolle 2. KEYWORDS HDPE pipes, Nol Ring creep test, ageing effects, fracture mechanism, crack depth ratio, aged layer loading than a monotonic tensile loading. It is to be noticed that the Nol Ring test subjected to a creep

  12. Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

  13. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  14. Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

  15. London penetration depth and coherence length of SU(3) vacuum flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Francesca Cuteri; Alessandro Papa

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse profile of the chromoelectric field generated by a quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum is analysed within the dual superconductor scenario, then the London penetration depth and coherence length are extracted. The color field is determined on the lattice through a connected correlator of two Polyakov loops measured on smeared configurations.

  16. The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ã? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

  17. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

  18. Optical key system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  19. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  20. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  1. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  2. NOIlVyiSINIIAIQV AOd3N3 AO^HNH

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)May£661. NOIlVdlSINIWG

  3. Modelling of long-range transport of Southeast Asia biomass-burning aerosols to Taiwan and their radiative forcings over East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chuan-Yao; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chen, Wei-Nei

    2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols and air pollutants during the springtime in Southeast Asia. At Lulin mountain background station (elevation 2862 m) in Taiwan, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter particles with diameter less than 10 ?m (PM10), were measured around 150-250 ppb, 40-60 ppb, and 10-30?g/m3, respectively at spring time (February-April) during 2006 and 2009, which are about 2~3 times higher than those in other seasons. Observations and simulation results indicate that the higher concentrations during the spring time are clearly related to biomass burning plumes transported from the Indochina Peninsula of Southeast Asia. The spatial distribution of high aerosols optical depth (AOD) were identified by the satellite measurement and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) ground observation, and could be reasonably captured by the WRF-Chem model during the study period of 15-18 March, 2008. AOD reached as high as 0.8-1.0 in Indochina ranging from 10 to 22°N and 95 to 107°E. Organic carbon (OC) is a major contributor of AOD over Indochina according to simulation results. The contributor of AOD from black carbon (BC) is minor when compared with OC over the Indochina. However, the direct absorption radiative forcing of BC in the atmosphere could reach 35-50 W m-2, which is about 8-10 times higher than that of OC. The belt shape of radiation reduction at surface from Indochina to Taiwan could be as high 20-40 W m-2 during the study period. The implication of the radiative forcing from biomass burning aerosols and their impact on the regional climate in East Asia is our major concern.

  4. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  5. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  6. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  7. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  8. Lorentz Group in Ray Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Baskal; E. Georgieva; Y. S. Kim; M. E. Noz

    2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been almost one hundred years since Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity in 1905. He showed that the basic space-time symmetry is dictated by the Lorentz group. It is shown that this group of Lorentz transformations is not only applicable to special relativity, but also constitutes the scientific language for optical sciences. It is noted that coherent and squeezed states of light are representations of the Lorentz group. The Lorentz group is also the basic underlying language for classical ray optics, including polarization optics, interferometers, the Poincare\\'e sphere, one-lens optics, multi-lens optics, laser cavities, as well multilayer optics.

  9. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  10. Cavity quantum electro-optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankei Tsang

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum dynamics of the coupling between a cavity optical field and a resonator microwave field via the electro-optic effect is studied. This coupling has the same form as the opto-mechanical coupling via radiation pressure, so all previously considered opto-mechanical effects can in principle be observed in electro-optic systems as well. In particular, I point out the possibilities of laser cooling of the microwave mode, entanglement between the optical mode and the microwave mode via electro-optic parametric amplification, and back-action-evading optical measurements of a microwave quadrature.

  11. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  12. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  13. Full spectrum optical safeguard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

  14. Optics in data center network architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrington, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Reducing Cabling Complexity with Optics . . . . .Advances in Information Optics and Photonics. SPIE, 2008. [c-Through: Part-time Optics in Data Centers,” in Proceedings

  15. High-index-contrast electromechanical optical switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Reginald (Reginald Eugene), 1978-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System developers are looking to replace protocol-dependent, bandwidth-limited optical networks with intelligent optically-transparent integrated photonic networks. Several electromechanical optical switches are explored ...

  16. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

  17. Microwave to Optical Link Using an Optical Microresonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jost, J D; Lecaplain, C; Brasch, V; Pfeiffer, M H P; Kippenberg, T J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to phase coherently link optical to radio frequencies with femtosecond modelocked lasers has enabled counting cycles of light and is the basis of optical clocks, absolute frequency synthesis, tests of fundamental physics, and improved spectroscopy. Using an optical microresonator frequency comb to establish a coherent link promises to greatly extend optical frequency synthesis and measurements to areas requiring compact form factor, on chip integration and repetition rates in the microwave regime, including coherent telecommunications, astrophysical spectrometer calibration or microwave photonics. Here we demonstrate for the first time a microwave to optical link using a microresonator. Using a temporal dissipative single soliton state in an ultra high Q crystalline microresonator an optical frequency comb is generated that is self-referenced, allowing to phase coherently link a 190 THZ optical carrier directly to a 14 GHz microwave frequency. Our work demonstrates that precision optical frequency...

  18. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 201 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 202 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  19. Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Bachelor of Science Degree in Optics Bachelor of Science Degree in Optical Engineering The Institute of Optics Major Requirements OPT 197 Geometrical Optics Lab (2 cr.) OPT 198 Physical Optics Lab (2 Theory of Optics OPT 225 Optical Sources and Detectors OPT 241 Geometrical Optics OPT 242 Aberrations

  20. adaptive optics optical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptive optics optical First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptive Optical Transport...

  1. OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, Andrew Jacob

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . ________________________________ Chairperson Michael Krueger ________________________________ Norman Akers ________________________________ Shawn Bitters Date Defended: March 29, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for ANDREW HUFFMAN certifies... OPTIMISTIC-OPTICALITY BY ANDREW HUFFMAN Submitted to the graduate degree program in ART and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts...

  2. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  3. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, R A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the nRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during the dark period associated with shelving.

  4. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A Mould

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the qRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they not only describe the dark period during shelving, but they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during that time.

  5. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Haewon

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is modeled by a linear integral equation and an inverse problem involving a diffusion equation in n spatial dimensions, n=2, 3. Based on measured data, the optical absorption coefficient ?...

  6. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  7. Magneto-optic current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Valsko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Fisher, Brandon L.; Welp, Ulrich

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical current transducer configured to sense current in the conductor is disclosed. The optical current transducer includes a light source and a polarizer that generates linearly polarized light received from a the light source. The light is communicated to a magneto-optic garnet that includes, among other elements, bismuth, iron and oxygen and is coupled to the conductor. The magneto-optic garnet is configured to rotate the polarization of the linearly polarized light received from the polarizer. The optical current transducer also includes an analyzer in optical communication with the magneto-optic garnet. The analyzer detects the rotation of the linearly polarized light caused by the magneto-optic garnet.

  8. 4-ID-D optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-ID-D Beamline Optics A schetch of the major optical components for beam line 4-ID-D are shown above. All these components located in the B-station upstream from the D...

  9. Optics (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optics Group (X-ray Science Division) The mission of the Optics Group is to facilitate the efficient and productive use and operation of APS beamline-based research facilities. In...

  10. Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

  11. Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http, A. M. Weiner Purdue University C. Lin Avanex Corporation Conference on Lasers and Electro Optics;Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/ 2

  12. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  13. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  14. Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2 ) Power Meter Tissue block Bare Fiber = 12° = 6 with the beveled cannula over CeA. d) Chart indicating estimated light power density seen at various distances from the fiber tip in mouse brain tissue when the light power density seen at the fiber tip was 7 mW (~99 mW/mm2

  15. {sup 14}C depth profiles in Apollo 15 and 17 cores and lunar rock 68815

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Cloudt, S.; Donahue, D.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona AMS Facility] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona AMS Facility; Sisterson, J.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Harvard Cyclotron Lab.] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Harvard Cyclotron Lab.; Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Masarik, J. [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics] [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the activity vs. depth profiles of {sup 14}C produced by both solar cosmic rays (SCR) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in Apollo 15 lunar cores 15001-6 and 15008, Apollo 17 core 76001, and lunar rock 68815. Calculated GCR production rates are in good agreement with {sup 14}C measurements at depths below {approximately}10 cm. Carbon-14 produced by solar protons was observed in the top few cm of the Apollo 15 cores and lunar rock 68815, with near-surface values as high as 66 dpm/kg in 68815. Only low levels of SCR-produced {sup 14}C were observed in the Apollo 17 core 76001. New cross sections for production of {sup 14}C by proton spallation on O, Si, Al, Mg, Fe, and Ni were measured using AMS. These cross sections are essential for the analysis of the measured {sup 14}C depth profiles. The best fit to the activity-depth profiles for solar-proton-produced {sup 14}C measured in the tops of both the Apollo 15 cores and 68815 was obtained for an exponential rigidity spectral shape R{sub 0} of 110--115 MV and a 4 {pi} flux (J{sub 10}, Ep > 10 MeV) of 103--108 protons/cm{sup 2}/s. These values of R{sub 0} are higher, indicating a harder rigidity, and the solar-proton fluxes are higher than those determined from {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 53}Mn measurements.

  16. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical

  17. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  18. Single-cycle nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

  19. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  20. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  1. 1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence-3120 Received January 8, 2003 An optical-fiber-based multichannel polarization-sensitive Mueller optical was dynamically calibrated to eliminate the polarization distortion caused by the single-mode optical fiber

  2. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 \\Theta 4 square array of optical tweezers -- the hexadeca

  3. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; C. Russell

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-3 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,487 m (4,880 ft) below ground surface (bgs). Slotted screen is placed in an upper screened section from 1,095 to 1,160 m bgs (3,591 to 3,805 ft bgs) and in the lower screened section from 1,278 to 1,474 m bgs (4,191 to 4,834 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is significant upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus and large vertical flow velocities in the well casing result in the measured borehole flow rates being potentially highly nonrepresentative of conditions in the aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  4. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  5. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  6. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  7. IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson, Mike Brookes and Pier Luigi Dragotti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson London Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom. ABSTRACT Image based rendering is a technique of traditional color images with depth images. This combination promises to improve the rendering quality

  8. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,P.; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; ,

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  9. American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening · What might have caused global warming · Whether global warming

  10. Bonded, walk-off compensated optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bonded, walk-off compensated crystal, for use with optical equipment, and methods of making optical components including same.

  11. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyllaconcentration ([Chl-a]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between?0.2and?0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted seamore »salt aerosol optical depth,AODdiff) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nmAODdiff(sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  12. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  13. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  14. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  15. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM); Looney, Larry D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  16. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  17. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  18. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  19. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen, CH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  20. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  1. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  2. Black optic display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  3. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking technologies. Several years ago, when many of these optical networking research topics were first being investigated, they were the subject of controversial debate. The new techniques challenged many long-held concepts related to architecture and technology. However, today all major networking organizations are transitioning toward infrastructure that incorporates these new concepts. This progress has been assisted through the series of Optical Networking Testbed Workshops (ONT). The first (ONT1) outlined a general framework of key issues and topics and developed a series of recommendations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). The second (ONT2) developed a common vision of optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop8). Processes that allow for a common vision encourage widespread deployment of these types of resources among advanced networking communities. Also, such a shared vision enables key concepts and technologies to migrate from basic research testbeds to wider networking communities. The ONT-3 workshop built on these earlier activities by expanding discussion to include additional considerations of the international interoperability and of greater impact of optical networking technology on networking in general. In accordance with this recognition, the workshop confirmed that future-oriented research and development is indispensable to fundamentally change the current Internet architecture to create a global network incorporating completely new concepts. The workshop also recognized that the first priority to allow for this progress is basic research and development, including international collaborative activities, which are important for the global realization of interoperability of a new generation architecture.

  4. Modular optical detector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  5. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  6. Optically Controlled Jitter Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Manasson; V. A. Manasson

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new simple circuit producing random pulse trains is proposed and experimentally studied. The circuit is composed of an operational amplifier and two feedback links, one of which comprises two photodiodes. The photodiodes are responsible for nonlinearity in the feedback. By varying the illumination it is possible to control the nonlinearity in the photodiode current-voltage characteristics and change the degree of randomness in the oscillations. The circuit's simplicity and optical control make it attractive for coupled map lattices.

  7. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  8. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  9. PXIE Optics and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Shteynas, B.G.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) will serve as a prototype for the Project X front end. The aim is to validate the Project-X design and to decrease technical risks mainly related to the front end. The paper discusses the main requirements and constraints motivating the facility layout and optics. Final adjustments to the Project X front end design, if needed, will be based on operational experience gained with PXIE.

  10. MicroSight Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. MicroSight Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroSight is an innovative gunsight technology that allows a marksman's eye to focus on both the front gunsight and the intended target. The MicroSight improves both firearm safety and performance by imaging two objects at different focal distances. The MicroSight was developed at Idaho National Laboratory, and has been licensed by Apollo Optical Systems. You can learn more about INL's research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  13. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  14. Optical ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  15. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  16. Optical modular arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri S. Pavlichin; Hideo Mabuchi

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale integrated photonic devices and circuits offer a path to ultra-low power computation at the few-photon level. Here we propose an optical circuit that performs a ubiquitous operation: the controlled, random-access readout of a collection of stored memory phases or, equivalently, the computation of the inner product of a vector of phases with a binary "selector" vector, where the arithmetic is done modulo 2pi and the result is encoded in the phase of a coherent field. This circuit, a collection of cascaded interferometers driven by a coherent input field, demonstrates the use of coherence as a computational resource, and of the use of recently-developed mathematical tools for modeling optical circuits with many coupled parts. The construction extends in a straightforward way to the computation of matrix-vector and matrix-matrix products, and, with the inclusion of an optical feedback loop, to the computation of a "weighted" readout of stored memory phases. We note some applications of these circuits for error correction and for computing tasks requiring fast vector inner products, e.g. statistical classification and some machine learning algorithms.

  17. Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

  18. ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 Multiple Output Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    DSTAWG DST Pulse Shaper Fiber ports Imaging optics U.S. Quarter #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 One Guide ­ One Pulse Pulses slab Loss-engineering to control relative pulse amplitude. #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER

  19. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  20. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  1. {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

  2. Semi-empirical model for depth dose distributions of megavoltage x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuja, S.D.; Stroup, S.L.; Bolin, M.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose distribution due to absorption of photon energy fluence in a homogeneous water phantom irradiated by megavoltage x-ray beams has been analyzed with a semiempirical model. The method generalizes an analytical formalism for the scattering component of dose within a water phantom which was developed recently for monoenergetic photon beams. Contributions to dose via Compton interaction and pair creation form the essential structure of the secondary component formula. Both the central-axis percent depth dose and off-central-axis ratios can be determined for beams of different sizes, used at any value of source to surface distance. The input data include the values of linear attenuation and energy-absorption coefficients in water at energies between 10 keV and the equivalent energy of the beam. Predicted values of the central-axis percent depth dose and the off-central-axis ratios are compared with the measured data for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 35, 45, and 70 MVp x-ray beams. For the central-axis percent depth dose, agreement is within 3% for fields of sizes between 5 x 5 and 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/, and 5% for larger fields, for beams of MVp up to 20. For higher energy beams, comparison was made only for the 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ fields and the discrepancies were within 3%. For the off-central-axis ratios, agreement between the predicted and measured values is within 5% over the umbra region but worsens in the penumbra region and geometrical shadow. This formalism requires large computer storage for generating data for all realistic beams irradiating normal-size phantoms.

  3. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  4. All-optical switching in optically induced nonlinear waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebel, Falko, E-mail: falko.diebel@uni-muenster.de; Boguslawski, Martin; Rose, Patrick; Denz, Cornelia [Institut für Angewandte Physik and Center for Nonlinear Science (CeNoS), Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Leykam, Daniel; Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate all-optical vortex switching in nonlinear coupled waveguide arrays optically induced in photorefractive media. Our technique is based on multiplexing of nondiffracting Bessel beams to induce various types of waveguide configurations. Using double- and quadruple-well potentials, we demonstrate precise control over the coupling strength between waveguides, the linear and nonlinear dynamics and symmetry-breaking bifurcations of guided light, and a power-controlled optical vortex switch.

  5. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  6. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Melvin D. (Richland, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  7. 2nd Quarterly technical progress report for geothermal system temperature-depth database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1997-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory in Dallas, Texas, the Earth`s surface and internal temperature are studied. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, a data base containing geothermal temperature well information for the United States is being developed. During this calendar quarter, activity with this project has continued involving several different tasks: planning and development of the geothermal system thermal-well data base and temperature-depth data, development of the specifications for the data base, and completion of an initial inventory of the geothermal areas for which data are available.

  8. 3rd Quarterly technical progress report for geothermal system temperature-depth database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory in Dallas, Texas, the Earth`s surface and internal temperature are studied. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, a data base containing geothermal temperature well information for the United States is being developed. During this calendar quarter, activity with this project has continued involving several different tasks: planning and development of the geothermal system thermal-well data base and temperature-depth data, and development of a World Wide Web home page.

  9. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  10. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3Depth Profile of Uncompensated

  11. NREL: State and Local Governments - In-Depth Solar Technical Assistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost of6Data TheNews The followingIn-Depth

  12. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalTo helpUniversitiesofDepartmentalDeploymentDepth

  13. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an

  14. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in

  15. Correlation of in vivo photosensitizer fluorescence and photodynamic-therapy-induced depth of necrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    to quantify tis- sue photosensitizer uptake and to predict PDT tissue damage. © 2003 Society of Photo-Optical and Department of Radiation Oncology Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 Michael Solonenko University of Pennsylvania Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Radiation Oncology Philadelphia

  16. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass.

  17. Realization of Coherent Optically Dense Media via Buffer-Gas Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Hong; Alexey V. Gorshkov; David Patterson; Alexander S. Zibrov; John M. Doyle; Mikhail D. Lukin; Mara G. Prentiss

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that buffer-gas cooling combined with laser ablation can be used to create coherent optical media with high optical depth and low Doppler broadening that offers metastable states with low collisional and motional decoherence. Demonstration of this generic technique opens pathways to coherent optics with a large variety of atoms and molecules. We use helium buffer gas to cool 87Rb atoms to below 7 K and slow atom diffusion to the walls. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in this medium allows for 50% transmission in a medium with initial OD >70 and for slow pulse propagation with large delay-bandwidth products. In the high-OD regime, we observe high-contrast spectrum oscillations due to efficient four-wave mixing.

  18. Cold inelastic collisions between lithium and cesium in a two-species magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlöder, U; Schünemann, U; Grimm, R; Weidemüller, M

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate collisional properties of lithium and cesium which are simultaneously confined in a combined magneto-optical trap. Trap-loss collisions between the two species are comprehensively studied. Different inelastic collision channels are identified, and inter-species rate coefficients as well as cross sections are determined. It is found that loss rates are independent of the optical excitation of Li, as a consequence of the repulsive Li$^*$-Cs interaction. Li and Cs loss by inelastic inter-species collisions can completely be attributed to processes involving optically excited cesium (fine-structure changing collisions and radiative escape). By lowering the trap depth for Li, an additional loss channel of Li is observed which results from ground-state Li-Cs collisions changing the hyperfine state of cesium.

  19. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  20. Fiber optic compass development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kyongtae

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is illustrated schematically in Fig. 3-1. The light source is an erbium doped fiber (EDF) laser in the ring configuration [11-12]. Total amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) power is 7 mW at 45 mW pump power. The laser is spectrally scanned in the 1525 ~ 1565... optic modulator and amplified by a commercial erbium- doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). The spectrum of the laser after amplification at 6 different wavelengths is shown in Fig. 3-3. After amplification, the light passes through a fiber coupler...

  1. Quantum Gravitational Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham M Shore

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum theory, the curved spacetime of Einstein's general theory of relativity acts as a dispersive optical medium for the propagation of light. Gravitational rainbows and birefringence replace the classical picture of light rays mapping out the null geodesics of curved spacetime. Even more remarkably, {\\it superluminal} propagation becomes a real possibility, raising the question of whether it is possible to send signals into the past. In this article, we review recent developments in the quantum theory of light propagation in general relativity and discuss whether superluminal light is compatible with causality.

  2. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  4. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  5. Sandia Energy - Quantum Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton LasingQuantum Optics

  6. System for testing optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  7. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Di#ractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using di#ractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  8. Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Optical Tweezer Arrays and Optical Substrates Created with Diffractive Optics Eric R. Dufresne)) We describe a simple method for creating multiple optical tweezers from a single laser beam using diffractive optical elements. As a demonstration of this technique, we have implemented a 4 × 4 square array

  9. Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

  10. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  11. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  12. Efficiencies of Quantum Optical Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Hogg; Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

  13. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  14. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Deqiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IEEE, 88, pp806-18, A. Yariv, "Quantum Electronics", Wiley;30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2002 A. Yariv, "Optical waves in crystals :

  15. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  16. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  17. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  18. Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno navigation channels are maintained by dredging sand and slurries off sea and river removal by dredging. Some progress has already been made, both at Leeds

  19. Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination that are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination!) of 14C per gram of carbon. Sensitivities to uranium and thorium in a 5-kg sample, assuming secular

  20. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  1. Bundled monocapillary optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirsch, Gregory (1277 Linds Mar Center, Suite 128, Pacifica, CA 94044)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of glass or metal wires are precisely etched to form the desired shape of the individual channels of the final polycapillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of a group of wires from an etchant bath. The etched wires undergo a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation being used. This reflective surface may be a single layer of material, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The collection of individual wires is assembled into a close-packed multi-wire bundle, and the wires are bonded together in a manner which preserves the close-pack configuration, irrespective of the local wire diameter. The initial wires are then removed by either a chemical etching procedure or mechanical force. In the case of chemical etching, the bundle is generally segmented by cutting a series of etching slots. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary array is typically bonded to a support substrate. The result of the process is a bundle of precisely oriented radiation-reflecting hollow channels. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the radiation from a source of radiation which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, a synchrotron radiation source, a reactor or spallation source of neutrons, or some other source.

  2. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  3. Covert Optical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulat A. Bash; Andrei H. Gheorghe; Monika Patel; Jonathan Habif; Dennis Goeckel; Don Towsley; Saikat Guha

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Encryption prevents unauthorized decoding, but does not ensure stealth---a security demand that a mere presence of a message be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of covert communication that is secure against the most powerful physically-permissible adversary. We show that, although it is impossible over a pure-loss channel, covert communication is attainable in the presence of any excess noise, such as a $300$K thermal blackbody. In this case, $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{n})$ bits can be transmitted reliably and covertly in $n$ optical modes using standard optical communication equipment. The all-powerful adversary may intercept all transmitted photons not received by the intended receiver, and employ arbitrary quantum memory and measurements. Conversely, we show that this square root scaling cannot be outperformed. We corroborate our theory in a proof-of-concept experiment. We believe that our findings will enable practical realizations of covert communication and sensing, both for point-to-point and networked scenarios.

  4. Design, installation and implementation of a Neutron Depth Profiling facility at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Nazir Sabbar

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING FACILITY AT THE TEXAS A&M NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER A Thesis by NAZIR SABBAR KHALIL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING FACILITY AT THE TEXAS A(IM NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER A Thesis by NAZIR SABBAR KHALIL...

  5. Two-dimensional spectral/statistical analysis of Marine magnetic data: implications for depth-to-magnetic source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrull, Jeffrey Lee

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T'A'0-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANAI. YSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis by JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Approved as to style...

  6. Previous Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillingim, Matthew

    Dayside Aurora Conjugacy Investigations Optical-Non-optical comparisons: · Dickinson et al., 1986, compared low-altitude satellite particle data to ground-based images · Northern hemisphere aurora poleward of southern aurora · Technique only sensitive to shifts in latitude · Mende et al., 1990, compared ground

  7. Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Engineering extension.uci.edu/optics OpticalEngineeringand OpticalInstrumentDesign Certificate and optical systems. These are essential to virtually every industry including defense, medical, clean energy. The Optical Engineering Certificate Program addresses the growing demand for skilled professionals who can

  8. Reconfigurable optical switches with monolithic electrical-to-optical interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.; Zhou, P. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for High Technology Materials; Zolper, J.C.; Lear, K.L.; Vawter, G.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leibenguth, R.E.; Adams, A.C. [AT and T Bell Labs., Breinigsville, PA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be integrated with heterojunction phototransistors (HPTs) and heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) on the same wafer to form high speed optical and optoelectronic switches, respectively, that can be optically or electrically addressed. This permits the direct communication and transmission of data between distributed electronic processors through an optical switching network. The experimental demonstration of an integrated optoelectronic HBT/VCSEL switch combining a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) with a VCSEL is described below, using the same epilayer structure upon which binary HPT/VCSEL optical switches are also built. The monolithic HBT/VCSEL switch has high current gain, low power dissipation, and a high optical to electrical conversion efficiency. Its modulation has been measured and modeled.

  9. Optical forces and optical torques on various materials arising from optical lattices in the Lorentz-Mie regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Lin

    By combining the Maxwell stress tensor with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we calculate the optical force and optical torque on particles from optical lattices. We compare our method to the two-component ...

  10. Optical Formula Recognition Stephane Lavirotte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optical Formula Recognition St´ephane Lavirotte Lo¨ic Pottier Safir Team Safir Team INRIA Sophia This paper describes the design and the first steps of implementation of Ofr (Optical Formula Recognition on the third part: we define a class of context-sensitive graph gram- mars for mathematical formulas, study

  11. CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED FIRING SET USING MINIATURE PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS BY TODD EDWARDAL85000 #12;CONTROL FOR AN OPTICALLY POWERED FIRING SET USING MINIATURE PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAYS BY TODD of Science Electrical Engineering The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico May, 2009 #12;CONTROL

  12. Optical Theorem in Nonlinear Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the optical theorem for scattering of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear media. This result is used to obtain the power extinguished from a field by a nonlinear scatterer. The cases of second harmonic generation and the Kerr effect are studied in some detail. Applications to nonlinear apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy are considered.

  13. Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Prosthetics Mimicking the Eye Abstract The eye is a complex optical system that, like other still being in its infancy. Introduction The eye consists of many parts. · Sclera: The majority of the eye, it forms the white shell and the basic shape of the eyeball. · Cornea: The frontal 1/6 of the eye

  14. VARIATION OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    radiative forcing due to the aerosol, W m-2 FT is the solar constant, W m-2 Ac is the fractional cloud cover;APPROACH TO MODELING AEROSOL RADIATIVE EFFECTS Transport Chemistry Microphysics Removal ModelEmissions Size-distributed Composition Optical Properties Radiative Effects Optics Model Radiation Transfer Model #12;CLASSES OF AEROSOL

  15. Effect of equatorial line nodes on the upper critical field and London penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper critical field Hc2 and its anisotropy are calculated for order parameters with line nodes at the equators, kz=0, of the Fermi surface of uniaxial superconductors. It is shown that characteristic features found in Fe-based materials (a nearly linear Hc2(T) in a broad T domain, a low and increasing on warming anisotropy ?H=Hc2,ab/Hc2,c) can be caused by competing effects of the equatorial nodes and of the Fermi surface anisotropy. For certain material parameters, ?H(T)?1 may change sign upon warming, in agreement with the recorded behavior of FeTeS systems. It is also shown that the anisotropy of the penetration depth ??=?c/?ab decreases upon warming to reach ?H at Tc, in agreement with data available. For some materials ??(T) may change upon warming, from ??>1 at low Ts to ??<1 at high Ts.

  16. Superconducting coherence length and magnetic penetration depth of a p-wave holographic superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng Huabi; Fan Zheyong [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in (3+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in (2+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconducting coherence length {xi} of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we make a perturbative study of the gravity theory analytically. The superconducting coherence length {xi} is found to be proportional to (1-T/T{sub c}){sup -1/2} near the critical temperature T{sub c}. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth {lambda}{proportional_to}(T{sub c}-T){sup 1/2} by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  17. Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  18. Complex Faraday depth structure of Active Galactic Nuclei as revealed by broadband radio polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, S P; Robishaw, T; Schnitzeler, D H F M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Feain, I J; Taylor, A R; Gaensler, B M; Landecker, T L; Harvey-Smith, L; Carretti, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the Faraday depth structure of four bright (> 1 Jy), strongly polarized, unresolved, radio-loud quasars. The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to observe these sources with 2 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth from 1.1 to 3.1 GHz. This allowed us to spectrally resolve the polarization structure of spatially unresolved radio sources, and by fitting various Faraday rotation models to the data, we conclusively demonstrate that two of the sources cannot be described by a simple rotation measure (RM) component modified by depolarization from a foreground Faraday screen. Our results have important implications for using background extragalactic radio sources as probes of the galactic and intergalactic magneto-ionic media as we show how RM estimations from narrow-bandwidth observations can give erroneous results in the presence of multiple interfering Faraday components. We postulate that the additional RM components arise from polarized structure in the compact inner regio...

  19. Optical set-reset latch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  20. Optical Approach to Gravitational Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Yi

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical approach begins by interpreting the gravitational redshift resulting to a change in the relative velocity of light due to the medium of propagation in the gravitational field. The discussion continues by pointing out an agreement in structure between the equation for rays in geometrical optics and the geodesic equation of general relativity. From their comparison we learn that the path of rays should be given by the relation $ds^2=n^2(r)dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, not by $ds^2=dr^2+r^2d\\theta^2$, in a medium with spherical symmetry of refractive index $n(r)$. The development of an optical analogy suggests introducing $n^2(r)$ in place of $g_{rr}$ as an optical version of the Schwarzschild metric. In form and content, $n^2(r)$ is different from $g_{rr}$. The optical point of view replaces the general-relativity explanations in terms of time and gravitation.

  1. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  2. Development of optical field emitter arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yujia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical field emitters are electron emission sources actuated by incident light. Optically actuated field emitters may produce ultrafast pulses of electrons when excited by ultrafast optical pulses, thus making them of ...

  3. SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK FOR THE TEACHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SCIENCE, OPTICS & YOU GUIDEBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE TEACHER INTRODUCTION What is Science Optics and You? ...................................................... Using Centers to Teach Science) ACTIVITIES MODULE 1: THINKINGABOUT LIGHTAND OPTICS ........................... 1. Perspectives: Powers of 10

  4. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  5. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  6. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  7. Bevalac external beamline optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  8. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  9. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  10. Studies of 3D-cloud optical depth from small to very large values, and of the radiation and remote sensing impacts of larger-drop clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have basically completed all the goals stated in the previous proposal and published or submitted journal papers thereon, the only exception being First-Principles Monte Carlo which has taken more time than expected. We finally finished the comprehensive book on 3D cloud radiative transfer (edited by Marshak and Davis and published by Springer), with many contributions by ARM scientists; this book was highlighted in the 2005 ARM Annual Report. We have also completed (for now) our pioneering work on new models of cloud drop clustering based on ARM aircraft FSSP data, with applications both to radiative transfer and to rainfall. This clustering work was highlighted in the FY07 “Our Changing Planet” (annual report of the US Climate Change Science Program). Our group published 22 papers, one book, and 5 chapters in that book, during this proposal period. All are listed at the end of this section. Below, we give brief highlights of some of those papers.

  11. Sensitivity Study of the Effects of Mineral Dust Particle Nonsphericity and Thin Cirrus Clouds on MODIS Dust Optical Depth Retrievals and Direct Radiative Forcing Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Qian

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A special challenge posed by mineral dust aerosols is associated with their predominantly nonspherical particle shapes. In the present study, the scattering and radiative properties for nonspherical mineral dust aerosols at violet-to-blue (0.412, 0...

  12. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras,...

  13. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols. Correlations Between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols....

  14. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  15. Silicon Photonics for Low- Energy Optical Communications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in MZ configuration, travelling wave carrier depletion MZ modulator, and thermo-optic MZ switch). Number Title US 7,616,850 Wavelength-tunable Optical Ring Resonators...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: micro-optical devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    micro-optical devices Sandia and EMCORE: Solar Photovoltaics, Fiber Optics, MODE, and Energy Efficiency On March 29, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Partnership,...

  17. Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Quantum Enabled Security (QES) for Optical Communications Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed Quantum Enabled...

  18. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

  19. Power inverter with optical isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G.; Schroeder, John Alan

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically isolated power electronic power conversion circuit that includes an input electrical power source, a heat pipe, a power electronic switch or plurality of interconnected power electronic switches, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the input power source, a mechanism for connecting comprising an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or input bus bars, an optically isolated drive circuit connected to the switch, a heat sink assembly upon which the power electronic switch or switches is mounted, an output load, a mechanism for connecting the switch to the output load, the mechanism for connecting including an interconnecting cable and/or bus bar or plurality of interconnecting cables and/or output bus bars, at least one a fiber optic temperature sensor mounted on the heat sink assembly, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the load interconnection cable and/or output bus bar, at least one fiber optic current sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar, and at least one fiber optic voltage sensor mounted on the input power interconnection cable and/or input bus bar.

  20. OPTICAL BIOPSY: COMPLEMENTING HISTOLOGY WITH NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Christina

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    acquisition from 32 detectors. The initial task competed involved the scanning mechanism; a program was created to control motorized optical scanning mirrors. The next task required a circuit board to be built to interface the detectors with the computer. A...

  1. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

    1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

  2. Graphene Nanobubble: A New Optical Nonlinear Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Qiaoliang; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Shaojuan; Jiang, Xiaofang; Xu, Qing-Hua; Loh, Kian Ping; Venkatesan, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is a rising star in nonlinear optics due to its saturable absorption and giant Kerr nonlinearity, these properties are useful in digital optics based on optical nonlinear devices. However, practical applications require large optical nonlinearities and these are inherently limited by the interaction length of atomically thin graphene. Here, we demonstrate optical bistability in a Fabry Perot cavity containing monolayer and bilayer graphene which have been restructured to form nanobubbles. We find that graphene nanobubble can act as a new type of optical nonlinear media due to its vertical side wall as well as added curvature, which enable strong non linear dispersive effects leading to a large optically induced phase change. Unlike thermally induced bistability, the all optical switching between two transmission states happens within a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. Nanobubble based optical devices with intrinsic optical nonlinearity help to overcome the optical path length limitation of atomical...

  3. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kenneth L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  4. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  5. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS The plurality of optical singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Michael Victor

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS EDITORIAL The plurality of optical singularities Guest Editors Michael Berry (Co-Director of NATO ARW) H H Wills Physics, Kiev, Ukraine This collection of papers arose from an Advanced Research Workshop on Singular Optics

  6. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

  7. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  8. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  9. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  10. Temperature inversion on the surface of externally heated optically thick multigrain dust clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dejan Vinkovic

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was recently discovered that the temperature in the surface layer of externally heated optically thick gray dust clouds increases with the optical depth for some distance from the surface, as opposed to the normal decrease in temperature with distance in the rest of the cloud. This temperature inversion is a result of efficient absorption of diffuse flux from the cloud interior by the surface dust exposed to the external radiation. A micron or bigger size grains experience this effect when the external flux is of stellar spectrum. We explore what happens to the effect when dust is a mixture of grain sizes (multigrain). Two possible boundary conditions are considered: i) a constant external flux without constrains on the dust temperature, and ii) the maximum dust temperature set to the sublimation temperature. We find that the first condition allows small grains to completely suppress the temperature inversion of big grains if the overall opacity is dominated by small grains. The second condition enables big grains to maintain the inversion even when they are a minor contributor to the opacity. In reality, the choice of boundary condition depends on the dust dynamics. When applied to the physics of protoplanetary disks, the temperature inversion leads to a previously unrecognized disk structure where optically thin dust can exist inside the dust destruction radius of an optically thick disk. We conclude that the transition between the dusty disk and the gaseous inner clearing is not a sharp edge, but rather a large optically thin region.

  11. Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner Purdue University, School 2011 Keywords: Ultrafast optics Pulse shaping Femtosecond optics Coherent control Optical signal programmable reshapingof ultrafast pulses, or generation of arbitrary optical waveforms, according to user

  12. 1 x N^2 wavelength-selective switch with two cross-scanning one-axis analog micromirror arrays in a 4-f optical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, J C; Huang, STY; Hah, D; Wu, Ming C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optical ?berinclude optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS),

  13. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  14. Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

  15. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  16. Bio-inspired optical components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walish, Joseph John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guiding electro-magnetic radiation is fundamental to optics. Lenses, mirrors, and photonic crystals all accomplish this task by different routes. Understanding the interaction of light with materials is fundamental to ...

  17. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  18. New optical materials containing isobenzofuran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Scott Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobenzofuran, a member of the benzo[c]heterocycles, is an extremely reactive molecule with unusual electronic properties. In this thesis we investigate the integration of isobenzofuran subunits into conjugated optical ...

  19. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Loinger

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  20. Stochastic Physical Optics & Bell's correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Geurdes

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With the use of classical statistical argumentation similar to the one used in e.g. statistical optics, it is demonstrated that in entanglement of photons, a classical realist explanation cannot be excluded by the CHSH measure in experiment.