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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Reflectance based optical fiber chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film chemical sensor undergoes changes in reflective optical properties when exposed to a chemical species. A thin metal film is deposited at the end of an optical fiber, and exposure of the thin film to the chemical species causes changes in the effective thickness of the thin film, thereby changing its reflective properties. A chemical detection system based on the thin film sensor includes a light source and an optical divider for dividing light from the light source into a first and second light path. The first light path leads to circuitry for providing a reference signal. The thin film chemical sensor receives light from the second light path, and a photoelectric detector detects light reflected from the chemical sensor and provides an electrical signal representative of the reflected light. Circuitry is provided for comparing the reference signal with the reflected light signal, thereby providing a measurement signal indicative of the presence of the chemical species. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Pfeifer, K.B.; Ricco, A.J.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

Grace, Karen M. (Ranchos de Taos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Honkanen, Seppo (Tucson, AZ)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Eugene, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

FEASIBILITY OF A STACK INTEGRATED SOFC OPTICAL CHEMICAL SENSOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed during the UCR Innovative Concepts phase I program was designed to demonstrate the chemical sensing capabilities of nano-cermet SPR bands at solid oxide fuel cell operating conditions. Key to this proposal is that the materials choice used a YSZ ceramic matrix which upon successful demonstration of this concept, will allow integration directly onto the SOFC stack. Under the Innovative Concepts Program the University at Albany Institute for Materials (UAIM)/UAlbany School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering synthesized, analyzed and tested Pa, and Au doped YSZ nano-cermets as a function of operating temperature and target gas exposure (hydrogen, carbon monoxide and 1-dodecanethiol). During the aforementioned testing procedure the optical characteristics of the nano-cermets were monitored to determine the sensor selectivity and sensitivity.

Michael A. Carpenter

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Bend, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Feasibility of a Stack Integrated SOFC Optical Chemical Sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE-NETL Innovative Concepts (IC) phase II program investigated the feasibility of harsh environment compatible chemical sensors based on monitoring the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of metal nanoparticle doped YSZ nano-cermets, as a function of fuel concentrations, impurities e.g. CO and temperature(500-900 C). In particular, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) exhibit a strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band whose shape and spectral position is not only highly dependent on the refractive index of the host medium but also on chemical reactions at the interface between the metal and the surrounding environment. Studies have been completed on the oxygen and temperature dependence of the SPR band of the AuNPs, CO sensing studies, oxygen/hydrogen titration experiments, ethanol sensing studies and finally NO{sub 2} sensing studies. Reversible changes in the SPR band are observed for all chemical exposure studies with the sensing mechanism being determined by the oxidative or reductive properties of the exposure gases. Reactions which remove charge from the AuNPs was observed to cause a redshift in the SPR band, while charge donation to the AuNPs causes a blue shift in the SPR band. CO, hydrogen and ethanol in air mixtures were all reductive in nature as they reacted with the YSZ bound oxygen anions forming CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O thus ultimately inducing charge donation to the AuNPs and a blue shift in the SPR band. While NO{sub 2} and oxygen were oxidative and induced the production of YSZ bound oxygen anions, charge removal from the AuNPs and a redshift in the SPR band.

Michael A. Carpenter

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fiber-Optic Sensor with Simultaneous Temperature, Pressure, and Chemical Sensing Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This project aimed to develop a multifunctional sensor suitable for process control application in chemical and petrochemical industries. Specifically, the objective was to demonstrate a fiber optic sensing system capable of simultaneous temperature, pressure, and chemical composition determinations based on a single strand of sapphire optical fiber. These capabilities were to be achieved through the incorporation of a phosphor and a Bragg grating into the fiber, as well as the exploitation of the evanescent field interaction of the optical radiation inside the fiber with the surrounding chemical medium. The integration of the three functions into a single probe, compared to having three separate probes, would not only substantially reduce the cost of the combined system, but would also minimize the intrusion into the reactor. Such a device can potentially increase the energy efficiency in the manufacture of chemical and petrochemical products, as well as reduce waste and lead to improved quality. In accordance with the proposed research plan, the individual temperature, pressure and chemical sensors where fabricated and characterized first. Then towards the end of the program, an integrated system was implemented. The sapphire fibers were grown on a laser heated pedestal growth system. The temperature sensor was based on the fluorescence decay principle, which exploits the temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay rate of the selected phosphor. For this project, Cr3+ was chosen as the phosphor, and it was incorporated into the sapphire fiber by coating a short length of the source rod with a thin layer of Cr2O3. After the viability of the technique was established and the growth parameters optimized, the temperature sensor was characterized up to 300 ?C and its long term stability was verified. The chemical sensor determined the concentration of chemicals through evanescent field absorption. Techniques to increase the sensitivity of the evanescent field interaction such as tapering and coiling the fiber were successfully demonstrated. It was shown that the sensor is capable of quantitative measurements in both the mid-infrared and the near infrared regions of the spectrum. For the pressure sensor, a novel concept involving a pressure amplifier was investigated. While the basic idea was found to work, technical difficulties prevented the demonstration of a sensor capable of quantitative pressure measurements. As a result, the final combined probe contained only a temperature sensor and a chemical sensor. Under this program not only was the technical feasibility of a dual temperature/chemical sensor demonstrated, so were those of two ancillary devices. The first is a scan-and-dwell fiber optic mid-IR spectrometer specifically designed for process control applications. Also, a versatile high-brightness fiber optic light source with interchangeable emitting elements to cover different spectral regions has been demonstrated. The commercial potentials of the complete system as well as the individual components are being actively explored now.

Kennedy, Jermaine L

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

In situ chemical characterization of waste sludges using FTIR-based fiber optic sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of unknown mixed wastes is a mandatory step in today`s climate of strict environmental regulations. Cleaning up the nuclear and chemical wastes that have accumulated for 50 years at the Hanford Site is the largest single cleanup task in the United States today. The wastes are stored temporarily in carbon steel single- and double-shell tanks that are buried in tank farms at the Site. In the 1950s, a process to scavenge radioactive cesium and other soluble radionuclides in the wastes was developed to create additional tank space for waste storage. This scavenging process involved treatment of the wastes with alkali cyanoferrates and nickel sulfate to precipitate {sup 137}Cs in the presence of nitrate oxidant. Recent safety issues have focused on the stability of cyanoferrate-bearing wastes with large quantities of nitrates and nitrites. Nitrate has been partially converted to nitrite as a result of radiolysis during more than 35 years of storage. The major safety issue is the possibility of the presence of local hot spots enriched in {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr that under optimum conditions can self-heat causing dry out and a potential runaway reaction of the cyanoferrates with the nitrates/nitrites). For waste tank safety, accurate data of the concentration and distribution of cyanoferrates in the tanks are needed. Because of the extensive sampling required and the highly restricted activities allowed in the tank farms, simulated tank wastes are used to provide an initial basis for identifying and quantifying realistic concerns prior to waste remediation. Fiber optics provide a tool for the remote and in situ characterization of hazardous and toxic materials. This study is focused on near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) fiber optic sensors for in situ chemical characterization of Hanford Site waste sludges.

Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Jeppson, D.W.; Lockrem, L.L.; Blewett, G.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrated optical tamper sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of an monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chemical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated optical sensor  

SciTech Connect

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Integrated optical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of fiber optic sensors uses sol-gel derived porous silica materials doped with nanometer particles of noble metals in the form of fiber or coating for sensing trace H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3} and HCl in gas samples at for applications ambient temperature. The third classes of fiber optic sensors use sol-gel derived semiconductor metal oxide coating on the surface of silica optical fiber as transducers for selectively sensing H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO at high temperature. In addition, optical fiber temperature sensors use the fluorescence signal of rare-earth metal ions doped porous silica optical fiber or the optical absorption signal of thermochromic metal oxide materials coated on the surface of silica optical fibers have also been developed for monitoring gas temperature of corrosive gas. Based on the results obtained from this project, the principle of fiber optic sensor techniques for monitoring matrix gas components as well as trace components of coal gasification derived syngas has been established. Prototype sensors for sensing trace ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in gasification derived syngas have been built up in our laboratory and have been tested using gas samples with matrix gas composition similar to that of gasification derived fuel gas. Test results illustrated the feasibility of these sensors for applications in IGCC processes.

Shiquan Tao

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Portable Chemical Sensors for Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Sensors for Environmental and State of Health Monitoring Emerging nano technologies are transforming microsensor research and development, a key enabler of Sandia's...

22

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optical humidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

Tarvin, J.A.

1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Optical humidity sensor  

SciTech Connect

An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Decentralized Dynamic Sensor Activation Protocol for Chemical Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the significant amount of energy consumed by chemical sensors for sensing, reducing sensing activity is critical for improving the lifespan of chemical sensor networks. In this paper, we consider a simple decentralized dynamic sensor activation ...

Shanika Karunasekera; Champake Mendis; Alex Skvortsov; Ajith Gunatilaka

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Silicon fiber optic sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

Sandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object.  It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of an object. 

30

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry, disturbances were monitored in long (several km) lengths of optical fiber. Narrow linewidth and low frequency drift in the laser were achieved through a combination of optical feedback and insulation of the laser cavity against environmental effects. The frequency drift of the laser, characterized using an all-fiber Mach Zehnder interferometer, was found to be less than 1 MHz/min, as required for operation of the intrusion detection system. Intrusions were simulated in a laboratory setting using a piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber. By monitoring the Rayleigh backscattered light with a photodetector and comparing traces with and without an induced phase shift, the phase disturbances were detected and located. Once the feasibility of such a sensor was proven in the laboratory, the experimental set up was transferred to Texas A&M's Riverside Campus. At the test site, approximately 40 meters of fiber optic cable were buried in a triangle perimeter and then spliced into the 12 km path length which was housed inside the test facility. Field tests were conducted producing results comparable to those found in the laboratory. Intrusions over this buried fiber were detectable on the ?-OTDR trace and could be localized to the intrusion point. This type of sensor has the potential benefits of heightened sensitivity, covertness, and greatly reduced cost over the conventional seismic, acoustic, infrared, magnetic, and fiber optic sensors for monitoring long (multi-km) perimeters.

Maier, Eric William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fiber optic moisture sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, R.R.

1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

Aylott, Jonathan W. (Ann Arbor, MI); Chen-Esterlit, Zoe (Ann Arbor, MI); Friedl, Jon H. (Ames, IA); Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Savvateev, Vadim N. (Ames, IA); Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA)

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Gas sensor technology at Sandia National Laboratories: Catalytic gate, Surface Acoustic Wave and Fiber Optic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia`s gas sensor program encompasses three separate electronic platforms: Acoustic Wave Devices, Fiber Optic Sensors and sensors based on silicon microelectronic devices. A review of most of these activities was presented recently in a article in Science under the title ``Chemical Microsensors.`` The focus of the program has been on understanding and developing the chemical sensor coatings that are necessary for using these electronic platforms as effective chemical sensors.

Hughes, R.C.; Moreno, D.J.; Jenkins, M.W.; Rodriguez, J.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

ORNL 2010-G00612/jcn UT-B ID 200802066 Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Technology Summary ORNL researchers developed a ...

40

Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

ORNL researchers developed a cost-efficient nanomechanical sensor that candetect chemicals adsorbed to a surface and then quickly analyze and identifythose chemicals. The device is a significant improvement over current detectiontechnologies, which ...

42

Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Passive in-situ chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

Morrell, Jonathan S. (Farragut, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

B. G. Parker

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fiber optic sensors for environmental applications: A brief review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the flow a groundwater quality. This understanding is achieved by measurement of the appropriate chemical and physical subsurface parameters. The ideal measurement would accurately assess a parameter without affecting the parameter or its environment. Fiber optic spectroscopy offers some of the most promising techniques for accurate, non-invasive measurements of environmental parameters. Fiber optic sensors for subsurface applications are currently being developed by several Department of Energy laboratories. Some of these sensors have been successfully deployed in the field and are attaining the goals of accurate, noninvasive, real time measurements in the subsurface.

Rossabi, J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor  

SciTech Connect

We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optical Fiber Sensors for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.0 Pressure Sensors Optical Fiber Sensors for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery 104 7.0 Pressure Sensors Monitoring of high pressures with high accuracy in oil reservoirs is...

56

A microelectronic design for low-cost disposable chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept and design of integrated microelectronics for a low-cost disposable chemical sensor. The critical aspects of this chemical sensor are the performance of the microelectronic chip ...

Laval, Stuart S. (Stuart Sean), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analog Integrated 2-D Optical Flow Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I present a new focal-plane analog very-large-scale-integrated (aVLSI) sensor that estimates optical flow in two visual dimensions. Its computational architecture consists of a two-layer network of locally connected motion units that collectively ... Keywords: constraint satisfaction, neuromorphic, parallel computation, recurrent network, regularization

Alan A. Stocker

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Photolithographic patterning of polymer-encapsulated optical oxygen sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we show a novel fabrication process capable of yielding arbitrarily-shaped optical oxygen sensor patterns at micron resolution. The wafer-level process uses a thin-film sacrificial metal layer as intermediate mask, protecting the sensor ... Keywords: Optical oxygen sensor, Photolithography, PtOEPK/PS, Sensor patterning

Volker Nock; Maan Alkaisi; Richard J. Blaikie

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas Pipelines. Partnering Organization: Luna Innovations, Incorporated, Blacksburg, VA. ...

60

Nanomaterials on Fiber Optic Sensors in Healthcare and Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fiber optic sensors have several advantages over conventional electrical counterparts: 1) immunity to electromagnetic interference; 2)Lightweight; 3) Small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cnse.albany.edu cnse.albany.edu Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments Dr. Michael A. Carpenter College of NanoScale Science and Engineering Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center University at Albany - SUNY Dr. Sang-Hyun Oh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 6/11/13 ! Oh group, University of Minnesota Carpenter Group, CNSE cnse.albany.edu Harsh Environment Chemical Sensors Nanocomposite Materials * Optical analysis of Au SPR bands * YSZ, TiO 2 , CeO 2 matrix materials * 500-800°C operating environment * SOFC, Jet engines, turbines * CO, H 2 , NO x , R x S Goals of Research are Two-Fold 1. Develop prototype nanorod materials for use in next generation sensing devices

62

Optical inverse-square displacement sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

Optical inverse-square displacement sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R+.DELTA.R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as ##EQU1##

Howe, Robert D. (San Mateo County, CA); Kychakoff, George (King County, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor thermal imaging, chemical delivery and other new horizons. Finally, as part of this lecture, Lewis

65

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple gas and turbine-blade properties University of Wisconsin - Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering Principal...

66

Distributed Optical Sensor for CO2 Leak Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the technology "Distributed Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection," for which a Patent Application has been filed. This technology is available for licensing andor further...

67

Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants. Author(s), Paul Ohodnicki, Congjun Wang, Douglas Kauffman, Kristi Kauffman, ...

68

Label-free Chemical and Biological Sensors Based on Self ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Synthesis and Structural Analysis of Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Optical Applications · Complex Crystallization Dynamics in Amorphous Germanium ...

69

Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor  

SciTech Connect

A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Physical and chemical sensor technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing emphasis on envirorunental issues, waste reduction, and improved efficiency for industrial processes has mandated the development of new chemical and physical sensors for field or in-plant use. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a number of technologies for sensing physical and chemical properties. Table 1 gives some examples of several sensors. that have been developed recently for environmental, industrial, commercial or government applications. Physical sensors of pressure, temperature, acceleration, acoustic vibration spectra, and ionizing radiation have been developed. Sensors developed at LLNL for chemical species include inorganic solvents, heavy metal ions`, and gaseous atoms and compounds. Primary sensing technologies we have employed have been based on optical fibers, semiconductor optical or radiation detectors, electrochemical activity, micromachined electromechanical (MEMs) structures, or chemical separation technologies. The complexities of these sensor systems range from single detectors to more advanced micro-instruments on-a-chip. For many of the sensors we have developed the necessary intelligent electronic support systems for both local and remote sensing applications. Each of these sensor technologies are briefly described in the remaining sections of this paper.

Balch, J.W.; Ciarlo, D.; Folta, J.; Glass, R.; Hagans, K.; Milanovich, F.; Sheem, S.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Preliminary field demonstration of a fiber-optic TCE sensor. [Trichloroethylene (TCE)  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a differential-absorption fiber-optic sensor for use in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring of certain volatile organochlorines. The principle of detection is a quantitative, irreversible chemical reaction that forms visible light-absorbing products. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatographic (GC) standard measurements and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity sufficient for the environmental monitoring of trace levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform. This sensor is currently under evaluation in monitoring well and vadose zone applications. In this paper, we describe the principles of the existing single measurement sensor technology and show preliminary field-test results. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Angel, S.M.; Langry, K.; Roe, J.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Milanovich, F.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

Proceedings: 3rd EPRI Optical Sensor Systems Workshop  

SciTech Connect

These are the proceedings of the third Optical Sensor System Workshop, part of an ongoing effort by EPRI to support development of optical sensor technology, to identify benefits for utility users, and to position EPRI members as more ''informed buyers'' and users.

None

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1099 Fiber-Optic Sensor for Web Velocity Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light from the web surface (with no physical contact), the output of the fiber-optic sensorIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1099 Fiber-Optic Sensor for Web Velocity Measurement Abstract--The design and development of a new fiber-optic sensor for measuring the velocity of a continuous

Pagilla, Prabhakar R.

76

Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property  

SciTech Connect

In this program, Nuonics, Inc. has studied the fundamentals of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials-based optical sensor technology suited for extreme environments of coal-fired engines in power production. The program explored how SiC could be used for sensing temperature, pressure, and potential gas species in a gas turbine environment. The program successfully demonstrated the optical designs, signal processing and experimental data for enabling both temperature and pressure sensing using SiC materials. The program via its sub-contractors also explored gas species sensing using SiC, in this case, no clear commercially deployable method was proven. Extensive temperature and pressure measurement data using the proposed SiC sensors was acquired to 1000 deg-C and 40 atms, respectively. Importantly, a first time packaged all-SiC probe design was successfully operated in a Siemens industrial turbine rig facility with the probe surviving the harsh chemical, pressure, and temperature environment during 28 days of test operations. The probe also survived a 1600 deg-C thermal shock test using an industrial flame.

Nabeel Riza

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

Nave, S.E.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Methods for Reducing Biofouling of Moored Optical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biofouling is one of the primary limiting factors in terms of measurement accuracy and deployment longevity for oceanographic studies involving autonomous sampling. Copper can significantly reduce marine fouling for long-term optical sensor ...

Derek V. Manov; Grace C. Chang; Tommy D. Dickey

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nanostructured Inorganic Thin Film Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thin Film Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors for Gas Sensing in Energy and Environmental Systems ... Co-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles and Thin Films for Enhanced Solar Energy Utilization ... Synthesis of Magnetic Core-TS-1 Zeolite Shell Catalyst.

82

New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

for ensuring safety in pharmaceutical, transportation, and other sectors. ... process, without resorting to chemical cleaning techniques after each thermal cycle

84

Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

NETL: Gasification - Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Center for Photonics Technology Project Number: DE-FC26-99FT40685 Project Description Phase I - The Photonics Laboratory at Virginia Tech has successfully developed a novel temperature sensor capable of operating at temperatures up to 1600 °C and in harsh conditions. The sensor uses single-crystal sapphire to make an optically-based measurement and will fulfill the need for the real-time monitoring of high temperatures created in gasification processes. Phase II - Based on a successful Phase I laboratory demonstration of a Broadband Polarimetric Differential Interferometric (BPDI) temperature sensor, Virginia Tech's Phase II development objective is to further the development of the sensor for industrial use in slagging coal gasifiers. This will include ruggedizing the design of the sensor and creation of a suitable protective housing such that it can be placed into existing ports of coal gasifiers. The potential industrial use of the sensor will be determined through full-scale testing and development. The sensor design and fabrication has been completed and is undergoing testing. Overall performance and survivability of the sensor will be determined.

87

Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Compatible Chemical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Register as a New User ... Symposium, 2012 Symposium on Surfaces and Heterostructures at Nano- or Micro-Scale and Their Characterization, Properties, and Applications ... 2012 Shri Ram Arora Award: Novel Sensor Structure of SnO2 Thin Film Integrated ... Localized Plasmon Enhancement at Dopant Sites in Graphene.

88

Analog Integrated 2-D Optical Flow Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the sensor for smart visual interfaces [46] or robotics applications [47], in particular when ... )2, where h is the grid constant. 3. The difference in log-space turns ...

89

Vehicle exhaust gas chemical sensors using acoustic wave resonators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, novel acoustic wave-based sensors were explored for detecting gaseous chemical species in vehicle exhaust streams. The need exists for on-line, real-time monitors to continuously analyze the toxic exhaust gases -- nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrocarbons (HC) -- for determining catalytic converter efficiency, documenting compliance to emission regulations, and optimizing engine performance through feedback control. In this project, the authors adapted existing acoustic wave chemical sensor technology to the high temperature environment and investigated new robust sensor materials for improving gas detection sensitivity and selectivity. This report describes one new sensor that has potential use as an exhaust stream residual hydrocarbon monitor. The sensor consists of a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator coated with a thin mesoporous silica layer ion-exchanged with palladium ions. When operated at temperatures above 300 C, the high surface area film catalyzes the combustion of the hydrocarbon vapors in the presence of oxygen. The sensor acts as a calorimeter as the exothermic reaction slightly increases the temperature, stressing the sensor surface, and producing a measurable deviation in the resonator frequency. Sensitivities as high as 0.44 (ppm-{Delta}f) and (ppm-gas) have been measured for propylene gas, with minimum detectable signals of < 50 ppm of propylene at 500 C.

Cernosek, R.W.; Small, J.H.; Sawyer, P.S.; Bigbie, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, M.T. [3M Industrial and Consumer Sector Research Lab., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulating means for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor means compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. 4 figs.

Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

Adams, Jesse D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Distributed Optical Sensor for CO2 Leak Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Sensor for CO Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection Opportunity Research is active on the technology "Distributed Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection," for which a Patent Application has been filed. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview The availability of fossil fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, there are concerns over the impacts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere-particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations is a promising technology to reduce the impact of CO

93

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Applications for homeland security, emergency planning Instruments in Argonne's Terahertz Test Facility, such as the one Sami Gopalsami is using, can detect trace chemicals at the part-per-billion level.

96

Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level. 5 figures.

Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: 1 October 1998 Reporting Period End Date: 31 March 2003 Principal Investigator: Anbo Wang Principal Report Authors: Kristie L. Cooper, Gary R. Pickrell, Anbo Wang Report Issued: June 2003 DOE Award Number: DE-FT26-98BC15167 Submitted by: Center for Photonics Technology Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061-0111 ii Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

In Situ Sensors for the Chemical Industry- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The project focused on analytical techniques that can be applied in situ. The innovative component of this project is the focus on achieving a significant breakthrough in two of the three primary Process Analytical (PA) fields. PA measurements can roughly be broken down into: ? Single component measurements, ? Multiple component measurements and ? Multiple component isomer analysis. This project targeted single component measurements and multiple component measurements with two basic technologies, and to move these measurements to the process, achieving many of the process control needs. During the project the following achievements were made: ? Development of a low cost Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) Analyzer system for measurement of 1) Oxygen in process and combustion applications, 2) part per million (ppm) H2O impurities in aggressive service, 3) ppm CO in large scale combustion systems. This product is now commercially available ? Development of a process pathlength enhanced (high sensitivity) Laser Based Analyzer for measurement of product impurities. This product is now commercially available. ? Development of signal processing methods to eliminate measurement errors in complex and changing backgrounds (critical to chemical industry measurements). This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. ? Development of signal processing methods to allow multi-component measurements in complex chemical streams. This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. ? Development of process interface designs to allow in-situ application of TDL technology in aggressive (corrosive, high temperature, high pressure) commonly found in chemical processes. This development is incorporated in the commercially available ASI TDL analyzer. ? Field proving of 3 laser-based analyzer systems in process control and combustion applications at Dow Chemical. Laser based analyzers have been available for >5yrs, however significant product price/performance issues have minimized their applicability in the chemical industry. In order to take advantage of the promise of this technology a number of technology advances were required, within price limits for market acceptance. This project significantly advanced the state of TDL technology for application in chemical industry applications. With these advances a commercially available product now exists that has already achieved market success and is installed in critical applications. The ability to make fast, sensitive and accurate measurements inside the chemical processes is now delivering improved process control, energy efficiency and emissions control within the U.S. Chemical Industry. Despite the success we enjoyed for the laser-based sensors, there were significant technical barriers for the solid-state sensors. With exception of a generic close-coupled extractive housing and electronics interface, there were significant issues with all of the solid-state sensor devices we sought to develop and test. Ultimately, these issues were roadblocks that prevented further development and testing. The fundamental limitations of available sensor materials that we identified, formulated and tested were overwhelming. This situation forced our team to cancel these portions of the project and focus our resources on laser-based sensor techniques. The barriers of material compatibility, sensitivity, speed of response, chemical interferences, etc. are surmountable in the field of solid-state sensors. Inability to address any single one of these attributes will prevent wide-implementation into this market. This situation is plainly evident by the lack of such devices in the online analyzer market (for petrochemicals).

Tate, J.D.; Knittel, Trevor

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor system for monitoring long perimeters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A distributed sensor using an optical fiber for detecting and locating intruders over long perimeters (>10 km) is described. Phase changes resulting from either the pressure of the intruder on the ground immediately above the buried fiber or from seismic disturbances in the vicinity are sensed by a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer (??OTDR). Light pulses from a cw laser operating in a single longitudinal mode and with low (MHz/min range) frequency drift are injected into one end of the single mode fiber, and the backscattered light is monitored with a photodetector. In laboratory tests with 12 km of fiber on reels, the effects of localized phase perturbations induced by a piezoelectric fiber stretcher on ??OTDR traces were characterized. In field tests in which the sensing element is a single mode fiber in a 3-mm diameter cable buried in an 8 to 18 inch deep, 4 inch wide trench in clay soil, detection of intruders on foot up to 15 ft from the cable line was achieved. In desert terrain field tests in which the sensing fiber is in a 4.5-mm diameter cable buried in a 1 ft deep, 2.5 ft wide trench filled with loose sand, high sensitivity and consistent detection of intruders on foot and of vehicles traveling down a road near the cable line was realized over a cable length of 8.5 km and a total fiber path of 19 km in real time. In a final series of field tests in clay soil, phase changes produced by the steps of a person walking up to 15 ft away from the buried cable were observed, and vehicles traveling at 10 mph were consistently detected up to 300 ft away. Based on these results, this technology may be regarded as a candidate for providing low-cost perimeter security for nuclear power plants, electrical power distribution centers, storage facilities for fuel and volatile chemicals, communication hubs, airports, government offices, military bases, embassies, and national borders.

Juarez, Juan C.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

Colburn, Jr., John W. (Houston, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken. 5 figures.

Colburn, J.W. Jr.

1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

The design of a low power carbon nanotube chemical sensor system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a hybrid CNT/CMOS chemical sensor system that comprises of a carbon nanotube sensor array and a CMOS interface chip. The full system, including the sensor, consumes 32?W at 1.83kS/s readout rate, accomplished through ... Keywords: carbon nanotube, low power, sensor system

Taeg Sang Cho; Kyeong-jae Lee; Jing Kong; Anantha P. Chandrakasan

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Center embossed diaphragm design guidelines and Fabry-Perot diaphragm fiber optic sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research established the design guidelines for center embossed diaphragms for micro-diaphragm fiber type sensors. Following the guidelines, a center embossed diaphragm fiber optic sensor (CE-DFOS) based on Fabry-Perot interference was designed and ... Keywords: Acoustic sensor, Center embossed diaphragm, Fabry-Perot, Fiber optic, MEMS

Yan Sun; Ganhua Feng; George Georgiou; Edip Niver; Karen Noe; Ken Chin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Chemical Sensors for the Detection of Chlorine and Nitrogen Trichloride at ppb Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of air quality is of great importance, in particular for the protection of the workers who can be exposed to toxic gas. The present work reports the development of new chemical sensors for the detection of halogenated gases. These sensors ... Keywords: chemical sensors, chlorine, nitrogen trichloride, tribromide ion, sol-gel process, UV-Visible absorption

Julien Garcia; Thi-Dinh Nguyen; Thu-Hoa Tran-Thi; Anne-Marie Laurent

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Performance characterization of an internsity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor  

SciTech Connect

A testbed simulating an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor is experimentally characterized, and the implications regarding sensor design are discussed. Of interest are the intensity distribution of the transmitted optical signal and the relationships between sensor architecture and performance. Particularly, an intensity-modulated sensor's sensitivity, linearity, displacement range, and resolution are functions of the relative positioning of its transmitting and receiving fibers. In this paper, sensor architectures with various combinations of these performance metrics are discussed. A sensor capable of micrometer resolution is reported, and it is concluded that this work could lead to an improved methodology for sensor design.

Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Santhony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Performance characterization of an internsity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor  

SciTech Connect

A testbed simulating an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor is experimentally characterized, and the implications regarding sensor design are discussed. Of interest are the intensity distribution of the transmitted optical signal and the relationships between sensor architecture and performance. Particularly, an intensity-modulated sensor's sensitivity, linearity, displacement range, and resolution are functions of the relative positioning of its transmitting and receiving fibers. In this paper, sensor architectures with various combinations of these performance metrics are discussed. A sensor capable of micrometer resolution is reported, and it is concluded that this work could lead to an improved methodology for sensor design.

Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Santhony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

Johnson, Jr., Alan T. (Philadelphia, PA); Gelperin, Alan (Princeton, NJ); Staii, Cristian (Madison, WI)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

A High-Sensitivity Fiber-Optic Sensor for Fatigue Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, A High-Sensitivity Fiber-Optic Sensor for Fatigue Testing. Author(s), Nguyen Q Nguyen, Nikhil Gupta. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Nikhil Gupta.

112

Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Autonomous Optical Sensor System for the Monitoring of Nitrogen Dioxide from Aging Rocket Propellant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optical sensor system has been developed for the autonomous monitoring of NO{sub 2} evolution in energetic material aging studies. The system is minimally invasive, requiring only the presence of a small sensor film within the aging chamber. The sensor material is a perylene/PMMA film that is excited by a blue LED light source and the fluorescence detected with a CCD spectrometer. Detection of NO{sub 2} gas is done remotely through the glass window of the aging chamber. Irreversible reaction of NO{sub 2} with perylene, producing the non-fluorescent nitroperylene, provides the optical sensing scheme. The rate of fluorescence intensity loss over time can be modeled using a numerical solution to the coupled diffusion and a nonlinear chemical reaction problem to evaluate NO{sub 2} concentration levels. The light source, spectrometer, spectral acquisition, and data processing were controlled through a Labivew program run by a laptop PC. Due to the long times involved with materials aging studies the system was designed to turn on, warm up, acquire data, power itself off, then recycle at a specific time interval. This allowed the monitoring of aging HE material over the period of several weeks with minimal power consumption and stable LED light output. Despite inherent problems with gas leakage of the aging chamber they were able to test the sensor system in the field under an accelerated aging study of rocket propellant. They found that the propellant evolved NO{sub 2} at a rate that yielded a concentration of between 10 and 100 ppm. The sensor system further revealed that the propellant, over an aging period of 25 days, evolves NO{sub 2} with cyclic behavior between active and dormant periods.

COX, TRISHA D.; SINGH, SEEMA; HUNTER, JOHN A.; JONES, GARY D.; SINCLAIR, MICHAEL B.; ROHWER, LAUREN E. S.; POHL, PHILLIP I.; ANDRZEJEWSKI, WILLIAM; SASAKI, DARRYL Y.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Porous silicon optical cavity structure applied to high sensitivity organic solvent sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work reports the thermal annealing process, the number of layer and electrochemical process effect in the optical response quality of Bragg and microcavity devices that were applied as organic solvent sensors. These devices have been obtained ... Keywords: Microcavities, Optical sensors, Photonic crystal, Porous silicon

Danilo R. Huanca; Francisco J. Ramirez-Fernandez; Walter J. Salcedo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biosensor and chemical sensor probes for calcium and other metal ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to chemical sensor and biosensor probes for measuring low concentration of metals and metal ions in complex samples such as biological fluids, living cells, and environmental samples. More particularly the present invention relates to a gel-based Indo-1 and Fura-2 chemical sensor probes for the measurement of low concentrations of calcium, cadmium, magnesium and the like. Also disclosed is a detector device using the sensors of the present invention.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Viallet, Pierre (Perpignan, FR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Using Chemical Sensors to Control Molten Metal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

N. Hara and D.D. MacDonald, "Development of Dissolved Hydrogen Sensor Based on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia with Noble Metal Electrolytes," J. Electrochem

117

Ultra-low-power components for an RFID Tag with physical and chemical sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the development and optimization of the main components for a multisensing flexible Tag with RFID communication capabilities and integrated physical and chemical sensors for logistic datalogging applications will be reported. For this specific ... Keywords: Logistics, MOX sensors, RFID, Ultra-low-power

Stefano Zampolli; Ivan Elmi; Enrico Cozzani; Gian Carlo Cardinali; Andrea Scorzoni; Michele Cicioni; Santiago Marco; Francisco Palacio; Jose M. Gómez-Cama; Ilker Sayhan; Thomas Becker

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: ? Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, ? Selects the right sensors for process conditions ? Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and ? Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature and Strain Monitoring in Motors and Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early detection of potential problems in motor and generator windings helps decrease outage time and reduces repair costs. This work demonstrates the use of fiber optic sensors for measuring temperature and strain in these and other electrical components.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Optical Transient Detector (OTD): Instrument Characteristics and Cross-Sensor Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning data from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to perform preliminary validation of the satellite-based Optical Transient Detector (OTD). Sensor precision, accuracy, detection efficiency, and biases of the ...

D. J. Boccippio; W. Koshak; R. Blakeslee; K. Driscoll; D. Mach; D. Buechler; W. Boeck; H. J. Christian; S. J. Goodman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part I: Predicted Diurnal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory calibration and observed background radiance data are used to determine the effective sensitivities of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), as functions of local hour and pixel location within the ...

Dennis J. Boccippio; William J. Koshak; Richard J. Blakeslee

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Laboratory Calibration of the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present in detail the laboratory apparatus and techniques that were used to complete a full radiometric calibration of two space-based lightning detectors: the optical transient detector (OTD) and the lightning imaging sensor (LIS) ...

William J. Koshak; Mike F. Stewart; Hugh J. Christian; James W. Bergstrom; John M. Hall; Richard J. Solakiewicz

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Adaptive optics wavefront sensors based on photon-counting detector arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For adaptive optics systems, there is a growing demand for wavefront sensors that operate at higher frame rates and with more pixels while maintaining low readout noise. Lincoln Laboratory has been investigating Geiger-mode ...

Aull, Brian F.

124

Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*gkakaran@eie.gr Keywords: white-light interferometer, fibre-optic pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry. In this work, we present a low pressure sensor based on white-light Fabry-Perot interferometer where poly used as low-coherent white-light source transmitted through a single-mode fibre (SMF-28). The light

Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

125

Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Coal Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Coal Gasifiers Description Accurate temperature measurement inside a coal gasifier is essential for safe, efficient, and cost-effective operation. However, current sensors are prone to inaccurate readings and premature failure due to harsh operating conditions like high temperature (1,200-1,600 °C), high pressure (up to 500 pounds per square inch gauge [psig]),

126

Chalcogenide Glasses Developed for Optical Micro-sensor Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the sensor field, chalcogenide glasses are well established membranes or thin ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

127

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL CERAMIC NANOFILM-FIBER INTEGRATED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF COAL DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to conduct fundamental studies on advanced ceramic materials and fiber optic devices for developing new types of high temperature (>500{degree}C) fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for monitoring fossil (mainly coal) and biomass derived gases in power plants. The primary technical objective is to investigate and demonstrate the nanocrystalline doped-ceramic thin film enabled FOCS that possess desired stability, sensitivity and selectivity for in-situ, rapid gas detection in the syngas streams from gasification and combustion flue gases. This report summarizes research works of two integrated parts: (1) development of metal oxide solid thin films as sensing materials for detection and measurement of important gas components relevant to the coal- and biomass-derived syngas and combustion gas streams at high temperatures; and (2) development of fiber optic devices that are potentially useful for constructing FOCS in combination with the solid oxide thin films identified in this program.

Junhang Dong; Hai Xiao; Xiling Tang; Hongmin Jiang; Kurtis Remmel; Amardeep Kaur

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Optical Fiber Sensors For Monitoring Joint Articulation And Chest Expansion Of A Human Body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fiber-optic sensors employing optical fibers of elastomeric material are incorporated in devices adapted to be worn by human beings in joint and chest regions for the purpose of monitoring and measuring the extent of joint articulation and chest expansion especially with respect to time.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fiber-Optic Sensor Technology for Diagnostics of Underground Power Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundSince the development of the first low-loss optical fiber in early 1970s, fiber-optic communication has undergone explosive growth. Today, many fiber sensors are commercially available and some of them have been widely in the electric utility industry. The Electric Power Research ...

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

High throughput optical sensor arrays for drug screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the world of drug discovery, high throughput whole cell assays are a critical step in discovering therapeutically relevant drug compounds [1]. This report details the development of several novel sensor systems capable ...

Harjes, Daniel I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Oceanic Remote Chemical/Optical Analyzer (ORCA)—An Autonomous Moored Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An autonomous, moored profiler [the Oceanic Remote Chemical/Optical Analyzer (ORCA)] was developed to sense a variety of chemical and optical properties in the upper water column. It is presently used to monitor water quality parameters in South ...

John P. Dunne; Allan H. Devol; Steven Emerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microstructure Profiles of Laser-induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra: Evaluation of Backscatter and Forward-Scatter Fiber-Optic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation and characterization of backscatter and forward-scatter fiber-optic fluorescence sensors attached to a microstructure profiling instrument are described. By using an optical multichannel array detector to record emission ...

Russell A. Desiderio; Timothy J. Cowles; James N. Moum; Michael Myrick

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors  

SciTech Connect

This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

Nabeel Riza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fiber optic sensor for detecting damage location and shock wave velocity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival `points` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the `points` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

Weiss, J.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Monolithic piezoelectric sensor (MPS) for sensing chemical, biochemical and physical measurands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric sensor and assembly for measuring chemical, biochemical and physical measurands is disclosed. The piezoelectric sensor comprises a piezoelectric material, preferably a crystal, a common metal layer attached to the top surface of the piezoelectric crystal, and a pair of independent resonators placed in close proximity on the piezoelectric crystal such that an efficacious portion of acoustic energy couples between the resonators. The first independent resonator serves as an input port through which an input signal is converted into mechanical energy within the sensor and the second independent resonator serves an output port through which a filtered replica of the input signal is detected as an electrical signal. Both a time delay and an attenuation at a given frequency between the input signal and the filtered replica may be measured as a sensor output. The sensor may be integrated into an assembly with a series feedback oscillator and a radio frequency amplifier to process the desired sensor output. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a selective film is disposed upon the grounded metal layer of the sensor and the resonators are encapsulated to isolate them from the measuring environment. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, more than two resonators are used in order to increase the resolution of the sensor.

Andle, Jeffrey C. (Bangor, ME); Lec, Ryszard M. (Orono, ME)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nanocoating Enhanced Optical Fiber Sensors - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy ... In that time, considerable progress has been made in conception and development of novel fiber-optic configurations ...

138

Integration of GPS, accelerometer and optical fiber sensors for structural deformation monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Telecommunications. Her current research interests are the integration of RTK-GPS, accelerometer, and optical fiber sensors, and digital signal processing. Monitoring the response of structures, especially tall buildings, under severe loading conditions is an important requirement for the validation of their design and construction, as well as being a maintenance concern. Traditionally such response has been measured using accelerometers. However it is impossible to measure the static or quasi-static components of movement with such sensors. An integrated system comprising RTK-GPS, accelerometer, and optical fiber sensors has been proposed for monitoring structural deformation, with the objective being to assess the integrity of structures. The GPS and accelerometer sensors have been installed on a 108m tall steel tower in Tokyo, together with other sensors such as anemometer and strain gauge. In this paper the seismic and wind-induced responses of the tower are analysed using Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the GPS and accelerometer measurements. Then the correlated signals are extracted by a digital filtering technique. The filtered data sets are also converted to displacement (in the case of accelerometer) and acceleration (in the case of GPS) through double integration and double differentiation respectively, for the purpose of direct comparison. The results agree with each other very well, except that the static component is missing from the accelerometer derived results. Meanwhile, extensive indoor experiments have been conducted to test optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the measurement of distributed strain.

Xiaojing Li

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Field emission chemical sensor for receptor/binder, such as antigen/antibody  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

Panitz, John A. (Edgewood, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Wide Area and Distributed Hydrogen Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advances in optical sensors show promise for the development of new wide area monitoring and distributed optical network hydrogen detection systems. Optical hydrogen sensing technologies reviewed here are: 1) open path Raman scattering systems, 2) back scattering from chemically treated solid polymer matrix optical fiber sensor cladding; and 3) shlieren and shearing interferometry imaging. Ultrasonic sensors for hydrogen release detection are also reviewed. The development status of these technologies and their demonstrated results in sensor path length, low hydrogen concentration detection ability, and response times are described and compared to the corresponding status of hydrogen spot sensor network technologies.

Zalosh, Robert G.; Barilo, Nick F.

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in urban environments and to detect chemical species concentrations in migrating plumes. Given is our research in these areas and a status report of our progress.

Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fibre optical measuring network based on quasi-distributed amplitude sensors for detecting deformation loads  

SciTech Connect

A new design of a sensitive element for a fibre optical sensor of deformation loads is proposed. A distributed fibre optical measuring network, aimed at determining both the load application point and the load mass, has been developed based on these elements. It is shown that neural network methods of data processing make it possible to combine quasi-distributed amplitude sensors of different types into a unified network. The results of the experimental study of a breadboard of a fibre optical measuring network are reported, which demonstrate successful reconstruction of the trajectory of a moving object (load) with a spatial resolution of 8 cm, as well as the load mass in the range of 1 - 10 kg with a sensitivity of 0.043 kg{sup -1}. (laser optics 2012)

Kul'chin, Yurii N; Kolchinskiy, V A; Kamenev, O T; Petrov, Yu S

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress on the program â??Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systemsâ?ť funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

Anbo Wang; Gary Pickrell

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

All optical sensor for automated magnetometry based on Coherent Population Trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An automated magnetometer suitable for long lasting measurement under stable and controllable experimental conditions has been implemented. The device is based on Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) produced by a multi-frequency excitation. CPT resonance is observed when a frequency comb, generated by diode laser current modulation, excites Cs atoms confined in a $\\pi/4\\times(2.5)^2\\times1 \\textrm{cm}^3$, 2 Torr $N_2$ buffered cell. A fully optical sensor is connected through an optical fiber to the laser head allowing for truly remote sensing and minimization of the field perturbation. A detailed analysis of the CPT resonance parameters as a function of the optical detuning has been made in order to get high sensitivity measurements. The magnetic field monitoring performances and the best sensitivity obtained in a balanced differential configuration of the sensor are presented.

Belfi, J; Biancalana, V; Dancheva, Y; Moi, L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, Randy R. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Optical pH Sensors for High Temperature Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel pH measurement system based on remote absorption spectroscopy via two uni-directional optical fibers has been developed for use in cooling water sampling lines in power plants. The system was designed to operate at 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit) and 1379 kPa (200 psi) and, so far, has been shown to measure reproducibly the pH of a flowing stream at room temperature and 1379 kPa (200 psi).

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

Towards slime mould chemical sensor: Mapping chemical inputs onto electrical potential dynamics of Physarum Polycephalum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally derived a unique one-to-one mapping between a range of selected bioactive chemicals and patterns of oscillations of the slime mould's extacellular electrical potential.

Whiting, James G H; Adamatzky, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 13, NO. 7, JULY 1995 1I89 New Opportunities in Fiber-optic Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 13, NO. 7, JULY 1995 1I89 New Opportunities in Fiber-optic-Several possibilities for new fiber-optic sensors are proposed that are based on two. The developmentof a compact, low-cost fiber-optic method for tbe accurate measurement of timdfrequency is also

Shahriar, Selim

150

Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of High-Temperature/High-Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/ Temperature/ High-Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor Background The Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMI) Program provides a mechanism for cooperative research among these institutions, the private sector, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy. The program provides for the exchange of technical information to raise the overall level of HBCU/OMI competitiveness with other institutions in the field of fossil

152

Molecules and materials for the optical detection of explosives and toxic chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical chemosensing, especially using amplifying fluorescent polymers, can allow for the highly sensitive and selective vapor-phase detection of both explosives and highly toxic chemicals, including chemical warfare agents. ...

Thomas, Samuel William, III

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of New Optical Sensors for Measurements of Mercury Concentrations, Speciation, and Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for elemental mercury was developed and applied for measurements in a high-temperature flow reactor and in the exhaust stream of a coal-fired combustor. The final version of the sensor incorporates a 375-nm single-mode laser and a 784-nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The output of these lasers is sum-frequency mixed in a non-linear beta-barium borate crystal to generate a 254-nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency is tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7-nm. The tuning range is large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. Because of this large tuning range, the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Broadband absorption is a major concern for lamp-based mercury sensor, and the sample to be monitored must be chemically treated prior to analysis to remove species such as SO{sub 2} that absorb near 253.7 nm. No pretreatment is required when our diode-laser-based sensor is used for elemental mercury measurements. Our laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA), and were generally in good agreement except that the insitu diode-laser-based sensor measurements tended to give somewhat higher concentrations than the CMA measurements, presumably due to absorption of elemental mercury in the sampling lines needed for the CMA measurements. At Texas A&M University, the homogeneous oxidation of elemental mercury was studied using a high-temperature flow reactor.

Robert Lucht

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Novel fused-LEDs devices as optical sensors for colorimetric analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a novel, low power optical sensing platform based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) is described. The sensor is constructed from a pair of LEDs fused together at an angle where one LED functions as the light source and the other LED is reverse biased to function as a light detector. Sensor function is based on the level of light received by the detector diode, which varies with the reflectance of the interface between the device and its environment, or the chemochromic membrance that covers the device. A simple microprocessor circuit is used to measure the time taken for the photon-induced current to discharge the detector LED from an initial 5V (logic 1) to 1.7V (logic zero). This sensing device has been successfully used for colour and colour-based pH measurements and offers extremely high sensitivity, enabling detection down to the sub micro molar level of dyes.

King Tong Lau; Susan Baldwin; Roderick L. Shepherd; Paul H. Dietz; William S. Yerazunis; Dermot Diamond; King Tong Lau A; Susan Baldwin A; Roderick L. Shepherd B; Paul H. Dietz B; William S. Yerzunis B; Dermot Diamond A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

Wood, C.B.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, Charles B. (Lakewood, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Literature search, review, and compilation of data for chemical and radiochemical sensors: Task 1 report  

SciTech Connect

During the next several decades, the US Department of Energy is expected to spend tens of billions of dollars in the characterization, cleanup, and monitoring of DOE`s current and former installations that have various degrees of soil and groundwater contamination made up of both hazardous and mixed wastes. Each of these phases will require site surveys to determine type and quantity of hazardous and mixed wastes. It is generally recognized that these required survey and monitoring efforts cannot be performed using traditional chemistry methods based on laboratory evaluation of samples from the field. For that reason, a tremendous push during the past decade or so has been made on research and development of sensors. This report contains the results of an extensive literature search on sensors that are used or have applicability in environmental and waste management. While restricting the search to a relatively small part of the total chemistry spectrum, a sizable body of reference material is included. Results are presented in tabular form for general references obtained from data base searches, as narrative reviews of relevant chapters from proceedings, as book reviews, and as reviews of journal articles with particular relevance to the review. Four broad sensor types are covered: electrochemical processes, piezoelectric devices, fiber optics, and radiochemical processes. The topics of surface chemistry processes and biosensors are not treated separately because they often are an adjunct to one of the four sensors listed. About 1,000 tabular entries are listed, including selected journal articles, reviews of conference/meeting proceedings, and books. Literature to about mid-1992 is covered.

NONE

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effect of gas feeding methods on optical properties of GaN grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Ga vacancies, GaN growth, gas feeding method, optical property, rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD), yellow luminescence

Sun Jung Kim; Young Hun Seo; Kee Suk Nahm; Yun Bong Hahn; Hyun Wook Shim; Eun-Kyung Suh; Kee Young Lim; Hyung Jae Lee

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Underwater Threat Source Localization: Processing Sensor Network TDOAs with a Terascale Optical Core Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revolutionary computing technologies are defined in terms of technological breakthroughs, which leapfrog over near-term projected advances in conventional hardware and software to produce paradigm shifts in computational science. For underwater threat source localization using information provided by a dynamical sensor network, one of the most promising computational advances builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. In this article, we present initial results of sensor network calculations that focus on the concept of signal wavefront time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA). The corresponding algorithms are implemented on the EnLight processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Laboratories. This tera-scale digital optical core processor is optimized for array operations, which it performs in a fixed-point-arithmetic architecture. Our results (i) illustrate the ability to reach the required accuracy in the TDOA computation, and (ii) demonstrate that a considerable speed-up can be achieved when using the EnLight 64a prototype processor as compared to a dual Intel XeonTM processor.

Barhen, Jacob [ORNL; Imam, Neena [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property Modulation and Vibration-Tolerant Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the this part of the Continuation Phase 2 period (Oct. 1, 06 to March 31, 07) of this project were to (a) fabricate laser-doped SiC wafers and start testing the SiC chips for individual gas species sensing under high temperature and pressure conditions and (b) demonstrate the designs and workings of a temperature probe suited for industrial power generation turbine environment. A focus of the reported work done via Kar UCF LAMP lab. is to fabricate the embedded optical phase or doped microstructures based SiC chips, namely, Chromium (C), Boron (B) and Aluminum (Al) doped 4H-SiC, and to eventually deploy such laser-doped chips to enable gas species sensing under high temperature and pressure. Experimental data is provided from SiC chip optical response for various gas species such as pure N2 and mixtures of N2 and H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. Another main focus of the reported work was a temperature sensor probe assembly design and initial testing. The probe transmit-receive fiber optics were designed and tested for electrically controlled alignment. This probe design was provided to overcome mechanical vibrations in typical industrial scenarios. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report.

Nabeel A. Riza

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application and modeling of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy for microsphere-based optical glucose sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new glucose affinity sensor based on a homogeneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay system was developed to monitor the competitive binding between concanavalin A (ConA) and dextran. The FRET quenching kinetics of the donor were analyzed from frequency-domain (FD) measurements as functions of both glucose and acceptor-protein concentrations using a Förster-type decay kinetics model. The results showed that the FD measurements and donor decay kinetics can indicate quantitative changes in the presence of glucose at concentrations ranging from 0 to 224 mg/dL. The second set of experiments proved the feasibility of performing analyte sensing with FD lifetime spectroscopy using microsphere-based sensors in multiple scattering solutions. A well characterized pH-sensitive fluorophore was entrapped in poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres. The particles were then immersed in a buffered polystyrene solution of various pH. Measurements of phase shift and modulation of the generated and multiply scattered fluorescent light were acquired as the modulation frequency of the incident excitation light varied from 10 to 120 MHz. After the measured data were analyzed with the coupled diffusion equations, the obtained lifetimes from the scattering measurements matched values from non-scattering measurements. Lastly, a new two-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was developed to predict light propagation through the sensors and thus was used to evaluate these sensors and to design these sensors for implantation. The model used random packing structure and considered geometric optics and two light propagation speeds. Experimental measurements of phase-shift and modulation of excitation light were made on a cubic phantom with non-fluorescent resin microspheres of 74 µm diameter, and compared to those computed from the MC simulation. The results showed that the mean phase shift (PS) deviation was 0.736° and the mean amplitude deviation was 42%. Quantitative changes in detected fluorescence phase-shift and modulation were investigated for microsphere diameter, volume fraction, refractive index, and fluorophore lifetime. We also found that even though the sensitivity of PS change in the presence of scattering was the same as the value without scattering, the values of PS were magnified due to the scattering effects.

Liang, Feng

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Optical fiber evanescent wave adsorption sensors for high-temperature gas sensing in advanced coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern advanced energy systems such as coal-fired power plants, gasifiers, or similar infrastructure present some of the most challenging harsh environments for sensors. The power industry would benefit from new, ultra-high temperature devices capable of surviving in hot and corrosive environments for embedded sensing at the highest value locations. For these applications, we are currently exploring optical fiber evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy (EWAS) based sensors consisting of high temperature core materials integrated with novel high temperature gas sensitive cladding materials. Mathematical simulations can be used to assist in sensor development efforts, and we describe a simulation code that assumes a single thick cladding layer with gas sensitive optical constants. Recent work has demonstrated that Au nanoparticle-incorporated metal oxides show a potentially useful response for high temperature optical gas sensing applications through the sensitivity of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption peak to ambient atmospheric conditions. Hence, the simulation code has been applied to understand how such a response can be exploited in an optical fiber based EWAS sensor configuration. We demonstrate that interrogation can be used to optimize the sensing response in such materials.

Buric, M.; Ohodnicky, P.; Duy, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

Final Technical Report - Advanced Optical Sensors to Minimize Energy Consumption in Polymer Extrusion Processes  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective: The objectives of this study are to develop an accurate and stable on-line sensor system to monitor color and composition on-line in polymer melts, to develop a scheme for using the output to control extruders to eliminate the energy, material and operational costs of off-specification product, and to combine or eliminate some extrusion processes. Background: Polymer extrusion processes are difficult to control because the quality achieved in the final product is complexly affected by the properties of the extruder screw, speed of extrusion, temperature, polymer composition, strength and dispersion properties of additives, and feeder system properties. Extruder systems are engineered to be highly reproducible so that when the correct settings to produce a particular product are found, that product can be reliably produced time after time. However market conditions often require changes in the final product, different products or grades may be processed in the same equipment, and feed materials vary from lot to lot. All of these changes require empirical adjustment of extruder settings to produce a product meeting specifications. Optical sensor systems that can continuously monitor the composition and color of the extruded polymer could detect process upsets, drift, blending oscillations, and changes in dispersion of additives. Development of an effective control algorithm using the output of the monitor would enable rapid corrections for changes in materials and operating conditions, thereby eliminating most of the scrap and recycle of current processing. This information could be used to identify extruder systems issues, diagnose problem sources, and suggest corrective actions in real-time to help keep extruder system settings within the optimum control region. Using these advanced optical sensor systems would give extruder operators real-time feedback from their process. They could reduce the amount of off-spec product produced and significantly reduce energy consumption. Also, because blending and dispersion of additives and components in the final product could be continuously verified, we believe that, in many cases, intermediate compounding steps could be eliminated (saving even more time and energy).

Susan J. Foulk

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Adsorption–desorption noise in plasmonic chemical/biological sensors for multiple analyte environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated intrinsic noise in plasmonic sensors caused by adsorption and desorption of gaseous analytes on the sensor surface. We analyzed a general situation when there is a larger number of different analyte species. We applied our model to calculate ...

Olga Jakši?; Zoran Jakši?; Jovan Matovi?

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sensor Data Processing for Tracking Underwater Threats Using Terascale Optical Core Devices  

SciTech Connect

A critical aspect of littoral surveillance (including port protection) involves the localization and tracking of underwater threats such as manned or unmanned autonomous underwater vehicles. In this article, we present a methodology for locating underwater threat sources from uncertain sensor network data, and illustrate the threat tracking aspects using active sonars in a matched filter framework. The novelty of the latter paradigm lies in its implementation on a tera-scale optical core processor, EnLight , recently introduced by Lenslet Laboratories. This processor is optimized for array operations, which it performs in a fixed point arithmetic architecture at tera-scale throughput. Using the EnLight 64 prototype processor, our results (i) illustrate the ability to reach a robust tracking accuracy, and (ii) demonstrate that a considerable speed-up (a factor of over 13,000) can be achieved when compared to an Intel XeonTM processor in the computation of sets of 80K-sample complex Fourier transforms that are associated with our matched filter techniques.

Barhen, Jacob [ORNL; Imam, Neena [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Characterization of a dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber coated with ruthenium-incorporated solgel  

SciTech Connect

A dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber as the substrate and dichlorotris (1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium as a fluorescence indicator is studied. Oxygen quenching characteristics of both intensity and phase were measured; the obtained characteristics showed deviation from the linear relation described by the Stern-Volmer equation. A two-layer model is proposed to explain the deviation, and main parameters can be deduced with the model.

Chu Fenghong; Yang Junjie; Cai Haiwen; Qu Ronghui; Fang Zujie

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

Kisholoy Goswami

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fiber optic detector and method for using same for detecting chemical species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Buchanan, Bruce R. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Rugged fiber optic probes and sampling systems for remote chemical analysis via the Raman technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advances in fiber optics, diode lasers, CCD detectors, dielectric and holographic optical filters, grating spectrometers, and chemometric data analysis have greatly simplified Raman spectroscopy. In order to make a rugged fiber optic Raman probe for solids/slurries like these at Savannah River, we have designed a probe that eliminates as many optical elements and surfaces as possible. The diffuse reflectance probe tip is modified for Raman scattering by installing thin dielectric in-line filters. Effects of each filter are shown for the NaNO{sub 3} Raman spectrum. By using a diode laser excitation at 780 nm, fluorescence is greatly reduced, and excellent spectra may be obtained from organic solids. At SRS, fiber optic Raman probes are being developed for in situ chemical mapping of radioactive waste storage tanks. Radiation darkening of silica fiber optics is negligible beyond 700 nm. Corrosion resistance is being evaluated. Analysis of process gas (off-gas from SRS processes) is investigated in some detail: hydrogen in nitrogen with NO{sub 2} interference. Other applications and the advantages of the method are pointed out briefly.

Nave, S.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Design and implementation of a real-time, chemical sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current methods of environmental chemical data collection are limited in both time and space. This limited set of data inhibits researchers from fully understanding the chemical processes occurring in water bodies. In order ...

Wong, Joseph Y. (Joseph Yee), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Highly Sensitive, Integrable, Multimode, Evanescent-Wave Chem/bio Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fully integrated optical chem/bio sensor complete with integrated source, chemically sensitive waveguide, detector arrays, and associated signal processing electronics on a Si-CMOS chip is… (more)

Lillie, Jeffrey J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Recent Progress in Physical and Bio-chemical Sensor Research at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote and unobtrusive detection of the presence of dangerous chemical and ... Present security sensing and monitoring technologies often fail to provide ...

177

Structure, Mechanism and Applications of Sol-Gel Clad Fiber-Optic Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kinetic barrier results in a pH hysteresis which might be an important consideration in the development of chemical

Fellows Olteanu, Marta Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thin-Film Fiber Optic Sensors for Power Control and Fault Detection. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Described is the development of an optical current measurement device, an active power conditioning system, and sol gel type thin films for the detection of magnetic fields.

Duncan, Paul Grems

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MEMS-based resonant sensor arrays : selective detection of volatile and toxic chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With growing concerns about homeland security, public health, and environmental cleanliness, there is a strong need today for robust chemical sensing systems that are portable in addition to being highly sensitive. While ...

Whitfield, George C., 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Particle Size and Optical Depth Using Polarimetric Sensor Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a conceptual approach toward the remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using the degree of polarization and polarized reflectance associated with the first three Stokes parameters, I, Q, and U, for the ...

S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou; Y. Takano; R. L. Slonaker

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Real-time optical diagnostics of graphene growth induced by pulsed chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics and mechanisms of graphene growth on Ni films at 720 -880 C have been measured using fast pulses of acetylene and real-time optical diagnostics. In situ UV-Raman spectroscopy was used to unambiguously detect isothermal graphene growth at high temperatures, measure the growth kinetics with ~ 1s temporal resolution, and estimate the fractional precipitation upon cooldown for the first time. Optical reflectivity and videography provided much faster temporal resolution. Both the growth kinetics and the fractional isothermal precipitation were found to be governed by the C2H2 partial pressure in the CVD pulse for a given film thickness and temperature, with up to ~ 94% of graphene growth occurring isothermally within 1 second at 800 C at high partial pressures. At lower partial pressures, isothermal graphene growth is shown to continue 10 seconds after the gas pulse. These flux-dependent growth kinetics are described in the context of a dissolution/precipitation model, where carbon rapidly dissolves into the Ni film and later precipitates driven by gradients in the chemical potential. The combination of pulsed-CVD and real-time optical diagnostics opens new opportunities to understand and control the fast, sub-second growth of graphene on various substrates at high temperatures.

Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Thonnard, Norbert [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Novel Applications of Fiber Optic Sensor Technology for Diagnostics of Underground Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the state of the art in the use of fiber optics in measurement applications, with particular regard to applications suitable for measuring or monitoring significant parameters for underground power cables. The report summarizes the physics of fiber-based measurement systems and discusses what measurement systems can be implemented today with commercial or near-commercial equipment.

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Eddy Covariance Measurements with Closed-Path Optical Humidity Sensors: A Feasible Concept?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Humidity spectra obtained with a closed-path optical hygrometer (LI-6262) show an apparent low-pass characteristic with a cutoff frequency varying between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz. Laboratory measurements revealed that contamination of the intake filter ...

Gerhard Peters; Bernd Fischer; Hans Münster

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optical sensor development for MCFCs: HCl detection through wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contaminants in coal gas can degrade the performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. A laser diode sensor and a wavelength modulation spectrometer have been developed capable of detecting, in situ, HCl gas at ppM levels and below on time scales < 1 min, using 25 cm path lengths. Due to intensity and overlap of {sup 18}OCO with P10 transition of HCl, sensitivity is somewhat limited (close to 100 ppB, however) because of limited S/N ratios; this will be improved by eliminating all etalon effects. Alternative HCl lines with possibly reduced spectral interference will be looked for. Detection of H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}Se will also be investigated. It was found that room-temperature Li/K carbonate can be used as prefilter for HCl contaminants.

Hanold, R.; Funk, D.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Oldenborg, R.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Embedded Sensor Technology Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber Sensors are poised to be used in future LEPs. The three primary vehicles for fiber sensors are Department 1, Joint Test Assembly (JTA), and Shelf Life (SL). The National Security Enterprise (NSE) community plans to incorporate optical sensors or systems into these vehicles. Additionally, hermetic sealing of optical systems is required if optical technology is to be integrated into LEP and future weapons applications. Hermetic seals will reduce the long-term risk of contamination which can degrade or incapacitate optical components. This study was funded through the Kansas City Plant's (KCP) ESC work package between 2007 and 2009 to develop optical sensors, identify commercial fiber sensors and hermetic connectors, and qualify these sensors against likely weapon lifetime environments.

Kennedy, Chris

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sensors and Actuators A 169 (2011) 111 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light sources. The system including optical devices could be expensive or unsuitable for long the depo- sition efficiency [13]. A precise power supply system as potentiostat is required in the electro.S. Wolfbeis, Fiber-optic chemical sensors and biosensors, Analytical Chem- istry 76 (2004) 3269­3284. [4] A

Chiao, Jung-Chih

191

Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples  

SciTech Connect

We study the miniaturisation of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6x10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 {mu}m, it detects a minimum absorbance of AU = 6 x 10{sup -5} in a probed volume of 10 pl. (authors)

Schimpf, A. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France); Canto, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA de Marcoule, DEN - DRCP - SEAA - LAMM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Bucci, D. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France); Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA de Marcoule, DEN - DRCP - SEAA - LAMM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Broquin, J. E. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics A computer program to calculate the optical properties of glazing systems and laminates. The program can be used to construct new laminates from existing components and...

193

Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

Martinez, Jennifer S. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, Karen M. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, Wynne K. (Los Alamos, NM); Shreve, Andrew P. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of a Distributed Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor for Logging Wellbore Temperature at the Beowawe and Dixie Valley Geothermal Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A distributed temperature sensor (DTS) system, utilizing Raman backscattering to measure temperatures of optical fiber, has recently been installed in production wells at the Beowawe and Dixie Valley, NV, geothermal fields. The system has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of acquiring temperature logs. However, the optical transmission of the initial fibers installed at Beawawe degraded over several months, resulting in temperature errors. Optical transmission spectra of the failed fibers indicate hydroxide contamination via hydrogen diffusion as a possible failure mechanism. Additional fibers with coatings designed to resist hydrogen diffusion were installed and have maintained their optical transmission over several months in the 340-360 F Beowawe wells. The same fibers installed in a 470 F Dixie Valley well rapidly failed. Possible methods to prevent fiber degradation include encasing the fiber in metallic buffer layer that resists hydrogen diffusion. Additional methods to correct temperature errors include using additional optical sources to measure fiber losses at the operating wavelengths. Although the DTS system is expected to have one degree F accuracy, we have observed an average accuracy of five degrees. The fiber connections appear to be the uncertainty source. Using connectors with greater stability should restore accuracy.

Smithpeter, Colin; Norman, Randy; Krumhansl, James; Benoit, Dick; Thompson, Steve

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

Piezoelectric Fiber Fabrication for Magnetoelectric Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Properties of Bifeo3: Polar Oxides for Fundamental Science and Solar Energy Applications · Piezoelectric Fiber Fabrication for Magnetoelectric Sensors

197

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physicist Sensor Science Division Ultraviolet Radiation Group. ... Ph.D. Optical Sciences and Engineering ... Orlando, FL MS Electrical Engineering, The ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sensors-00997-2005 Low-Cost Surface Mount LED Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION EDs are being used far more commonly as light sources in optical chemical sensors due to the low-cost, low-power consumption, reliability and ever increasing range of devices and wavelengths available. The increased interest in LED sources has had a major impact on low-cost component based chemical sensors, where the main goal is to achieve analytical performance without the expense of more conventional instrumentation [1-5]. Typically a photodiode is used for detection, providing good sensitivity and a significant reduction in system cost. Usually the photodiode is operated at Vbias=0V and hence itself can be considered as a lowpower sensor, however, in addition to the detector, a good quality operational amplifier and mid-to-high resolution ADC are required to complete the device. These additional components not only increase system complexity and cost, but also add to the power requirements, which is of particular importance in battery-powered s

Sensor Films Results; Roderick L. Shepherd; William S. Yerazunis; Senior Member; King Tong Lau; Dermot Diamond

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Application of Clouds Occurrence Climatology from CALIOP to Evaluate Performances of Airborne and Satellite Electro-Optical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide variety of optronic sensors, onboard satellite or airborne platform, are used for remote sensing, surveillance applications or telecommunications. Cloud presence in the field of view is one of the key factors limiting the performances of ...

A. Bizard; K. Caillault; C. Lavigne; A. Roblin; P. Chervet

200

Tests gauge LED sensors for fuel-dye measurements  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work was to develop a low cost, robust sensor to allow direct measurement of Solvent Red 164 dye concentration in off-road fuel at refineries and fuel terminals. Optical absorption sensors based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) are rugged, low-cost, have low power consumption, and can be designed to be intrinsically safe.LED-based systems have been used in a variety of chemical detection applications including heavy metals, pH, CO2, and O2. The approach for this work was to develop a sensor that could be mounted on a pipeline sight glass, precluding the need for direct contact of the sensor with the fuel. Below is described the design and testing of three different LED/photodiode sensors utilizing reflectance spectrometry for the measurement of dye concentration.

Ozanich, Richard M.; Lucke, Richard B.; Melville, Angela M.; Wright, Bob W.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Available Technologies: Plasmonic Nanocube Sensor  

Berkeley Lab researchers Hung-Jen Wu and John T. Groves have developed a plasmonic nanocube sensor – a low cost, label free optical detection tool ...

202

Optical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Optical fiber-based single-shot picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy Andrew R. Cook aÍ’ and Yuzhen Shen Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA Í‘Received 27 January 2009; accepted 29 May 2009; published online 17 July 2009Í’ A new type of single-shot transient absorption apparatus is described based on a bundle of optical fibers. The bundle contains 100 fibers of different lengths, each successively giving Ďł15 ps longer optical delay. Data are collected by imaging light from the exit of the bundle into a sample where it is overlapped with an electron pulse or laser excitation pulse, followed by imaging onto a charge coupled device Í‘CCDÍ’ detector where the intensity of light from each fiber is measured simultaneously. Application to both ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis is demonstrated. For pulse

203

UV impact on the optical properties of thin films of positive tone chemically amplified resist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemically amplified photo resist are blend materials whose main compounds are a polymer matrix and an added photo acid generator. Lithography processes that allow imaging patterns in a CAR resist films consist in exposing at first the film to UV light ... Keywords: CAR, Dill parameters, Ellipsometry

J. H. Tortai; H. Trouvé; S. Soulan; A. Akbalik Rapine

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne...

205

Optical keyboard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY); Feichtner, John D. (Fiddletown, CA); Phillips, Thomas E. (San Diego, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for overall at least maintaining, or ideally improving the achievable sensitivity.

Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

210

Chemical microsensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

Li, DeQuan (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ris-PhD-19(EN) Self Calibrating Interferometric Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interferometric Sensor Department: Optics and Plasma Research Department Risø-PhD-19(EN) January 2006 This thesis

212

Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Particulate matter sensor with a heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

Kim, Jung-Taek (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon, Korea); Luk, Vincent K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

217

Real-time, in situ film thickness metrology in a 10 Torr W chemical vapor deposition process using an acoustic sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis to establish a sensor model with an accuracy better than 1%. This was achieved in a 10 Torr W CVD achieving film thickness metrology with a 2% error using mass spectrometry or residual gas analysis scale Ulvac ERA 1000 W CVD cluster tool which is outfitted with water- cooled walls. The WF6 precursor

Rubloff, Gary W.

218

Tapered capillary optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

Hirsch, Gregory (365 Talbot Ave., Pacifica, CA 94044)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign  

SciTech Connect

A comparison between observed aerosol optical properties from the MILAGRO field campaign, which took place in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during March 2006, and values simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) model, reveals large differences. To help identify the source of the discrepancies, data from the MILAGRO campaign are used to evaluate the "aerosol chemical to aerosol optical properties" module implemented in the full chemistry version of the WRF-Chem model. The evaluation uses measurements of aerosol size distributions and chemical properties obtained at the MILAGRO T1 site. These observations are fed to the module, which makes predictions of various aerosol optical properties, including the scattering coefficient, Bscat; the absorption coefficient, Babs; and the single-scattering albedo, v0; all as a function of time. This simulation is compared with independent measurements obtained from a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) at a wavelength of 870 nm. Because of line losses and other factors, only "fine mode" aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 mm are considered here. Over a 10-day period, the simulations of hour-by-hour variations of Bscat are not satisfactory, but simulations of Babs and v0 are considerably better. When averaged over the 10-day period, the computed and observed optical properties agree within the uncertainty limits of the measurements and simulations. Specifically, the observed and calculated values are, respectively: (1) Bscat, 34.1 ± 5.1 Mm-1 versus 30.4 ± 4.3 Mm-1; (2) Babs, 9.7 ± 1.0 Mm-1 versus 11.7 ± 1.5 Mm-1; and (3) v0, 0.78 ± 0.04 and 0.74 ± 0.03. The discrepancies in values of v0 simulated by the full WRF-Chem model thus cannot be attributed to the "aerosol chemistry to optics" module. The discrepancy is more likely due, in part, to poor characterization of emissions near the T1 site, particularly black carbon emissions.

Barnard, James C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe L.; Arnott, W. P.; Laskin, Alexander

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Implantable medical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Measurement system for metal-oxide gas sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on smell sensing and classification has been developed for a long time by many ways. Most of these have been focused on bad smells, when factors of bad smells were known chemically. Many gas sensors have been developed to detect specific chemicals. ... Keywords: Metal-oxide gas sensor, Multi-channel sensors, Smell measurement

Hideo Araki; Sigeru Omatu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fibre optics: Forty years later  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a brief overview of the state of the art in fibre optics and its main applications: optical fibre communications, fibre lasers and fibre sensors for various physical property measurements. The future of fibre optics and the status of this important area of the modern technology in Russia are discussed. (fiber optics)

Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Novel Sensor for Transformer Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the progress made in the detection of acetylene and hydrogen gas dissolved in oil using novel methods of optical fiber sensing. Of note in this report are the sensitivity and resolution enhancements of the two sensing methods as well as the construction of a field-testable prototype. The sensor’s non-sensitivity to several other gases commonly found in insulating transformer oil is also described. With some further development, the resolution of gas detection can still be ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

225

for distributed wireless sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMS technology is enabling the development of inexpensive, autonomous wireless sensor nodes with volumes ranging from cubic mm to several cubic cm. These tiny sensor nodes can form rapidly deployed, massive distributed networks to allow unobtrusive, spatially dense, sensing and communication. MEMS enable these devices by reducing both the volume and energy consumption of various components. This paper will review some of the wireless sensor nodes under development and applicable MEMS devices for small and efficient optical communication, micropower generation, and sensing. In addition, CMOS post-process micromachining will be discussed as a method of achieving low cost and high integration. 1.

Brett A. Warneke; Kristofer S. J. Pister

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Physical and Chemical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data image data image Physical and Chemical Applications Research in this area includes: Chemical analysis (femtosecond laser ablation). Advanced sensors (laser ultrasonics). Advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy- hydrogen storage, nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes, nanowires, and nanoparticles). Photons to fuels (biosynthetic pathways for generating hydrocarbon biofuels in photosynthetic organisms). Advanced Sensor Development Sensor-based control of industrial processes can help companies: Decrease production costs; Reduce waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines; Lower manufacturing downtime from equipment maintenance; Increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes; Detect equipment failure early, before it becomes a major liability;

227

Use of Optical Microscopy to Examine Crystallite Nucleation and Growth in Thermally Annealed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a simple method to investigate crystallite nucleation and growth in stepwise, thermally annealed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot wire chemical vapor deposition a-Si:H films. By confining film thicknesses to the range 500-4000 {angstrom}, optical microscopy in the reflection mode can be used to readily detect crystallites in the thermally annealed a-Si:H lattice. Measurements of the crystallite density versus annealing time for identically prepared films of different thickness show that the crystallite nucleation rate is smaller for thinner films, suggesting that crystallite nucleation is homogeneous, in agreement with previous results. A comparison of film nucleation rates with those obtained by other methods on identically prepared films shows excellent agreement, thus establishing the validity of the current technique. The potential effect of impurity (oxygen) incorporation during the stepwise annealing in air is shown not to affect crystallite nucleation and growth, in that SIMS oxygen profiles for stepwise versus continuous annealing show not only similar impurity profiles but also similar bulk impurity densities.

Mahan, A. H.; Dabney, M. S.; Reedy, Jr R. C.; Molina, D.; Ginley, D. S.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

New-generation absolute angle sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes new schemes for absolute angle sensors designed on the modern element base (megapixel CCD- and CMOS-matrices). In these schemes communication between a measured object and a receiving module is organized through an optical channel ...

Yu. A. Grodetskii; Yu. E. Dukarevich; Yu. M. Ivanov

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

MEMS CHIP CO2 SENSOR FOR BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an affordable, reliable sensor to enable demand controlled ventilation (DCV). A significant portion of total energy consumption in the United States is used for heating or air conditioning (HVAC) buildings. To assure occupant safety and fresh air levels in large buildings, and especially those with sealed windows, HVAC systems are frequently run in excess of true requirements as automated systems cannot now tell the occupancy level of interior spaces. If such a sensor (e.g. thermostat sized device) were available, it would reduce energy use between 10 and 20% in such buildings. A quantitative measure of ''fresh air'' is the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) present. An inert gas, CO{sub 2} is not easily detected by chemical sensors and is usually measured by infrared spectroscopy. Ion Optics research developed a complete infrared sensor package on a single MEMS chip. It contains the infrared (IR) source, IR detector and IR filter. The device resulting from this DOE sponsored research has sufficient sensitivity, lifetime, and drift rate to meet the specifications of commercial instrument manufacturers who are now testing the device for use in their building systems.

Anton Carl Greenwald

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Molecular sieve sensors for selective detection at the nanogram level  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a selective chemical sensor for selective detection of chemical entities even at the nanogram level. The invention further relates to methods of using the sensor. The sensor comprises: (a) a piezoelectric substrate capable of detecting mass changes resulting from adsorption of material thereon; and (b) a coating applied to the substrate, which selectively sorbs chemical entities of a size smaller than a preselected magnitude.

Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Brown, Kelly D. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A novel tactile sensor for detecting lumps in breast tissue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a compact tactile sensor in order to guide the clinician or the self-user for non-invasive detection of lumps. The new design has an advantage over the existing discrete tactile sensors and detection methods by efficiently sensing force ... Keywords: artificial palpation, breast cancer, haptics, lump detection, optical array sensor, tactile mapping

Mehmet Ayyildiz; Burak Guclu; Mustafa Z. Yildiz; Cagatay Basdogan

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dual-transduction-mode sensing approach for chemical detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart devices such as electronic nose have been developed for application in many fields like national security, defense, environmental regulation, health care, pipeline monitoring and food analysis. Despite a large array of individual sensors, these devices still lack the ability to identify a target at a very low concentration out of a mixture of odors, limited by a single type of transduction as the sensing response to distinguish one odor from another. Here, we propose a new sensor architecture empowering each individual sensor with multi-dimensional transduction signals. The resolving power of our proposed electronic nose is thereby multiplied by a set of different and independent variables which synergistically will provide a unique combined fingerprint for each analyte. We demonstrate this concept using a Light Emitting Organic Field-Effect Transistor (LEOFET). Sensing response has been observed on both electrical and optical output signals from a green LEOFET upon exposure to an explosive taggant, with optical signal exhibiting much higher sensitivity. This new sensor architecture opens a field of devices for smart detection of chemical and biological targets.

Wang, Liang (Frank); Swensen, James S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Team communications among autonomous sensor swarms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider team (swarm) of unmanned vehicles (UVs) equipped with various sensors (videos, chemicals, etc). Those swarms need efficient communication to feed sensed data, communicate data to other swarms, to navigate and, more generally, ...

Mario Gerla; Yunjung Yi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Toward Wide-Angle Microvision Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving computer vision on microscale devices is a challenge. On these platforms, the power and mass constraints are severe enough for even the most common computations (matrix manipulations, convolution, etc.) to be difficult. This paper proposes ... Keywords: Computational sensors, micro/nano computer vision, optical templates, optical computing, micro/nano robotics

Sanjeev J. Koppal, Ioannis Gkioulekas, Travis Young, Hyunsung Park, Kenneth B. Crozier, Geoffrey L. Barrows, Todd Zickler

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Micromechanical calorimetric sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Study of radiation hardness of optical fibers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Optical fiber manufacturing is a multibillion dollar industry today, and optical fibers have found diverse applications, such as telecommunication, medicine, nuclear and chemical industries, and… (more)

Thomas, Rayburn D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams  

SciTech Connect

An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences. We will concentrate on the spectral region near 1530 nm, where other researchers have had some success in measuring ammonia.

Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF NITRIC OXIDE AND AMMONIA CONCENTRATIONS BY OPTICAL ABSORPTION IN PARTICLE-LADEN COMBUSTION EXHAUST STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2 described in this progress report, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences.

Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The...

247

Sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, further, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

A novel 1-gram insect based device measuring visual motion along 5 optical directions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Leppvuori, and N. Franceschini, "A miniature bio-inspired optic flow sensor based on low temperature co-fired

249

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

This series of inventions addresses harsh environment sensing at temperatures above approximately 400-500oC using novel sensing materials that are compatible with optical sensing platforms as well as more conventional resistive platforms. The sensors ...

250

Microbar sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass microsensor is fabricated with a microcantilever oscillated by a piezoelectric transducer. A chemical coating having absorptive or adsorptive affinity for a specifically targeted chemical or compound is applied to the microcantilever for oscillation in the monitored atmosphere. Molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the microcantilever coating resulting in an oscillating mass increase which influences the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. The rate at which the coated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is functional of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change is related to the concentration of the target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. Such oscillation frequency changes are detected by a center-crossing photodiode which responds to a laser diode beam reflected from the microcantilever surface resulting in an output frequency from the photodiode that is synchronous with the microcantilever frequency.

Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

253

Theory, electro-optical design, testing, and calibration of a prototype atmospheric supersaturation, humidity, and temperature sensor. Final report Mar 81-Jul 82  

SciTech Connect

A new infrared differential absorption - passive thermal emission based instrument designed to make accurate in-cloud measurements of absolute humidity, air temperature, relative humidity, and ice and water supersaturations has been developed. Absolute humidity is measured by the differential infrared absorption of a broad-band light beam between 2.45 microns wavelength and the strongly absorbing water vapor band at 2.67 microns. Air temperature is sensed by a passive radiometric measurement of the Planck's law radiance emitted by carbon dioxide molecules in their very intense emission band at 4.25 microns. Significant operational advantages over previous 14-16 micron band radiometers are achieved. These non-contact optical measurements of absolute humidity and true air temperature can then be combined to yield relative humidity values with respect to both water and ice which remain valid in condensing supersaturated conditions and in spite of hydrometeors in the sample volume.

Nelson, L.D.

1982-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Temperature Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Protection tube and thermowell materials...applications such as steam lines, oil refineries, and chemical

255

Thin-film spectroscopic sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed an integrated spectrometer for chemical analysis by evanescent electromagnetic radiation absorption in a reaction volume. The spectrometer comprises a noninteractive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device. There is further disclosed a chemical sensor to determine the pressure and concentration of a chemical species in a mixture comprising an interactive waveguide, a substrate, an entrance grating and an exit grating, an electromagnetic radiation source, and an electromagnetic radiation sensing device.

Burgess, Jr., Lloyd W. (Seattle, WA); Goldman, Don S. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

PNGV NOx sensors and systems for engine management: Revision 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and General Motors` AC Rochester Division formed an agreement to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides from automobiles by developing a fiber-optic pressure sensor integrated into a spark plug and a new spark plug material with improved thermal conductivity and anti-fouling characteristics. These improvements will help the US auto industry`s global competitiveness by improving fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions. The reconfigured DOE Complex will benefit from enhanced process control by meeting safety requirements that limit worker exposure to chemicals and radiation in automated facilities.

NONE

1996-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors R&D for Nuclear Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-optic sensors offer a broad range of advantages over traditional electrical sensors. These advantages include electromagnetic immunity, significantly lower signal transmission loss, high signal transfer rate (or wide operating spectrum), and better multiplexing capability. Among the many types of fiber-optic sensors, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors stand out because of their simple mechanical structure, ease of compliance with industrial standards, simple multiplexing, and adaptable manufacturing...

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Humidity Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Applications for humidity sensors...parts 5 to 40 0 to 50 Magnetic heads, LSIs, ICs Agriculture, forestry stockbreeding Greenhouse air conditioning 5 to 40 0 to 100 Air conditioning Dew prevention in tealeaf growing -10 to 60 50 to 100 Dew prevention Broiler farming 20 to 25 40 to 70 Health control Measurement Thermostatic bath -5 to 100 0 to...

259

Stray Light Correction of the Marine Optical System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Marine Optical System is a spectrograph-based sensor used on the Marine Optical Buoy for the vicarious calibration of ocean color satellite sensors. It is also deployed from ships in instruments used to develop bio-optical algorithms that ...

Michael E. Feinholz; Stephanie J. Flora; Mark A. Yarbrough; Keith R. Lykke; Steven W. Brown; B. Carol Johnson; Dennis K. Clark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN COASTAL WATERS OF THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a data acquisition assembly that takes advantage of the optical fiber and network communication systems Optical Oceanography Group, with sensors mounted on their "Slowdrop" profiling system. Two separate ac-9's vehicle configuration and optical sensor acquisition system has been successfully tested on a recent

Sosik, Heidi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology  

SciTech Connect

This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

Milnes, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wireless sensor network survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless sensor network (WSN) has important applications such as remote environmental monitoring and target tracking. This has been enabled by the availability, particularly in recent years, of sensors that are smaller, cheaper, and intelligent. These ... Keywords: Protocols, Sensor network deployment, Sensor network services, Survey, Wireless sensor network

Jennifer Yick; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Multiple channel optical data acquisition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple channel optical data acquisition system is provided in which a plurality of remote sensors monitoring specific process variable are interrogated by means of a single optical fiber connecting the remote station/sensors to a base station. The remote station/sensors derive all power from light transmitted through the fiber from the base station. Each station/sensor is individually accessed by means of a light modulated address code sent over the fiber. The remote station/sensors use a single light emitting diode to both send and receive light signals to communicate with the base station and provide power for the remote station. The system described can power at least 100 remote station/sensors over an optical fiber one mile in length.

Fasching, G.E.; Goff, D.R.

1985-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor  

SciTech Connect

This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we expect the dynamic range to be up to 180 dB. Currently, we have observed the noise floor in a 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz bandwidth to be near -160 dB/Hz relative to 1 m2/s4. To meet the objectives of this program, we are finalizing the design of a 3 axis sensor for shallow borehole deployments, with a diameter of 40 mm and a length a 150 mm.

Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sniffing Out a Better Chemical Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In humans, there are about 350 types of sensory neurons and many copies of each type; dogs and mice have several hundreds more types of ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Battery-free Wireless Sensor Network For Advanced Fossil-Fuel Based Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the project supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG26-07NT4306. The aim of the project was to conduct basic research into battery-free wireless sensing mechanism in order to develop novel wireless sensors and sensor network for physical and chemical parameter monitoring in a harsh environment. Passive wireless sensing platform and five wireless sensors including temperature sensor, pressure sensor, humidity sensor, crack sensor and networked sensors developed and demonstrated in our laboratory setup have achieved the objective for the monitoring of various physical and chemical parameters in a harsh environment through remote power and wireless sensor communication, which is critical to intelligent control of advanced power generation system. This report is organized by the sensors developed as detailed in each progress report.

Yi Jia

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks are becoming increasingly pervasive. Existing methods of aggregation in sensor networks offer mostly standard mathematical operators over homogeneous data types. In this paper, we instead focus on supporting emerging scenarios in which ...

Sanem Kabadayi; Adam Pridgen; Christine Julien

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dynamic sensor tasking in heterogeneous, mobile sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern sensor environments often attempt to combine several sensors into a single sensor network. The nodes of this network are generally heterogeneous and may vary with respect to sensor complexity, sensor operational ...

Jones, Peter B. (Peter B.), S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Airborne Characterization of the Chemical, Optical, and Meteorological Properties, and Origins of a Combined Ozone-Haze Episode over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne observations of trace gases, particle size distributions, and particle optical properties were made during a constant altitude transect from New Hampshire to Maryland on 14 August 2002, the final day of a multiday haze and ozone (O3) ...

Brett F. Taubman; Lackson T. Marufu; Charles A. Piety; Bruce G. Doddridge; Jeffrey W. Stehr; Russell R. Dickerson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fiber optic detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. (1998), Determination of chemical- structural changes inOptical, physical, and chemical properties of tar ballsE. (2001), Study on the chemical character of water soluble

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Micro-position sensor using faraday effect  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

McElfresh, Michael (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew (Pittsburgh, PA); Silveira, Joseph P. (Tracy, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

Ding, S. Y.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optical Sensor for Unknown Gas Detection  

Giving animals in need a HOME. November 14, 2013. LLNL, Intel, ... Breath analysis for explosives or radiological exposure assessment in Homeland Security applications;

278

Sandia National Laboratories Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

As shown in the figure, a small excitation source, such as a laser or LED, excites a localized area of fluorescence at an unknown position along the

279

Colorimetric Detection of Formaldehyde: A Sensor for Air Quality Measurements and a Pollution-Warning Kit for Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new chemical sensors for the detection of formaldehyde, a ubiquitous and carcinogenic indoor air pollutant is described. These sensors are based on the use of nanoporous matrices acting as sponge to trap the targeted pollutant and ... Keywords: Formaldehyde, colorimetric detection, chemical sensor, indoor air, nanoporous matrices, sol-gel

S. Mariano; W. Wang; G. Brunelle; Y. Bigay; T. H. Tran-Thi

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Six degree of freedom sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Six degree of freedom sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

Vann, C.S.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Micromechanical potentiometric sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Optical and mechanical behavior of the optical fiber infrasound sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. The mostfrom Nuclear Ex- plosions – Part II: The Soviet Test of 30

DeWolf, Scott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optically-pumped UV Lasing from a GaN-based VCSEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optically-pumped UV Lasing from a GaN-based VCSEL Optically-pumped UV Lasing from a GaN-based VCSEL by J. Han, K. E. Waldrip, J. J. Figiel, S. R. Lee, and A. J. Fischer* Motivation-Compact ultraviolet sources are required for advanced chemical and biological sensors, high density optical storage, and as pump sources for phosphors used in solid-state white lighting. Although GaN-based edge- emitting lasers operating near 400 nm are available commercially, shorter wavelengths as well as other lasing geometries have remained a challenge. In particular, electrically-injected vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have not been demonstrated in the III-Nitrides. VCSELs have unique advantages due to their low cost, compact size, and well- defined circular output beam. Optoelectronic sources based on UV VCSELS will be the

285

Chemical leukoderma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy sensor and methods for using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A surface plasmon resonance ("SPR") probe with a detachable sensor head and system and methods for using the same in various applications is described. The SPR probe couples fiber optic cables directly to an SPR substrate that has a generally planar input surface and a generally curved reflecting surface, such as a substrate formed as a hemisphere. Forming the SPR probe in this manner allows the probe to be miniaturized and operate without the need for high precision, expensive and bulky collimating or focusing optics. Additionally, the curved reflecting surface of the substrate can be coated with one or multiple patches of sensing medium to allow the probe to detect for multiple analytes of interest or to provide multiple readings for comparison and higher precision. Specific applications for the probe are disclosed, including extremely high sensitive relative humidity and dewpoint detection for, e.g., moisture-sensitive environment such as volatile chemical reactions. The SPR probe disclosed operates with a large dynamic range and provides extremely high quality spectra despite being robust enough for field deployment and readily manufacturable.

Anderson, Brian Benjamin (N. Augusta, SC); Nave, Stanley Eugene (Evans, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sensors for Screening and Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Much attention, in fact an entire session at this conference, is being devoted to protecting the United States against human threats--individuals who may pose a danger by their mere presence on US soil. However, tomorrow's terrorists will employ weapons in their attacks, and we must also be diligent in preventing these weapons from reaching their targets. Sensors can play an important role in detecting these weapons before they achieve their desired effects. A sensor system can best be understood as a way of automating search techniques that would normally be carried out by a human's touch and vision senses, or by a dog's sniffing capabilities. The list of potential threats is long, including nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological weapons, and each presents its own challenges. However, any effective system must meet the following requirements: (1) Sensor systems must be operationally practical. Delays must be kept to a minimum. The systems must be safe to operate. Individual privacy and corporate proprietary information must be protected. The systems must be part of a viable concept of operations; i.e., they must provide information that can enable effective, preemptive actions to be taken. (2) Sensors systems must be highly sensitive, providing a low probability of missed detections (false negatives). Our adversaries will conceal their device from detection, and they will likely probe our defenses for any weaknesses. Our systems must be robust against these techniques. (3) Sensor systems must give a low probability of false alarms (false positives). Our response to the detection of such a weapon will marshal substantial resources and, in many scenarios, be highly disruptive to the general population. Thus a system that gives frequent false alarms will soon be ignored.

Dye, D.H.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ACEQ sensors than for chem-bio sensors 1 Under groundlocations In contrast to chem-bio sensors, false positives (or Implementation, Part 1: Chem. -Bio-Sensors, ACER Report,

Gundel, Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Full spectrum optical safeguard  

SciTech Connect

An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Giant magnetoresistive sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Digital Sensor Technology  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Online distributed sensor selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key problem in sensor networks is to decide which sensors to query when, in order to obtain the most useful information (e.g., for performing accurate prediction), subject to constraints (e.g., on power and bandwidth). In many applications the utility ... Keywords: approximation algorithms, distributed multiarmed bandit algorithms, sensor networks, submodular optimization

Daniel Golovin; Matthew Faulkner; Andreas Krause

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Method Of Signal Amplification In Multi-Chromophore Luminescence Sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescence-based method for highly sensitive and selective detection of analyte molecules is proposed. The method employs the energy transfer between two or more fluorescent chromophores in a carefully selected polymer matrix. In one preferred embodiment, signal amplification has been achieved in the fluorescent sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) using two dyes, 3-aminofluoranthene (AM) and Nile Red (NR), in a hydrogen bond acidic polymer matrix. The selected polymer matrix quenches the fluorescence of both dyes and shifts dye emission and absorption spectra relative to more inert matrices. Upon DMMP sorption, the AM fluorescence shifts to the red at the same time the NR absorption shifts to the blue, resulting in better band overlap and increased energy transfer between chromophores. In another preferred embodiment, the sensitive material is incorporated into an optical fiber system enabling efficient excitation of the dye and collecting the fluorescent signal form the sensitive material on the remote end of the system. The proposed method can be applied to multichromophore luminescence sensor systems incorporating N-chromophores leading to N-fold signal amplification and improved selectivity. The method can be used in all applications where highly sensitive detection of basic gases, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), Sarin, Soman and other chemical warfare agents having basic properties, is required, including environmental monitoring, chemical industry and medicine.

Levitsky, Igor A. (Fall River, MA); Krivoshlykov, Sergei G. (Shrewsbury, MA)

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Printed optics: 3d printing of embedded optical elements for interactive devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a b c d Figure 1: Custom optical elements are fabricated with 3D printing and embedded in interactive devices, opening up new possibilities for interaction including: unique display surfaces made from 3D printed ‘light pipes ’ (a), novel internal illumination techniques (b), custom optical sensors (c), and embedded optoelectronics (d). We present an approach to 3D printing custom optical elements for interactive devices labelled Printed Optics. Printed Optics enable sensing, display, and illumination elements to be directly embedded in the casing or mechanical structure of an interactive device. Using these elements, unique display surfaces, novel illumination techniques, custom optical sensors, and embedded optoelectronic components can be digitally fabricated for rapid, high fidelity, highly customized interactive devices. Printed Optics is part of our long term vision for interactive devices that are 3D printed in their entirety. In this paper we explore the possibilities for this vision afforded by fabrication of custom optical elements using today’s 3D printing technology.

Karl D. D. Willis; Eric Brockmeyer; Scott E. Hudson; Ivan Poupyrev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

Long-term nitrate measurements in the ocean using the In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: sensor integration into the Apex profiling float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free, optical nitrate sensors (ISUS: In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer) can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

298

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics LBL Logo A-Z CSD Research Highlights CSD Directory Chemical Sciences Division A-Z Index Phone Book Search Berkeley Lab INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH PROGRAMS Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences Catalytic Science Chemical Physics The Glenn T. Seaborg Center (GTSC) STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD > Research Programs > Chemical Physics The Chemical Physics Program of the Chemical Science Division of LBNL is concerned with the development of both experimental and theoretical methodologies for studying molecular structure and dynamical processes at the most fundamental level, and with the application of these to specific

300

Application of an all-solid-state diode-laser-based sensor for carbon monoxide detection by optical absorption in the 4.4 ? 4.8 µm spectral region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for mid-infrared absorption measurements of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is difference-frequency mixed (DFM) with the output of a 550-mW diode-pumped cw Nd:YAG laser in a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal to produce tunable cw radiation in the mid-infrared. The wavelength of the 860-nm ECDL can be coarse tuned between 860.78 to 872.82 nm allowing the sensor to be operated in the 4.4 ? 4.8 µm region. Results from single-pass mid-IR direct absorption experiments for CO concentration measurements are discussed. CO measurements were performed in CO/CO2/N2 mixtures in a room temperature gas cell that allowed the evaluation of the sensor operation and data reduction procedures. Field testing was performed at two locations: in the exhaust of a well-stirred reactor (WSR) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the exhaust of a gas turbine at Honeywell Engines and Systems. Field tests demonstrated the feasibility of the sensor for operation in harsh combustion environments but much improvement in the sensor design and operation was required. Experiments in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air CO2-doped flames were performed featuring two-line thermometry in the 4.8 µm spectral region. The sensor concentration measurement uncertainty was estimated at 2% for gas cell testing. CO concentration measurements agreed within 15% of conventional extractive sampling at WSR, and for the flame experiments the repeatability of the peak absorption gives a system uncertainty of 10%. The noise equivalent CO detection limit for these experiments was estimated at 2 ppm per meter, for combustion gas at 1000 K assuming a SNR ratio of 1.

Rodolfo, Barron Jimenez

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SensorTran | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SensorTran SensorTran Jump to: navigation, search Name SensorTran Place Austin, Texas Zip 78701 Product Austin, Texas-based designer of fibre optic-based Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) systems and solutions for the energy industry, with applications in asset and environmental monitoring. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

Martin, James E. (Tijeras, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Anderson, Robert A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fiber optic refractive index monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

Weiss, Jonathan David (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Two applications of the Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two important applications of the fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI) sensor are investigated: (1) an optical binary switch for aerospace application, and (2) an FFPI weigh-in-motion sensor for measuring the weight of trucks traveling down a highway. In the fiber optical switch, the FFPI sensor is bonded to a copper cantilever to sense the elongation of cavity length induced by force applied to the end of the cantilever via a pushed button. Light from a superluminescent diode light source passes through a scanned Michelson interferometer and is reflected from a sensing FFPI and a reference FFPI to produce a fringe pattern. A secondary interferometer uses a distributed feedback laser light source to compensate for irregularities in the mechanical scanning rate of the moving stage to achieve precision measurement of the optical path difference. The system is calibrated by applying known weights to the cantilever. The elongation measured by the FFPI sensor shows excellent linearity as a function of the force applied, and little hysteresis was observed. By comparing the measured force to a threshold, the system produces a binary signal that indicates the state of the pilotactuated system; i. e., whether or not the button has been pushed. In FFPI weigh-in-motion sensors system, the FFPI sensors are installed in metal bars so that they will experience the strain induced by applied loads and are connected to the Signal Conditioning Unit (SCU). The SCU determines the induced phase shift in the FFPI and produces voltage outputs proportional to the phase shifts. Laboratory Material Testing System tests show that the fiber optic sensor response is a fairly linear function of the axial displacement. In highway tests the FFPI sensors showed strong responses and consistently reproduced the expected characteristics of truck wheel crossings. A falling weight deflectometer was used to calibrate the sensor response and predict unknown loads. All sensors in steel bars and aluminum bars showed excellent repeatability and accurate predictions, with an average relative percentage error within 2%. The study on sensor response variation with applied load positions shows a bell shaped distribution. Truck tests on the road sensors indicate that the repeatability of wheel crossings at similar position is good. The sensor can accurately measure axle spacing, speed, and truck class.

Xie, Zhaoxia

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced Geothermal Optical Transducer (AGOT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's geothermal pressure-temperature measuring tools are short endurance, high value instruments, used sparingly because their loss is a major expense. In this project LEL offered to build and test a rugged, affordable, downhole sensor capable ofretuming an uninterrupted data stream at pressures and of 10,000 psi and temperatures up to 250 C, thus permitting continuous deep-well logging. It was proposed to meet the need by specializing LEL's patented 'Twin Column Transducer' technology to satisfy the demands of geothermal pressure/temperature measurements. TCT transducers have very few parts, none of which are moving parts, and all of which can be fabricated from high-temperature super alloys or from ceramics; the result is an extremely rugged device, essentially impervious to chemical attack and readily modified to operate at high pressure and temperature. To measure pressure and temperature they capitalize on the relative expansion of optical elements subjected to thermal or mechanical stresses; if one element is maintained at a reference pressure while the other is opened to ambient, the differential displacement then serves as a measure of pressure. A transducer responding to temperature rather than pressure is neatly created by 'inverting' the pressure-measuring design so that both deflecting structures see identical temperatures and temperature gradients, but whose thermal expansion coefficients are deliberately mismatched to give differential expansion. The starting point for development of a PT Tool was the company's model DPT feedback-stabilized 5,000 psi sensor (U.S. Patent 5,311,014, 'Optical Transducer for Measuring Downhole Pressure', claiming a pressure transducer capable of measuring static, dynamic, and true bi-directional differential pressure at high temperatures), shown in the upper portion of Figure 1. The DPT occupies a 1 x 2 x 4-inch volume, weighs 14 ounces, and is accurate to 1 percent of full scale. Employing a pair of identical, low-expansion, pressurized tubes machined from a single piece of Ni-spane-C 902 alloy, the instrument is insensitive to temperature- and temperature-gradient-induced errors and, by virtue of its inherent ruggedness, withstands 50G shocks and 100G acceleration. In operation the DPT sensor employs a micro-measurement technology employing the variation of signal amplitude as opposed illuminating and detector fibers deviate from their initial alignment under the influence of pressure forces. Phase I demonstrated that a temperature-sensing column can readily be appended to this device, transforming it into a 250 C-plus pressure-temperature Tool. Phase I testing of an unsophisticated laboratory transducer proved the concept's viability; the test instrument was linear to 5,000 psi (its design limit), exhibited 10 psi sensitivity (0.2 % of full scale), and demonstrated excellent repeatability when cycled from 0 to 5,000 psi and back. The impediments to extrapolating from this device to a working transducer were, therefore, practical engineering problems rather than fundamental limitations imposed by physics. One of these was packaging the sensing unit in a housing sufficiently robust and small enough in diameter for insertion through several kilometers of typical geothermal pipe; another was designing it to carry auxiliary weight great enough to drop the instrument against a large pressure gradient, while at the same time making provision for easy recovery via standard 'fishing' tools should the transducer separate from its cable and fall into the well. An optimal arrangement of optical delivery and signal extraction elements and their configuration was to be selected and suitable signal and data processing hardware and software provided.

None

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Interactive optical panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy efficient sensor node implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. ... Keywords: acoustic, distributed sensor network (dsn), dsp, fpga, seismic, vehicle classification, video

Jan R. Frigo; Eric Y. Raby; Sean M. Brennan; Christophe Wolinski; Charles Wagner; Francois Charot; Edward Rosten; Vinod K. Kulathumani

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test vehicles to collect several safety-related signals of interest to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors is expected to make possible a number of safety-related analyses such as determining the frequency and severity of braking events and tracking tire pressure changes over time. Because these signals are posted to the vehicle's databus, they also have the potential to be

313

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Express Licensing Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Express Licensing Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Negotiable Licensing Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Express Licensing Foil electron multiplier Express Licensing Hydrogen Sensor

314

PNNL: Available Technologies: Sensors  

Non-Contact Sensor for Measuring the Density and Speed of Sound of a Liquid Contained in a Pipeline or Vessel; Real-Time Fluid Viscometer in Contact ...

315

New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Miniature Optical Particle Counter for In Situ Aircraft Aerosol Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modification of a commercial Met One 237A optical sensor to accept custom electronics consisting of a single logarithmic amplifier providing 256 size bins over the 0.3–14-?m diameter range is described. Configuration of the optical particle ...

Antony D. Clarke; Norman C. Ahlquist; Steven Howell; Ken Moore

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nitrogen oxide -- Sensors and systems for engine management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this Cooperative Research and Development (CRADA) effort is to further develop sensors and sensor systems in order to meet current and anticipated air emissions requirements due to the operation of Defense Program facilities and the emission standards imposed on new vehicles operating in this country. Specific objectives of this work are to be able to measure and control on-line and in real-time, emissions, engine operation, air-to-fuel intake ratios, and throttle/accelerator positions in future models of consumer automobiles. Sensor and application specific integrated circuit developments within Lockheed Martin Energy Systems are applicable to the monitoring and engine controls needed by General Motors. In the case of emissions sensors, base technology in thick/thin film sensors and optical systems will be further developed to address the combination of high temperature and accumulated deposits expected in the exhaust stream. Other technologies will also be explored to measure fuel-to-air ratios and technologies such as fiber optic and acoustic wave devices that are applicable to the combustion sensing on an individual base. Two non-contact rotary position sensors have been developed for use in control-by-wire throttle control applications. The two CRADA developed sensors consist of a non-contact, differential capacitance position transducer and a custom complementary metal oxide semiconductor (C-MOS) application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) suitable for use in both passenger and engine compartments.

Hiller, J.M.; Bryan, W.L. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, C.E. [General Motors, Inc., Flint, MI (United States). A.C. Rochester Div.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

319

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings July 23, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what

320

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings July 23, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect

A sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as wind speed and direction pairs with the percentage of occurrence of the pairs over the historical period. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate population at risk against standard exposure levels. Sensor locations are determined via a dynamic programming algorithm where threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Froth height level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single sensor, comprised of a tube located near the foaming liquid, and another well away from the first, are used to determine the existence of foam in the vicinity of the probe. Two sensors a known distance apart can be used to locate the froth assuming a uniform froth density. The present invention utilizes the pressure differential existing between process chamber ambient pressure and the froth pressure to determine the existence of a froth and its location. Where froth density is not constant, multiple sensors at differing heights with respect to each other, or a single movable sensor, are used. Information derived using the multiple or movable sensor yields unambiguous froth density and height data.

Glaser, J.W.; Holmes, L.; Upadhye, R.S.; Wilder, J.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

International Conference on Experimental Mechanics We describe a methodology to relate optical signals to surface motion, and apply it to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The telescopic optical system is shown with the fiber-optically coupled single-element sensor. Figures 19 and 20 with the optical measurements. We show how the optical system is capable of detecting theoretically expected modal achromatic telescope Meade Optical flip-mirror Model 647 Fiber-optically coupled near-infrared (1.6 micron

Kielkopf, John

324

Energy harvesting Wheel Speed Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a prototype energy harvesting autonomous sensor, called the Autonomous Wheel Speed Sensor (AWSS), that is targeted for operation in the Electronic Braking… (more)

Parthasarathy, Dhasarathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optical studies of the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}RSO{sub 3} R = CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}, CHFCF{sub 2} and CHF system: Chemical tuning of the counterion  

SciTech Connect

The authors compare the polarized optical spectra of the organic metal {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFSO{sub 3} and the {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material with those of the first fully organic superconductor {beta}{double_prime}-ET{sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. The small chemical modification of the counterion has a dramatic effect on the spectral and charge transport properties of these materials, and they discuss their electronic structure in terms of band structure, many-body effects, and disorder. Based on structural differences in the anion pocket of the three salts, they conclude that the unusual electronic excitations observed in the {beta}{double_prime}-(ET){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CHFCF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} metal/insulator material are caused by disorder-related localization.

Olejniczak, I.; Jones, B. R.; Dong, J.; Pigos, J. M.; Zhu, Z.; Garlach, A. D.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Schlueter, J. A.; Ward, B. H.; Morales, E.; Kini, A. M.; Winter, R. W.; Mohtasham, J.; Gard, G. L.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Micro-Machined Thin Film Sensor Arrays For The Detection Of H2, Containing Gases, And Method Of Making And Using The Same.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a hydrogen sensor including a thin film sensor element formed by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD), on a micro-hotplate structure. The thin film sensor element includes a film of a hydrogen-interactive metal film that reversibly interacts with hydrogen to provide a correspondingly altered response characteristic, such as optical transmissivity, electrical conductance, electrical resistance, electrical capacitance, magneto resistance, photoconductivity, etc., relative to the response characteristic of the film in the absence of hydrogen. The hydrogen-interactive metal film may be overcoated with a thin film hydrogen-permeable barrier layer to protect the hydrogen-interactive film from deleterious interaction with non-hydrogen species. The hydrogen permeable barrier may comprise species to scavenge oxygen and other like species. The hydrogen sensor of the invention may be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently configured as a hand-held apparatus.

DiMeo, Jr., Frank (Danbury, CT); Baum, Thomas H. (New Fairfield, CT)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

An Operational Real-Time Ocean Sensor Network in the Gulf of Maine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) was established in the summer of 2001 as a prototype real-time observing system that now includes eleven solar-powered buoys with physical and optical sensors, four shore-based long-range HF radar surface ... Keywords: CODAR, GoMOOS, Gulf of Maine, Ocean Observing Systems, Sensor networks, neural networks, ocean optics, real-time

Neal R. Pettigrew; Collin S. Roesler; Francois Neville; Heather E. Deese

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

NETL: Gasification Systems - Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation Virginia Polytechnic Institute Project No.: DE-FC26-99FT40685 Phase I - The Photonics Laboratory at Virginia Tech has...

330

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

RF current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electrochemical micro sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

OPTICS5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Last Updated: 09/11/13 Table of Contents INSTALLATION EXECUTION bullet ** Operating Systems -- Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista 64 bit ** Optics5 may not work correctly with regional/locale settings using "," as a decimal separator. bullet Which Windows operating systems can be used to run Optics? "Class Does Not Support Automation or Expected Interface" error message bullet How much hard disk space should be available to install Optics? Optics user manual bullet I receive a virus warning (nimda-virus) when installing Optics. What should I do? NFRC Procedure for Applied Films bullet I have installed Optics but I can't find the program or the icon.

334

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor concept for deep space exploration Research directions Weapons chemistry and nuclear performance Radiological, nuclear, and chemical signatures Energy production,...

335

Optical state-of-charge monitor for batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the instantaneous state-of-charge of a battery in which change in composition with discharge manifests itself as a change in optical absorption. In a lead-acid battery, the sensor comprises a fiber optic system with an absorption cell or, alternatively, an optical fiber woven into an absorbed-glass-mat battery. In a lithium-ion battery, the sensor comprises fiber optics for introducing light into the anode to monitor absorption when lithium ions are introduced.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Battery – Sensor Monitor  

INL researchers have invented a method to evaluate materials using an impedance method, rather than relying upon nondestructive techniques optical, ...

337

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

An Improved Humidity Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common feature of all capacitance humidity sensors is their undesirable hysteresis effect due to the unequal adsorption and desorption of water vapor on the surfaces of their dielectric porous materials. To eliminate this error, an improved ...

Shixuan Pang; Hartmut Graßl; Horst Jäger

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

VibroTracker: a vibrotactile sensor tracking objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although vibrotactile feedback enlivens virtual interaction, it is difficult to measure actual vibrations of moving objects. Our VibroTracker system achieves this with an optical gaze controller and a laser Doppler vibrometer, enabling users to relive ... Keywords: haptic media, laser doppler vibrometer, tactile sensor, vibrotactile sensation

Leo Miyashita; Yuko Zou; Masatoshi Ishikawa

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Sandia National Labs: Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanostructures, surface physics and chemistry, plasma and chemical processing, lasers and optics, pattern recognition, remote sensing, ion-solid interactions and effects...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optical far-and near-field femtosecond laser ablation of Si for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical far-and near-field femtosecond laser ablation of Si for nanoscale chemical analysis Title Optical far-and near-field femtosecond laser ablation of Si for nanoscale chemical...

342

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

(Funding source: NASA Grant NNC04GB52G, 2004-2009 and NSF Grant CTS-0086988, 2001-2005) Invention Summary For: "Fluorescence and Fiber-Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary For: "Fluorescence and Fiber-Optics Based Real-Time Thickness Sensor for Dynamic Liquid Films OF THE SENSOR'S FEATURES The name of the invention Fluorescence and Fiber-Optics Based Real-Time Thickness: a vendor that makes fiber-optic cables fitted to specified machined parts (distal tips, etc.), a vendor

Narain, Amitabh

344

| Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

| Link to Us | or Ads by Google Biomedical Nano Sensor Review Nano Nano Market Car Nano Printer, Bio & Chemical Analysis Nano Days Online Event Nanotechnology presentations Online of Nanotechnology accordions leading to sensor-embedded covers for aircraft and robots, and even prost humans. nanoNEWS Making

Rogers, John A.

345

Biological Microsensors - Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science to deliver prototype solutions in applications ranging from biodetection to photovoltaics. Sensor development includes discrete sensors and sensor arrays based on...

346

Sensors and Controls Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Higher operating efficiencies, emission reductions, improved reliability, and lower operating costs are benefits that the power industry can realize with the utilization of sensors and controls. However, for the power industry to derive the maximum benefit from sensors and controls, improvements in existing technologies and novel approaches to challenging measurements are needed. Recognizing the importance of sensors and controls, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a sensors and controls workshop on April 17 to 18, 2001, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on identifying technology needs in sensors and controls for existing fossil-energy power plants as well as future facilities conceived under the Vision 21 Program. Forty-six experts from 29 organizations, including private industry, research laboratories, academia, and government agencies, attended the workshop. The meeting opened with keynote speakers from NETL and the private sector. NETL officials spoke of the Vision 21 and advanced research programs. Speakers from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Delphi Automotive Systems Research Laboratory discussed the improvements realized with their respective operation through the use of sensors and controls. NETL keynote speakers Robert Romanosky and Carl Bauer emphasized that developing sensor and control systems plays a critical role in DOE Office of Fossil Energy Vision 21 Program, clean coal activities under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the proposed Clean Coal Power Initiative. The Vision 21 Program is aimed at providing technologies for ultra-clean fossil-fuel-based energy production with 60- to 75-percent efficiencies and near zero emissions. The program also uses a modular approach to present opportunities to not only generate power, but also co-produce clean fuels, chemicals, steam, and other useful products. The ultra-high efficiency and environmental performance goals of the Vision 21 Program mean that facilities must operate at optimum conditions, while adapting in real-time to changes in load and feedstock. These are challenging performance goals. They will require advanced control and sensing systems that can be adapted and optimized in real time. To improve the overall plant performance of existing power plants, one of the most cost-effective methods is to update the sensor and control systems.

Susan Maley; Robert R. Romanosky

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments  

SciTech Connect

This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Sensors Passive Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Mineral maps can be used to show the presence of hydrothermal minerals and mineral assemblages Stratigraphic/Structural: Map structures/faults and regional strain rates Hydrological: Map surface water features Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Passive Sensors: Sensors that measure energy which is naturally available in the environment. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

350

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Speaker(s): Steven Lanzisera Date: February 8, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kevin Kircher Wireless sensor networks have been promising to provide easy data collection and control capability to applications ranging from scientific data collection, disaster recover, national security, and more. The user experience, however, has been filled with confusing terminology, complicated systems, and a lack of interoperability between vendors. Users with a background in the technology and fundamentals are better able to understand system capabilities, make decisions, and end up with a network that meets their needs. Although a sufficient coverage of this topic is at least a semester course, the goal of this talk is to give a brief

351

Capacitive proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Event detection in sensor networks for modern oil fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the experience of implementing event detection analytics to monitor and forewarn oil production failures in modern, digitized oil fields. Modern oil fields are equipped with thousands of sensors and gauges to measure various physical and chemical ... Keywords: digital oil field, event warning, gas, industry, near real time analytics, oil, petroleum, surveillance

Matthew Hill; Murray Campbell; Yuan-Chi Chang; Vijay Iyengar

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

O' Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

Provancher, William

357

Data acquisition and analysis of the UNCOSS underwater explosive neutron sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the FP7 UNCOSS project (Underwater Coastal Sea Surveyor, http://www.uncoss-project.org) is to develop a neutron-based underwater explosive sensor to detect unexploded ordnance lying on the sea bottom. The Associated Particle Technique is used to focus the inspection on a suspicious object located by optical and electromagnetic sensors and to determine if there is an explosive charge inside. This paper presents the data acquisition electronics and data analysis software which have been developed for this project. The electronics digitize and process the signal in real-time based on a field programmable gate array structure to perform precise time-of-flight and gamma-ray energy measurements. UNCOSS software offers the basic tools to analyze the time-of-flight and energy spectra of the interrogated object. It allows to unfold the gamma-ray spectrum into pure elemental count proportions, mainly C, N, O, Fe, Al, Si, and Ca. The C, N, and O count fractions are converted into chemical proportions by taking into account the gamma-ray production cross sections, as well as neutron and photon attenuation in the different shields between the ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) and the explosive, such as the explosive iron shell, seawater, and ROV envelop. These chemical ratios are plotted in a two-dimensional (2D) barycentric representation to position the measured point with respect to common explosives. The systematic uncertainty due to the above attenuation effects and counting statistical fluctuations are combined with a Monte Carlo method to provide a 3D uncertainty area in a barycentric plot, which allows to determine the most probable detected materials in view to make a decision about the presence of explosive. (authors)

Carasco, C.; Eleon, C.; Perot, B. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Boudergui, K.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Normand, S.; Sannie, G.; Woo, R.; Bourbotte, J. M. [CEA, LIST, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Advanced Sensors for Multifunctional Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more precision, most of the examples are related to multifunctional gas ... Still , those systems do not have the information capacity of natural biologic ... shape- memory devices, temperature sensors, and liquid-viscosity sensors as well.

360

Sensors for Underground Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different sensors are needed for underground distribution applications. These include sensors for temperature monitoring to track possible overload issues and other issues that can cause heating in underground systems (for example, arcing), sensors for fault detection and characterization, and sensors for voltage and current monitoring to support a wide range of applications (for example, SCADA, volt/var control, and load flow management). In 2008, EPRI evaluated the present state of medium-...

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sensor applications. They have the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, low cost, and low power consumption. However ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Carriers. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,Vapor Sensors. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2008,Absorption. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Carbon Monoxide Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for calibration of every sensor coming off the ...

364

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Composite sensor membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

Lean blowoff detection sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Miniaturized wireless sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses an overview of the wireless sensor networks. It is shown that MEMS/NEMS technologies and SIP concept are well suited for advanced architectures. It is also shown analog architectures have to be compatible with digital signal techniques to develop smart network of microsystem.

Lecointre, Aubin; Dubuc, David; Katia, Grenier; Patrick, Pons; Aubert, Hervé; Muller, A; Berthou, Pascal; Gayraud, Thierry; Plana, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemical Sciences Division: Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD Directory A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Rebecca Abergel CSD Project Scientist; The Glenn T. Seaborg Center. Musahid Ahmed CSD Staff Scientist, Chemical Physics Program/Chemical Dynamics Beamline Publications Richard A. Andersen Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Senior Faculty Scientist, The Glenn T. Seaborg Center Publications John Arnold Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Faculty Scientist, Catalytic Science Program Publications B Ali Belkacem CSD Deputy and Senior Staff Scientist; Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program Leader

370

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sensor system for web inspection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Navigation protocols in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop distributed algorithms for adaptive sensor networks that respond to directing a target through a region of space. We model this problem as an online distributed motion planning problem. Each sensor node senses values in its perception space ... Keywords: Sensor networks, motes, navigation, potential field, robotics

Qun Li; Daniela Rus

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

Kyle, Kevin R. (Brentwood, CA); Brown, Steven B. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Chemical Activation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Activation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Adsorption Milton R. Smith, Jr., 1 Edward W. Bittner, 1 Wei Shi, 1, 2 J. Karl Johnson, 1, 2 and Bradley C....

376

OPTICS 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) Release notes NOTE: See the Optics Knowledge Base for how to run this version of Optics on the Microsoft Vista and Microsoft Windows 7 operating systems March 5, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 2 New ! January 7, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 1 October 23, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.01 September 27, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.00 (only released on CDs at NFRC Annual Fall Meeting) Release notes Maintenance Pack 2 Bug fixes: New features: bullet Applied films that were created could not be saved or exported. This has been fixed. bullet Exporting glazing systems generated a message that the operation failed because the glazing system type is unknown. Glazing systems can now be exported to file (e.g. to view the spectral data), but the structure information will be lost.

377

Multiplexed Sensor for Synthesis Gas Compsition and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project has been to develop a highly sensitive, multiplexed TDL-based sensor for CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O (and temperature), CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S, and NH{sub 3}. Such a sensor was designed with so-called 'plug-and-play' characteristics to accommodate additional sensors, and provided in situ path-integrated measurements indicative of average concentrations at speeds suitable for direct gasifier control. The project developed the sensor and culminated in a real-world test of the underlying technology behind the sensor. During the project, new underlying measurements of spectroscopic constants for all of the gases of interest performed, in custom cells built for the project. The envisioned instrument was built from scratch from component lasers, fiber optics, amplifier blocks, detectors, etc. The sensor was tested for nearly a week in an operational power plant. The products of this research are expected to have a direct impact on gasifier technology and the production of high-quality syngas, with substantial broader application to coal and other energy systems. This report is the final technical report on project DE-FG26-04NT42172. During the project we completed all of the milestones planned in the project, with a modification of milestone (7) required due to lack of funding and personnel.

Steven Buckley; Reza Gharavi; Marco Leon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optical engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

Saito, T T

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement, delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps, Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png Active Sensors: Sensors that emit their own source of energy then measure the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, James A. (Thornton, CO); Stoddard, Lawrence M. (Arvada, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer is disclosed comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy. 5 figs.

Sopori, B.L.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

SciTech Connect

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Inexpensive CO Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 An Inexpensive CO Sensor A schematic of the prototype CO passive sensor. Carbon moNOxide is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas whose primary source indoor is the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This gas can be a potential problem in any house that uses combustion appliances for space or water heating, cooking, or idling an automobile in an attached garage. Although most appliances work correctly, a problem can exist in houses when the appliance is unventilated or its ventilation system does not properly eliminate exhaust gases from the house. Since Americans spend 90% of their time indoors and 65 to 70% in their residences, understanding how and when CO builds up indoors could save lives. We have very little systematic data on how CO hazards are distrubuted in the indoor environment, but mortality

389

Rigid particulate matter sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Underground Distribution Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising costs of new infrastructure, increasing demand, and a declining number of available workers will drive utilities to operate as efficiently as possible. The practice of overbuilding infrastructure to improve or maintain reliability will be viewed as cost-inefficient. Utilities will be forced to operate distribution systems more dynamically and efficiently. Distribution sensors will help provide the needed information to utilities to achieve the goal of dynamic efficiency. The Underground Distributi...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of a Hydrogen, Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor (MIS) Sensor for Use in the Headspace of Distribution Transformers: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) chemical sensors used to detect hydrogen in transformer headspaces and discusses their design, operating characteristics, and response to hydrogen in mixed-gas environments. It addresses several technical issues regarding MIS sensor fabrication and the use of MIS sensors to monitor hydrogen fault-gas levels in the headspace of transformers. A new design overcomes problems encountered in some earlier attempts to fabricate a reliable MIS hydrogen se...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological ...  

• Ease of integration into other microelectronics ... System and method for measuring conductivity on molecular level ... Visit the Department of Energy Website.

399

Microcantilever-Based Sensor Array to Detect Various Chemical ...  

Potential applications would benefit pipeline operations, personal equipment, and environmental and health monitoring. Development Status.

400

Using Chemical Sensors to Control Molten Metal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... emission monitoring, aeronautical and space systems, planetary exploration, ... and production of materials under consideration for a new generation of I.C.s.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selectivity 2. Design and develop bulls-eye energy harvesting structures Need for new sensing technologies to meet the requirements for zero emission energy sources Why do...

402

5 CMOS Platform Technology for Chemical Sensors - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

feedback capacitor (Cfb) are realized as interdigital capacitors. The Sigma-Delta ...... of the second amplifier is used for the coarse tuning during startup. Small.

403

Evaluating fusion techniques for multi-sensor satellite image data  

SciTech Connect

Satellite image data fusion is a topic of interest in many areas including environmental monitoring, emergency response, and defense. Typically any single satellite sensor cannot provide all of the benefits offered by a combination of different sensors (e.g., high-spatial but low spectral resolution vs. low-spatial but high spectral, optical vs. SAR). Given the respective strengths and weaknesses of the different types of image data, it is beneficial to fuse many types of image data to extract as much information as possible from the data. Our work focuses on the fusion of multi-sensor image data into a unified representation that incorporates the potential strengths of a sensor in order to minimize classification error. Of particular interest is the fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a single, multispectral image of the best possible spatial resolution. We explore various methods to optimally fuse these images and evaluate the quality of the image fusion by using K-means clustering to categorize regions in the fused images and comparing the accuracies of the resulting categorization maps.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Data collection, storage, and retrieval with an underwater sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel platform for underwater sensor networks to be used for long-term monitoring of coral reefs and fisheries. The sensor network consists of static and mobile underwater sensor nodes. The nodes communicate point-to-point using a novel high-speed optical communication system integrated into the TinyOS stack, and they broadcast using an acoustic protocol integrated in the TinyOS stack. The nodes have a variety of sensing capabilities, including cameras, water temperature, and pressure. The mobile nodes can locate and hover above the static nodes for data muling, and they can perform network maintenance functions such as deployment, relocation, and recovery. In this paper we describe the hardware and software architecture of this underwater sensor network. We then describe the optical and acoustic networking protocols and present experimental networking and data collected in a pool, in rivers, and in the ocean. Finally, we describe our experiments with mobility for data muling in this network.

I. Vasilescu; K. Kotay; D. Rus; M. Dunbabin; P. Corke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

Francesca Matteucci

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fiber optic D dimer biosensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Grant, Sheila A. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Novel and Low Cost Temperature Sensors for Lines, Transformers, and Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on an investigation into the performance of fiber optic sensing (e.g., in conductors, transformers, and cables) to determine change in fiber characteristics with regards to sensor-aging effects and performance accuracy with time. The project began in 2002 with a rigorous analysis of temperature sensors for both point and distributed systems across a conductor / transformer winding. Key requirements that must be met are low cost, reliable performance, and good aging characteristics (...

2002-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

408

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

SciTech Connect

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Systems and methods for free space optical communication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Free space optical communication methods and systems, according to various aspects are described. The methods and systems are characterized by transmission of data through free space with a digitized optical signal acquired using wavelength modulation, and by discrimination between bit states in the digitized optical signal using a spectroscopic absorption feature of a chemical substance.

Harper, Warren W [Benton City, WA; Aker, Pamela M [Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Semiconductor and Optical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences > Semiconductor Material & Device Sciences > Advanced Materials Sciences > Lasers, Optics & Remote Sensing Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Jeff Nelson Jerry A. Simmons Sr. Manager Idabelle Idabelle Courtney Admin. Asst. Departments Semiconductor and Optical Sciences The Semiconductor and Optical Sciences Department oversees the operations of the following departments providing new scientific knowledge that can lead to technology solutions in the areas of: Compound semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices Chemical science to materials technologies, emphasizing the science and engineering of Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) Remote sensing and detection of WMD proliferation activities

411

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gas Sensors Based on Ceramic p-n Heterocontacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ceramic p-n heterocontacts based on CuO/ZnO were successfully synthesized and a systematic study of their hydrogen sensitivity was conducted. The sensitivity and response rates of CuO/ZnO sensors were studied utilizing current-voltage, current-time, and impedance spectroscopy measurements. The heterocontacts showed well-defined rectifying characteristics and were observed to detect hydrogen via both dc and ac measurements. Surface coverage data were derived from current-time measurements which were then fit to a two-site Langmuir adsorption model quite satisfactorily. The fit suggested that there should be two energetically different adsorption sites in the system. The heterocontacts were doped in an attempt to increase the sensitivity and the response rate of the sensor. First, the effects of doping the p-type (CuO) on the sensor characteristics were investigated. Doping the p-type CuO with both acceptor and isovalent dopants greatly improved the hydrogen sensitivity. The sensitivity of pure heterocontact observed via I-V measurements was increased from {approx}2.3 to {approx}9.4 with Ni doping. Dopants also enhanced the rectifying characteristics of the heterocontacts. Small amounts of Li addition were shown to decrease the reverse bias (saturation) current to 0.2 mA at a bias level of -5V. No unambiguous trends were observed between the sensitivity, the conductivity, and the density of the samples. Comparing the two phase microstructure to the single phase microstructure there was no dramatic increase in the sensitivity. Kinetic studies also confirmed the improved sensor characteristics with doping. The dopants decreased the response time of the sensor by decreasing the response time of one of the adsorption sites. The n-type ZnO was doped with both acceptor and donor dopants. Li doping resulted in the degradation of the p-n junction and the response time of the sensor. However, the current-voltage behavior of Ga-doped heterocontacts showed the best rectifying characteristics with very high forward currents. Ga doped heterocontacts showed the highest sensitivity observed during current-time measurements as well, even though the sensor response was rather slow. Finally, a possible synergistic effect of doping both p and n-sides was studied by utilizing current-time measurements for 1.5 mol% Ni-CuO/1.5 mol% Ga-ZnO heterocontact. A sensitivity value of {approx}5.1 was obtained with the fastest response among all the samples. The time needed to reach 90% coverage was lowered by a factor of 4 when compared to the pure heterocontact and the time needed to reach 70% coverage was just over one minute. Heterocontact gas sensors are promising candidates for high temperature sensor applications. Today, Si-based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology has shown great promise for developing novel devices such as pressure sensors, chemical sensors, and temperature sensors through complex designs. However, the harsh thermal, vibrational, and corrosive environments common to many aerospace applications impose severe limitations on their use. Sensors based on ceramic p-n heterocontacts are promising alternatives because of their inherent corrosion resistance and environmental stability. The other advantages include their inherent tuning ability to differentiate between different reducing gases and a possible cost efficient production of a wireless sensor. Being a capacitive type sensor, its output can be transformed into a passive wireless device by creating a tuned LC circuit. In this way, the sensor output (the capacitance) can be accessed remotely by measuring the resonant frequency. The relatively simple structure of heterocontacts makes it suitable for thick film fabrication techniques to make sensor packages.

Seymen Murat Aygun

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stochastic binary sensor networks for noisy environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a stochastic framework for detecting anomalies or gathering events of interest in a noisy environment using a network consisting of binary sensors. A binary sensor is an extremely coarse sensor, capable of measuring data to only 1-bit ... Keywords: energy consumption, energy efficiency, noisy environments, sensor networks, simulation, stochastic binary sensors, wireless networks

T. Nguyen; Dong Nguyen; Huaping Liu; Duc A. Tran

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

PC Board Mountable Corrosion Sensors  

Sandia National Laboratories has created sensors to identify and assess the pervasive and expensive problem of corrosion in applications ranging from ...

415

Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 802.15.4 radio (for wireless operation) as well as thewireless sensor network protocol, significant power can be saved during network operations.

Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Title Molecular oxygen sensors based on photoluminescent silica aerogels Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Ayers, Michael R., and Arlon J. Hunt Journal Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids Volume 225 Pagination 343-347 Keywords aerogel, air pressure, oxygen concentration, oxygen molecules, photoluminescence Abstract Photoluminescent silica aerogel acts as the active element of an optical sensor for molecular oxygen. The luminescent aerogel is prepared by the action of energized reducing gases on a standard silica aerogel. Intensity of aerogel photoluminescence decreases as the collision frequency between oxygen molecules and the luminescent carriers in the aerogel matrix increases. This behavior is a characteristic of many photoluminescent materials and arises from a transfer of energy from the aerogel to surrounding oxygen molecules. A sensor for oxygen concentration or air pressure can therefore be simply constructed utilizing an ultraviolet source for excitation and a suitable detector for the emitted visible signal. Stern-Volmer quenching constants for the aerogel sensing element are 1.55Ă—10-2 Torr-1 for hydrophilic aerogel and 2.4Ă—10-3 Torr-1 for hydrophobic aerogel.

417

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus is deployed from an airplane or a ship to make oceanographic observations in a profile of the surface-to-ocean floor, while deployed on the floor, and then a second profile when returning to the ocean surface. The device then records surface conditions until on-board batteries fail. All data collected is stored and then transmitted from the surface to either a satellite or other receiving station. The apparatus is provided with an anchor that causes descent to the ocean floor and then permits ascent when the anchor is released. Anchor release is predetermined by the occurrence of a pre-programmed event.

McCoy, Kim O. (Carmel, CA); Downing, Jr., John P. (Port Townsand, WA); DeRoos, Bradley G. (Worthington, OH); Riches, Michael R. (Silver Spring, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in...

422

Geothermal chemical control and monitoring instrumentation: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the geothermal fluid chemistry at operating temperature is needed to optimize operation, prevent corrosion, increase equipment service life and maximize profit and use. Available electrochemical sensors do not survive at the temperatures encountered in geothermal fluids; and new developments in this area are required. Chemical control and monitoring instruments for measuring in situ characteristics of geothermal fluids are under development. Progress in the development of electrochemical sensors to measure pH, carbonate and sulfide-sulfur is discussed.

Jensen, G.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing platforms. Detection of the chem/bio agent reporter (GFP) can be detected only at a specific wavelength.

Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

On the application of the MODTRAN4 atmospheric radiative transfer code to optical remote sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification of atmospheric effects on the solar radiation measured by a spaceborne or airborne optical sensor is required for some key tasks in remote sensing, such as atmospheric correction, simulation of realistic scenarios or retrieval of atmospheric ...

Luis Guanter; Rudolf Richter; Hermann Kaufmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Observations of Optical Lighting Emissions from above Thunderstorms Using U-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine how to achieve orders of magnitude improvement in spatial and temporal resolution and in sensitivity of satellite lightning sensors. better quantitative measurements of the characteristics of the optical emissions from ...

H. J. Christian; R. L. Frost; P. H. Gillaspy; S. J. Goodman; O. H. Vaughan Jr.; M. Brook; B. Vonnegut; R. E. Orville

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a project designed to develop an intergrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface as a site characterization tool.

Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Determining Bottom Reflectance and Water Optical Properties Using Unmanned Underwater Vehicles under Clear or Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with hyperspectral optical sensors that measure downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance was deployed over sandy bottoms, sea grass patches, and coral reefs near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, during the ...

David C. English; Kendall L. Carder

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Heterogeneous wireless sensor network deployment and topology control based on irregular sensor model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous wireless sensor network (heterogeneous WSN) consists of sensor nodes with different ability, such as different computing power and sensing range. Compared with homogeneous WSN, deployment and topology control are more complex in heterogeneous ... Keywords: heterogeneous sensor deployment, irregular sensor model, sensor coverage, topology control, wireless sensor network

Chun-Hsien Wu; Yeh-Ching Chung

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optical State-of-Change Monitor for Lead-Acid Batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the instantaneous state-of-charge of a battery in which change in composition with discharge manifests itself as a change in optical absorption. In a lead-acid battery, the sensor comprises a fiber optic system with an absorption cdl or, alternatively, an optical fiber woven into an absorbed-glass-mat battery. In a lithium-ion battery, the sensor comprises fiber optics for introducing light into the anode to monitor absorption when lithium ions are introduced.

Weiss, Jonathan D.

1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

432

Sensors and Actuators B 119 (2006) 384391 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy of formation of the oxide, MOx. A plot of 2Op or 2 ln Op vs. temperature, gives the contour of the path of the M/MOx coexistence. Using reliable Gibbs energy data [2-3], the loci of 210log Op that established by virtue of thermodynamic equilibrium between M and MOx or between MOx and MOy, this allows

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

433

Disens: scalable distributed sensor network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation is widely used for developing, evaluating and analyzing sensor network applications, especially when deploying a large scale sensor network remains expensive and labor intensive. However, due to its computation intensive nature, existent simulation ... Keywords: distributed simulation, sensor network, simulation

Ye Wen; Rich Wolski; Gregory Moore

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Development of a chemical vision spectrometer to detect chemical agents.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes initial work in developing a no-moving-parts hyperspectral-imaging camera that provides both a thermal image and specific identification of chemical agents, even in the presence of nontoxic plumes. The camera uses enhanced stand-off chemical agent detector (ESCAD) technology based on a conventional thermal-imaging camera interfaced with an acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). The AOTF is programmed to allow selected spectral frequencies to reach the two dimensional array detector. These frequencies are combined to produce a spectrum that is used for identification. If a chemical agent is detected, pixels containing the agent-absorbing bands are given a colored hue to indicate the presence of the agent. In test runs, two thermal-imaging cameras were used with a specially designed vaporizer capable of controlled low-level (low ppm-m) dynamic chemical releases. The objective was to obtain baseline information about detection levels. Dynamic releases allowed for realistic detection scenarios such as low sky, grass, and wall structures, in addition to reproducible laboratory releases. Chemical releases consisted of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) and methanol. Initial results show that the combination of AOTF and thermal imaging will produce a chemical image of a plume that can be detected in the presence of interfering substances.

Demirgian, J.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Security for wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter identifies the vulnerabilities associated with the operational paradigms currently employed by Wireless Sensor Networks. A survey of current WSN security research is presented. The security issues of Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks and infrastructure ... Keywords: WSN, security, sensor networks, wireless

Sasikanth Avancha; Jeffrey Undercoffer; Anupam Joshi; John Pinkston

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Substation Sensor Database Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Substation Sensor database provides utilities with a searchable list of sensors available to be applied in substation applications. The Substation Sensor Database provides a searchable database of sensors available to substation engineers, categorized by Area, Component, Sub-Component, Parameter, and Technology. By specifying each category, the list can be filtered to a sub-set of sensors. By clicking on a sensorname, details can be viewed including a description, sensor maturity, and a link to the m...

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Fiber Optic Seismic Sensor for Unattended Ground Sensing Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as promising technologies for many applications, such as intruder detection and perimeter defense systems-based demodulation system; (b) a digital lock-in amplifier and field programmable gate array techniques for weak for numerous applications, which include intruder detection and perimeter defense systems for military

Li, Hongbin

439

Calibrating the Spatial Response of Bio-Optical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an experimental method used to establish the spatial wavenumber response of in situ fluorometers. The method is applied to a fluorometer developed to measure the structure of the fluorescence field at high spatial ...

Fabian Wolk; Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Hua Li; Rolf G. Lueck

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optical fiber pressure and acceleration sensor fabricated on a ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "optic chemical sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

In Situ Optical Sensor for Measuring Particulate Inorganic ...  

... system monitoring and lead to a greater understanding of the biological pump and its relation to global climate change, ...

442

Laboratory Comparisons of Acoustic and Optical Sensors for Microbubble Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a recent comparison between three microbubble size spectrum measurement systems. These systems are the light-wattering bubble counter, the photographic bubble-imaging system, and the acoustic resonator array. ...

Ming Vang Su; Douglas Todoroff; John Cartmill

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-Based Optical Sensors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pollution. Conceptual drawing of coated fiber Bragg grating and photo of Long Period gratings (LPG) on fiber. Figure and photo provided courtesy of University of Pittsburgh....

444

Energy efficient sensor network implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Novel Zigzag Shape Gives Sensors Magnetic Appeal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have designed tiny magnetic sensors in a "zigzag" shape that are ... Zigzag-shaped magnetic sensors. ...

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

446

Category:Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging P Passive Sensors S Stereo Satellite Imagery SWIR Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:PassiveSensors&oldid594073" Category: Remote Sensing...

447

Energy Harvesting Support for Sensor Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Energy Harvesting Support for SensorLifetime or Per formance Energy Harvesting System life andProposed Solution: Energy Harvesting Support for sensor

Jason Hsu; Aman Kansal; Mani Srivastava

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Wireless Temperature Sensors for Improved HVAC Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reliable, and affordable and affordable Wireless Temperature Sensors for Improved HVAC Control An assessment of wireless sensor technology Executive Summary This Technology...

449

HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Sensors, HVAC Sensors, Controls, and Human Controls, and Human Feedback Interfaces Feedback Interfaces April 26, 2010 Dr. Amr Gado Emerson Climate Technologies Heating And...

450

Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Smart Grid Applications Using Sensor Web Services .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sensor network web services have recently emerged as promising tools to provide remote management, data collection and querying capabilities for sensor networks. They can be… (more)

Asad, Omar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Sensors and Controls Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

453

Optical memory  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

Microcantilever heater-thermometer with integrated temperature-compensated strain sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides microcantilever hotplate devices which incorporate temperature compensating strain sensors. The microcantilever hotplate devices of the present invention comprise microcantilevers having temperature compensating strain sensors and resistive heaters. The present invention also provides methods for using a microcantilever hotplate for temperature compensated surface stress measurements, chemical/biochemical sensing, measuring various properties of compounds adhered to the microcantilever hotplate surface, or for temperature compensated deflection measurements.

King, William P. (Champaign, IL); Lee, Jungchul (Champaign, IL); Goericke, Fabian T. (Wolfsburg, DE)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

Reedy, Robert P. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

Reedy, R.P.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

457

Enhancing chemical reactions  

SciTech Connect

Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

Morrey, John R. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

459

Excursions in Chemical Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009). [118] F. A. Cotton, Chemical Applications of GroupExcursions in Chemical Dynamics by Shervin Fatehi AFall 2010 Excursions in Chemical Dynamics Copyright 2010 by

Fatehi, Shervin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z