National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for opsmax performance reflect

  1. High performance anti-reflection coatings for broadband multi-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    2000-02-23

    The success of bandgap engineering has made high efficiency broadband multi-junction solar cells possible with photo-response out to the band edge of Ge. Modeling has been conducted which suggests that current double layer anti-reflection coating technology is not adequate for these devices in certain cases. Approaches for the development of higher performance anti-reflection coatings are examined. A new AR coating structure based on the use of Herpin equivalent layers is presented. Optical modeling suggests a decrease in the solar weighted reflectance of over 2.5{percent} absolute as a result. This structure requires no additional optical material development and characterization because no new optical materials are necessary. Experimental results and a sensitivity analysis are presented.

  2. Performance of "Moth Eye" Anti-Reflective Coatings for Solar Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Kane, M.; Jiang, P.

    2011-03-14

    An inexpensive, effective anti-reflective coating (ARC) has been developed at the University of Florida to significantly enhance the absorption of light by silicon in solar cells. This coating has nano-scale features, and its microstructure mimics that of various night active insects (e.g. a moth's eye). It is a square array of pillars, each about 700 nm high and having a diameter of about 300 nm. Samples of silicon having this coating were exposed either to various combinations of either elevated temperature and humidity or to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) at the Savannah River National Laboratory, or to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light and to a 532 nm laser light at the University of Florida. The anti-reflective properties of the coatings were unaffected by any of these environmental stresses, and the microstructure of the coating was also unaffected. In fact, the reflectivity of the gamma irradiated ARC became lower (advantageous for solar cell applications) at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. These results show that this coating is robust and should be tested in actual systems exposed to either weather or a space environment. Structural details of the ARCs were studied to optimize their performance. Square arrays performed better than hexagonal arrays - the natural moth-eye coating is indeed a square array. The optimal depth of the templated nanopillars in the ARC was investigated. A wet etching technology for ARC formation was developed that would be less expensive and much faster than dry etching. Theoretical modeling revealed that dimple arrays should perform better than nipple arrays. A method of fabricating both dimple and nipple arrays having the same length was developed, and the dimple arrays performed better than the nipple arrays, in agreement with the modeling. The commercial viability of the technology is quite feasible, since the technology is scalable and inexpensive. This technology is also compatible with current industrial fabrication of solar cells.

  3. Whole House Thermal Performance of Asphalt Shingles Exploiting Special Infrared Reflective Pigments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, L.; Miller, W.; Desjarlais, A.; Jacobs, J.; Youngquist, A.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial Mineral Products St. Paul, Minnesota Adam Youngquist Graduate Student Mechanical Engineering University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee ABSTRACT New “cool pigmented” colors that appear as dark colors in the visible spectrum... of background foliage in the visible and NIR spectra. The chlorophyll in plants strongly absorbs in the non-green parts of the visible spectrum, giving the leaf a dark green color with high reflectance elsewhere in the solar spectrum 1 (Kipling 1970...

  4. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  5. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  11. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  12. An investigation into the information provided by the concurrent use of in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) was performed. These two analytical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , semiconductor and superconductor thin films. Surface sensitivity of the REELS spectrometer was found to be less, Semiconductor and Superconductor Films and Interfaces by Concurrent Use of In Situ Reflection High Energy

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  17. Mirror: Visually reflecting C{sup ++}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orosco, R.; Campo, M.; Sole, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Reflection is the ability of a system to inspect and change a model of itself. This ability allows to transparently control and extend the functionality of an existing system without performing any changes to the system itself. In dynamic object-oriented languages like CLOS or Smalltalk. the reflective ability is supported directly by the language. In C++, in contrast, reflection must be provided by some form of code annotation and pre-processing. In most cases, this approach either requires modification of the system code, or just supports the reflection of entire classes but not the reflection of determined objects. This work presents the Mirror environment that supports C++ reflective programming through visual association of meta-classes to classes. It allows full transparent reflection of objects using three-dimensional presentations of the different architecture levels. The environment adds reflective ability to C++ classes without any code modification visible to the user, as well as dynamically selective reflection of objects.

  18. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yun, Jae-Chul (Naperville, IL); Para, Adam (St. Charles, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  3. Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Sung Hun (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2007-07-03

    Employing collector optics that has a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics is normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

  4. Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Lee, Sang Hun

    2006-07-25

    Employing collector optics that have a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics are normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

  5. Reflecting to learn mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-08-09

    The reflective WTLM prompts used in the seminar were developed by our research team or were adapted ..... Narrowing the gap between a vision of reform and teaching practice: Middle level teachers. ... Principles and standards for school.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

  7. Partially Reflected Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Singer; Z. Schuss; D. Holcman

    2007-09-02

    The radiation (reaction, Robin) boundary condition for the continuum diffusion equation is widely used in chemical and biological applications to express reactive boundaries. The underlying trajectories of the diffusing particles are believed to be partially absorbed and partially reflected at the reactive boundary, however, the relation between the reaction (radiation) constant in the Robin boundary condition and the reflection probability is still unclear. In this paper we clarify the issue by finding the relation between the reaction (radiation) constant and the absorption probability of the diffusing trajectories at the boundary. We analyze the Euler scheme for the underlying It\\^o dynamics, which is assumed to have variable drift and diffusion tensor, with partial reflection at the boundary. Trajectories that cross the boundary are terminated with a given probability and otherwise are reflected in a normal or oblique direction. We use boundary layer analysis of the corresponding Wiener path integral to resolve the non-uniform convergence of the probability density function of the numerical scheme to the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with the Robin boundary condition, as the time step is decreased. We show that the Robin boundary condition is recovered in the limit iff trajectories are reflected in the co-normal direction. We find the relation of the reactive constant to the termination probability. We show the effect of using the new relation in numerical simulations.

  8. Reflecting to learn mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael Kenney

    2013-08-09

    preservice teachers' pedagogical content knowledge with reflection on writing prompts in mathematics .... 1283). PCK provides a knowledge base for teaching subject matter as well .... ideas did you add to your own mathematics or pedagogical knowledge base? .... Hopefully, I will be able to keep an eye on my terminology.

  9. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  10. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    ;4/21/2010 2 Reflection configurations Reflection attributes Salt tectonics This profile from Germany displays

  11. Seismic reflection investigations of sinkholes beneath Interstate Highway 70 in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.; Knapp, Ralph W.; McElwee, Carl D.

    1986-02-01

    Seismic reflection studies were performed across actively developing sinkholes located astride Interstate Highway 70 in Russell County, Kansas. Results indicate that high?resolution seismic reflection surveys are useful in the subsurface...

  12. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  13. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  14. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  15. Reflections on our Past, Present, and Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reflections on our Past, Present, and Future Reflections on our Past, Present, and Future Print Reflecting on 2014, I'd first point to our impressive science (see many highlights...

  16. Understanding teacher beliefs with reflective tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karwan, Vanessa Ann

    2009-01-01

    fieldbook: Strategies and tools for building a learningBeliefs with Reflective Tools by Vanessa Ann Karwan Doctoraudio-visual technology as a tool for reflection in teacher

  17. December2010 AboutReflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    in the student-nominated category. In addition we focus on a range of innovations in teaching, learning of Reflections, the newsletter which focuses on teaching, learning and assessment in Queen's and more generally and this time focused on Increasing Students' Satisfaction in the context of the National Student Survey (NSS

  18. Standardization of Solar Mirror Reflectance Measurements - Round Robin Test: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyen, S.; Lupfert, E.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Kennedy, C.

    2010-10-01

    Within the SolarPaces Task III standardization activities, DLR, CIEMAT, and NREL have concentrated on optimizing the procedure to measure the reflectance of solar mirrors. From this work, the laboratories have developed a clear definition of the method and requirements needed of commercial instruments for reliable reflectance results. A round robin test was performed between the three laboratories with samples that represent all of the commercial solar mirrors currently available for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The results show surprisingly large differences in hemispherical reflectance (sh) of 0.007 and specular reflectance (ss) of 0.004 between the laboratories. These differences indicate the importance of minimum instrument requirements and standardized procedures. Based on these results, the optimal procedure will be formulated and validated with a new round robin test in which a better accuracy is expected. Improved instruments and reference standards are needed to reach the necessary accuracy for cost and efficiency calculations.

  19. Nonhyperbolic reflection moveout for orthorhombic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, A.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection moveout in azimuthally anisotropic media is not only azimuthally dependent but it is also

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, P

  1. Reflection positivity in simplicial gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Schrader

    2015-10-21

    Within the context of piecewise linear manifolds we establish reflection positivity with a Hilbert action given in terms of the Regge curvature and a cosmological term. Using this positivity a Hilbert space for a quantum theory is constructed and some field operators and observables are given. The set-up allows to introduce time reversal though no time exists. All constructions are non-perturbative.

  2. Dobrushin Interfaces via Reflection Positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senya Shlosman; Yvon Vignaud

    2007-04-13

    We study the interfaces separating different phases of 3D systems by means of the Reflection Positivity method. We treat discrete non-linear sigma-models, which exhibit power-law decay of correlations at low temperatures, and we prove the rigidity property of the interface. Our method is applicable to the Ising and Potts models, where it simplifies the derivation of some known results. The method also works for large-entropy systems of continuous spins.

  3. Reflections for quantum query algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben W. Reichardt

    2010-05-10

    We show that any boolean function can be evaluated optimally by a quantum query algorithm that alternates a certain fixed, input-independent reflection with a second reflection that coherently queries the input string. Originally introduced for solving the unstructured search problem, this two-reflections structure is therefore a universal feature of quantum algorithms. Our proof goes via the general adversary bound, a semi-definite program (SDP) that lower-bounds the quantum query complexity of a function. By a quantum algorithm for evaluating span programs, this lower bound is known to be tight up to a sub-logarithmic factor. The extra factor comes from converting a continuous-time query algorithm into a discrete-query algorithm. We give a direct and simplified quantum algorithm based on the dual SDP, with a bounded-error query complexity that matches the general adversary bound. Therefore, the general adversary lower bound is tight; it is in fact an SDP for quantum query complexity. This implies that the quantum query complexity of the composition f(g,...,g) of two boolean functions f and g matches the product of the query complexities of f and g, without a logarithmic factor for error reduction. It further shows that span programs are equivalent to quantum query algorithms.

  4. Learning ProblemSolving Concepts by Reflecting on Problem Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Ashok

    Learning Problem­Solving Concepts by Reflecting on Problem Solving Eleni Stroulia and Ashok K. Goel Learning and problem solving are intimately related: problem solving determines the knowledge requirements of the reasoner which learning must fulfill, and learning enables improved problem­solving performance. Different

  5. REFLECT HOME | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering of apumptheDrivingREEEDecemberREFLECT HOME

  6. REFLECT HOME | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering of apumptheDrivingREEEDecemberREFLECT

  7. Discharge lamp with reflective jacket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

  8. A Reflective Symmetry Descriptor Michael Kazhdan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it does. The objective of our work is to define a continuous measure of reflective symmetry (over any on the sphere in proportion to the measure of reflective symmetry about the #12;Fig. 1. A visualization vectors on the sphere in proportion to the measure of reflective symmetry about the plane through

  9. Shallow structure from a seismic reflection profile across the Borah Peak, Idaho, fault scarp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1986-09-01

    A short 12-fold CDP seismic-reflection survey was performed along the road to Doublespring Pass across the fault scarp formed by the October 28, 1983, magnitude-7.3, Idaho earthquake. This high-resolution reflection survey was conducted to determine...

  10. A system for optimizing interior daylight distribution using reflective Venetian blinds with independent blind angle control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Molly E

    2005-01-01

    An operational algorithm for blind angle control is developed to optimize the daylighting performance of a system of reflective Venetian blinds. Numerical modeling and experiment confirm that independent control of alternating ...

  11. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-26

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

  12. Photovoltaic module with light reflecting backskin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsiorawski, Ronald C. (Danvers, MA)

    2007-07-03

    A photovoltaic module comprises electrically interconnected and mutually spaced photovoltaic cells that are encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant between a light-transparent front cover and a back cover, with the back cover sheet being an ionomer/nylon alloy embossed with V-shaped grooves running in at least two directions and coated with a light reflecting medium so as to provide light-reflecting facets that are aligned with the spaces between adjacent cells and oriented so as to reflect light falling in those spaces back toward said transparent front cover for further internal reflection onto the solar cells, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to the photovoltaic cells, thereby increasing the current output of the module. The internal reflector improves power output by as much as 67%.

  13. Does Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Listokin, Yair Jason

    2007-01-01

    =980422. Kamar, Ehud. 2006. “Does Shareholder Voting onDoes Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?contests. The literature that does exist is methodologically

  14. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Carlo program simulating light propagation in isotropic orTerms—Lambertian reflection, light collection, Monte Carloy-axis) and fraction specular light (right y- axis) for a

  15. April 15, 2010 Seismic Reflection IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Distance Migration Example 1 Migration Example 2 Migration Example 2 Migration "smiles" DEPTH SECTIONS' Dipping Reflections Move down dip and lengthen; dips become shallower We need to migrate reflections back to their original locations Migration #12;4/15/2010 2 A simple geometric method of migration is possible

  16. Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Platts, David (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2006-08-22

    An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. T

  18. CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection Up things, on the lighting that illuminates the scene, and on the interaction of light with the objects in the scene. Some of the basic qualitative properties of lighting and object reflectance that we need

  19. Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey (Oakland, CA); Lin, Yun (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-04-29

    An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

  20. Fresnel Reflection 9.0.3 polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Chapter 9 Fresnel Reflection 9.0.3 polarization: iE rE tE i r t 1 2 iH rH tH iE rE tE i r t 1 2 i that n1 sin i = n2 sin t (9.2) 45 #12;46 CHAPTER 9. FRESNEL REFLECTION Boundary conditions iH rH tH #12;48 CHAPTER 9. FRESNEL REFLECTION and here Ei + Er = Et (9.16) or Hi Z-1 1 + Hr Z-1 1

  1. The Substantive Validity of Work Performance Measures: Implications for Relationships Among Work Behavior Dimensions and Construct-Related Validity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Nichelle

    2012-10-19

    .e., task performance, citizenship performance, counterproductive work behavior, and withdrawal) were developed that integrated existing definitions of similar behaviors. Each definition reflects a parsimonious conceptualization of existing performance...

  2. Jots : cultivating reflective learning in scratch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbaum, Eric (Eric Ross)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis introduces the Jots system, a new technology designed to engage children in reflective learning as they work on design projects. Jots enables children to create brief updates, or "jots," describing their ...

  3. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  4. Diffuse reflectance imaging with astronomical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasinoff, Samuel W.

    Diffuse objects generally tell us little about the surrounding lighting, since the radiance they reflect blurs together incident lighting from many directions. In this paper we discuss how occlusion geometry can help invert ...

  5. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    P describe Green functions QO(u)* *). Note that the matrix is completely determined GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions

  6. Oblique reflections of internal gravity wave beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Hussain H. (Hussain Habibullah)

    2012-01-01

    We study nonlinear effects in reflections of internal gravity wave beams in a continuously stratified liquid which are incident upon a uniform slope at an oblique angle. Wave motion in a stratified fluid medium is unique ...

  7. Bidirectional reflection functions from surface bump maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, B.; Max, N.; Springmeyer, R.

    1987-04-29

    The Torrance-Sparrow model for calculating bidirectional reflection functions contains a geometrical attenuation factor to account for shadowing and occlusions in a hypothetical distribution of grooves on a rough surface. Using an efficient table-based method for determining the shadows and occlusions, we calculate the geometric attenuation factor for surfaces defined by a specific table of bump heights. Diffuse and glossy specular reflection of the environment can be handled in a unified manner by using an integral of the bidirectional reflection function times the environmental illumination, over the hemisphere of solid angle above a surface. We present a method of estimating the integral, by expanding the bidirectional reflection coefficient in spherical harmonics, and show how the coefficients in this expansion can be determined efficiently by reorganizing our geometric attenuation calculation.

  8. Reflection and transmission of conformal perturbation defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilka Brunner; Cornelius Schmidt-Colinet

    2015-08-18

    We consider reflection and transmission of interfaces which implement renormalisation group flows between conformal fixed points in two dimensions. Such an RG interface is constructed from the identity defect in the ultraviolet CFT by perturbing the theory on one side of the defect line. We compute reflection and transmission coefficients in perturbation theory to third order in the coupling constant and check our calculations against exact constructions of RG interfaces between coset models.

  9. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-01-01

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

  10. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

    1999-05-11

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

  11. Reflection and transmission of conformal perturbation defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunner, Ilka

    2015-01-01

    We consider reflection and transmission of interfaces which implement renormalisation group flows between conformal fixed points in two dimensions. Such an RG interface is constructed from the identity defect in the ultraviolet CFT by perturbing the theory on one side of the defect line. We compute reflection and transmission coefficients in perturbation theory to third order in the coupling constant and check our calculations against exact constructions of RG interfaces between coset models.

  12. Origin of deep crustal reflections: Implications of coincident seismic refraction and reflection data in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbrook, W.S. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA)); Catchings, R.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Jarchow, C.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The authors compare seismic refraction and reflection results along the PASSCAL/COCORP 40{degree}N transect in the northern Basin and Range of Nevada in order to determine the origin of the prominent reflections from the deep crystalline crust. Reflection data along the transect show a thick zone of discontinuous, subhorizontal reflections, beginning at 4-6 s two-way traveltime (10-20 km depth) and ending at 9-11 s (27-35 km). Two independently derived velocity models, based on refraction data, are largely similar and agree on many important aspects of the reflectivity-velocity relation. Both models show that the top of the reflective zone lies 3-8 km above a prominent mid-crustal velocity discontinuity, which is interpreted to separate bulk silicic from bulk dioritic-gabbroic crust; in most places, the silicic mid-crust is more strongly reflective than the mafic lower crust. This pattern is expected in areas where ductile shearing is the mechanism responsible for the reflectivity. One of the velocity models, however, suggests that, in places, the strongest reflectivity spans both the middle (6.1-6.3 km/s) and lower (6.6 km/s) crust; this pattern suggests that the combined influence of ductile strain fabrics and mafic intrusions gives rise to crustal reflections. Both models show that the lowermost crust and crust/mantle transition are highly reflective, also suggesting the presence of mafic and/or ultramafic intrusions. Thus the observed reflection patterns suggest that ductile shearing and the intrusion of mantle-derived magma - both of which are likely to have accompanied the extreme Cenozoic extension - are important factors in generating deep crustal reflections.

  13. High reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Mirkarimi, Paul B. (Sunol, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  14. Process for fabricating high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Mirkarimi, Paul B. (Sunol, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  15. REFLECT: A computer program for the x-ray reflectivity of bent perfect crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etelaeniemi, V.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W. . Dept. of Physics; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-09-01

    The design of monochromators for x-ray applications, using either standard laboratory sources on synchrotron radiation sources, requires a knowledge of the reflectivity of the crystals. The reflectivity depends on the crystals used, the geometry of the reflection, the energy range of the radiation, and, in the present case, the cylindrical bending radius of the optical device. This report is intended to allow the reader to become familiar with, and therefore use, a computer program called REFLECT which we have used in the design of a dual beam Laue monochromator for synchrotron angiography. The results of REFLECT have been compared to measured reflectivities for both bent Bragg and Laue geometries. The results are excellent and should give full confidence in the use of the program. 6 refs.

  16. Polarization Studies of Resonant Forbidden Reflections in Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, P.; Barois, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Wang, S. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; McCoy, B. K.; Huang, C. C.; Pindak, R.; Caliebe, W.

    2007-11-30

    We report the results of resonant x-ray diffraction experiments performed on thick films of a biaxial liquid crystal made of achiral bent-core molecules. Polarization properties of forbidden reflections are observed as a function of the sample rotation angle {phi} about the scattering vector Q for the first time on a fluid material. The experimental data are successfully analyzed within a tensor structure factor model by taking the nonperfect alignment of the liquid crystal into account. The local structure of the B{sub 2} mesophase is hence determined to be SmC{sub S}P{sub A}.

  17. Ultrafast transient reflectance of epitaxial semiconducting perovskite thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolin, S. Y.; Guglietta, G. W.; Baxter, J. B. E-mail: smay@coe.drexel.edu; Scafetta, M. D.; May, S. J. E-mail: smay@coe.drexel.edu

    2014-07-14

    Ultrafast pump-probe transient reflectance (TR) spectroscopy was used to study carrier dynamics in an epitaxial perovskite oxide thin film of LaFeO{sub 3} (LFO) with a thickness of 40 unit cells (16?nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (LSAT). TR spectroscopy shows two negative transients in reflectance with local maxima at ?2.5?eV and ?3.5?eV which correspond to two optical transitions in LFO as determined by ellipsometry. The kinetics at these transients were best fit with an exponential decay model with fast (5–40 ps), medium (?200 ps), and slow (??3?ns) components that we attribute mainly to recombination of photoexcited carriers. Moreover, these reflectance transients did not completely decay within the observable time window, indicating that ?10% of photoexcited carriers exist for at least 3?ns. This work illustrates that TR spectroscopy can be performed on thin (<20?nm) epitaxial oxide films to provide a quantitative understanding of recombination lifetimes, which are important parameters for the potential utilization of perovskite films in photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications.

  18. Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using a Large Airborne In Situ Microphysical Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using the performances of the proposed ice water content (IWC)­radar reflectivity Z and IWC­Z­temperature T relationships produce a very different ice water path, spanning an order of magnitude (Stephens et al. 2002). Clouds

  19. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  20. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1980-01-01

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  1. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  2. A reflective optical transport system for ultraviolet Thomson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A reflective optical transport system for ultraviolet Thomson scattering from electron plasma waves on OMEGA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A reflective optical...

  3. Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection...

  4. ADVANCED REFLECTIVE FILMS AND PANELS FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLAR...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ADVANCED REFLECTIVE FILMS AND PANELS FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLAR COLLECTORS ADVANCED REFLECTIVE FILMS AND PANELS FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLAR COLLECTORS This presentation was delivered...

  5. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01

    to varying levels solar radiation, and quantify theirproperties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces,siding surface. Direct solar radiation to siding, reflected

  6. Account of Nuclear Scattering at Volume Reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondarenco, M V

    2011-01-01

    For a particle traversing a bent crystal in the regime of volume reflection we evaluate the probability of interaction with atomic nuclei. Regardless of the continuous potential shape, this probability is found to differ from the corresponding value in an amorphous target by an amount proportional to the crystal bending radius, and the particle deflection angle. Based on this result, we evaluate the rate of inelastic nuclear interactions, and the final beam angular dispersion due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experiments. The impact of multiple Coulomb scattering on the mean volume reflection angle is also discussed.

  7. Emergence of exponentially small reflected waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Betz; Alain Joye; Stefan Teufel

    2008-04-23

    We study the time-dependent scattering of a quantum mechanical wave packet at a barrier for energies larger than the barrier height, in the semi-classical regime. More precisely, we are interested in the leading order of the exponentially small scattered part of the wave packet in the semiclassical parameter when the energy density of the incident wave is sharply peaked around some value. We prove that this reflected part has, to leading order, a Gaussian shape centered on the classical trajectory for all times soon after its birth time. We give explicit formulas and rigorous error bounds for the reflected wave for all of these times.

  8. Reflection technique for thermal mapping of semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, Martin J. (Lee, NY)

    1989-06-20

    Semiconductors may be optically tested for their temperatures by illuminating them with tunable monochromatic electromagnetic radiation and observing the light reflected off of them. A transition point will occur when the wavelength of the light corresponds with the actual band gap energy of the semiconductor. At the transition point, the image of the semiconductor will appreciably darken as the light is transmitted through it, rather than being reflected off of it. The wavelength of the light at the transition point corresponds to the actual band gap energy and the actual temperature of the semiconductor.

  9. Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Hemispheres Reflected by Steel and Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Darrell Bess

    2008-06-01

    During the period from June 1967 through September 1969 a series of critical experiments was performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory with spherical and hemispherical plutonium assemblies as nested hemishells as part of a Nuclear Safety Facility Experimental Program to evaluate operational safety margins for the Rocky Flats Plant. These assemblies were both bare and fully or partially oil-reflected. Many of these experiments were subcritical with an extrapolation to critical configurations or critical at a particular oil height. Existing records reveal that 167 experiments were performed over the course of 28 months. Unfortunately, much of the data was not recorded. A reevaluation of the experiments had been summarized in a report for future experimental and computational analyses. This report examines only fifteen partially oil-reflected hemispherical assemblies. Fourteen of these assemblies also had close-fitting stainless-steel hemishell reflectors, used to determine the effective critical reflector height of oil with varying steel-reflector thickness. The experiments and their uncertainty in keff values were evaluated to determine their potential as valid criticality benchmark experiments of plutonium.

  10. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  11. CHAPTER 127 Bragg Reflection Breakwater: A New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    on the seabed can be an effective reflector of surface gravity waves. The reflected wave energy varies of the incident wave energy. Technical Issues At the onset of the research program, there were a num- ber Jenkins Technologies, Carpinteria, CA 2 Engineer, Naval Civil Engineering Lab, Port Hueneme, CA 3

  12. 3D tracking via body radio reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabelac, Zachary (Zachary E.)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents WiTrack, a system that tracks the 3D motion of a user from the radio signals reflected off her body. It works even if the person is occluded from the WiTrack device or in a different room. WiTrack does ...

  13. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  14. April 20, 2010 Seismic Reflection V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    ? Vertical Resolution How thin a layer can we resolve? Dependent on seismic wavelength Reflectors are barely is an example of a "fully interpreted" seismic profile. What is the event history here? #12;4/19/2010 3 Here4/19/2010 1 GG450 April 20, 2010 Seismic Reflection V Data Interpretation I Today's material comes

  15. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Gerouki, Alexandra (Medford, MA); Liu, Te-Yang (Arlington, MA); Goldner, Mark A. (Cambridge, MA); Haas, Terry E. (Southborough, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

  16. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  17. EXPERIMENT #3 REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY We will use the reflectance attachment and fiber optics OceanOptics spectrophotometer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    EXPERIMENT #3 REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY We will use the reflectance attachment and fiber optics OceanOptics spectrophotometer to measure the reflectance spectrum of several paint samples in the special optically flat-bottomed cell so that the bottom is completely covered. Scan the reflectance

  18. A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  19. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  20. Reflective optical imaging method and circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2001-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  1. Painleve VI, Rigid Tops and Reflection Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Levin; M. Olshanetsky; A. Zotov

    2006-06-01

    We show that the Painlev{\\'e} VI equation has an equivalent form of the non-autonomous Zhukovsky-Volterra gyrostat. This system is a generalization of the Euler top in $C^3$ and include the additional constant gyrostat momentum. The quantization of its autonomous version is achieved by the reflection equation. The corresponding quadratic algebra generalizes the Sklyanin algebra. As by product we define integrable XYZ spin chain on a finite lattice with new boundary conditions.

  2. Multiple-reflection optical gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A multiple-reflection optical cell for Raman or fluorescence gas analysis consists of two spherical mirrors positioned transverse to a multiple-pass laser cell in a confronting plane-parallel alignment. The two mirrors are of equal diameter but possess different radii of curvature. The spacing between the mirrors is uniform and less than half of the radius of curvature of either mirror. The mirror of greater curvature possesses a small circular portal in its center which is the effective point source for conventional F1 double lens collection optics of a monochromator-detection system. Gas to be analyzed is flowed into the cell and irradiated by a multiply-reflected composite laser beam centered between the mirrors of the cell. Raman or fluorescence radiation originating from a large volume within the cell is (1) collected via multiple reflections with the cell mirrors, (2) partially collimated and (3) directed through the cell portal in a geometric array compatible with F1 collection optics.

  3. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  4. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal for designing laser cavities, spectrographs and adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The use, range respectively. This is discussed using examples from adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The performance

  5. Aberration-free, all-reflective laser pulse stretcher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-09-28

    An all-reflective pulse stretcher for laser systems employing chirped-pulse amplification enables on-axis use of the focusing mirror which results in ease of use, significantly decreased sensitivity to alignment and near aberration-free performance. By using a new type of diffraction grating which contains a mirror incorporated into the grating, the stretcher contains only three elements: 1) the grating, 2) a spherical or parabolic focusing mirror, and 3) a flat mirror. Addition of a fourth component, a retro-reflector, enables multiple passes of the same stretcher resulting in stretching ratios beyond the current state of the art in a simple and compact design. The pulse stretcher has been used to stretch pulses from 20 fsec to over 600 psec (a stretching ratio in excess of 30,000).

  6. The reflecting surface of the MAGIC-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bastieri; J. Arnold; C. Baixeras; O. Citterio; F. Dazzi; B. De Lotto; M. Doro; M. Ghigo; E. Giro; F. Goebel; R. Kosyra; E. Lorenz; M. Mariotti; R. Mirzoyan; R. Paoletti; G. Pareschi; D. Pascoli; A. Pepato; L. Peruzzo; A. Saggion; P. Sartori; A. Sillanpää

    2007-09-10

    The MAGIC Collaboration is building a second telescope, MAGIC II, improving the design of the current MAGIC Telescope. MAGIC II is being built at 85 m of distance from MAGIC I, and will also feature a huge reflecting surface of ~240 m$^2$ of area. One of the improvement is the design for the mirror of MAGIC II, that are lighter and larger, being square of 1 m of side and weighting around 15 kg. For the development and production of the new mirrors, two different techniques, both reliable and affordable in price, were selected: the diamond milling of aluminium surfaces and the cold slumping of thin glass panes. As tests for the second one are still ongoing, we present a description of the diamond milling technique, and its application and performance to the produced mirrors.

  7. A protocol for EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry using reflection scanning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papaconstadopoulos, Pavlos Hegyi, Gyorgy; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry system using reflection measurements and to suggest a calibration protocol for precise and accurate reflection film dosimetry. Methods: A set of 14 Gafchromic EBT3 film pieces were irradiated to various doses ranging from 0 to 8 Gy and subsequently scanned using both the reflection and transmission mode. Scanning resolution varied from 50 to 508 dpi (0.5–0.05 mm/pixel). Both the red and green color channels of scanned images were used to relate the film response to the dose. A sensitivity, uncertainty, and accuracy analysis was performed for all scanning modes and color channels. The total uncertainty, along with the fitting and experimental uncertainty components, was identified and analyzed. A microscope resolution target was used to evaluate possible resolution losses under reflection scanning. The calibration range was optimized for reflection scanning in the low (<2 Gy) and high (>2 Gy) dose regions based on the reported results. Results: Reflection scanning using the red channel exhibited the highest sensitivity among all modes, being up to 150% higher than transmission mode in the red channel for the lowest dose level. Furthermore, there was no apparent loss in resolution between the two modes. However, higher uncertainties and reduced accuracy were observed for the red channel under reflection mode, especially at dose levels higher than 2 Gy. These uncertainties were mainly attributed to saturation effects which were translated in poor fitting results. By restricting the calibration to the 0–2 Gy dose range, the situation is reversed and the red reflection mode was superior to the transmission mode. For higher doses, the green channel in reflection mode presented comparable results to the red transmission. Conclusions: A two-color reflection scanning protocol can be suggested for EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry using the red channel for doses less than 2 Gy and the green channel for higher doses. The precision and accuracy are significantly improved in the low dose region following such a protocol.

  8. Reflective optical imaging systems with balanced distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Optical systems compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate are described. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical systems are particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput, and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical systems are characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  9. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (Sunol, CA); Hudyma, Russell M. (San Ramon, CA); Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT); Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  10. Spin, Statistics, and Reflections, II. Lorentz Invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernd Kuckert; Reinhard Lorenzen

    2005-12-21

    The analysis of the relation between modular P$_1$CT-symmetry -- a consequence of the Unruh effect -- and Pauli's spin-statistics relation is continued. The result in the predecessor to this article is extended to the Lorentz symmetric situation. A model $\\G_L$ of the universal covering $\\widetilde{L_+^\\uparrow}\\cong SL(2,\\complex)$ of the restricted Lorentz group $L_+^\\uparrow$ is modelled as a reflection group at the classical level. Based on this picture, a representation of $\\G_L$ is constructed from pairs of modular P$_1$CT-conjugations, and this representation can easily be verified to satisfy the spin-statistics relation.

  11. Solar photovoltaic reflective trough collection structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-11-19

    A photovoltaic (PV) solar concentration structure having at least two troughs encapsulated in a rectangular parallelepiped optical plastic structure, with the troughs filled with an optical plastic material, the troughs each having a reflective internal surface and approximately parabolic geometry, and the troughs each including photovoltaic cells situated so that light impinging on the optical plastic material will be concentrated onto the photovoltaic cells. Multiple structures can be connected to provide a solar photovoltaic collection system that provides portable, efficient, low-cost electrical power.

  12. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  13. Category:Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap Contact Properties JumpReflection Survey

  14. Passivating overcoat bilayer for multilayer reflective coatings for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A passivating overcoat bilayer is used for multilayer reflective coatings for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft x-ray applications to prevent oxidation and corrosion of the multilayer coating, thereby improving the EUV optical performance. The overcoat bilayer comprises a layer of silicon or beryllium underneath at least one top layer of an elemental or a compound material that resists oxidation and corrosion. Materials for the top layer include carbon, palladium, carbides, borides, nitrides, and oxides. The thicknesses of the two layers that make up the overcoat bilayer are optimized to produce the highest reflectance at the wavelength range of operation. Protective overcoat systems comprising three or more layers are also possible.

  15. Volume Reflection Dependence of 400 GeV/c Protons on the Bent Crystal Curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, W.; Vomiero, A.; Baricordi, S.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Milan, R.; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Ambrosi, G.; Zuccon, P.; Bertucci, B.; Burger, W. J.; Duranti, M.; Cavoto, G.; Santacesaria, R.; Valente, P.; Iacoangeli, F.; Pisano, S.; Luci, C.

    2008-12-05

    The trend of volume reflection parameters (deflection angle and efficiency) in a bent (110) silicon crystal has been investigated as a function of the crystal curvature with 400 GeV/c protons on the H8 beam line at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. This Letter describes the analysis performed at six different curvatures showing that the optimal radius for volume reflection is approximately 10 times greater than the critical radius for channeling. A strong scattering of the beam by the planar potential is also observed for a bend radius close to the critical one.

  16. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick ...

  17. Transmission and reflection properties of layered left-handed materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jianbing James, 1971-

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the reflection and transmission properties of layered left-handed materials (LHM). In particular, the reflection properties of (LHM) slabs are studied for the Goos-Hanchen (GH) lateral shift ...

  18. THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS INFORMATION O Box 7216, Austin TX 78713- 7216. Cover: The Tower, reflected in one of the Tower Garden ponds

  19. Computational 3D and reflectivity imaging with high photon efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Dongeek

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the 3D structure and reflectivity of a scene can be done using photon-counting detectors. Traditional imagers of this type typically require hundreds of detected photons per pixel for accurate 3D and reflectivity ...

  20. inside/out : mirrors for reflective, creative thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portocarrero, Edwina

    2011-01-01

    In this document I present three tools for reflective, creative thinking: Pillow-Talk, the NeverEnding Drawing Machine and Calliope. These tools make use of the "distorted mirror" metaphor for self-reflection. They are ...

  1. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2001-01-01

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

  2. A replaceable reflective film for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 3M Company manufactures a silvered acrylic film called ECP-305 that is regarded as the preferred reflective film for use on stretched-membrane heliostats. However, ECP-305 will degrade in time, due to both corrosion of the silver layer and delamination at the film's silver-to-acrylic interface, and will eventually need to be replaced. 3M uses a very aggressive adhesive on this film, and once it is laminated, replacement is very difficult. The purpose of this investigation was the development of a replaceable reflector, a reflective film that can be easily removed and replaced. A replaceable reflector was successfully configured by laminating ECP-305 to the top surface of a smooth, dimensionally stable polymer film, with a removable adhesive applied to the underside of the polymer film. Several stages of screening and testing led to the selection of a 0.010-inch thick polycarbonate (GE 8030) as the best polymer film and a medium tack tape (3M Y-9425) was selected as the best removable adhesive. To demonstrate the feasibility of the replaceable reflector concept and to provide a real-time field test, the chosen construction was successfully applied to the 50-m{sup 2} SKI heliostat at the Central Receiver Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. 4 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Performative architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya, Sergio (Sergio Alejandro)

    2011-01-01

    The following thesis explores two central hypotheses. On the one hand it introduces the idea of performative architecture (performance in design), and has done so with the desire to contribute directly to the expansion of ...

  4. On the Mechanism of the Volume Reflection of Relativistic Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalev, Gennady V

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the volume reflection of positively and negatively charged relativistic particles in a bent crystal have been analyzed. It has been shown that the empty core effect is significant for the negatively charged particles. The average reflection angle of the negatively charged particles has been determined and the conditions for the observation of the reflection and refraction are discussed.

  5. Camera-based reflectivity measurement for solar thermal applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camera-based reflectivity measurement for solar thermal applications John D. Pye1 , Clifford K. Ho2 2 6125 8778, john.pye@anu.edu.au. 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. ckho of the solar-weighted reflectivity of the receiver component in CSP systems. Such reflectivity measurement

  6. COS Coating Reflectivity Specification Date: August 2, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS Coating Reflectivity Specification Date: August 2, 1999 Document Number: COS-08-0008 Revision for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS Coating Reflectivity Specification Size Code Indent No Astronomy Revision A COS Coating Reflectivity Specfication University of Colorado at Boulder Page i Table

  7. Seismic Reflection Results: Stewart Gulch Region, Boise, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Seismic Reflection Results: Stewart Gulch Region, Boise, Idaho Report Prepared for The Terteling) Boise State University Boise, Idaho 83725 Technical Report BSU CGISS 96-04 1 December 1996 #12;SEISMIC REFLECTION RESULTS: STEWART GULCH REGION, BOISE, IDAHO 1 SEISMIC REFLECTION RESULTS: STEWART GULCH REGION

  8. Model solution for volume reflection of relativistic particles in a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondarenco, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    For volume reflection process in a bent crystal, exact analytic expressions for positively- and negatively-charged particle trajectories are obtained within a model of parabolic continuous potential in each interplanar interval, with the neglect of incoherent multiple scattering. In the limit of the crystal bending radius greatly exceeding the critical value, asymptotic formulas are obtained for the particle mean deflection angle in units of Lindhard's critical angle, and for the final beam profile. Volume reflection of negatively charged particles is shown to contain effects of rainbow scattering and orbiting, whereas with positively charged particles none of these effects arise within the given model. The model predictions are compared with experimental results and numerical simulations. Estimates of the volume reflection mean angle and the final beam profile robustness under multiple scattering are performed.

  9. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  10. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  11. Spatial-Heterodyne Interferometry For Reflection And Transm Ission (Shirt) Measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bingham, Philip R [Knoxville, TN; Tobin, Ken W [Harriman, TN

    2006-02-14

    Systems and methods are described for spatial-heterodyne interferometry for reflection and transmission (SHIRT) measurements. A method includes digitally recording a first spatially-heterodyned hologram using a first reference beam and a first object beam; digitally recording a second spatially-heterodyned hologram using a second reference beam and a second object beam; Fourier analyzing the digitally recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram to define a first analyzed image; Fourier analyzing the digitally recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram to define a second analyzed image; digitally filtering the first analyzed image to define a first result; and digitally filtering the second analyzed image to define a second result; performing a first inverse Fourier transform on the first result, and performing a second inverse Fourier transform on the second result. The first object beam is transmitted through an object that is at least partially translucent, and the second object beam is reflected from the object.

  12. Measured Energy Savings from the Application of Reflective Roofs in 3 AT and T Regeneration Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashen; Rainer, Leo

    2000-11-01

    Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in three AT and T regeneration buildings during the summer of 2000. These buildings are constructed with concrete and are about 14.9 m2 (160 f2; 10x16 ft)in size. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. Then, the roofs of the buildings were painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original roof reflectances were about 26 percent; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72 percent. In two of these buildings, we monitored savings of about 0.5kWh per day (8.6 kWh/m2 [0.8 kWh/ft2]). The third building showed a reduction in air-conditioning energy use of about 13kWh per day. These savings probably resulted from the differences in the performance (EER) of the two dissimilar AC units in this building. The estimated annual savings for two of the buildings are about 125kWh per year; at a cost of dollar 0.1/kWh, savings are about dollar 12.5 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote location of the buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them with white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence the payback time for having reflective roofs is nil, and the reflective roofs save an accumulated 370kWh over 30 years of the life of the roof.

  13. Total internal reflection photonic crystal prism Ethan Schonbrun1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Total internal reflection photonic crystal prism Ethan Schonbrun1 , Maxim Abashin2 , John Blair3 of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309 ethan

  14. KP solitons and Mach reflection in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Kodama

    2012-10-01

    This gives a survey of our recent studies on soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation with an emphasis on the Mach reflection problem in shallow water.

  15. Reflection and transmission coefficients of a fracture in transversely ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-28

    dependent reflection and transmission coefficients. On the other hand, velocity discontinuities generate an energy loss at the interface. The specific viscosity ...

  16. Ion reflection, gyration, and dissipation at supercritical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosling, J.T.; Robson, A.E.

    1984-04-01

    This brief review emphasizes the following points: (1) Ion reflection is the dominant ion dissipation mechanism at nearly perpendicular, supercritical shocks. (2) An increasing fraction of the ions incident on a supercritical shock is reflected as the Mach number increases. The actual fraction reflected can be predicted using the Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relations. (3) The effective temperature associated with the dispersion in velocity space associated with ion reflection accounts for a large fraction of the temperature rise observed across supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shocks.

  17. Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic...

  18. school of education, health, and human performance Boundless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    school of education, health, and human performance #12;Boundless: The Campaign for the College the next era of the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance. The magnitude of our goal reflects for meaningful research, service and learning. The School of Education, Health, and Human Performance

  19. Repository performance confirmation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the Yucca Mountain license application identified a broad suite of monitoring activities. A revision of the plan was expected to winnow the number of activities down to a manageable size. As a result, an objective process for the next stage of performance confirmation planning was developed as an integral part of an overarching long-term testing and monitoring strategy. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance monitoring program at once reflects its importance to stakeholders while demonstrating adequate understanding of relevant monitoring parameters. The compliance criteria were stated by regulation and are currently monitored as part of the regulatory rule for disposal. At the outset, the screening practice and parameter selection were not predicated on a direct or indirect correlation to system performance metrics, as was the case for Yucca Mountain. Later on, correlation to performance was established, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continues to monitor ten parameters originally identified in the compliance certification documentation. The monitoring program has proven to be effective for the technical intentions and societal or public assurance. The experience with performance confirmation in the license application process for Yucca Mountain helped identify an objective, quantitative methodology for this purpose. Revision of the existing plan would be based on findings of the total system performance assessment. Identification and prioritization of confirmation activities would then derive from performance metrics associated with performance assessment. Given the understanding of repository performance confirmation, as reviewed in this paper, it is evident that the performance confirmation program for the Yucca Mountain project could be readily re-engaged if licensing activities resumed.

  20. Daylighting and solar shading performances of an innovative automated reflective louver system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman

    2014-08-07

    follows initial investigations into the design and applicability of an automated retrofitted panel thermal shutters which can also act as a sunshade and daylighting system. The system has a patented function which allows each shutter...

  1. DoMobility-Based Performance Measures Reflect Emissions Trends?1 Alexander Y. Bigazzi3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    , and environmental costs[3], [4]. Increased fuel consumption and23 elevated emissions from motor vehicles are often.Sand also estimates the amount of fuel "wasted" in congestion [5]; according to the27 UMR,fuel wastedper with the dual objectives of32 improved air quality and reducedcongestion[7].33 Given the common association

  2. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A FORCE-REFLECTING TELEOPERATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    For certain applications, such as space servicing, undersea operations, and hazardous material handling tasks in nuclear reactors, the environments can be uncertain, complex, and hazardous. Lives may be in danger if humans were to work under these conditions. As a result, a man-machine system--a teleoperator system--has been developed to work in these types of environments. In a typical teleoperator system, the actual system operates at a remote site; the operator located away from this system usually receives visual information from a video image and/or graphical animation on the computer screen. Additional feedback, such as aural and force information, can significantly enhance performance of the system. Force reflection is a type of feedback in which forces experienced by the remote manipulator are fed back to the manual controller. Various control methods have been proposed for implementation on a teleoperator system. In order to examine different control schemes, a one Degree-Of-Freedom (DOF) Force-Reflecting Manual Controller (FRMC) is constructed and integrated into a PC. The system parameters are identified and constructed as a mathematical model. The Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic controllers are developed and tested experimentally. Numerical simulation results obtained from the mathematical model are compared with those of experimental data for both types of controllers. In addition, the concept of a telesensation system is introduced. A telesensation system is an advanced teleoperator system that attempts to provide the operator with sensory feedback. In this context, a telesensation system integrates the use of a Virtual Reality (VR) unit, FRMC, and Graphical User Interface (GUI). The VR unit is used to provide the operator with a 3-D visual effect. Various commercial VR units are reviewed and features compared for use in a telesensation system. As for the FRMC, the conceptual design of a 3-DOF FRMC is developed in an effort to make the system portable, compact, and lightweight. A variety of design alternatives are presented and evaluated. Finally, a GUI software package is developed to interface with several teleoperation unit components. These components include an industrial robot, electric motor, encoder, force/torque sensor, and CCD camera. The software includes features such as position scaling, force scaling, and rereferencing and is intended to provide a sound basis for the development of a multi-DOF FRMC system in the future.

  3. May 31, 2005 Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 31, 2005 . Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves: Summary of Experimental of an acoustic wave as a reflecting virtual interface for propagating impulses. It is by now well accepted (e.g., see [2, 7, 11, 14]) that acoustic pressure waves will interact with electromagnetic signals in ways

  4. Mirror contamination and secondary electron effects during EUV reflectivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Mirror contamination and secondary electron effects during EUV reflectivity analysis M. Catalfanoa, USA; b SEMATECH Inc., Albany, NY 12203, USA ABSTRACT We investigated Ru mirror contamination film at different angles. During the contamination process, the EUV reflectivity of the Ru film

  5. A 16-ELEMENT REFLECTION GRID AMPLIFIER Frederic Lecuyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a reflection architecture, which should provide thermal per- formance superior to transmission grids. The grid spaced differential transistor pairs. All grid amplifiers to date have used a transmission architecture, which can double as a large metal heat sink. Otherwise, the operation of reflection grid amplifiers

  6. Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Erhard

    Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos a and Erhard Neher b, Department.loos@uibk.ac.at bemail: neher@uottawa.ca Abstract. We develop a general theory of reflection systems and, more specifically, partial root sys- tems which provide a unifying framework for finite root systems, Kac-Moody root

  7. Reflections on the future of democracy in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    Reflections on the future of democracy in Europe Contributions to The Future of Democracy in Europe of Political Affairs Council of Europe #12;French edition: Réflexions sur l'avenir de la démocratie en Europe reflect those of the Council of Europe. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced

  8. Evaluation of Plutonium Hemisphere Critical Experiments Partially Reflected by Steel and Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2012-01-01

    A series of 15 critical experiments performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s were evaluated and then determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments for the validation of calculational methods. This series of experiments was part of a larger set of experiments performed to evaluate operational safety margins at the Rocky Flats Plant. The experiments consisted of bare plutonium metal hemishells reflected by steel hemishells of increasing thickness and motor oil. The hemishell assembly was suspended within dual aluminum tanks. Criticality was achieved by pumping oil into the tanks such that effectively infinite reflection was achieved in all directions except directly above the assembly; then the critical oil height was recorded. The results of these experiments had been initially ignored because early computational methods had been inadequate to analyze partially-reflected configurations. The dominant uncertainties include the uncertainty in the average plutonium density and the composition of materials in the gaps between the plutonium hemishells. Simple and detailed benchmark models were developed. Eigenvalue calculations using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 were within 2s of the benchmark values. This benchmark evaluation has been added to the ICSBEP Handbook.

  9. Performance Contracting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodin, E.

    2011-01-01

    vehicle to reach the city/district?s goals ? Make needed improvements ? Promote campus-wide energy efficiency ? Speed up renovation timeline ? Receive guaranteed results Schneider Electric ? Buildings Business ? CATEE 2011 8 City of Dallas...Performance Contracting ? A Resource for Energy Efficiency Projects Schneider Electric ? Buildings Business ? CATEE 2011 2 Top Challenges for Cities & Schools Tax Revenue Reductions Property values down, sales tax revenue down, etc Energy...

  10. Modelling of Reflective Propagating Slow-mode Wave in a Flaring Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, X; Van Doorsselaere, T; Keppens, R; Xia, C

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in EUV images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory}/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131, 94~\\AA~emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km/s in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperatu...

  11. A simple scanning spectrometer based on a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghisleri, C.; Milani, P., E-mail: paolo.milani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); WISE srl, Piazza Duse 2, 20122 Milano (Italy); Potenza, M. A. C.; Bellacicca, A. [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ravagnan, L. [WISE srl, Piazza Duse 2, 20122 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-10

    We report a scanning optical spectrometer based on the use of a stretchable elastomeric reflective grating. The grating is obtained by supersonic cluster beam implantation of silver nanoparticles on polydimethylsiloxane previously grooved by molding to create a replica of a commercial digital versatile disk grating. The use of a stretchable grating allows the spectrometer spanning the whole optical wavelength range by solely extending the diffraction element by more than 100% of its original dimensions. The stretchable reflective optical grating shows excellent performances and stability upon thousands of stretching cycles. The use of this elastomeric element makes the optical layout and the mechanics of the spectrometer extremely simple and advantageous for those applications where spectral resolution is not a major requirement. As a proof of principle, we present the absorption spectrum of Rhodamine B in solution obtained by our spectrometer and compared to commercial instruments.

  12. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  13. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Vriddhachalam K. (Los Alamos, NM); Newnam, Brian E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 .mu.m, and preferably less than 100 .mu.m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 .mu.m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm .times.25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  14. Passive Exposure to Mobile Phones: Enhancement of Intensity by Reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuyoshi Hondou; Takenori Ueda; Yasuhiro Sakata; Nobuto Tanigawa; Tetsu Suzuki; Taizo Kobayashi; Kensuke Ikeda

    2007-03-12

    In a recent Letter [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 71, 432 (2002)], we reported a preliminary calculation and concluded that public exposure to mobile phones can be enhanced by microwave reflection in public spaces. In this paper, we confirm the significance of microwave reflection reported in our previous Letter by experimental and numerical studies. Furthermore, we show that "hot spots" often emerge in reflective areas, where the local exposure level is much higher than average. Such places include elevators, and we discuss other possible environments including trains, buses, cars, and airplanes. Our results indicate the risk of "passive exposure" to microwaves.

  15. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

  16. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  17. Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsPartiesOriginalPerformance assessment (PA)

  18. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsPartiesOriginalPerformanceOptimization »

  19. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01

    build-up and permanent distortion Property Description Total solarbuild-up and permanent distortion; and factors that determine the properties of reflected solarbuild-up (ASTM 1998). A black object absorbs most visible incident solar

  20. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    be described completely in terms of various "Gre* *en functions" of type Bn0. However, note that the Green GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions

  1. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  2. Image statistics and the perception of surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharan, Lavanya

    2005-01-01

    Humans are surprisingly good at judging the reflectance of complex surfaces even when the surfaces are viewed in isolation, contrary to the Gelb effect. We argue that textural cues are important for this task. Traditional ...

  3. Reflective Interfaces : assisting teens with stressful situations online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Birago (Birago Korayga)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the concept of Reflective Interfaces, a novel approach to user experience design that promotes positive behavioral norms. Traditional interface design methodologies such as User Centered Design are ...

  4. Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jeff

    2015-06-09

    Engel Presents his book, "Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War," a reevaluation of the Gulf War's origins, the war itself, and its regional and long term impact on international relations.

  5. Reflectance of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for Xenon Scintillation Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, C; Pereira, A; Chepel, V; Lopes, M I; Solovov, V

    2009-01-01

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength region (175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Fluoropolymers, namely ETFE, FEP and PFA were also measured.

  6. Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members Dianne P. O'Leary http O'Leary. Copyright Dianne P. O'Leary, 1999 Version 1: June 1999 1 Picture Yourself: You are male

  7. Theory of reflectivity properties of graphene-coated material plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Petrov, V M

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical description for the reflectivity properties of dielectric, metal and semiconductor plates coated with graphene is developed in the framework of the Dirac model. Graphene is described by the polarization tensor allowing the analytic continuation to the real frequency axis. The plate materials are described by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivities. The general formulas for the reflection coefficients and reflectivities of the graphene-coated plates, as well as their asymptotic expressions at high and low frequencies, are derived. The developed theory is applied to the graphene-coated dielectric (fused silica), metal (Au and Ni), and semiconductor (Si with various charge carrier concentrations) plates. In all these cases the impact of graphene coating on the plate reflectivity properties is calculated over the wide frequency ranges. The obtained results can be used in many applications exploiting the graphene coatings, such as the optical detectors, transparent conductors, anti-reflec...

  8. Reflective cracking of shear keys in multi-beam bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharpe, Graeme Peter

    2009-06-02

    strength to resist cracking from vehicular loads, but uneven temperature changes and shrinkage strains cause high tensile stresses in the shear key regions and lead to reflective cracking. The analyses showed the highest stresses were often times near...

  9. Reflection and Transmission of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields through Multilayered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughstun, Kurt

    Reflection and Transmission of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields through Multilayered Biological Media- cally rigorous, physically correct description of the propagation of pulsed electromagnetic fields pulses through multilayered biological media consisting of three biological tissue layers rep- resenting

  10. Seismic Reflection Studies in Long Valley Caldera, Califomia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Ross A.; Deemer, Sharon J.; Smithson, Scott B.

    1991-03-10

    Seismic reflection studies in Long Valley caldera, California, indicate that seismic methods may be successfully employed to image certain types of features in young silicic caldera environments. However, near-surface geological conditions within...

  11. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly...

  12. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Report SERI/TR-642-761, Solar Energy Research Institute,radiation Direct reflected solar energy from smooth surfaceshighest in the sky. The solar energy incident on a receiving

  13. Amplified total internal reflection: theory, analysis, and demonstration of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagness, Susan C.

    : The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, 2nd ed. (Artech House, 2000). 10. Z. Wang, Z. Zhang, Z. Xu, and Q a passive medium upon total internal reflection (TIR) from a gainy medium, has been the subject

  14. Amplified total internal reflection: theory, analysis, and demonstration of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    : The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, 2nd ed. (Artech House, 2000). 10. Z. Wang, Z. Zhang, Z. Xu, and Q amplification that occurs within a passive medium upon total internal reflection (TIR) from a gainy medium, has

  15. Repetitive output laser system and method using target reflectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Roy R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1978-01-01

    An improved laser system and method for implosion of a thermonuclear fuel pellet in which that portion of a laser pulse reflected by the target pellet is utilized in the laser system to initiate a succeeding target implosion, and in which the energy stored in the laser system to amplify the initial laser pulse, but not completely absorbed thereby, is used to amplify succeeding laser pulses initiated by target reflection.

  16. High reflectivity grating waveguide coatings for 1064nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bunkowski; O. Burmeister; D. Friedrich; K. Danzmann; R. Schnabel

    2006-08-01

    We propose thin single-layer grating waveguide structures to be used as high-reflectivity, but low thermal noise, alternative to conventional coatings for gravitational wave detector test mass mirrors. Grating waveguide (GWG) coatings can show a reflectivity of up to 100% with an overall thickness of less than a wavelength. We theoretically investigate GWG coatings for 1064nm based on tantala (Ta2O5) on a Silica substrate focussing on broad spectral response and low thickness.

  17. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01

    UNIVERSAL SIGNAL PROCESSING METHOD FOR MULTIMODE REFLECTIVE SENSORS A Thesis by ROBERT EUGENE LARSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering UNIVERSAL SIGNAL PROCESSING METHOD FOR MULTIMODE REFLECTIVE SENSORS A Thesis by ROBERT EUGENE LARSON Approved as to style and content by: nry F. Taylor (Chair of Committee) hin Su...

  18. Active Reflection Absorption for a Three Dimensional Multidirectional Wave Generator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz Castro, Oscar

    2010-10-12

    set of independent wave paddles (flume wave makers) working together in parallel, using 2D ARA (1D filters) to create a multidirectional wavemaker with wave absorption capability. Therefore, no information on directionality of reflected waves... in considerable damping of the reflected waves is achieved compared to not using anything at all in a multidirectional wavemaker. Also the use of electronic analog filters, for the ARA loop, support these approaches. On the other hand, Fully-3D ARA systems...

  19. Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Functions from surface bump maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, B.K.

    1988-06-17

    The interaction of light and matter define what we see. This interaction can be characterized by a function which relates incoming light to the distribution of outgoing or reflected light. The Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Function (BRDF) is just such a function. Computer graphics scientists attempting to model this function have made simplifying assumptions about the reflecting surfaces. These simpler models have produced adequate results but only handle very uniform or isotropic surface characteristics. Reality on the other hand is filled with a variety of surface textures which result in a variety of BRDFs. This thesis broadens the class of BRDFs which can be used in computer graphics to render objects more realistically. It presents two enhancements to previous work done by the author. First, it describes a method for the approximation of surface absorption of light through the use of a computed geometric attentuation factor. This factor is computed by calculating the parts of the surface which are visible in the incident and reflecting directions. Specifically, it describes the algorithms and theory behind the visibility calculations and how it affects the reflection properties of the surface. Second, it describes a method for computing Fresnel's Law for conducting and dielectric surface materials and how Fresnel's Law affects surface reflectivity. This work also presents a method for rendering objects using the computed BRDFs. 38 refs., 29 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Channeling and Volume Reflection Based Crystal Collimation of Tevatron Circulating Beam Halo (T-980)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Annala, G.; Drozhdin, A.; Johnson, T.; Legan, A.; Mokhov, N.; Reilly, R.; Still, D.; Tesarek, R.; Zagel, J.; Peggs, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /Serpukhov, IHEP /INFN, Ferrara /PNPI, CSTD

    2010-05-01

    The T980 crystal collimation experiment is underway at the Tevatron to determine if this technique could increase 980 GeV beam-halo collimation efficiency at high-energy hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the LHC. T980 also studies various crystal types and parameters. The setup has been substantially enhanced during the Summer 2009 shutdown by installing a new O-shaped crystal in the horizontal goniometer, as well as adding a vertical goniometer with two alternating crystals (O-shaped and multi-strip) and additional beam diagnostics. First measurements with the new system are quite encouraging, with channeled and volume-reflected beams observed on the secondary collimators as predicted. Investigation of crystal collimation efficiencies with crystals in volume reflection and channeling modes are described in comparison with an amorphous primary collimator. Results on the system performance are presented for the end-of-store studies and for entire collider stores. The first investigation of colliding beam collimation simultaneously using crystals in both the vertical and horizontal plane has been made in the regime with horizontally channeled and vertically volume-reflected beams. Planning is underway for significant hardware improvements during the FY10 summer shutdown and for dedicated studies during the final year of Tevatron operation and also for a 'post-collider beam physics running' period.

  1. X-ray reflection spectra from ionized slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. R. Ross; A. C. Fabian; A. J. Young

    1999-02-23

    X-ray reflection spectra are an important component in the X-ray spectra of many active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole candidates. It is likely that reflection takes place from highly ionized surfaces of the accretion disc in some cases. This can lead to strong Comptonization of the emergent iron, and other, absorption and emission features. We present such reflection spectra here, computed in a self-consistent manner with the method described by Ross and Fabian. In particular we emphasise the range where the ionization parameter (the flux to density ratio) \\xi is around and above 10^4. Such spectra may be relevant to the observed spectral features found in black hole candidates such as Cygnus X-1 in the low/hard state.

  2. Total transmission and total reflection by zero index materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viet Cuong Nguyen; Lang Chen

    2010-07-01

    In this report, we achieved total transmission and reflection in a slab of zero index materials with defect(s). By controlling the defect's radius and dielectric constant, we can obtain total transmission and reflection of EM wave. The zero index materials, in this report, stand for materials with permittivity and permeability which are simultaneously equal to zero or so called matched impedance zero index materials. Along with theoretical calculations and simulation demonstrations, we also discuss about some possible applications for the proposed structure such as shielding or cloaking an object without restricting its view. We also suggest a way to control total transmission and reflection actively by using tunable refractive index materials such as liquid crystal and BST. The physics behind those phenomena is attributed to intrinsic properties of zero index materials: constant field inside zero index slab.

  3. Corrosion-resistant multilayer structures with improved reflectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Robinson, Jeff C.

    2013-04-09

    In one general embodiment, a thin film structure includes a substrate; a first corrosion barrier layer above the substrate; a reflective layer above the first corrosion barrier layer, wherein the reflective layer comprises at least one repeating set of sub-layers, wherein one of the sub-layers of each set of sub-layers being of a corrodible material; and a second corrosion barrier layer above the reflective layer. In another general embodiment, a system includes an optical element having a thin film structure as recited above; and an image capture or spectrometer device. In a further general embodiment, a laser according to one embodiment includes a light source and the thin film structure as recited above.

  4. Advanced remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator concept is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world. 10 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  5. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Paul R. (Lenoir City, TN); Shapira, Hanna B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1981-01-01

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  6. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Robert; Curcija, Charlie; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2011-07-07

    The subject of glass solar reflectance and its contribution to permanent vinyl siding distortion has not been extensively studied, and some phenomena are not yet well understood. This white paper presents what is known regarding the issue and identifies where more research is needed. Three primary topics are discussed: environmental factors that control the transfer of heat to and from the siding surface; vinyl siding properties that may affect heat build-up and permanent distortion; and factors that determine the properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces, including insulating window glass. Further research is needed to fully characterize the conditions associated with siding distortion, the scope of the problem, physical properties of vinyl siding, insulating window glass reflection characteristics, and possible mitigation or prevention strategies.

  7. Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, Randy R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  8. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    A companion article explored how solar reflectance varies with surface orientation and solar position, and found that clear sky air mass 1 global horizontal (AM1GH) solar reflectance is a preferred quantity for estimating solar heat gain. In this study we show that AM1GH solar reflectance R{sub g,0} can be accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer, or an updated edition of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (version 6). Of primary concern are errors that result from variations in the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight. Neglecting shadow, background and instrument errors, the conventional pyranometer technique can measure R{sub g,0} to within 0.01 for surface slopes up to 5:12 [23{sup o}], and to within 0.02 for surface slopes up to 12:12 [45{sup o}]. An alternative pyranometer method minimizes shadow errors and can be used to measure R{sub g,0} of a surface as small as 1 m in diameter. The accuracy with which it can measure R{sub g,0} is otherwise comparable to that of the conventional pyranometer technique. A solar spectrophotometer can be used to determine R*{sub g,0}, a solar reflectance computed by averaging solar spectral reflectance weighted with AM1GH solar spectral irradiance. Neglecting instrument errors, R*{sub g,0} matches R{sub g,0} to within 0.006. The air mass 1.5 solar reflectance measured with version 5 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer can differ from R*{sub g,0} by as much as 0.08, but the AM1GH output of version 6 of this instrument matches R*{sub g,0} to within about 0.01.

  9. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment and Anti-Reflection Coatings for Millimeter Wave Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quealy, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Flat Anti-Reflection Coating . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.2 Anti-Kam Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AR CoatingAnti-Reflection Coatings . . . . . 2.2.2 Signal and Mapping

  10. Neutron Reflectivity Study of Lipid Membranes Assembled on Ordered Nanocomposite and Nanoporous Silica Thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Neutron Reflectivity Study of Lipid Membranes Assembled on Ordered Nanocomposite and Nanoporous on orderednanocompositeandnanoporoussilicathinfilmsbyfusionofsmallunilamellarvesicles.Thestructure of these membranes was investigated using neutron reflectivity. The underlying thin

  11. Millisecond time resolution neutron reflection from a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalgliesh, R.M.; Lau, Y.G.J.; Richardson, R.M.; Riley, D.J. [ISIS Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    The director reorientation of the liquid crystal 4,4' octyl cyanobiphenyl in the nematic phase under application of bursts of ac field have been observed using time-resolved neutron scattering in reflection geometry. The relaxation of the director has been shown to agree with existing theory, as determined by material and cell parameters. This result shows that it is possible to use neutron reflection measurements from buried interfaces to follow kinetic processes on a time scale comparable with the pulse length of the ISIS neutron source (20 ms)

  12. Simultaneous imaging/reflectivity measurements to assess diagnostic mirror cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Doerner, R. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We describe a technique to assess the efficacy of mirror cleaning techniques and detect any damage to the mirror surface. The method combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements in the red, green, and blue spectral regions and at selected wavelengths. The method has been applied to laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150-420 nm thick. It is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber.

  13. Rigorous bounds on Transmission, Reflection, and Bogoliubov coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of some basic mathematical tools of wide relevance to mathematical physics. Transmission and reflection coefficients are associated with quantum tunneling phenomena, while Bogoliubov coefficients are associated with the mathematically related problem of excitations of a parametric oscillator. While many approximation techniques for these quantities are known, very little is known about rigorous upper and lower bounds. In this thesis four separate problems relating to rigorous bounds on transmission, reflection and Bogoliubov coefficients are considered, divided into four separate themes: 1) Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients; 2) Bounding the greybody factors for Schwarzschild black holes; 3) Transformation probabilities and the Miller--Good transformation; 4) Analytic bounds on transmission probabilities.

  14. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  15. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  16. Carver Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance and Optimization Performance Monitoring Last edited: 2012-01-09 12:31:03...

  17. REFLECTIONS ON AUTISM Clarence E. Schutt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFLECTIONS ON AUTISM Clarence E. Schutt, Ph.D. Autism was once a private matter. It was rare to encounter a person with autism. If one did, it was usually a family member or neighbor. Treatments were non by families. As studies began to include ever larger numbers of recognized cases, autism came to be described

  18. Reflective Middleware Solutions for Context-Aware Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Wolfgang

    in wireless networking technologies and the growing success of mobile computing devices, such as laptop the application becomes both more difficult and makes little sense. Mobile systems need to detect and adaptReflective Middleware Solutions for Context-Aware Applications Licia Capra, Wolfgang Emmerich

  19. Some reflections on mathematics and its relation to computer science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Some reflections on mathematics and its relation to computer science Liesbeth De Mol "No paradigm, it is worthless Knuth used this story to explain how he considered mathematics and computer science to be distinct, for developing my thoughts on experimental mathematics and computer science. Of equal importance is the fact

  20. Internal Wave Reflection in Uniform Shear B. R. Sutherland ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal Wave Reflection in Uniform Shear B. R. Sutherland ? Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Alberta Edmonton, AB T6G 2G1, Canada SUMMARY If non­hydrostatic internal waves are of sufficiently large amplitude, they undergo significant dispersion due to interactions between the waves

  1. Dynamic Behaviors of Plasma Reflection during Keyhole Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    Dynamic Behaviors of Plasma Reflection during Keyhole Arc Welding YuMing Zhang and Yi Ma Welding Engineering College of Engineering University of Kentucky #12;Keyhole Double-Sided Arc Welding Work PAW Torch: in any existing arc welding process? No ! Why Not in Keyhole PAW? No current through the keyhole ! Plasma

  2. Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    ,aswellasuncertaintiesin data, validation by means of the independent in situ airborne and ground-based measurements that are co. Liou Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles the measured ice particle morphology. We demonstrate that laboratory scat- tering and reflectance data for thin

  3. Infra-red reflectance and emissivity spectra of nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maturilli, A; Kulakova, I I; Helbert, J

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance and emissivity spectra of nanodiamonds powder were measured in a dedicated setup at temperatures up to 873 K. The spectra are characterised by presence of sharp bands due to surface-bound functional groups. Thermal desorption of oxygen-containing groups lead to corresponding spectral changes. The maximal emissivity of nanodiamond powder reaches 0.985.

  4. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    , that the Green functions of type D n can be described completely in terms of various ``Green functions'' of typeGREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions associated

  5. Reflected and Transmitted Irradiance from Area Sources using Vertex Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Reflected and Transmitted Irradiance from Area Sources using Vertex Tracing Michael M. Stark irradiance analytically from polygonal luminaires in polygonal environments has proven effective for direct- ally used edge-based solutions to the irradiance integral; our previous work pre- sented a vertex

  6. Fiber optic hydrophone sensor arrays using low reflectance internal mirrors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Seo

    1998-01-01

    magnetron sputtering machine was used for producing a coating on a cleaved fiber end. Three different coating thicknesses of the TiO2 material [(150 i, 250 h, and 300 i)] for the low reflectance internal mirrors were tested. For the controllable low...

  7. Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members Dianne P. O'Leary \\Lambda June. This document benefitted from helpful advice and references from Nora Sleumer and Timothy O'Leary. Copyright Dianne P. O'Leary, 1999 Version 1: June 1999 1 Picture Yourself: You are male, almost 20 years old, naive

  8. Continuous Wave Terahertz Reflection Imaging of Human Colorectal Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Continuous Wave Terahertz Reflection Imaging of Human Colorectal Tissue Pallavi Doradlaa,b , Karim cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross the microwave and infrared regions of the spectrum. The high sensitivity of THz radiation to water concentration

  9. Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard's Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    all learn, and our impact on the world are all greatly improved as a result. THE STATE OF SOCIAL research approach the impact of quantita- tive social science. It had a part in remaking most Fortune 500Restructuring the Social Sciences: Reflections from Harvard's Institute for Quantitative Social

  10. Light Source Interpolation for Sparsely Sampled Reflectance Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Light Source Interpolation for Sparsely Sampled Reflectance Fields Billy Chen, Hendrik P. A. Lensch present a technique that approximates the correct result of relighting from intermediate light source resolution in the light source positions is rather lim- ited. As a consequence, smoothly moving high- lights

  11. Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future* Robert Conn Fusion Energy, "Opportunities and Directions in Fusion Energy Science for the Next Decade", held July 11-23, 1999 in Snowmass, Colorado. #12;2 Abstract History shows that all the major opportunities to advance fusion research were

  12. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  13. Toward Infusing Modular and Reflective Design Learning throughout the Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgas, John

    Toward Infusing Modular and Reflective Design Learning throughout the Curriculum John C. Georgas intervention that cen- ters on the widespread infusion of design learning throughout the curriculum using: An emphasis on broadly infusing design learning through the curriculum using modular design challenges

  14. Waveform tomography at a groundwater contamination site: Surface reflection data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, R. Gerhard

    acoustic-waveform tomography to 45 2D seismic profiles to image the 3D geometry of a buried pale- ochannel the shallowest groundwater system in the study area. The 2D profiles were extracted from a 3D surface reflection the channel showed marked vertical and lat- eral velocity heterogeneity. Traveltime tomography and waveform

  15. Stochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    . Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR) · Both maps will have edges #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR measurement modelStochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance and Illumination Separation Ayres Fan

  16. Bragg reflection waveguides as integrated sources of entangled photon pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to design an electrically pumped entangled photon source. © 2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 230Bragg reflection waveguides as integrated sources of entangled photon pairs Sergei V. Zhukovsky,1 of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario

  17. Seismic Reflection Interpretation Geology 556/764 Fall 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Reflection Interpretation Geology 556/764 Fall 2015 This course is for graduate students seismic interpretation. (3 Credit Hours) EWS 201, 1:15 pm - 4:15 pm Tuesday Instructor: Jim Kellogg (7-4501) E-mail: kellogg@sc.edu Goals and Content of Course: Students will learn seismic interpretation

  18. Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonsson, Fredrik

    Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals Karri Varis, Marco Mattila Optoelectronics from opals that are synthesized using polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres. © 2005 of self-organized opal photonic crystals," Phys. Rev. E 61, 5784­5793 (2000). 12. M. Bardosova and R. H

  19. Oblique Shock Waves and Shock Reflection Department of Mathematics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Dening

    are generated as solid projectile flies supersonically, or as a planar shock wave is reflected along a ramp. We of a regular shock reflection to Mach reflection. 1 Introduction Oblique shock waves are produced as airplane flies supersonically, or as shock waves are reflected at a planar solid surface. With other conditions

  20. Writing Performance Objectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Couse Description: This course provides the opportunity for supervisors and managers to write performance objectives or performance standards based on the department’s performance management system.

  1. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    than solar reflectance, thermal emittance, or Energy-Star™Energy Conservation Code prescribes a minimum solar reflectance and thermal

  2. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  3. Quantum Brownian motion near a point-like reflecting boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. De Lorenci; E. S. Moreira Jr.; M. M. Silva

    2014-07-07

    The Brownian motion of a test particle interacting with a quantum scalar field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting boundary is studied in (1 + 1)-dimensional flat spacetime. Particularly, the expressions for dispersions in velocity and position of the particle are explicitly derived and their behaviors examined. The results are similar to those corresponding to an electric charge interacting with a quantum electromagnetic field near a reflecting plane boundary, mainly regarding the divergent behavior of the dispersions at the origin (where the boundary is placed), and at the time interval corresponding to a round trip of a light pulse between the particle and the boundary. We close by addressing some effects of allowing the position of the particle to fluctuate.

  4. Large Scale Performance Measurement of Content-Based Automated Image-Orientation Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Large Scale Performance Measurement of Content-Based Automated Image-Orientation Detection Abstract (sepia toned), contains reflections in water, and contains few markers. Row 4: If deeper information

  5. Multiple-channel, total-reflection optic with controllable divergence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, David M. (Voorheesville, NY); Downing, Robert G. (Albany, NY)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for providing focused x-ray, gamma-ray, charged particle and neutral particle, including neutron, radiation beams with a controllable amount of divergence are disclosed. The apparatus features a novel use of a radiation blocking structure, which, when combined with multiple-channel total reflection optics, increases the versatility of the optics by providing user-controlled output-beam divergence.

  6. Reflection beamshifts of visible light due to graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermosa, N

    2015-01-01

    I present theoretical calculations of reflection beamshifts, Goos-H\\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts, due to the presence of a monolayer graphene on a dielectric media when using a beam with wavelength in the visible range. Specifically, I look at beamshifts for different polarization states (p, s, $45^0$, $\\sigma^+$). The Goos-H\\"anchen shifts I calculated are in good agreement with results of a recent experiment. I will discuss other possible experimental routes to determine beamshifts in graphene.

  7. Methodology for predicting asphalt concrete overlay life against reflection cracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayawickrama, Priyantha Warnasuriya

    1985-01-01

    METHODOLOGY FOR PREDICTING ASPHALT CONCRETE OVERLAY Lr 8 AGAINST REFLECTION CRACKING A Thesis by PRIYANTHA NARNASURIYA JAYAWICKRAMA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements.... Experimental investigations carried out at Ohio State University ( 1, 2, 3) and Texas A8M University ( 4, 5, 6 ) have verified the applicability of fracture mechanics principles in predicting fatigue life of asphalt TIP OF THE CRACX /~ // N/i OVERLAY OLD...

  8. Terminology relating to measurements taken on thin, reflecting films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This standard consists of terms and definitions pertaining to measurements taken on thin, reflecting films, such as found in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials. In particular, the terms are related to the standards in Section , which were generated by Committee E08 on Fatigue and Fracture. Terminology E 1823 Relating to Fatigue and Fracture Testing is applicable to this standard. 1.2 The terms are listed in alphabetical order.

  9. Reflection and Ducting of Gravity Waves Inside the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacGregor, K B

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves excited by overshoot at the bottom of the convection zone can be influenced by rotation and by the strong toroidal magnetic field that is likely to be present in the solar tachocline. Using a simple Cartesian model, we show how waves with a vertical component of propagation can be reflected when traveling through a layer containing a horizontal magnetic field with a strength that varies with depth. This interaction can prevent a portion of the downward-traveling wave energy flux from reaching the deep solar interior. If a highly reflecting magnetized layer is located some distance below the convection zone base, a duct or wave guide can be set up, wherein vertical propagation is restricted by successive reflections at the upper and lower boundaries. The presence of both upward- and downward-traveling disturbances inside the duct leads to the existence of a set of horizontally propagating modes that have significantly enhanced amplitudes. We point out that the helical structure of these ...

  10. Inversion of seismic reflection traveltimes using a nonlinear optimization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pullammanappallil, S.K.; Louie, J.N. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present the use of a nonlinear optimization scheme called generalized simulated annealing to invert seismic reflection times for velocities, reflector depths, and lengths. A finite-difference solution of the eikonal equation computes reflection traveltimes through the velocity model and avoids ray tracing. They test the optimization scheme on synthetic models and compare it with results from a linearized inversion. The synthetic tests illustrate that, unlike linear inversion schemes, the results obtained by the optimization scheme are independent of the initial model. The annealing method has the ability to produce a suite of models that satisfy the data equally well. They make use of this property to determine the uncertainties associated with the model parameters obtained. Synthetic examples demonstrate that allowing the reflector length to vary, along with its position, helps the optimization process obtain a better solution. The authors put this to use in imaging the Garlock fault, whose geometry at depth is poorly known. They use reflection times picked from shot gathers recorded along COCORP Mojave Line 5 to invert for the Garlock fault and velocities within the Cantil Basin below Fremont Valley, California. The velocities within the basin obtained by their optimization scheme are consistent with earlier studies, though their results suggest that the basin might extend 1--2 km further south. The reconstructed reflector seems to suggest shallowing of the dip of the Garlock fault at depth.

  11. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  12. Multivariate calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, C.L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers. 19 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Apparatus to study crystal channeling and volume reflection phenomena at the SPS H8 beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandale, Walter; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Still, Dean A.; Carnera, Alberto; De Salvador, Davide; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Chiozzi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Damiani, Chiara; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Giuliano; Mazzolari, Andrea; Milan, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Azzarello, Philipp; Battiston, Roberto

    2008-02-15

    A high performance apparatus has been designed and built by the H8-RD22 collaboration for the study of channeling and volume reflection phenomena in the interaction of 400 GeV/c protons with bent silicon crystals, during the 2006 data taking in the external beamline H8 of the CERN SPS. High-quality silicon short crystals were bent by either anticlastic or quasimosaic effects. Alignment with the highly parallel (8 {mu}rad divergence) proton beam was guaranteed through a submicroradian goniometric system equipped with both rotational and translational stages. Particle tracking was possible by a series of silicon microstrip detectors with high-resolution and a parallel plate gas chamber, triggered by various scintillating detectors located along the beamline. Experimental observation of volume reflection with 400 GeV/c protons proved true with a deflection angle of (10.4{+-}0.5) {mu}rad with respect to the unperturbed beam, with a silicon crystal whose (111) planes were parallel to the beam.

  14. Polyethylene-Reflected Arrays of HEU(93.2) Metal Units Separated by Vermiculite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie Gorham; J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Virginia Dean; Davis Reed

    2010-09-01

    This benchmark details the results of an experiment performed in the early 1970s as part of a series testing critical configurations in three dimensional arrays. For this experiment, cylinders of 93.2% enriched uranium metal were arranged in a 2x2x2 array inside of a polyethylene reflector. Layers of vermiculite of varying heights were surrounding each cylinder to achieve criticality variations. A total of four experimental configurations were tested by D.W. Magnuson, and detailed in his experimental report “Critical Three-Dimensional Arrays of Neutron Interacting Units: Part IV. Arrays of U(93.2) Metal Reflected by Concrete and Arrays Separated by Vermiculite and Reflected by Polyethylene.” The benchmark HEU-MET-FAST054 is closely related; the results of both experiments are discussed in the same report (Ref. 1) Closely related work has been recorded in HEU-MET-FAST-053, which is a benchmark evaluation of a different series of three dimensional array experiments with four different moderator materials. HEU-MET-FAST-023 and HEU-MET-FAST-026 are also related because they utilize the same metal cylinders as these experiments.

  15. Standard test method for strain gradient measurements of thin, reflecting films using an optical interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measuring the strain gradient in thin, reflecting films. It applies only to films, such as found in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials, which can be imaged using an optical interferometer. Measurements from cantilevers that are touching the underlying layer are not accepted. 1.2 This test method uses a non-contact optical interferometer with the capability of obtaining topographical 3-D data sets. It is performed in the laboratory. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Improving experimental phases for strong reflections prior to density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Hilgenfeld, Rolf, E-mail: hilgenfeld@biochem.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zu Chong Zhi Road, Shanghai 201203, People’s Republic of (China); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    A genetic algorithm has been developed to optimize the phases of the strongest reflections in SIR/SAD data. This is shown to facilitate density modification and model building in several test cases. Experimental phasing of diffraction data from macromolecular crystals involves deriving phase probability distributions. These distributions are often bimodal, making their weighted average, the centroid phase, improbable, so that electron-density maps computed using centroid phases are often non-interpretable. Density modification brings in information about the characteristics of electron density in protein crystals. In successful cases, this allows a choice between the modes in the phase probability distributions, and the maps can cross the borderline between non-interpretable and interpretable. Based on the suggestions by Vekhter [Vekhter (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. D61, 899–902], the impact of identifying optimized phases for a small number of strong reflections prior to the density-modification process was investigated while using the centroid phase as a starting point for the remaining reflections. A genetic algorithm was developed that optimizes the quality of such phases using the skewness of the density map as a target function. Phases optimized in this way are then used in density modification. In most of the tests, the resulting maps were of higher quality than maps generated from the original centroid phases. In one of the test cases, the new method sufficiently improved a marginal set of experimental SAD phases to enable successful map interpretation. A computer program, SISA, has been developed to apply this method for phase improvement in macromolecular crystallography.

  17. Fresnel reflection from a cavity with net roundtrip gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansuripur, Tobias S

    2013-01-01

    A planewave incident on an active etalon with net roundtrip gain may be expected to diverge in field amplitude, yet Maxwell's equations admit only a convergent solution. By examining a Gaussian beam obliquely incident on such a cavity, we find that the "side-tail" of the beam leaks into the cavity and gives rise to a field that interferes with the main portion of the beam, which is ultimately responsible for the convergence of the field. This mechanism offers perspective for many phenomena, and we specifically discuss the implications for amplified total internal reflection.

  18. Graphene fish-scale array as controllable reflecting photonic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriev, Victor; Prosvirnin, Sergey L

    2015-01-01

    We report resonant features of novel controllable reflectarray which consists of meander-like graphene strips placed on a metal-backed dielectric substrate. The structure manifests two kinds of resonances appeared as sharp deeps of reflectivity. The first one exists because the strips of periodic cells of the structure have resonant sizes for induced surface plasmon-polaritons. The second kind of resonances is defined by excitation of TM eigenwaves of the whole structure as a plane photonic crystal. The latter resonances do not depend on whether the strips of the unit cells have resonant sizes or not.

  19. Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection December 17, 2007 #12;Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results Boundary Brunnian braids, mirror reflection and the homotopy groups Brunnian Braids Boundary Brunnian Braids Main Results #12

  20. V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code April 25, 2013 - 12:14am...

  1. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

  2. In situ characterization of soil properties using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waiser, Travis Heath

    2007-09-17

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid proximal-sensing method that is being used more and more in laboratory settings to measure soil properties. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy research that has been completed in laboratories shows...

  3. Diffuse reflectance FTIR of stains on grit blasted metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G.L.; Hallman, R.L. Jr.; Cox, R.L.

    1997-08-09

    Diffuse reflectance mid-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy has been applied to the detection of oil contamination on grit-blasted metals. The object of this application is to detect and discriminate between silicone and hydrocarbon oil contamination at levels approaching 10 mg/m{sup 2}. A portable FTIR spectrometer with dedicated diffuse reflectance optics was developed for this purpose. Using translation devices positioned by instructions from the spectrometer operating system, images of macroscopic substrates were produced with millimeter spatial resolution. The pixels that comprise an image are each a full mid-infrared spectrum with excellent signal-to-noise, each determined as individual files and uniquely saved to disc. Reduced spectra amplitudes, based on peak height, area, or other chemometric techniques, mapped as a function of the spatial coordinates of the pixel are used to display the image. This paper demonstrates the application of the technique to the analysis of stains on grit-blasted metals, including the calibration of the method, the inspection of substrates, and the migration of oil contamination.

  4. Reduction in Vehicle Temperatures and Fuel Use from Cabin Ventilation, Solar-Reflective Paint, and a New Solar-Reflective Glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Meyer, J.; Rustagi, M.; Olson, K.; Kogler, R.

    2007-05-01

    An analysis to determine the impact of reducing the thermal load on a vehicle using solar-reflective paint and glazing.

  5. Distributed performance counters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Kristan D; Evans, Kahn C; Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L

    2013-11-26

    A plurality of first performance counter modules is coupled to a plurality of processing cores. The plurality of first performance counter modules is operable to collect performance data associated with the plurality of processing cores respectively. A plurality of second performance counter modules are coupled to a plurality of L2 cache units, and the plurality of second performance counter modules are operable to collect performance data associated with the plurality of L2 cache units respectively. A central performance counter module may be operable to coordinate counter data from the plurality of first performance counter modules and the plurality of second performance modules, the a central performance counter module, the plurality of first performance counter modules, and the plurality of second performance counter modules connected by a daisy chain connection.

  6. Photoluminescence and reflectance measurements on annealed porous silicon implanted with nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoluminescence and reflectance measurements on annealed porous silicon implanted with nitrogen and 1000 °C. Photoluminescence (PL) and reflectance measurements on the implanted samples for wavelengths. After annealing, the reflectance decreased in the UV region up to 600 °C. Above 800 °C

  7. Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculation Worksheet SRI-WS Computer Generated Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculation Worksheet SRI-WS Computer Generated Form Date: Climate Roof) Roofing products with high solar reflectance and thermal emittance are referred to as "Cool Roof hot, light-colored surfaces reflect solar energy and stay cooler. However, high emittance is also

  8. Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation -GEY 772/772L Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation - GEY 772/772L ­ Spring 2006 Room TEC 104 Processing, Yilmaz; and Practical Seismic Interpretation, Badley; A Lab Manual of Seismic Reflection the fundamentals of geologic interpretation of 2D and 3D reflection seismic data. The class provides hands

  9. A Kernel-Based Spatio-Temporal Dynamical Model for Nowcasting Weather Radar Reflectivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Kernel-Based Spatio-Temporal Dynamical Model for Nowcasting Weather Radar Reflectivities Ke Xu of the technique and its potential for nowcasting weather radar reflectivities. Key Words: Bayesian, dilation to nowcasting weather radar reflectivities into two general categories. The first is the use of simple

  10. Statistical Analysis of Spatial Point Patterns on Deep Seismic Reflection Data: A Preliminary Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    from bitmaps of images of processed reflection seismic profiles are analyzed to quantify the reflectivity patterns. The point process characteristics for two different regions of a deep seismic reflection or not seismic data processing schemes have significant difference in the behaviour of point process

  11. Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Robert L.

    Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils reflectometry TDR mea- surement in highly conductive soils. It makes use of information contained in the TDR signal from the reflection at the surface of the soil rather than the reflection from the end

  12. Two-axis MEMS scanner with transfer-printed high-reflectivity, broadband monolithic silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Two-axis MEMS scanner with transfer-printed high-reflectivity, broadband monolithic silicon@illinois.edu Abstract: We present a two-axis electrostatic MEMS scanner with high- reflectivity monolithic. The reflective surfaces of the MEMS scanner are transfer-printed PC mirrors with low polarization dependence, low

  13. Anti-reflection coating for nitrogen-vacancy optical measurements T. K. Yeung,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Anti-reflection coating for nitrogen-vacancy optical measurements in diamond T. K. Yeung,1,2 D. Le-reflection (AR) coatings for optical excitation and fluorescence measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color. These AR coatings improve NV-diamond optical measurements by reducing optical reflection at the diamond

  14. Performance Management Methodology Moving from Performance Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    includes: (1) a summary of the challenge facing senior managers to design and deploy a strategic performance management system; (2) a discussion of how the PEA proposes to...

  15. Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    091515 President's Performance Contracting Challenge Status (September 15, 2015) Pipeline: Amount of project costs in procurement process and expected to award. Awarded:...

  16. Presidential Performance Contracting Challenge: Performance Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data 081515 President's Performance Contracting Challenge Status (August 15, 2015) Pipeline: Amount of project costs in procurement process and expected to award. Awarded:...

  17. Buildings Performance Database

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distinguish between expected returns and performance risk Conduct performance risk analysis * Diversify risk by investing in a range of buildings and measures Support...

  18. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPC INL Logo Home High-Performance Computing INL's high-performance computing center provides general use scientific computing capabilities to support the lab's efforts in advanced...

  19. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing HPC High Performance Computing (HPC) Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of strategic...

  20. Performance Analysis with Vampir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (frank.winkler@tu-dresden.de) Performance Analysis with Vampir Disclaimer Performance tools will not automatically make you code run faster. They help you understand, what your...

  1. SUMMARY GUIDANCE FOR BENCHMARK PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY GUIDANCE FOR BENCHMARK PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Performance Attributes 0-39% 40-59% 60-79% 80 technical knowledge/skill General technical understanding Superior technical knowledge in all tasks Exceptional technical knowledge; beyond expectations for position Quality Work did not meet minimum

  2. Volume Reflection of a Proton Beam in a Bent Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Yu. M.; Petrunin, A. A.; Skorobogatov, V. V.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Gelamkov, A. V.; Lapina, L. P.; Schetkovsky, A. I.; Vavilov, S. A.; Baranov, V. I.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Afonin, A. G.; Baranov, V. T.; Chepegin, V. N.; Guidi, V.; Vomiero, A.

    2006-10-06

    Volume reflection predicted in the mid-1980s by Taratin and Vorobiev has been observed for the first time in the interactions of a 70 GeV proton beam with a short bent crystal. Incident protons deviate from convex atomic planes in the bulk of the crystal as a result of coherent interaction with bent lattice around the tangency point of particle trajectory with a curved atomic plane. The deflection angle 2{theta}{sub R} was found to be (39.5{+-}2.0) {mu}rad, or (1.65{+-}0.08){theta}{sub c} in terms of the critical angle for channeling. The process has a large probability with respect to channeling and takes place in the angular range equal to the bend angle of atomic planes. It could possibly open new fields of application of crystals in high-energy particle beam optics.

  3. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  4. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  5. Spectral snow-reflectance models for grain-size and liquid-water fraction in melting snow for the solar-reflected spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Spectral snow-reflectance models for grain-size and liquid- water fraction in melting snow.S.A. ABSTRACT. Two spectral snow-reflectance models that account for the effects of grain-size and liquid calculations are used to specify the essential optical properties of snow in the models.Two approaches

  6. Internet Performance Measurement Collaborators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internet Performance Measurement Collaborators Cross Industry Working Team (XIWT) High Performance of the timestamp mechanism in the ANS Surveyor Probe device FY98 · GITS Internet Performance Measurement Toolkit in Internet performance measurement through improved statistical analysis of the data that is collected

  7. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAJIWARA,K; BAXI,CB; LOHR,J; GORELOV,YA; GREEN,MT; PONCE,D; CALLIS,RW

    2003-07-01

    LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM. The thermal performance of three different designs for the steerable mirrors on the ECH launchers installed in the DIII-D tokamak has been evaluated theoretically and experimentally. In each case the disruption forces must be minimized while providing a low loss reflecting surface. One design uses all Glidcop{reg_sign} material, but shaped so that the center is appreciably thicker than the edge. A second design is graphite with a molybdenum surface brazed to the graphite. The latest design is laminated copper/stainless steel construction with a thin copper reflecting surface. All three mirrors employ passive radiative cooling. The mirror temperatures are measured by resistance temperature devices (RTDs) which are attached at the back surfaces of the mirrors. The temperature increases are moderate for the laminated mirror, which has the best overall performance.

  8. X-RAYING AN ACCRETION DISK IN REALTIME: THE EVOLUTION OF IONIZED REFLECTION DURING A SUPERBURST FROM 4U 1636-536

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keek, L.; Ballantyne, D. R. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (United States); Kuulkers, E. [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA/ESAC), Science Operations Department, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Strohmayer, T. E., E-mail: l.keek@gatech.edu [X-Ray Astrophysics Lab, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    When a thermonuclear X-ray burst ignites on an accreting neutron star, the accretion disk undergoes sudden strong X-ray illumination, which can drive a range of processes in the disk. Observations of superbursts, with durations of several hours, provide the best opportunity to study these processes and to probe accretion physics. Using detailed models of X-ray reflection, we perform time resolved spectroscopy of the superburst observed from 4U 1636-536 in 2001 with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. The spectra are consistent with a blackbody reflecting off a photoionized accretion disk, with the ionization state dropping with time. The evolution of the reflection fraction indicates that the initial reflection occurs from a part of the disk at larger radius, subsequently transitioning to reflection from an inner region of the disk. Even though this superburst did not reach the Eddington limit, we find that a strong local absorber develops during the superburst. Including this event, only two superbursts have been observed by an instrument with sufficient collecting area to allow for this analysis. It highlights the exciting opportunity for future X-ray observatories to investigate the processes in accretion disks when illuminated by superbursts.

  9. Impact of Sungate EP on PHEV Performance: Results of a Simulated Solar Reflective Glass PHEV Dynamometer Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J.

    2009-06-01

    Composite fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric test vehicle increased 8% to 41.6 mpg because of the reduction in thermal loads from Sungate EP glazings installed in the windshield and backlite.

  10. The roles of working memory, language proficiency, and training in simultaneous interpretation performance: evidence from Chinese-English bilinguals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzou, Yeh-Zu

    2009-05-15

    Simultaneous interpretation is a cognitively demanding task involving concurrent listening and speaking in two languages. Successful performance in this task likely relies on a good working memory, which reflects a person’s ...

  11. An Exploratory Study of the New Performance Index of the Heat Pump System Based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, W.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    The coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump system, based on the first law of thermodynamics and reflecting the quantity relation of input and output energy, has certain limitations on the evaluation of energy-saving efficiency...

  12. Sustainability Performance Office | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office Sustainability Performance Office...

  13. High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders -...

  14. High Performance Datacenter Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    High Performance Datacenter Networks Architectures, Algorithms, and Opportunities #12;Synthesis architecture conferences, such as ISCA, HPCA, MICRO, and ASPLOS. High Performance Datacenter Networks Computer Architecture Daniel J. Sorin 2009 The Datacenter as a Computer: An Introduction to the Design

  15. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE INTRODUCTION Even thoughHPLC - 1 High Performance Liquid Chromatography HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;HPLC - 2 High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  16. Superior Energy Performance Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency, Competitiveness, Transparency. These are the tenets of the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™). SEP is a market-based program that helps manufacturers to improve their plants' energy performance, which in turn helps to make them more competitive.

  17. A simple method for the measurement of reflective foil emissivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballico, M. J.; Ham, E. W. M. van der [National Measurement Institute, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2013-09-11

    Reflective metal foil is widely used to reduce radiative heat transfer within the roof space of buildings. Such foils are typically mass-produced by vapor-deposition of a thin metallic coating onto a variety of substrates, ranging from plastic-coated reinforced paper to 'bubble-wrap'. Although the emissivity of such surfaces is almost negligible in the thermal infrared, typically less than 0.03, an insufficiently thick metal coating, or organic contamination of the surface, can significantly increase this value. To ensure that the quality of the installed insulation is satisfactory, Australian building code AS/NZS 4201.5:1994 requires a practical agreed method for measurement of the emissivity, and the standard ASTM-E408 is implied. Unfortunately this standard is not a 'primary method' and requires the use of specified expensive apparatus and calibrated reference materials. At NMIA we have developed a simple primary technique, based on an apparatus to thermally modulate the sample and record the apparent modulation in infra-red radiance with commercially available radiation thermometers. The method achieves an absolute accuracy in the emissivity of approximately 0.004 (k=2). This paper theoretically analyses the equivalence between the thermal emissivity measured in this manner, the effective thermal emissivity in application, and the apparent emissivity measured in accordance with ASTM-E408.

  18. Water-Moderated and -Reflected Slabs of Uranium Oxyfluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Clinton Gross

    2010-09-01

    A series of ten experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in December 1955, and January 1956, in an attempt to determine critical conditions for a slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). These experiments were recorded in an Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Logbook and results were published in a journal of the American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Science and Engineering, by J. K. Fox, L. W. Gilley, and J. H. Marable (Reference 1). The purpose of these experiments was to obtain the minimum critical thickness of an effectively infinite slab of UO2F2 solution by extrapolation of experimental data. To do this the slab thickness was varied and critical solution and water-reflector heights were measured using two different fuel solutions. Of the ten conducted experiments eight of the experiments reached critical conditions but the results of only six of the experiments were published in Reference 1. All ten experiments were evaluated from which five critical configurations were judged as acceptable criticality safety benchmarks. The total uncertainty in the acceptable benchmarks is between 0.25 and 0.33 % ?k/keff. UO2F2 fuel is also evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-043, HEU-SOL-THERM-011, and HEU-SOL-THERM-012, but these those evaluation reports are for large reflected and unreflected spheres. Aluminum cylinders of UO2F2 are evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-050.

  19. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of Water-Reflected Uranium Oxyfluoride Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    A series of twelve experiments were conducted in the mid 1950's at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine the critical conditions of a semi-infinite water-reflected slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). A different slab thickness was used for each experiment. Results from the twelve experiment recorded in the laboratory notebook were published in Reference 1. Seven of the twelve experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments for the inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This evaluation will not only be available to handbook users for the validation of computer codes and integral cross-section data, but also for the reevaluation of experimental data used in the ANSI/ANS-8.1 standard. This evaluation is important as part of the technical basis of the subcritical slab limits in ANSI/ANS-8.1. The original publication of the experimental results was used for the determination of bias and bias uncertainties for subcritical slab limits, as documented by Hugh Clark's paper 'Subcritical Limits for Uranium-235 Systems'.

  20. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-17

    A system is disclosed for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focused beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focused beams creates a ``light cage`` and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained. 10 figs.

  1. Phase coherence and Andreev reflection in topological insulator devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Kurter, C.; Hor, Y. S.; Van Harlingen, D. J.

    2014-11-04

    Topological insulators (TIs) have attracted immense interest because they host helical surface states. Protected by time-reversal symmetry, they are robust to nonmagnetic disorder. When superconductivity is induced in these helical states, they are predicted to emulate p-wave pairing symmetry, with Majorana states bound to vortices. Majorana bound states possess non-Abelian exchange statistics that can be probed through interferometry. Here, we take a significant step towards Majorana interferometry by observing pronounced Fabry-Pérot oscillations in a TI sandwiched between a superconducting and a normal lead. For energies below the superconducting gap, we observe a doubling in the frequency of the oscillations, arisingmore »from an additional phase from Andreev reflection. When a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the TI surface, a number of very sharp and gate-tunable conductance peaks appear at or near zero energy, which has consequences for interpreting spectroscopic probes of Majorana fermions. Our results show that TIs are a promising platform for exploring phase-coherent transport in a solid-state system.« less

  2. Buildings Performance Metrics Terminology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides the terms and definitions used in the Department of Energys Performance Metrics Research Project.

  3. performance development and compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    · ProvidinginputtothePerformanceReviewprocess. Human Resources serves as a resource for school/division leadershipperformance development and compensation programs @WorkGuidebook #12;4 | Tufts University Human performance development program Tufts Competencies 5 The @Work Performance Development and Compensation Cycle

  4. Performance Computing with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen John

    High Performance Computing with Iceberg. Mike Griffiths Bob Booth November 2005 AP-Unix4 © University of Sheffield #12;Bob Booth High Performance Computing with Iceberg Contents 1. REVIEW OF AVAILABLE 23 7.1 USING FUSE TO MOUNT FILE SYSTEMS ON ICEBERG 23 2 #12;Bob Booth High Performance Computing

  5. High Performance Computing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

  6. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  7. Biomechanics Morphology, performance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    piscivorous fish. It is hypothesized that larger caudal regions enhance fast-start escape performance and thus-start performance and greater survivorship in the presence of predatory fish. Second, using individual-level data to investigate the mor- phology­performance­fitness pathway, I found that (i) fish with larger caudal regions

  8. High-performance combinatorial algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    2003-01-01

    mathematics, and high performance computing. The numericalalgorithms on high performance computing platforms.algorithms on high performance computing platforms, which

  9. Testing Vpin on Big Data Response to Reflecting on the Vpin Dispute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Wu,  K. ,  et  al.   A  Big  Data  Approach  to  Analyzing  Testing VPIN on Big Data -- Response to “Reflecting on theTesting  VPIN  on  Big  Data    –  Response  to  “

  10. Sandia Energy - New Sandia Mirror Isn't Shiny: Instead It Reflects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through direct measurements of the phase and amplitude of the reflected optical wave. The enhanced absorption and emission of transverse-electric dipoles placed close to...

  11. Anatomy-Based Algorithms for Detecting Oral Cancer Using Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Sasha

    OBJECTIVES: We used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to noninvasively and quantitatively distinguish benign from dysplastic/malignant oral lesions. We designed diagnostic algorithms to account for differences in ...

  12. Moving towards Decent Work. Labour in the Lula government: reflections on recent Brazilian experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    A inflexão do governo Lula: política econômica, crescimentoa política econômica do Governo Lula. São Paulo: Ed. UNESP,Decent Work* Labour in the Lula government: reflections on

  13. Diagnosing breast cancer using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    Using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, we have developed an algorithm that successfully classifies normal breast tissue, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating ductal ...

  14. A new trough solar concentrator and its performance analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Tao; Hongfei, Zheng; Kaiyan, He; Mayere, Abdulkarim

    2011-01-15

    The operation principle and design method of a new trough solar concentrator is presented in this paper. Some important design parameters about the concentrator are analyzed and optimized. Their magnitude ranges are given. Some characteristic parameters about the concentrator are compared with that of the conventional parabolic trough solar concentrator. The factors having influence on the performance of the unit are discussed. It is indicated through the analysis that the new trough solar concentrator can actualize reflection focusing for the sun light using multiple curved surface compound method. It also has the advantages of improving the work performance and environment of high-temperature solar absorber and enhancing the configuration intensity of the reflection surface. (author)

  15. 2 x 2 Polyethylene Reflected and Moderated Highly Enriched Uranium System with Rhenium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Nichole Ellis; Jesson Hutchinson; John D. Bess; Dmitry N. Polyakov; Evgeny S. Glushkov; Alexey E. Glushkov

    2010-09-01

    The 2 × 2 array HEU-Re experiment was performed on the Planet universal critical assembly machine on November 4th, 2003 at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For this experiment, there were 10 ½ units, each full unit containing four HEU foils and two rhenium foils. The top unit contained only two HEU foils and two rhenium foils. A total of 42 HEU foils were used for this experiment. Rhenium is a desirable cladding material for space nuclear power applications. This experiment consisted of HEU foils interleaved with rhenium foils and is moderated and reflected by polyethylene plates. A unit consisted of a polyethylene plate, which has a recess for rhenium foils, and four HEU foils in a single layer in the top recess of each polyethylene plate. The Planet universal criticality assembly machine has been previously used in experiments containing HEU foils interspersed with SiO2 (HEU-MET-THERM-001), Al (HEU-MET-THERM-008), MgO (HEU-MET-THERM-009), Gd foils (HEU-MET-THERM-010), 2 × 2 × 26 Al (HEU-MET-THERM-012), Fe (HEU-MET-THERM-013 and HEU-MET-THERM-015), 2 × 2 × 23 SiO2 (HEU-MET-THERM-014), 2 × 2 × 11 hastalloy plates (HEU-MET-THERM-016), and concrete (HEU-MET-THERM-018). The 2 × 2 array of HEU-Re is considered acceptable for use as a benchmark critical experiment.

  16. Elucidation of Perovskite Film Micro-Orientations Using Two-Photon Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Brianna R; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Yingzhong; Doughty, Benjamin L; Calhoun, Tessa R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of efficient hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite photovoltaic materials has caused the rapid development of a variety of preparation and processing techniques designed to maximize their performance. As processing methods continue to emerge, it is important to understand how the optical properties of these materials are affected on a microscopic scale. Here polarization resolved two-photon total internal reflectance microscopy (TIRFM) was used to probe changes in transition dipole moment orientation as a function of thermal annealing time in hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on glass. These results show that as thermal annealing time is increased the distribution of transition moments pointing out-of-plane decreases in favor of forming areas with increased in-plane orientations. It was also shown through the axial sensitivity of TIRFM that the surface topography is manifested in the signal intensity and can be used to survey aspects of morphology in coincidence with the optical properties of these films.

  17. A female signal reflects MHC genotype in a social primate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huchard, Elise; Raymond, Michel; Benavides, Julio; Marshall, Harry; Knapp, Leslie A; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2010-04-07

    Research Council (UK) Advanced Fellowship awarded to GC, a Ministère de l’Education et de la Recherche (France) Studentship, and a Royal Society Travel Grant awarded to both GC and EH. This paper is a publication of the ZSL Institute of Zoology’s Tsaobis... of Biological Anthropology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK. Authors’ contributions EH designed the study, collected the field data, carried out the molecular genetic studies, performed the statistical analyses and drafted...

  18. Study of neutron noise from reflected, metal assemblies with criticality safety applications in mind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.S.

    1985-08-20

    The author studied the statistics of detected neutrons that leaked from four subcritical reflected, enriched-uranium assemblies, to explore the feasibility of developing a criticality warning system based on neutron noise analysis. The calculated multiplication factors of the assemblies are 0.59, 0.74, 0.82, and 0.92. The author studied three possible discriminators, i.e., three signatures that might be used to discriminate among assemblies of various multiplications. They are: (1) variance-to-mean ratio of the counts in a time bin (V/M); (2) covariance-to-mean ratio of the counts in a common time bin from two different detectors (C/M); and (3) covariance-to-mean ratio of the counts from a single detector in two adjacent time bins of equal length, which the author calls the serial-covariance-to-mean ratio (SC/M). The performances of the three discriminators were not greatly different, but a hierarchy did emerge: SC/M greater than or equal to V/M greater than or equal to C/M. An example of some results: in the neighborhood of k = 0.6 the ..delta..k required for satisfactory discrimination varies from about 3% to 7% as detector solid angle varies from 19% to 5%. In the neighborhood of k = 0.8 the corresponding ..delta..ks are 1% and 2%. The noise analysis techniques studied performed well enough in deeply subcritical situations to deserve testing in an applications environment. They have a good chance of detecting changes in reactivity that are potentially dangerous. One can expect sharpest results when doing comparisons, i.e., when comparing two records, one taken in the past under circumstances known to be normal and one taken now to search for change.

  19. Design and performance of a microstrip reflectarray antenna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javor, Ronald David

    1994-01-01

    . . . . . A. Beam Switching. . B. Solid State Phase Shifters. C. Diode Integration with the Reflectarray. . . . . 13 20 20 21 24 30 30 30 CHAPTER D. Performance of the Switched Reflectarray. . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . V DUAL... reflectarray. 24 13a Geometry of radiation pattern measurement. 13b E-Plane radiation pattern. . 26 27 13c H-Plane radiation pattern. 14 Typical switched-line phase shifter. 31 15 Reflection-Type phase shifter utilizing a PIN diode. . . . . . . . . 16...

  20. Mechanical Performance Extreme Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical Performance ­ Extreme Conditions METALS This project provides property data, metrology information using the image correlation technique. With this instrument, high strain rate mechanical testing

  1. Hopper Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance and Optimization Compiler Comparisons Comparison of different compilers with different options on several benchmarks. Read More Using OpenMP Effectively...

  2. Guidelines for Performance Measurement

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-30

    Federal agencies, states, businesses, and foreign governments are increasingly relying on performance measurement information to help chart progress in increasingly frugal times. No cancellations.

  3. Contractor Past Performance Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and performance data to enable the government to ensure we are receiving the best prices for commonly used goods and services. Ensuring that the Government gets credit for...

  4. Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves: Summary of Experimental and Computational Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepler, Grace Martinelli

    Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves: Summary of Experimental and Computational to detect reflections of the electromagnetic wave off the acoustic wave front. To date, we have constructed. The circuitry and timing necessary to initiate an acoustic wave and synchronize it with the EM pulse have been

  5. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Montana Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    1 Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from NMRI as a metric for estimating vegetation water content (VWC) and evaluate the normalization procedure Reflection Index (NMRI). It is a measure of vegetation water content (VWC) estimated from data archived

  6. Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting of nonspherical ice particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting investigates the relationship between ice water content (IWC) and equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) at 94 GHz. Baum, and A. J. Heymsfield (2008), Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar

  7. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal systematically transport theoretic boundary conditions for acoustic wave reflection and transmission from a rough to energy transport in the high frequency limit and cal­ culate, in addition, the effect of the random rough

  8. Light is said to be reflected when the angle at which light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 #12;2 Light is said to be reflected when the angle at which light initially strikes a surface is equal to the angle at which light bounces off the same surface. In the diagram, light strikes a surface", this is an example of reflected light. Refraction is the bending of a wave when it enters a medium where it's speed

  9. Analysis of reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol scenes measured by SCIAMACHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Analysis of reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol scenes measured by SCIAMACHY M. de Graaf,1 of reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol scenes measured by SCIAMACHY, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D02206, doi aerosol (DDA) and biomass burning aerosol (BBA) scenes over oceans are presented, measured by the space

  10. Seismic reflection imaging of the Mount Rose fault zone, Reno, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    . Lateral variations and offsets in late Quaternary stratigraphy in South Reno identified on four seismicSeismic reflection imaging of the Mount Rose fault zone, Reno, Nevada Project Award Number: # G09AP expressed or implied, of the U.S. Government. #12;2 Abstract Five new high-resolution seismic reflection

  11. Seismic reflection imaging of thin, kimberlite dykes and sills: exploration and deposit characterization of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    Seismic reflection imaging of thin, kimberlite dykes and sills: exploration and deposit, in order to evaluate seismic reflection as a tool for subhorizontal kimberlite dyke/sill exploration for mine development purposes. D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Seismic exploration

  12. A New Diffuse Reflecting Material with Applications Including Integrating Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cone, Michael Thomas

    2014-04-16

    of over 97% throughout the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum.6 However, the reflectance of all these barium sulfate materials drops considerably in the UV, with Spectrareflect’s reflectance at 250 nm being only 94%.? Spectralon....5 Experimental Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 3.6 Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 3.7 UV-ICAM Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 vi 4. INTEGRATING...

  13. Tenfold reduction of Brownian noise in high-reflectivity optical coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Deborah

    Tenfold reduction of Brownian noise in high-reflectivity optical coatings Garrett D. Cole1,2 *, Wei and sensitivity are dictated by the excess mechanical damping of the high-reflectivity coatings that comprise at best been reduced by a factor of two. Here, we demonstrate a new paradigm in optical coating technology

  14. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  15. The effect of anisotropic reflectance on imaging spectroscopy of snow properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    The effect of anisotropic reflectance on imaging spectroscopy of snow properties Thomas H. Paintera in revised form 19 September 2003; accepted 30 September 2003 Abstract How does snow's anisotropic directional reflectance affect the mapping of snow properties from imaging spectrometer data? This sensitivity

  16. Optical reflectivity of solid and liquid methane: Application to spectroscopy of Titan's hydrocarbon lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    's hydrocarbon lakes Kimberly A. Adams,1 Steven D. Jacobsen,1 Zhenxian Liu,2 Sylvia-Monique Thomas,1,3 Maddury revealed dark patches in the surface reflectance at 2 and 5 mm, interpreted as hydrocarbon lakes forming) on dynamic planetary surfaces requires laboratory reflectance ratio measurements at relevant temperatures

  17. Reflectivity and topography of cells grown on glass-coverslips measured with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovryn, Ben

    Reflectivity and topography of cells grown on glass-coverslips measured with phase-shifted laser the topography and reflection from calibration spheres and from stress fibers and adhesions in both fixed membrane topography," Cell. Biochem. Bio- phys. 1(3), 391­414 (2004). 11. J. T. Groves, R. Parthasarathy

  18. Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

  19. A shallow seismic reflection survey in basalts of the Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1990-06-01

    recorded along a 500 m long line over a basalt, rhyolite, and sedimentary sequence in the Snake River Plain. Some shallow reflections at 40 to 50 ms on the field files are of exceptional quality with frequency exceeding 150 Hz. Reflections and refractions...

  20. To appear in ACM Transactions on Graphics Exposing Photo Manipulation with Inconsistent Reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    To appear in ACM Transactions on Graphics Exposing Photo Manipulation with Inconsistent Reflections manipulation, mirrors, image manipulation, forgery detection, center of projection. ACM Reference Format: O'Brien, J. F., and Farid, H. 2012. Exposing Photo Manipulation with Inconsistent Reflections. ACM Trans

  1. Quantum efficiency characterization of back-illuminated CCDs Part 2: reflectivity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantum efficiency characterization of back-illuminated CCDs Part 2: reflectivity measurements­111 (2006) (Electronic Imaging 2006) 19 Jan 2006 LBNL-59378 ABSTRACT The usual quantum efficiency (QE between 1 - R and the direct QE results. Keywords: CCD, quantum efficiency, reflectometer, reflectivity

  2. Influence of the atmosphere on remotely sensed reflection from vegetation surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmer, C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple scattering of solar radiation in a vegetation canopy is modelled equivalent to absorbing and scattering in a turbid medium with direction-dependent cross sections. Perturbations of plant reflection patterns due to atmospheric effects are computed at different altitudes and compared to the angular reflection characteristics caused by Lambertian surfaces of varying albedoes.

  3. A Reflective QoS-enabled Load Management Framework for Component-Based Middleware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Reflective QoS-enabled Load Management Framework for Component-Based Middleware Octavian Ciuhandu,murphyj}@eeng.dcu.ie ABSTRACT A new reflective QoS-enabled load management framework for component oriented middleware in complexity for the load management problem. Adaptive middleware offers the possibility of modifying

  4. Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV Richard L. Sandberg, David D. Allred.byu.edu ABSTRACT We present the measured reflectances (beamline 6.3.2, ALS at LBNL) of naturally oxidized uranium incidence. These show that uranium, as UO2, can fulfill its promise as the highest known single surface

  5. Remote-sensing reflectance determinations in the coastal ocean environment: impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Remote-sensing reflectance determinations in the coastal ocean environment: impact of instrumental the potential impact of instrumental characteristics and environmental variability on shipboard remote-sensing above the sea surface by 8­18%, and remote-sensing reflectance by 12­24%. Variations in radio- metric

  6. Geophys. 1. R. astr. Soc. (1987),89,7-18 MT and reflection: an essential combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1987-01-01

    ) studies and seismic reflection profiles conducted. Unfortunately, over many more regions the seismic of the magnetotelluric (MT) technique as having a vertical resolution equivalent to the seismic refraction method, in almost every case, be made wherever a seismic reflection survey is undertaken. Examples are shown from

  7. {beta}{sub eff} measurements in reflected reactors using a Rossi-{alpha} technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doulin, V.A. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Spriggs, G.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-01-20

    In this report the authors calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction equation for reflected reactors using the Rossi-{alpha} technique. They determine that the equation for the delayed neutron fraction is just as valid for reflected systems as it is for unreflected systems.

  8. Microstructured anti-reflection surface design for the omni-directional solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Weidong

    Microstructured anti-reflection surface design for the omni-directional solar cells Li Chen for the formation of hemispherical structures as an omni-directional anti-reflection (omni-AR) coating in solar cell current in such hemispherical solar cells hence enhanced to 1.5 times of bulk silicon solar cells

  9. Narrowing of high power diode laser arrays using reflection feedback from an etalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romalis, Mike

    Narrowing of high power diode laser arrays using reflection feedback from an etalon M. V. Romalisa for publication 27 June 2000 The spectrum of a high power multielement laser array is narrowed using reflection of the laser array is reduced by a factor of 2 with only 6% power loss. This reduction in FWHM is useful

  10. SWASH-BASED WAVE ENERGY REFLECTION ON NATURAL Rafael Almar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SWASH-BASED WAVE ENERGY REFLECTION ON NATURAL BEACHES Rafael Almar1 , Raimundo Ibaceta2 and the nature of reflected waves is crucial for various aspects of coastal science including energy balance others), have underlined the key role played by swash zone dynamics in controling the phase and energy

  11. Detectivity comparison between thin-film Pd/PVDF photopyroelectric interferometric and optical reflectance hydrogen sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    that palladium is capable of absorbing/desorbing large amounts of hydrogen reversibly, and this has been making reflectance hydrogen sensors Chinhua Wang, Andreas Mandelis,a) and Jose A. Garcia Photothermal dual photopyroelectric interference PPEI /optical reflectance OR solid-state hydrogen sensor system has

  12. Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos and Erhard Neher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Erhard

    Reflection systems and partial root systems Ottmar Loos and Erhard Neher Abstract. We develop a general theory of reflection systems and, more specifically, partial root sys- tems which provide a unifying framework for finite root systems, Kac-Moody root systems, extended affine root systems

  13. Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights.

  14. Combined Reflectivity/imaging Method for Assessing Diagnostic Mirror

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082InnovationPerformance20142017Cleaning

  15. Chapter XLIII Worker Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    effect that human performance variation can have on system performance, and it particularly affects the predictive capability of simulation models with a high proportion of manual tasks. The intentions variation in such simulation models; and secondly, to present some conceptual ideas for developing a worker

  16. Guidelines for Performance-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    TBI Guidelines for Performance- Based Seismic Design of Tall Buildings !"#$%&'()*+( ,&-"./"#(0, and the engineering judgments of persons with substantial knowledge in the design and seismic behavior of tall that are capable of seismic performance equivalent or superior to that attainable by design in accordance

  17. Performance Incentives for Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Performance Incentives for Transmission FERC's Standard Market Design should accommodate a performance-based regulation mechanism that is designed to align the interests of transmission operators to investment, transmission investors would be entitled to the CRRs or CRR auc- tion revenues engendered

  18. Employee Performance Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-14

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for employee performance appraisals, performance-related awards, and other forms of employee recognition. (Cancels existing provisions of DOE O 3450.1B, Incentive Awards, dated 6/23/92.) Cancels DOE O 331.1A, DOE O 3450.1B. Canceled by DOE O 331.1C

  19. Employee Performance Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-14

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for employee performance appraisals, performance-related awards, and other forms of employee recognition. Cancels DOE O 331.1A and (2) existing provisions of DOE O 3450.1B. Cancelled by DOE O 331.1C.

  20. Employee Performance Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-06-15

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for employee performance appraisals, performance-related awards, and other forms of employee recognition. This Order covers most employees at grades GS-15 and below. Cancels DOE O 331.1. Canceled by DOE O 331.1B.

  1. Residential Furnace Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 61467 Residential Furnace Blower Performance I.S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. The laboratory test and peak demand reductions in this study are based on replacing a Permanent Split Capacitor (PSC) blower

  2. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  3. Motivation Random Performance Tableaux Special Performance Tableaux Conclusion Generating Random Performance Tableaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisdorff, Raymond

    Motivation Random Performance Tableaux Special Performance Tableaux Conclusion Generating Random Performance Tableaux Raymond Bisdorff University of Luxembourg, FSTC/CSC Mons, April, 2009 Motivation Random Performance Tableaux Special Performance Tableaux Conclusion Motivation Provide random instances

  4. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made interpretation of the Mt. Simon and Knox sections difficult. The data quality also gradually decreased moving westward across the state. To meet evolving project objectives, in 2012 the seismic data was re-processed using different techniques to enhance the signal quality thereby rendering a more coherent seismic profile for interpreters. It is believed that the seismic degradation could be caused by shallow natural gas deposits and Quaternary sediments (which include abandoned river and stream channels, former ponds, and swamps with peat deposits) that may have complicated or changed the seismic wavelet. Where previously limited by seismic coverage, the seismic profiles have provided valuable subsurface information across central Illinois. Some of the interpretations based on this survey included, but are not limited to: - Stratigraphy generally gently dips to the east from Morgan to Douglas County. - The Knox Supergroup roughly maintains its thickness. There is little evidence for faulting in the Knox. However, at least one resolvable fault penetrates the entire Knox section. - The Eau Claire Formation, the primary seal for the Mt. Simon Sandstone, appears to be continuous across the entire seismic profile. - The Mt. Simon Sandstone thins towards the western edge of the basin. As a result, the highly porous lowermost Mt. Simon section is absent in the western part of the state. - Overall basement dip is from west to east. - Basement topography shows evidence of basement highs with on-lapping patterns by Mt. Simon sediments. - There is evidence of faults within the lower Mt. Simon Sandstone and basement rock that are contemporaneous with Mt. Simon Sandstone deposition. These faults are not active and do not penetrate the Eau Claire Shale. It is believed that these faults are associated with a possible failed rifting event 750 to 560 million years ago during the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia.

  5. Performance expectation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  6. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingcwdd2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  7. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT TIP SHEET Performance Management for New Employees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT TIP SHEET Performance Management for New Employees NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Workforce Management Office Ready to Perform Management at NOAA Performance Management is the process used to communicate expectations, evaluate employee

  8. The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica extracted from oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2014-03-14

    Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica is examined via time-resolved reflectivity measurements. After optical breakdown was caused by irradiation of a pump pulse with fluence F{sub pump}?=?3.3–14.9?J/cm{sup 2}, the reflectivity oscillated with a period of 63?±?2 ps for a wavelength ??=?795?nm. The period was reduced by half for ??=?398?nm. We ascribe the oscillation to the interference between the probe pulses reflected from the front and rear surfaces of the photo-excited molten fused silica layer. The time-resolved reflectivity agrees closely with a model comprising a photo-excited layer which expands due to the formation of voids, and then separates into two parts, one of which is left on the sample surface and the other separated as a molten thin layer from the surface by the spallation mechanism. Such oscillations were not observed in the reflectivity of soda-lime glass. Whether the reflectivity oscillates or not probably depends on the layer viscosity while in a molten state. Since viscosity of the molten fused silica is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the soda-lime glass at the same temperature, fused silica forms a molten thin layer that reflects the probe pulse, whereas the soda-lime glass is fragmented into clusters.

  10. Corepresentation in Joint Language: The effect of representing another’s utterance on one’s own task performance, and the mediation of friendship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackenzie, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Individuals unconsciously simulate others’ actions, a crucial element of prediction in joint action (Sebanz, Knoblich & Prinz, 2005). Studies reflect this tendency in tasks in which an individual’s performance is affected by the demands of a coactor’s...

  11. Photovoltaic Cell Performance Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount of electricity produced depends on the quality of the light available and the performance of the PV cell.

  12. Pay for Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Hampshire Pay for Performance (P4P) program works with large energy consumers to improve energy efficiency in their facilities. This program is available to commercial, industrial, and...

  13. HVAC Performance Maps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    h) max. 75% 50% 25% min. Speed Dane Christensen, PhD dane.christensen@nrel.gov National Renewable Energy Laboratory Performance Mapping at NREL NREL develops and validates model...

  14. Energy Performance Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) overview and summary of ESPC resources, including training, sample documents, and guides from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Author: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

  15. Performing Arts Boorkstore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram Cancer Center Benton Chapel Ingram Center for the Performing Arts A S A P Adult Emergency Elliston CENTER 53D 208 24TH AVE 86 BETA THETA PI 88 GODCHAUX NURSING ANNEX 131 VILLAGE APARTMENTS 205B MEDICAL

  16. Performing Arts (Campus Bookstore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cancer Center Benton Chapel Ingram Center for the Performing Arts A S A P Adult Emergency Barnes & Noble 24TH AVE 86 BETA THETA PI 88 GODCHAUX NURSING ANNEX 131 PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL 136 VILLAGE APARTMENTS

  17. Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) is a partnership between a system owner and an Energy Services Company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the facility under...

  18. Performing Arts (Campus Bookstore)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Performing Arts A S A P Adult Emergency Barnes & Noble at Vanderbilt (Campus Bookstore) CRC Women's Health NURSING ANNEX 131 PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL 136 VILLAGE APARTMENTS 205B 2135 BLAKEMORE 216 1207 17TH AVE 232

  19. Performing Arts Engineering Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram Cancer Center Benton Chapel Ingram Center for the Performing Arts A S A P Adult Emergency Elliston GODCHAUX NURSING ANNEX 131 VILLAGE APARTMENTS 205B MEDICAL CHILD CARE 213 2135 BLAKEMORE 216 2146 BELCOURT

  20. PERFORMANCE OF THE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A) PERFORMANCE OF THE 2 MeV MICROWAVE GUN FOR THE SSRL 150 MeV LINAC* M. Borland, M. C. Green, < R. II. Miller, L. V. Nelson," E. Tanabe, ,< J. N. Weaver, and H.Wiedemann...

  1. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-11-09

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) requirements of DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-6.

  2. Organizational Culture and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Elizabeth A.

    Organizations are all around us. Culture is trickier—to analyze and even to see. We consider both the effect of management on culture and the effect of culture on performance. We begin by describing an intervention that ...

  3. Understanding advanced material performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Victrex were able to access world-class expertise in computational chemistry and simulation methods, along insights and value using high performance computing, big data analytics, simulation and modelling

  4. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  5. High Performance Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡High PerformancePerformance

  6. Repository Performance Confirmation - 12119

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. Among the countless aspects of monitoring, performance confirmation holds a special place, involving distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. Discussion is divided into four themes: 1. A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives, 2. A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain, 3. A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and 4. An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. Experience from two repository programs in the United States sheds light on how performance confirmation has been executed. Lessons learned can help the next generation of performance confirmation. (author)

  7. Durable silver mirror with ultra-violet thru far infra-red reflection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jesse D. (Discovery Bay, CA)

    2010-11-23

    A durable highly reflective silver mirror characterized by high reflectance in a broad spectral range of about 300 nm in the UV to the far infrared (.about.10000 nm), as well as exceptional environmental durability. A high absorptivity metal underlayer is used which prevents the formation of a galvanic cell with a silver layer while increasing the reflectance of the silver layer. Environmentally durable overcoat layers are provided to enhance mechanical and chemical durability and protect the silver layer from corrosion and tarnishing, for use in a wide variety of surroundings or climates, including harsh or extreme environments.

  8. Relativistic smearing of the reflection spectrum in Galactic Black Hole Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Done; P. T. Zycki; D. A. Smith

    1997-12-17

    We identify the reflected component in the GINGA spectra of Nova Muscae, a Black Hole transient system which has been used as the prototype for the recent advection dominated disk models. We see that the reflected spectrum is generally significantly relativistically smeared, and use this and the amount of reflection to track the innermost extent of the accretion disk. We see that the optically thick disk does retreat during the decline, but more slowly than predicted by the advective models, posing problems for this description of the accretion flow.

  9. Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery System Based on Zintl Phase Materials with Embedded Nanoparticles Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...

  10. Introduction to Superconductivity Energy gap Andreev Reflection Theory Procedure and Results Conclusion A study of Andreev Reflection in Nb/Ge/Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    by Cooper pairs flows without resistance #12;Introduction to Superconductivity Energy gap Andreev Reflection that there was a minimum energy 2(T) required to break a Cooper pair into two quasiparticles. This energy gap (T) should > will enter the superconductor as quasiparticles. Electrons with energy Cooper pairs

  11. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  12. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Xiang; Yannian Li; Quan Li; Daniel A. Paterson; John M. D. Storey; Corrie T. Imrie; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-30

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  13. Pearls of Wisdom : technology for intentional reflection and learning in constructionist cooperatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Robbin Nicole, 1958-

    2006-01-01

    At the core of the constructionist learning paradigm is the idea that people learn through design experiences. However, in most settings, learners rarely revisit their work to reflect on design and learning processes. The ...

  14. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  15. Measurements of Differential Reflectivity in Snowstorms and Warm Season Stratiform Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Earle R.

    The organized behavior of differential radar reflectivity (ZDR) is documented in the cold regions of a wide variety of stratiform precipitation types occurring in both winter and summer. The radar targets and attendant ...

  16. On-Line Measurement of Lubricant Film Thickness Using Ultrasonic Reflection Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drinkwater, B.W.; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.; Harper, P.

    2004-02-26

    The ultrasonic reflectivity of a lubricant layer between two solid bodies depends on the ultrasonic frequency, the acoustic properties of the liquid and solid, and the layer thickness. In this paper, ultrasonic reflectivity measurements are used as a method for determining the thickness of lubricating films in bearing systems. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the outside of a bearing shell such that the wave is focused on the lubricant film layer. For a particular lubricant film the reflected pulse is processed to give a reflection coefficient spectrum. The lubricant film thickness is then obtained from either the layer stiffness or the resonant frequency. The method has been validated using static fluid wedges and the elastohydrodynamic film formed between a ball sliding on a flat. Film thickness values in the range 50-500 nm were recorded which agreed well with theoretical film formation predictions.

  17. Procedure for measuring the solar reflectance of flat or curved roofing assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    energy-use effects of cool roofs on California commercialfrom the application of reflective roofs in two small non-saving potentials of light-colored roofs for residential and

  18. Suppressing nonphysical reflections in Green's function estimates using source-receiver interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing nonphysical reflections in Green's function estimates using source-receiver interferometry Simon King1 and Andrew Curtis2 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry retrieves the Green's function of sources. Theory requires that sources completely surround the two receivers, but constraints

  19. [19] OSCILLATIONMETHOD 211 breaks down, and the most intense reflections will be systematically un-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    intensities from crystals of large unit cell. The problems imposed by the need to analyze the digitized data of two perpendicular bent mirrors, providing glancing-angle reflection in horizontal and vertical planes

  20. Effects of Charge on Osmotic Reflection Coefficients of Macromolecules in Fibrous Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, Gaurav

    A model based on continuum hydrodynamics and electrostatics was developed to predict the combined effects of molecular charge and size on the osmotic reflection coefficient (?[subscript o]) of a macromolecule in a fibrous ...

  1. Promoting Teacher Reflection To Enhance Head Start Teachers' Social-Emotional Practices: A Pilot Investigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Lynisha R

    2015-01-26

    This dissertation investigated the development and validation of a measure of reflection-focused problem solving (RFPS) consultation model and the effects of RFPS consultation on observed classroom social-emotional practices ...

  2. Acquisition and processing pitfall associated with the clipping of near-surface seismic reflection traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Steven D.; Steeples, Don W.; Malin, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    The processing of clipped seismic traces may produce high-frequency wavelets that can be misinterpreted as reflections in filtered shot gathers and common-midpoint (CMP) stacked sections. To illustrate this effect, a near-surface CMP seismic...

  3. The Impact of a Metacognitive Reflection Component in a Problem-Based Learning Unit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seifert, Kathryn A.

    2010-01-16

    This mixed methods dissertation explores the impact of metacognitive support (reflective journal entries and a think-aloud exercise) in a PBL (problem-based learning) unit. While students are developing a solution for a ...

  4. Recent advances in reflective optics for EUV/x-ray light sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent advances in reflective optics for EUVx-ray light sources Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Regina Soufli, LLNL Program...

  5. Generating intense ultrashort radiation by reflecting an ultrashort laser pulse from a thin target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Wenmin [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-10-03

    Particle-in-cell simulation and analytical modeling demonstrate that the reflection of a single-cycle light pulse from a thin target can produce an ultrashort ultraintense electromagnetic field.

  6. A program to design asphalt concrete overlays to mitigate reflection cracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyanarayana Rao, Sindhu

    2002-01-01

    . Various engineering reinforcing grids have been used in recent years to mitigate the occurrence and propagation of reflection cracking. Reinforcing grids made of fiberglass or polypropylene has been used for this purpose. The main objectives...

  7. Reflectance reduction of InP wafers after high-temperature annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    is beneficial for many devices, such as solar cells, LEDs, and sen- sors. Various methods of reflection unprocessed as the reference sample. Three quarters of one wafer were annealed in an oven at 350, 500, and 600

  8. Some reflections on 25 years of the Association for Behavior Analysis: Past, present, and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Edward K.; Baer, Donald M.; Donald, M.; Favell, Judith E.; Glenn, Sigrid S.; Sigrid, S.; Hineline, Philip N.; Malott, Maria E.; Michael, Jack

    2001-01-01

    This paper offers some reflections on the discipline and profession of behavior analysis, as well as on the Association for Behavior Analysis (ABA), on the occasion of the association's 25th anniversary. It is based on a panel session conducted...

  9. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill...

  10. Reflecting on the Invisible: Understanding End-User Perceptions of Ubiquitous Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Keith

    Reflecting on the Invisible: Understanding End-User Perceptions of Ubiquitous Computing Erika, ledantec, eaganj, keith}@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT How can designers of ubiquitous computing technologies): Miscellaneous. INTRODUCTION Evaluations of ubiquitous computing systems have typically examined the functional

  11. Does monetary poverty reflect caloric intake? Ibrahima BOCOUM CIRAD, UMR MOISA, F-34398 Montpellier, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Does monetary poverty reflect caloric intake? Ibrahima BOCOUM CIRAD, UMR MOISA, F-34398 poverty. Using a Maliansurvey thatincorporatesexceptionally detailed information on food consumption, we: poverty, food insecurity, caloric intake, household surveys, Mali 1 Introduction Estimating the number

  12. Reflection Space Image Based Rendering Brian Cabral, Marc Olano, Philip Nemec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olano, Marc

    Reflection Space Image Based Rendering Brian Cabral, Marc Olano, Philip Nemec SGI Abstract High to approximate the integral lighting equation. ¡ e-mail: ¢ cabral,olano,nemec£ @sgi.com Environment mapping

  13. Multiple gene genealogies and microsatellite markers reflect relationships between morphotypes of Sphaeropsis sapinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple gene genealogies and microsatellite markers reflect relationships between morphotypes between isolates representing different S. sapinea morphotypes, using multiple gene genealogies inferred from partial sequences of six protein-coding genes and six microsatellite loci. Genealogies generated

  14. The effects of experiential learning with an emphasis on reflective writing on deep-level processing of agricultural leadership students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Copie D.

    2010-01-16

    are instrumental in the development of students. Experiential learning, and, more importantly, reflective writing are important components of college instructors? repertoires. Learning is not complete without proper reflection. The purpose of this study...

  15. Using Visible and Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy to Characterize and Classify Soil Profiles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Katrina Margarette

    2011-10-21

    AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis by KATRINA MARGARETTE WILKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Soil Science USING VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY TO CHARACTERIZE AND CLASSIFY SOIL PROFILES A Thesis by KATRINA MARGARETTE WILKE Submitted...

  16. Calculation of infrared plasma reflection spectra of inhomogeneously doped P-type gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHEN Wei-xi; LI Guo-hua; NIU Jin-zhen; GUO Chang-zhi

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the surface concentration and concentration profile of free carriers, the layer thickness and free carrier concentration of the homogeneous substrate on the infrared plasma reflection spectra of inhomogeneously doped P-type GaAs layers is analyzed by computer solutions of differential equations for the optical admittance. Computed spectra are reported for four different profiles and several substrate concentrations. Methods for evaluation of the measured reflection spectra and the limitation of this technique are discussed.

  17. Volume reflection in a bent crystal with purely parabolic inter-planar potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondarenco, M V

    2009-01-01

    For trajectory of a particle undergoing volume reflection in a bent crystal an explicit expression is obtained, within the model of parabolic continuous potential in each inter-planar interval, and with the neglect of multiple scattering. For the case of bending radius well exceeding the critical value, a formula is derived for the final volume reflection angle in units of Lindhard's critical angle, and for the acquired beam angular spread.

  18. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  19. Selection of linear-cavity fibre laser radiation using a reflection interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terentyev, V S; Simonov, V A [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    We consider the use of a two-mirror multibeam reflection interferometer as a selector of linear-cavity single-mode fibre laser radiation and present experimental data on continuous wavelength tuning of an erbium-doped fibre laser. Conditions are found for single-longitudinal-mode operation of the fibre laser cavity using a reflection interferometer, with the possibility of broadband wavelength tuning. (control of laser pulse parameters)

  20. Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinker, Mary Norris

    1986-01-01

    SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Approved as to style and content by: D. A. Fa quiet...

  1. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16

    DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2009 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE...

  2. Internet Performance to Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, L

    2003-10-01

    We report the first results ever for real-time Internet performance to Africa using the PingER methodology. Multiple monitoring hosts were used to enable comparisons with performance from different parts of the world. From these preliminary measurements, we have found that Internet packet losses to some African sites in recent months range from very poor to bad (> 12%), some getting better, others are holding steady or getting worse. This, together with the average monthly Round Trip Times, imply end-to-end maximum TCP throughputs that are order of magnitudes different between countries in the region. Africa is shown to be far from the Internet performance in industrialized nations due to the poor infrastructure in place today. These monitoring efforts can provide valuable information to analyze the relative rates of future improvement and today they help us to quantify the digital divide and can provide quantitative information to policy makers.

  3. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of Thick Corrosion Layers on 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Castelli; P Persans; W Strohmayer; V Parkinson

    2006-03-23

    Corrosion resistant structural materials of both iron and nickel based alloys are used in the electric power industry for the construction of the coolant loops of both conventional and nuclear power generating stations. These materials, in the presence of high temperature (e.g. 287 C), high pH (e.g. 10.0 {at} 20 C) water with dissolved hydrogen will oxidize and form corrosion films that are double metal oxides (or spinels) of the form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}. This work describes optical reflectivity techniques that have been developed to study the growth of these films in situ. The optical technique uses a dual-beam specular reflection spectrometer to measure the spectrum of reflected light in small angle (i.e. < 15{sup o}) scatter. The reflection spectra are then calibrated using a set of corrosion coupons with corrosion films that are well known. Results are compared with models based on multilayer reflection and Mie scattering from a particle size distribution. Surface roughness is found to be the dominant cause of reduced reflection as the films grow.

  4. LHCb Detector Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; S. Akar; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. An; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; M. Andreotti; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; A. Badalov; C. Baesso; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; V. Batozskaya; V. Battista; A. Bay; L. Beaucourt; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; M. Borsato; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; J. Brodzicka; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; R. Calabrese; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Cassina; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; M. Chefdeville; S. Chen; S. -F. Cheung; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; V. Cogoni; L. Cojocariu; G. Collazuol; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; M. Corvo; I. Counts; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; A. C. Crocombe; M. Cruz Torres; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; J. Dalseno; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; M. Dorigo; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; K. Dreimanis; G. Dujany; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; S. Ely; S. Esen; H. M. Evans; T. Evans; A. Falabella; C. Färber; C. Farinelli; N. Farley; S. Farry; R. Fay; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; M. Fiorini; M. Firlej; C. Fitzpatrick; T. Fiutowski; P. Fol; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. Fu; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; S. Gallorini; S. Gambetta; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. García Pardiñas; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; L. Gavardi; A. Geraci; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; A. Gianelle; S. Gianì; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; C. Gotti; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; E. Graverini; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; L. Grillo; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; X. Han; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; L. Henry; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; M. Heß; A. Hicheur; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; J. Jalocha; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; N. Jurik; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; S. Karodia; M. Kelsey; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; B. Khanji; C. Khurewathanakul; S. Klaver; K. Klimaszewski; O. Kochebina; M. Kolpin; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; W. Kucewicz; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; K. Kurek; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; B. Langhans; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; T. Likhomanenko; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; F. Lionetto; B. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; P. Lowdon; D. Lucchesi; H. Luo; A. Lupato; E. Luppi; O. Lupton; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; A. Malinin; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; A. Mapelli; J. Maratas; J. F. Marchand; U. Marconi

    2015-03-11

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  5. LHCb Detector Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  6. Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging ToolsEdison Performance Performance

  7. Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, K L F; Tu, J J

    2006-01-01

    Reflectivity Measurements for Copper and Aluminumin the Far Infrared and the Resistive Wall Impedance in the LCLS Undulator

  8. Reflection and transmission of light waves from the air-magnetoplasma interface: Spatial and angular Imbert-Fedorov shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borhanian, Jafar

    2015-03-15

    We have investigated the reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave from the air-magnetoplasma interface. The reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained for an arbitrary polarized incident wave. The spatial and angular Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts are discussed. The numerical results are presented to study the dependence of the reflection and transmission coefficients and IF shifts on relevant parameters of the system. The plasma and wave parameters can be used to control the reflection coefficients and IF shifts.

  9. A Modular Framework for Performance-Based Durability Engineering: from Exposure to Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    in deaggregation, backwards conditioning, and updating of results to reflect new information or models. Limitations, sustainability, performance-based engineering 1. Introduction The design and renewal of sustainable and resilient infrastructure renewal to adapt to the changing climate will further stretch resources, and will require

  10. Performance Requirements for the Double Shell Tank (DST) System Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2000-04-20

    This document describes the performance requirements for the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System. These requirements reflect the Case 3, Project Planning Case from the Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan, Revision 1. These requirements, in turn, will be incorporated into a specification for the DST System.

  11. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.B.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  12. SEE ENLARGED Performing Arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Performing Arts A S A P Adult Emergency Elliston Hall Rice Hall Delbruck Hall Women's Health Ctr in MCN 53D 208 24TH AVE 86 BETA THETA PI 88 GODCHAUX NURSING ANNEX 131 VILLAGE APARTMENTS 205B MEDICAL CHILD

  13. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-20

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A and provides useful information on the incorporation of high performance sustainable building principles into building-related General Plant Projects and Institutional General Plant Projects at DOE sites. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-6A. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Supplementary Results Behavioral Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Brian

    of the performance measures. #12;Full Brain fMRI Analyses for Reward Anticipation See Tables 1 and 2 for the results of whole brain analyses. #12;Table 1. Patterns of Activation for Contrasts of BOLD Signal Immediately coordinates Area Side Talairach coordinates Area Side -24,-32,55 Postcentral gyrus Left 23,0,67 Middle frontal

  15. Team Identity and Performance-based Compensation Effects on Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blazovich, Janell L.

    2010-01-16

    This study investigates whether team members work harder and perform better when they are compensated based on both team and individual performance than when compensated based on team or individual performance alone and whether teammates...

  16. PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES FOR TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.; CRUMPLER, J.D.

    2005-09-30

    This report documents the performance objectives (metrics, times of analyses, and times of compliance) to be used in performance assessments of Hanford Site tank farm closure.

  17. Annual Performance Report FY 2004 Annual Performance Plan FY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I am pleased to present the Office of Inspector General's (OIG's) combined Fiscal Year 2004 Annual Performance Report and Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Performance Plan. In Fiscal Year...

  18. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The Second deployment site is the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12) Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Base upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth the project team has collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and experimental reflection line. At the time of preparing this report VSP data and experimental reflection line data has been collected and has have preliminary processing on the data sets.

  19. Measurement of the radial velocity of the Sun as a star by means of a reflecting solar system body. The effect of the body rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanza, A F

    2015-01-01

    Minor bodies of the solar system can be used to measure the spectrum of the Sun as a star by observing sunlight reflected by their surfaces. To perform an accurate measurement of the radial velocity of the Sun as a star by this method, it is necessary to take into account the Doppler shifts introduced by the motion of the reflecting body. Here we discuss the effect of its rotation. It gives a vanishing contribution only when the inclinations of the body rotation axis to the directions of the Sun and of the Earth observer are the same. When this is not the case, the perturbation of the radial velocity does not vanish and can reach up to about 2.4 m/s for an asteroid such as 2 Pallas that has an inclination of the spin axis to the plane of the ecliptic of about 30 degrees. We introduce a geometric model to compute the perturbation in the case of a uniformly reflecting body of spherical or triaxial ellipsoidal shape and provide general results to easily estimate the magnitude of the effect.

  20. High Performance Buildings Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.

  1. High Performance Computing School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    High Performance Computing School COMSC This module aims to provide the students with fundamental knowledge and understanding of techniques associated with High Performance Computing and its practical' skills in analysing and evaluating High Performance Computing and will be structured around

  2. Conditions for reflection and transmission of an ion acoustic soliton in a dusty plasma with variable charge dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Tomar, Renu; Dahiya, Raj P.

    2014-07-15

    Modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations are derived for the incident, reflected, and transmitted waves in order to examine the soliton reflection and its transmission through an inhomogeneous plasma comprising ions, dust grains with fluctuating charge and two types of electrons, namely nonisothermal electrons and isothermal electrons. All the mKdV equations are coupled at the point of reflection and solved for the reflected soliton. Unlike others, a relation is established between the velocity shifts of the incident, reflected and transmitted solitons, and based on a critical value of the shift of incident soliton the strengths of the soliton reflection and transmission are talked about. Conditions are obtained for the soliton reflection and its transmission, and a comparative study is made for the two cases of fixed and fluctuating charges on the dust grains.

  3. Delineation of spall zone from pre/post shot reflections studies: Preliminary results from BEXAR. Los Alamos Source Region Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.R.; Cogbill, A.H.; Weaver, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, R.; Steeples, D. [Kansas Univ., Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1992-12-31

    In order to delineate the lateral and depth extent of spall from a buried nuclear explosion, we have performed a high-resolution pre- and post-shot seismic reflection survey from BEXAR. Although the data quality were marginal due to poor wave propagation through the volcanic tuffs of Pahute Mesa, a number of interesting differences are observed on the pre- and post-shot surveys. On the pre-shot survey, a reflector (reflector `` 1 ``) is observed at 250 ms (or about 150 m depth) using a stacking velocity of 1300 m/s. On the post-shot survey two reflectors are observed and a stacking velocity of 1150 m/s was used representing a 12% reduction in compressional velocity. With this stacking velocity, reflector `` 1 `` is recorded at 290 ms (still at about 150 m depth) and a new reflector ``2`` is observed at 210 ms (or about 100 m depth). These stacking velocities correspond well with available uphole travel times collected in U19ba and nearby U19ax (BEXAR and KEARSARGE emplacement holes, respectively). The cause for the differences observed in the pre- and post-shot surveys may be due to one of two reasons. First, it is possible that the near-surface rocks were damaged as part of the spallation process (thus reducing the in situ velocities) and reflector ``2`` represents a spall detachment surface. However, analysis of acceleration data collected close to the reflection line suggests that the ground motions were probably inadequate to damage the tuffs. Also, no evidence of actual spallation was actually observed. The second hypothesis is that the near-surface velocities of the tuffs were altered by the change in saturation state due to extensive rains occurring between the pre- and postshot surveys. Although the dependence of seismic velocity on saturation state is controlled by a number of complex factors, it cannot be ruled out.

  4. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2015-05-19

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for mostmore »wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.« less

  5. High reflectance and low stress Mo2C/Be multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bajt, Sasa (Livermore, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A material for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayers that will reflect at about 11.3 nm, have a high reflectance, low stress, and high thermal and radiation stability. The material consists of alternating layers of Mo.sub.2 C and Be deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on a substrate, such as silicon. In one example a Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer gave 65.2% reflectance at 11.25 nm measured at 5 degrees off normal incidence angle, and consisted of 70 bilayers with a deposition period of 5.78 nm, and was deposited at 0.83 mTorr argon (Ar) sputtering pressure, with the first and last layers being Be. The stress of the multilayer is tensile and only +88 MPa, compared to +330 MPa of a Mo/Be multilayers of the same thickness. The Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer was capped with carbon which produced an increase in reflectivity of about 7% over a similar multilayer with no carbon capping material, thus raising the reflectivity from 58.3% to over 65%. The multilayers were formed using either Mo.sub.2 C or Be as the first and last layers, and initial testing has shown the formation of beryllium carbide at the interfaces between the layers which both stabilizes and has a smoothing effect, and appear to be smoother than the interfaces in Mo/Be multilayers.

  6. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for most wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.

  7. Measured energy savings from the application of reflective roofsin 2 small non-residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2003-01-14

    Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in two small (14.9 m{sup 2}) non-residential buildings during the summer of 2000. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. The roofs of the buildings were then painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original solar reflectivities of the roofs were about 26%; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72%. The monitored electricity savings were about 0.5kWh per day (33 Wh/m2 per day). The estimated annual savings are about 125kWh per year (8.4 kWh/m2); at a cost of $0.1/kWh, savings are about $0.86/m2 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote locations of these buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them a white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence, a reflective roof saves energy at no incremental cost.

  8. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that support expanded participation in the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program. Our Vision Home Performance with ENERGY STAR is accessible to all American households....

  9. Sustainability of Engineers’ High Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakata, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    belong to Performance-based HRM companies. Footnotes: i Seein charge of engineers’ HRM and MOT. Five factors haveWorkplace environment (HRM et al. ) Performance Evaluated

  10. High Performance Computing Center IT DIVISION -HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    . It will ensure that Texas Tech retains superior computing and visualization facilities. #12;High PerformanceHigh Performance Computing Center 9/27/2004 1 IT DIVISION - HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CENTER STRATEGIC PLAN MISSION STATEMENT The High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) promotes research and teaching

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report. Fourth quarter calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansing, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    WHC once again achieved significant improvement in its Overall safety performance as reflected by the injury/illness incidence rates. Incidence rates with one exception (Restricted Work Cases Only Incidence Rate) reflect sharp reductions. The increase in the Restricted Work Case Incidence Rate appears to be the result of effective case management activity and the return to work in a partial duty capacity of employees who may otherwise have been off work due to a work-related injury/illness (Page 2--9).

  12. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft x-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric M; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-04-05

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft x-ray reflectivity using linear s and p polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of x-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft x-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and is independent of the film thickness.

  13. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  14. Studying atmosphere-dominated hot Jupiter Kepler phase curves: Evidence that inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection is common

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shporer, Avi

    2015-01-01

    We identify 3 Kepler transiting planet systems, Kepler-7, Kepler-12, and Kepler-41, whose orbital phase-folded light curves are dominated by planetary atmospheric processes including thermal emission and reflected light, while the impact of non-atmospheric (i.e. gravitational) processes, including beaming (Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, is negligible. Therefore, those systems allow a direct view of their atmospheres without being hampered by the approximations used in the inclusion of both atmospheric and non-atmospheric processes when modeling the phase curve shape. Here we analyze Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b atmosphere based on their Kepler phase curve, while the analysis of Kepler-7b was presented elsewhere. The model we used efficiently computes reflection and thermal emission contributions to the phase curve, including inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection due to longitudinally varying cloud coverage. We confirm Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b show a westward phase shift between the brightest...

  15. What is the temporal analog of reflection and refraction of optical beams?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-10-28

    It is shown numerically and analytically that when an optical pulse approaches a moving temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes, it undergoes a temporal equivalent of reflection and refraction of optical beams at a spatial boundary. The main difference is that the role of angles is played by changes in the frequency. The frequency dependence of the dispersion of the material in which the pulse is propagating plays a fundamental role in determining the frequency shifts experienced by the reflected and refracted pulses. As a result, our analytic expressions for these frequency shifts allow us to find themore »condition under which an analog of total internal reflection may occur at the temporal boundary.« less

  16. Ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions: modeling and PIC simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liseykina, T; Vshivkov, V; Malkov, M

    2015-01-01

    Non-relativistic collisionless shock waves are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas and are known as efficient particle accelerators. However, our understanding of collisionless shocks, including their structure and the mechanisms whereby they accelerate particles remains incomplete. We present here the results of numerical modeling of an ion-acoustic collisionless shock based on one-dimensional (1D) kinetic approximation both for electrons and ions with a real mass ratio. Special emphasis is made on the shock-reflected ions as the main driver of shock dissipation. The reflection efficiency, velocity distribution of reflected particles and the shock electrostatic structure are studied in terms of the shock parameters. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed.

  17. Evaluating Steam Trap Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, N. Y.

    1986-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-86-06-126.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11555 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-86-06-126.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 EVALUATING STEAM... TRAP PERFORMANCE Noel Y Fuller, P.E. Holston Defense Corporation Kingsport, Tennessee ABSTRACT Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data from these tests...

  18. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance

  19. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance9

  20. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance960

  1. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance9607

  2. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance96073

  3. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly Performance960735

  4. Performance (perfSONAR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUserPartnershipsNews >Performance (perfSONAR)

  5. ARM - 2008 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive09 I N DScience8 Performance

  6. ARM - 2009 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive09 I N9 Performance Metrics

  7. Performance and Debugging Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance and Debugging

  8. Performance and Debugging Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance and DebuggingTools

  9. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance and DebuggingTools

  10. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance and

  11. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance andOptimization

  12. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools Performance

  13. Performance and Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance and Debugging Tools PerformanceOptimization

  14. Thermo-acoustic wave propagation and reflection near the liquid-gas critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, P

    2008-01-01

    Thermo-acoustic wave propagation and reflection near liquid-gas critical point is studied, and our results are compared to a recent ultra-sensitive interferometry measurement in near-critical CO2 [Y. Miura et al. Phys. Rev. E 74, 010101(2006)], which suggests the dominance of the thermo-acoustic nature of the piston effect on the time scale of microseconds. New features regarding the reflection patterns of thermo-acoustic waves near the critical point are revealed by proper inclusion of the critically diverging bulk viscosity.

  15. Mitigation of substrate defects in reflective reticles using sequential coating and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirkanimi, Paul B. (Sunol, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A buffer-layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The buffer-layer is formed by either a multilayer deposited on the substrate or by a plurality of sequentially deposited and annealed coatings deposited on the substrate. The plurality of sequentially deposited and annealed coating may comprise multilayer and single layer coatings. The multilayer deposited and annealed buffer layer coatings may be of the same or different material than the reflecting coating thereafter deposited on the buffer-layer.

  16. On the absence of simultaneous reflection and transmission in integrable impurity systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Castro-Alvaredo; A. Fring; F. Göhmann

    2002-06-01

    We establish that the Yang-Baxter equations in the presence of an impurity can in general only admit solutions of simultaneous tranmission and reflection when the transmission and reflection amplitudes commute in the defect degrees of freedom with an additional exchange of the corresponding rapidities. In the absence of defect degrees of freedom we show in complete generality, that the only exceptions to this are theories which possess rapidity independent bulk scattering matrices. In particular bulk theories with diagonal scattering matrices, can only be the free Boson and Fermion, the Federbush model and their generalizations. These anyonic solutions do not admit the possibility of excited impurity states.

  17. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vagin, K. Yu., E-mail: vagin@sci.lebedev.ru; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  18. The detectability of extrasolar planet surroundings - I. Reflected-light photometry of unresolved rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Arnold; Jean Schneider

    2004-06-09

    It is expected that the next generation of high-contrast imaging instruments will deliver the first unresolved image of an extrasolar planet. The emitted thermal infrared light from the planet should show no phase effect assuming the planet is in thermal equilibrium. But the reflected visible light will vary versus the phase angle. Here, we study the photometric variation of the reflected light versus the orbital phase of a ringed extrasolar planet. We show that a ring around an extrasolar planet, both obviously unresolved, can be detected by its specific photometric signature. A simple quantitative model is discussed, taking into account the basic optical and geometrical properties of the ringed planet.

  19. Detectability of planetary rings around an extrasolar planet from reflected-light photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Arnold; J. Schneider

    2005-10-19

    The next generation of high-contrast imaging instruments will provide the first unresolved image of an extrasolar planet. While the emitted infrared light from the planet in thermal equilibrium should show almost no phase effect, the reflected visible light will vary with the orbital phase angle. We study the photometric variation of the reflected light with orbital phase of a ringed extrasolar planet. We show that a ring around an extrasolar planet, both obviously unresolved, can be detected by its specific photometric signature. Keywords: Stars: planetary systems -- Planets: rings -- Extrasolar planet characterization

  20. Dispositional reflections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brummans, Boris H. J. M.

    2005-02-17

    In this dissertation, I explicate how scholars implicate themselves in the subfield of organizational communication studies by engaging in antinomic language-games which make the conduct of research (and textwork in ...

  1. Superior Energy Performance Overview Slides

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides a comprehensive overview of the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) program.

  2. Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rogers

    2011-12-31

    The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

  3. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

    2009-10-01

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  4. Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

    1980-03-01

    Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

  5. High Performance Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon J. Devitt; William J. Munro; Kae Nemoto

    2008-10-14

    The architecture scalability afforded by recent proposals of a large scale photonic based quantum computer, utilizing the theoretical developments of topological cluster states and the photonic chip, allows us to move on to a discussion of massively scaled Quantum Information Processing (QIP). In this letter we introduce the model for a secure and unsecured topological cluster mainframe. We consider the quantum analogue of High Performance Computing, where a dedicated server farm is utilized by many users to run algorithms and share quantum data. The scaling structure of photonics based topological cluster computing leads to an attractive future for server based QIP, where dedicated mainframes can be constructed and/or expanded to serve an increasingly hungry user base with the ideal resource for individual quantum information processing.

  6. The application of an ultrasonic shear wave reflection method for nondestructive testing of cement-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The application of an ultrasonic shear wave reflection method for nondestructive testing of cement for Nondestructive Testing of Cement-Based Materials at Early Ages An Experimental and Numerical Analysis by Dr associate under the supervision of Professor Surendra P. Shah at the Center for Advanced Cement

  7. Reflective responsibility for risk: a critical view of software and information systems development risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Montfort University

    evaluation of future states because the future is by definition unknown. Risks as known uncertaintiesReflective responsibility for risk: a critical view of software and information systems development risk management Bernd Carsten Stahl Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Centre for Computing

  8. SEQUOIA 2000 --A REFLECTION ON THE FIRST THREE YEARS Michael Stonebraker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    SEQUOIA 2000 -- A REFLECTION ON THE FIRST THREE YEARS Michael Stonebraker EECS Department University of California, Berkeley Abstract This paper describes the SEQUOIA 2000 project and its 2000 project is to build a better computing environment for Global Change Researchers, hereafter

  9. Using reflection techniques for flexible problem solving with examples from diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Teije, Annette

    Using reflection techniques for flexible problem solving with examples from diagnosis Annette ten problem solving consists of the dynamic selection and configurationof problem solving methods for a particular prob­ lem type, depending on the particular problem and the goal of problem solving. In this paper

  10. Determining the Density Profile of Confined Polymer Brushes with Neutron Reflectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    , University of South Florida, Florida 33620 3 Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE-12, MS H805Determining the Density Profile of Confined Polymer Brushes with Neutron Reflectivity W. A. HAMILTON,1 G. S. SMITH,1 N. A. ALCANTAR,2 J. MAJEWSKI,3 R. G. TOOMEY,4 T. L. KUHL5 1 Center for Neutron

  11. Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talwar, Devki N.

    Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

  12. Campus Sustainability Plan "UCSC's commitment to sustainability reflects one of our most closely held campus values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 Campus Sustainability Plan "UCSC's commitment to sustainability reflects one of our most closely, which inspired faculty and staff to join in. Today, sustainability is a campuswide commitment, and our, Chancellor 2013­16 #12;2 1 From the Chancellor-- UC Santa Cruz is serious about sustainability, and our

  13. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryzhik, Lenya

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Joseph B. Keller y George Papanicolaou z Leonid Ryzhik x February 13, 1999 Abstract Transport transport in the high frequency limit, and the Born expansion is used to calculate the effect of the random

  14. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Joseph B. Keller y George Papanicolaou z Leonid Ryzhik x March 8, 1999 Abstract Transport transport in the high frequency limit, and the Born expansion is used to calculate the effect of the random

  15. Recovering Spectral Reflectance under Commonly Available Lighting Conditions Jun Jiang and Jinwei Gu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Jinwei

    Recovering Spectral Reflectance under Commonly Available Lighting Conditions Jun Jiang and Jinwei light- ing conditions, such as daylight at different times over a day, camera flash and ambient light, and fluorescent and tungsten light. Our approach does not require camera spec- tral sensitivities or the spectra

  16. Human lightness perception is guided by simple assumptions about reflectance and lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard

    Human lightness perception is guided by simple assumptions about reflectance and lighting Richard F 0009, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3 ABSTRACT Lightness constancy is the remarkable ability of human successful approaches to understanding lightness perception that have developed along independent paths

  17. The effect of multiply reflected molecules in free molecule flow over a general body 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gordon Lee

    1993-01-01

    reflected molecules to the force and moments on a test body in the flow. The test configuration consisted of two flat plates joined along one edge at a right angle to each other. When force and moment coefficients of this 90' concave wedge were compared...

  18. An adaptive phase space method with application to reflection traveltime tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    the traveltimes of seismic waves produced by earthquakes. It also arises in exploration geophysics, in particular seismology in determining the inner structure of Earth by measuring at different seismic stations, hydrocarbon exploration. For instance in marine reflection seismology the data is collected on a ship

  19. AC 2007-504: NASA OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACULTY AT MINORITY INSTITUTIONS: REFLECTIONS OF NASA ADMINISTRATOR FELLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, Louis J.

    AC 2007-504: NASA OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACULTY AT MINORITY INSTITUTIONS: REFLECTIONS OF NASA. leverett@utep.edu http://research.utep.edu/pacelab Paul Racette, NASA As an adventurous adolescent, Paul sensing and instrument calibration. For these efforts and accomplishments Paul received the NASA Medal

  20. High Mercury Concentrations Reflect Trophic Ecology of Three Deep-Water Chondrichthyans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    High Mercury Concentrations Reflect Trophic Ecology of Three Deep-Water Chondrichthyans Michael C concentrations were explored for three deep-water chondrichthyans (Etmopterus princeps, Cen- troscymnus position in the trophic web (as indicated by differences in d15 N). Mercury is a major contaminant

  1. High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jason Michael

    2000-01-01

    Examination of seismic data from the deep-water Gulf of Mexico reveals the presence of High-Amplitude Reflection Packets (HARPs). An analog study conducted by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 155 identified and described Amazon Fan HARPs as a stacked...

  2. Simultaneous measurement of laser reflection and transmission of poly,,vinyl chloride...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Simultaneous measurement of laser reflection and transmission of poly,,vinyl chloride... James D. Van de Ven Arthur G. Erdman University of Minnesota Mechanical Engineering Department 111 Church. Previous work measuring optical properties for this purpose placed little importance on the light

  3. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS G(e, 1, n)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    of the matrix P give Green functions Q # (u)). Note that the matrix# is completely determined by the property characters, is completely dominated by Green functions. Thanks to Lusztig [L3], similar facts hold in generalGREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS G(e, 1, n) TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department

  4. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS G(e, 1, n)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    P give Green functions QO(u)). No* *te that the matrix is completely determined by the property to the values at unipotent elements of unipotent characters, is completely domi* *nated by Green functions GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS G(e, 1, n

  5. Comments on theory of volume reflection and radiation in bent crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondarenco, M V

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical results on charged particle interaction with planarly oriented thin bent crystals are reviewed, with the emphasis on dynamics in the continuous potential. Influence of boundary conditions on the volume-reflected beam profile is discussed. Basic properties of coherent bremsstrahlung in a bent crystal are highlighted.

  6. Former Assistant Secretary Reflects on Career High Point Leading EM: 'Well Worth the Effort'

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – In an occasional EM Update series, we feature interviews with former EM Assistant Secretaries to reflect on their achievements and challenges in the world’s largest nuclear cleanup and to discuss endeavors in life after EM.

  7. The effect of an additional reflection in a precedence effect Matthew J. Goupell,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litovsky, Ruth

    , 1990; Shinn-Cunningham et al., 1993; Tollin and Henning, 1998; Stellmack et al., 1999; Litovsky reflections (see Blauert, 1997; Litovsky et al., 1999 for reviews). The perceived locations of the sources in the location of the lag, called "lag discrimination suppression" (Litovsky et al., 1999; Litovsky and Shinn

  8. Morphological features of tweeks and nighttime D region ionosphere at tweek reflection height from the observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % during summer season and about 19% and 18% occurrences during equinox and winter seasons. Maximum to that during equinox and winter. Seasonally, tweek (ionospheric) reflection height in the premidnight (18:00-00:00 LT) during winter is less as compared to that during equinox and summer. Annual (seasonal average

  9. Seismic reflections and electrical conductivity: A case of Holmes's curious dog?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    at depth (and thus could have caused high electrical conductivity) but were expelled during uplift (WoodsSeismic reflections and electrical conductivity: A case of Holmes's curious dog? Frederick A. Cook-crustal seismic reflectors and areas of high electrical conductivity coincide over a wide area. Re- flective

  10. Martine Kaluszynski The return of the dangerous man1. Reflections on the idea of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Martine Kaluszynski The return of the dangerous man1. Reflections on the idea of dangerousness and its uses Abstract In France, the re-emergence of the notion of dangerousness in the process of law of recidivating and pose a particular danger based on serious personality problems. The law regarding security

  11. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction study of dehydrogenation process of Pd coated Mg nanoblades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590, USA Received 23 March 2008; accepted,2 Hydrogen has been con- sidered as one of the promising alternative energy resources due to its abundanceIn situ reflection high energy electron diffraction study of dehydrogenation process of Pd coated

  12. REFLECT: Supporting Active Listening and Grounding on the Web through Restatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    , March 19­23, 2011, Hangzhou, China. ACM XXX-X-XXXXX-XXX-X/XX/XX. Travis Kriplean Computer Science & Eng the creative energy, emotion, and intelligence of many, are important for moving us toward institutional political, is often hyperbolic. Our hypothesis is that reflective discourse's fragility and elusiveness

  13. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were generated locally by a propagating beam of internal tidal energy which had originatedUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local generation mecha- nism: tidal flow over steep topography forces a propagating beam of internal tidal wave

  14. National Center for Digital Government Reflections on The Fog of (Cyber)War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    National Center for Digital Government Reflections on The Fog of (Cyber)War Diego. These assertions are: (a) Cyberspace is a new operational domain for waging war; (b) Cyber warfare can be as severe, it aims at reconnecting the idea of "fog of war" to its Clausewitzian roots, highlighting the importance

  15. PARAMETRIC STUDY FOR MONITORING CEREBRAL BLOOD OXYGENATION USING DUAL-WAVELENGTH OPTICAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    the light reflectance measurement experiments in a neck tissue model with a submerged CCA/JV blood vessel monitoring of blood oxygenation state in the human brain is of paramount importance in the frontier of human in space will typically experience headward fluid shift: a condition where fluid in tissue and blood begins

  16. Ice iron/sodium film as cause for high noctilucent cloud radar reflectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Paul M.

    Ice iron/sodium film as cause for high noctilucent cloud radar reflectivity P. M. Bellan1 Received by assuming the ice grains are coated by a thin metal film; substantial evidence exists indicating that such a film exists and is caused by the deposition of iron and sodium atoms on the ice grain from iron

  17. Short Communication Categorical effects in fricative perception are reflected in cortical source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    modeling a b s t r a c t Previous research in speech perception has shown that category information affects that these phonological cate- gories strongly influence how speech is perceived: category information allows for betterShort Communication Categorical effects in fricative perception are reflected in cortical source

  18. Polyimide-waveguide-based thermal optical switch using total-internal-reflection effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Polyimide-waveguide-based thermal optical switch using total-internal-reflection effect Jianyi Yang with an X junction was designed and fabricated by using the thermo-optic effect of polyimide materials and fabricated the TIR TO switch us- ing polyimide materials. The TO effect of polymeric materials is negative, i

  19. Detecting voids in a 0.6 m coal seam, 7 m deep, using seismic reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-01-01

    Surface collapse over abandoned subsurface coal mines is a problem in many parts of the world. High-resolution P-wave reflection seismology was successfully used to evaluate the risk of an active sinkhole to a main north-south ...

  20. Low light reflectance may explain the attraction of birds to defoliated trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Low light reflectance may explain the attraction of birds to defoliated trees Elina Ma¨ntyla¨, Tero autumnata) in nontest branches. Species, age, or sex of the experimental bird or lighting (ultraviolet [UV light than the herbivore trees, whereas no such difference was found in the shadier forest patch trees