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1

Manhattan Project: Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex at Hanford, 1945 HANFORD BECOMES OPERATIONAL F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex at Hanford, 1945 HANFORD BECOMES OPERATIONAL (Hanford Engineer Works, 1943-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 The plutonium production facilities at the Hanford Engineer Works took shape with the same wartime urgency as did the uranium facilities at Oak Ridge. In February 1943, Colonel Matthias returned to the location he had helped select the previous December and set up a temporary headquarters. In late March, Matthias received his assignment. The three water-cooled production reactor (piles), designated by the letters B, D, and F, would be built about six miles apart on the south bank of the Columbia River. The four chemical separation plants would be built in pairs at two sites nearly ten miles south of the piles. A facility to produce slugs and perform tests would be approximately twenty miles southeast of the separation plants near Richland. Temporary quarters for construction workers would be put up at the Hanford town site, while permanent facilities for other personnel would be located down the road in Richland, safely removed from the production and separation plants. Life at Hanford would soon come to resemble that of the other "atomic boomtowns" of the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge.

2

Manhattan Project: Operation Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, July 1946  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS Crossroads Baker, Bikini Atoll, July 25, 1946 OPERATION CROSSROADS (Bikini Atoll, July 1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Even after the Trinity test and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, military officials still knew far less than they would have liked about the effects, especially on naval targets, of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, the Joint Chiefs of Staff requested and received presidential approval to conduct a series of tests during summer 1946. Vice Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, head of the test series task force, proposed calling the series Operation "Crossroads." "It was apparent," he noted, "that warfare, perhaps civilization itself, had been brought to a turning point by this revolutionary weapon."

3

Manhattan Project: Library  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LIBRARY LIBRARY Resources A number of government publications relating to the Manhattan Project are available either as web pages or as .pdf documents. Cover of the Manhattan Project publication Department of Energy Publications Fehner and Gosling, Origins of the Nevada Test Site Fehner and Gosling, Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site Gosling, Manhattan Project, 1999 Gosling, Manhattan Project, 2010 Harnessed Atom United States Nuclear Tests, 1945-1992 Wahlen, History of 100-B Area Los Alamos National Laboratory Publications Bainbridge, Trinity Fakley, "The British Mission" Hawkins, MDH: Project Y, Vol. 1 Los Alamos: Beginning of an Era, 1943-1945 Malik, Yields of Hiroshima and Nagasaki "Oppenheimer Years" Serber, Los Alamos Primer Truslow, MDH: Project Y, Vol. 2

4

Manhattan Project: Maps  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MAPS MAPS Resources Scroll down to view thumbnails of each map. Leslie Groves looks at a map of Japan. Manhattan Project: General Manhattan Project Facilities Places map "Signature Facilities of the MED" map Hanford Hanford map Hanford (black and white) map Hanford Site Diagram Hanford Site Location Map Hanford: Native Peoples map Hanford: Town map Los Alamos Map of Los Alamos, New Mexico Los Alamos: "Tech Area" map Oak Ridge Map of Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge (black and white) map Oak Ridge: Projected Site for Atomic Production Plants, 1942, map Other Flight paths for Hiroshima and Nagasaki missions map Map of the Trinity Test Site Post-War U.S. Nuclear Tests map Manhattan Project Facilities Manhattan Project Facilities

5

The Manhattan Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Project Sites and Their Contributions · Key Events · Scientists · Its Story · Additional Information · Related Information President Roosevelt Establishes the Manhattan Project President Roosevelt instructs the Army to take responsibility for construction of atomic weapons complex. The Army delegates the task to the Corps of Engineers, which establishes the Manhattan Engineer District. Courtesy of National Nuclear Security Administration The 70th anniversary of the establishment of the Manhattan Project on August 13, 1942, is celebrated this year. The Manhattan Project played an essential role in bringing World War II to an end through the building of the atomic bomb. This major achievement was possible because the U.S. government conducted a massive, secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon.

6

President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear Establishes Manhattan Project | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project June 17, 1942 Washington, DC President Roosevelt Establishes Manhattan Project

7

Manhattan Project: Places  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Places Places "Met Lab" (Metallurgical Laboratory) Oak Ridge: Clinton Engineer Works Hanford Engineer Works Los Alamos Other Places Places of the Manhattan Project Places PLEASE NOTE: The Places pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the places where the Manhattan Project occurred have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of places involved in the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all place pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

8

Manhattan Project: People Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PEOPLE IMAGES PEOPLE IMAGES Resources > Photo Gallery Scroll down to see each of these images individually. The images are: 1. J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, and Ernest Lawrence (courtesy the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); 2. Hanford, Washington, workers sending money home (reproduced from the photo insert in F. G. Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb (Washington: History Division, Department of Energy, October 2001)); 3. Oppenheimer and Leslie Groves at the Trinity Site, September 1945 (reproduced from the cover of the Office of History and Heritage Resources publication: The Signature Facilities of the Manhattan Project (Washington: History Division, Department of Energy, 2001)); 4. A WAC detachment marching at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, June 1945 (courtesy the Army Corps of Engineers; it is reprinted in Rachel Fermi and Esther Samra, Picturing the Bomb: Photographs from the Secret World of the Manhattan Project (New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 1995), 40);

9

Manhattan Project: Suggested Readings  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SUGGESTED READINGS SUGGESTED READINGS Resources > Readings The literature on the Manhattan Project is extensive. The purpose of this web page is not to catalogue it, but only to suggest a very select few places to start. For more exhaustive lists of secondary works relating to the early history of nuclear energy, consult the bibliographies of the books listed below. Suggested Surveys of the Manhattan Project Gosling, F. G. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. DOE/MA-0001; Washington: History Division, Department of Energy, January 1999. An overview history by the Chief Historian of the Department of Energy and the basis for most of the "Events" in this web site. The best short survey for the general reader. Revised with additional photographs in January 2010 as DOE/MA-0002 Revised and available in .pdf format.

10

Manhattan Project: Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Science In the Laboratory Particle Accelerators and Other Technologies The Atom and Atomic Structure Nuclear Physics Bomb Design and Components Radioactivity Science and technology of the Manhattan Project Science PLEASE NOTE: The Science pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the science and technology of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of scientific topics useful for understanding the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all science pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

11

Manhattan Project: Fuller Lodge  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FULLER LODGE FULLER LODGE Los Alamos Boys Ranch School and Los Alamos (The Town) Resources > Photo Gallery Fuller Lodge Fuller Lodge was one of the main structures of the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School, serving as its headquarters in its later years. It was converted into a mess hall and guest quarters during the Manhattan Project. In the photograph above, part of the guest house is visible in the distance to the right. The photograph above is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is also reproduced in Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society), 57. The additional photographs below are:

12

MANHATTAN PROJECT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MANHATTAN PROJECT MANHATTAN PROJECT MANHATTAN PROJECT MANHATTAN PROJECT The Department of Energy traces its origins to World War II and the Manhattan Project effort to build the first atomic bomb. As the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, the organization set up by the Army Corps of Engineers to develop and build the bomb, the Department continues to own and manage the Federal properties at most of the major Manhattan Project sites, including Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico. In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, both journalists and the public ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the end of the Second World War as the top news stories of the twentieth-century. The Manhattan Project is the story of some of the most renowned scientists of the century

13

Manhattan Project: Y-12 Operation, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge Y-12: OPERATION Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge Y-12: OPERATION (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1943-1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 During the summer and fall of 1943, the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant at Oak Ridge began to take shape. The huge buildings to house the operating equipment were readied as manufacturers began delivering everything from electrical switches to motors, valves, and tanks. While construction and outfitting proceeded, almost 5,000 operating and maintenance personnel were hired and trained. Then, between October and mid-December, Y-12 paid the price for being a new technology that had not been put through its paces in a pilot plant. Vacuum tanks in the first Alpha racetrack leaked and shimmied out of line due to magnetic pressure, welds failed, electrical circuits malfunctioned, and operators made frequent mistakes. Most seriously, the magnet coils shorted out because of rust and sediment in the cooling oil.

14

MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department, as the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, owns and manages the Federal properties at most of the major Manhattan Project sites, including Oak Ridge, Tennessee;...

15

Manhattan Project: People  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

People People Administrators Scientists Civilian Organizations Military Organizations Non-Technical Personnel J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, and Ernest Lawrence People PLEASE NOTE: The People pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select people and organizations of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of the groups of people contributing to the success of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the people included in that category. For a complete menu of all people pages, see the comprehensive list of people below.

16

Manhattan Project: Processes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Processes Processes Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Isotope Separation Plutonium Production Bomb Design, Development, and Production Bomb Testing and Weapon Effects Processes PLEASE NOTE: The Processes pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the industrial processes of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of processes involved in the mission of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all process pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

17

Manhattan Project: Events  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Time Periods Time Periods 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb 1942-1944: The Plutonium Path to the Bomb 1942-1945: Bringing It All Together 1945: Dawn of the Atomic Era 1945-present: Postscript -- The Nuclear Age Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard Events The events of the Manhattan Project have been grouped under the time periods listed to the left. A quick overview of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summaries on each of the eight "Time Periods" pages, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of the events pages for that particular time period. For a complete menu of all events pages, see the comprehensive list of events below.

18

The Manhattan Project -- Its Story  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project -- Its Story Project -- Its Story Establishment · Operations · Immediate Influences · Long-term Influences · Other Info More About the Manhattan Project atom image Courtesy Argonne National Laboratory The Manhattan Project -- Its Background This year is the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the Manhattan Project, a predecessor of the U.S. Department of Energy. To honor its impacts on science and history, various aspects of its background, establishment, operations, and immediate and long-term influences will be revisited. It started during the fall of 1939, when President F. D. Roosevelt was made aware of the possibility that German scientists were racing to build an atomic bomb and was warned that Hitler would be more than willing to resort to such a weapon. As a result, Roosevelt set up the Advisory Committee on Uranium, consisting of both civilian and military representatives, to study the current state of research on uranium and to recommend an appropriate role for the federal government. The result was limited military funding for isotope separation and the work on chain reactions by Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard at Columbia University.

19

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

20

Manhattan Project: Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Klaus Fuchs's Los Alamos security badge photo ESPIONAGE AND THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Klaus Fuchs's Los Alamos security badge photo ESPIONAGE AND THE MANHATTAN PROJECT (1940-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Security was a way of life for the Manhattan Project. The goal was to keep the entire atomic bomb program secret from Germany and Japan. In this, Manhattan Project security officials succeeded. They also sought, however, to keep word of the atomic bomb from reaching the Soviet Union. Although an ally of Britain and the United States in the war against Germany, the Soviet Union remained a repressive dictatorship and a potential future enemy. Here, security officials were less successful. Soviet spies penetrated the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos and several other locations, sending back to Russia critical information that helped speed the development of the Soviet bomb.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Manhattan Project: The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(Unofficial) MED emblem, 1946 THE MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT (Unofficial) MED emblem, 1946 THE MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT (1945-1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present With the end of the Second World War, American policymakers anticipated that the Manhattan Project's infrastructure would be turned over to and managed by a largely civilian commission. General Leslie Groves initially thought this would happen soon after the ending of hostilities. His strategy for interim management of the complex was thus one of "hold the line," where he sought to maintain the essential soundness of the physical plant and the personnel that ran it, complete ongoing construction, and promote efficiency and economy. One of his first decisions was to close down marginal operations such as the S-50 Thermal Diffusion Plant in the K-25 area and the Alpha racetracks of the Y-12 electromagnetic separations plant at Oak Ridge. His most serious short-term problem was in retaining personnel, particularly at Los Alamos where many scientists and technicians were eager to return to civilian pursuits.

22

Manhattan Project: The Manhattan Project and the Second World War,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oak Ridgers celebrate V-J Day THE MANHATTAN PROJECT AND THE SECOND WORLD WAR Oak Ridgers celebrate V-J Day THE MANHATTAN PROJECT AND THE SECOND WORLD WAR (1939-1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the surrender of Japan were the last acts of the Second World War. The most destructive weapon in the history of combat had helped bring an end to the most destructive conflict in human history.

23

Manhattan Project: The Venona Intercepts  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Venona intercept regarding Theodore Hall THE VENONA INTERCEPTS (Washington, D.C., 1946-1980) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Soviet intelligence officers in the United States regularly communicated with their superiors in Moscow via telegraphic cables. These messages were encrypted of course, but in 1946 the United States, with the assistance of Great Britain, began to decrypt a good number of these messages. This program led to the eventual capture of several Soviet spies within the Manhattan Project. The VENONA intercepts, as they were codenamed, remained a closely-guarded secret, known only to a handful of government officials, until the program was declassified in 1995. Meredith Gardner (left) and some of his team of cryptanalysts.

24

Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight Manhattan Project properties that were designated as "Signature Facilities." These properties, taken together, provided the essential core for successfully interpreting for the American public the Manhattan Project mission of developing an atomic bomb. The Department's goal was to move foward in preserving and interpreting these properties by integrating departmental headquarters and field activities and joining in a working partnership with all interested outside entities, organizations, and individuals, including Congress, state and local governments, the Department's contractors, and various other stakeholders.

25

Manhattan Project: Image Retouching`  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Image Retouching Image Retouching Resources > Photo Gallery Smyth Report (original) Smyth Report (retouched) Images on this web site have sometimes been "retouched." In every case, however, the intention has been only to restore the image as much as possible to its original condition. Above is a rather extreme example-"before and after" versions of the cover of the Smyth Report (Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945)). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted.") Larger versions of the same images are below.

26

Manhattan Project: Berkeley Meeting  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources Resources About this Site How to Navigate this Site Library Maps Note on Sources Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Photo Gallery Site Map Sources and Notes Suggested Readings BERKELEY MEETING University of California, Berkeley (March 29, 1940) Resources > Photo Gallery Lawrence, A. Compton, Bush, Conant, K. Compton, and Loomis A meeting regarding the 184-inch cyclotron project, held at the University of California, Berkeley, on March 29, 1940. Left to right: Ernest O. Lawrence, Arthur H. Compton, Vannevar Bush, James B. Conant, Karl T. Compton, and Alfred L. Loomis. The photograph is reprinted in Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr., The New World, 1939-1946: Volume I, A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission (Washington: U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1972), opposite page 33.

27

Manhattan Project: Potsdam Note  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

POTSDAM NOTE POTSDAM NOTE Potsdam, Germany (July 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery Note written by President Harry S. Truman, in which he brags that Stalin did not understand when Truman hinted at Potsdam of a powerful new American weapon. (Scroll down to see the note.) Due to the success of Soviet espionage, however, Truman was incorrect-in fact, Stalin knew about the atomic bomb project three years before Truman did. Truman wrote this note on the back of a photograph of the Potsdam Conference taken on July 19, 1945. In the photograph Stalin talks with Truman and Secretary of State James Byrnes (both have their backs to the camera). The photograph of Potsdam is courtesy the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, War Department, U.S. Army; this image, and the photograph of Truman's writing on the back of it, are courtesy the National Archives.

28

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SMALL) SMALL) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If you have a fast internet connection, you may wish to click here for a photo gallery with larger versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

29

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If this page is taking a long time to load, click here for a photo gallery with smaller versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

30

Manhattan Project: Informing the Public, August 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Smyth Report, August 1945. INFORMING THE PUBLIC The Smyth Report, August 1945. INFORMING THE PUBLIC (August 1945) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present The atomic bombing of Japan in early August 1945 suddenly thrust the Manhattan Project into the center of the public eye. What formerly had been privy to a select few now became the object of intense public curiosity and scrutiny. Manhattan Project officials, however, had no intent to release what they viewed as essential military secrets. To both allay inordinate inquisitiveness and satisfy the legitimate public need to know, officials in early 1944 began a carefully designed public relations program in anticipation of when they would have to announce the news to the world. They perceived that, from the standpoint of security, the release of some selected information would make it easier to maintain the secrecy of the highly classified aspects of the project. The public relations program had two parts: preparation of a series of public releases and preparation of an administrative and scientific history of the project.

31

The Manhattan Project National Security History Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Manhattan Project National Security History Series 5 Visit our Manhattan Project web site: http://www.cfo.doe.gov/me70/manhattan/index.htm 5 DOE/MA-0002 Revised F. G. Gosling Office of History and Heritage Resources Executive Secretariat Office of Management Department of Energy January 2010 The Manhattan Project National Security History Series 5 National Security History Series Volume I: The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb Volume II: Building the Nuclear Arsenal: Cold War Nuclear Weapons Development and Production, 1946-1989 (in progress) Volume III: Nonproliferation and Stockpile Stewardship: The Nuclear Weapons Complex in the Post-Cold War World (projected) The National Security History Series is a joint project of the Office

32

Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to to DOE Fuel Cell Manufacturing Workshop 2011 John Christensen, PE NREL Consultant DOE Fuel Cell Market Transformation Support August 11, 2011 Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project √ Identify manufacturing cost drivers to achieve affordability √ Identify best practices in fuel cell manufacturing technology √ Identify manufacturing technology gaps √ Identify FC projects to address these gaps MFCMP Objectives Completed Final Report due out Nov 2010 B2PCOE Montana Tech SME's Industry Academia Government FC Consortiums Power ranges * <0.5 kW (man portable / man wearable) * 0.5 kW< Power range < 10 kW (mobile power) Fuels: Hydrogen and reformed hydrocarbons *Packaged Fuels < 0.5 kW * Near term solution * Move through the supply chain like batteries

33

Manhattan Project: Solvay Physics Conference  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOLVAY PHYSICS CONFERENCE SOLVAY PHYSICS CONFERENCE Brussels, Belgium (October 1933) Resources > Photo Gallery Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, 1933 The Solvay Physics Conference, held in Brussels, Belgium, October 22-29, 1933. Attendees included two future key Manhattan Project scientists (Fermi and Lawrence), the future head of the Nazi atomic bomb program (Heisenberg), and numerous leading pre-war physicists. A partial list of those attending: Niels Bohr (seated, third from left) James Chadwick (seated, farthest right) J. B. Cockroft (middle row, third from right) Marie Curie (seated, fifth from left) Enrico Fermi (middle row, fifth from left) Werner Heisenberg (middle row, fourth from left) Ernest O. Lawrence (back row, second from right) Lise Meitner (seated, second from right)

34

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

35

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin, Yalta, Russia, February 9, 1945 FIRST STEPS TOWARD INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin, Yalta, Russia, February 9, 1945 FIRST STEPS TOWARD INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (1941-July 1945) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Throughout most of the Second World War, officials gave little consideration to the postwar atom. Even at the top echelons of government, few knew of the Manhattan Project, and among those who did the primary concern was the ultimate success of the bomb development and not possible impact of the bomb on postwar international relations. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Vannevar Bush, director of the Office of Science and Research and Development and perhaps the President’s closest adviser on the bomb, discussed "after-war control" on October 9, 1941, "at some length" but there was no follow-up.

36

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION (1949-Present) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Even before the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, many of the scientists of the Manhattan Project were arguing that international control of atomic energy was essential. Any modern, industrialized state, they reasoned, could eventually build its own atomic bomb if it so chose. There was no "secret" scientific theory or principle concerning the bomb. Its possibility was fundamental to modern physics. Then as now, the primary difficulties were engineering related: separating uranium-235 or producing plutonium and designing and building the actual weapon.

37

Work of Manhattan Project-era photographer Ed Westcott lives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Work of Manhattan ... Work of Manhattan Project-era photographer Ed Westcott lives on Posted: June 13, 2012 - 1:30pm Ed Westcott mans the shutter release for another historic...

38

Manhattan Project: Kasparov, Kamen, and Kheifits  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

KASPAROV, KAMEN, AND KHEIFITS KASPAROV, KAMEN, AND KHEIFITS California? (n.d.) Resources > Photo Gallery Kasparov, Kamen, and Kheifits This surveillance photograph was taken by Manhattan Project security officials. On the right is Gregory Kheifits (KHARON), the NKGB Resident in San Francisco from 1941 to July 1944. On the left is his successor, Gregory Kasparov (DAR). In between them is Martin Kamen, a chemist at the University of California, Berkeley's "Rad Lab." (Kamen was later dismissed as a "security risk.") The photo is courtesy the National Security Agency. For more on Kheifits and Kasparov, see "The Venona Story." See also "The Venona Intercepts, 1946-1980." See also the group photograph of the staff at the Rad Lab in 1939, which includes Kamen, Ernest O. Lawrence, Robert Oppenheimer, and numerous other Manhattan Project scientists. Lawrence is bottom row center; Kamen is over Lawrence's left shoulder; and Oppenheimer is over Kamen's right shoulder.

39

Manhattan Project National Historical Park | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project National Historical Park Manhattan Project National Historical Park Manhattan Project National Historical Park The Department, as the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, owns and manages the Federal properties at most of the major Manhattan Project sites, including Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico. For over a decade, the Department, in cooperation with other Federal agencies, state and local governments, and other stakeholders, has pursued the possibility of including its most significant Manhattan Project properties within a Manhattan Project National Historical Park. A panel of distinguished historic preservation experts convened in 2001 by the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation at the request of the Department of Energy recommended that the "ultimate goal" for

40

The Manhattan Project: An Interactive History  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, both journalists and the public ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the end of the Second World War as the top news stories of the twentieth-century. The advent of nuclear weapons, made possible by the Manhattan Project, not only helped bring an end to the Second World War-it ushered in the atomic age and determined how the next war, the Cold War, would be fought. The Manhattan Project: An Interactive History is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the Manhattan Project. Five main topical areas-Events, People, Places, Processes, and Science-are further divided into sub-sections, each with an introductory page and as many as a dozen or more sub-pages. The site is interactive in the sense that it is designed with the flexibility to meet the needs of a variety of users. Those seeking a brief overview of the Manhattan Project, for example, should start with the introductory pages for the eight sub-sections of the Events Section. Users wanting a more in-depth chronological history should read, in order, the fifty-six Events sub-pages. Numerous internal links within the content of the pages allows the reader to easily move from page to page, wherever his or her interests lead. There are thus multiple ways for the user to approach the site. In addition, the Resources Section provides access to a variety of resource materials, including photos, documents, maps, and published histories.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Manhattan Project: A Note on Sources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A NOTE ON SOURCES A NOTE ON SOURCES Resources > Note on Sources The text for this web site is a combination of original material and adaptations from previous publications of the Department of Energy (including contractors), its predecessor agencies (primarily the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District), and other government agencies. Adaptations run the gamut from summaries to close paraphrases to text being taken directly. This material was gathered and adapted for use by the DOE's Office of History and Heritage Resources. For detailed notes on what sources were used for any particular page, see the footnote at the bottom of the page or its entry in Sources and Notes. For a discussion of the best general sources on the Manhattan Project, see the Suggested Readings.

42

Manhattan Project: About the Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ABOUT THIS SITE ABOUT THIS SITE Resources Project Directors: Terrence R. Fehner, Chief Historian F. G. Gosling, former Chief Historian (retired) Assisted By: David Rezelman, Glenn T. Seaborg Fellow in Nuclear History Stephanie Young, Edward Teller Fellow in Science and National Security Studies Andrew Mamo, Edward Teller Fellow in Science and National Security Studies Emily Hamilton, Edward Teller Fellow in Science and National Security Studies Douglas O’Reagan, Edward Teller Fellow in Science and National Security Studies James Skee, Edward Teller Fellow in Science and National Security Studies Site Designer: Jennifer Johnson, Archivist Summary Words (estimate): 120,000 Total Pages if Printed (estimate): 430 Total Images: 500+ Photographs: 450+ Maps and Diagrams: 64 Total Images (counting varying sizes, etc.): 1,000+

43

Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb F.G. Gosling. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. DOE/MA-0002 Revised. Washington, D.C.: Department of Energy, 2010. 115 pp., with 38 pp. photo gallery). From the Forward to the 2010 Edition: "In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, journalists and historians ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the surrender of Japan to end the Second World War as the top story of the twentieth century. The advent of nuclear weapons, brought about by the Manhattan Project, not only helped bring an end to World War II but ushered in the atomic age and determined how the next war-the Cold War-would be fought. The Manhattan Project also became the organizational model behind

44

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

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Manhattan Project Resources | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manhattan Project Resources Manhattan Project Resources Manhattan Project Resources Building 9731 was the first building completed at Y-12 and was the "Pilot Plant" for the Calutron electromagnetic separation of uranium. The Manhattan Project web pages are designed to disseminate information and documentation on the Manhattan Project to a broad audience including scholars, students, and the general public. These web pages are a joint collaboration between DOE's Office of Classification and Office of History and Heritage Resources. The Y-12 History Center is proud to recommend them highly as they contain very helpful information. The site brings together an enormous amount of material, much of it never before released. An example of the key resource information provided is the update and

46

Manhattan Project: How to Navigate this Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

HOW TO NAVIGATE THIS SITE HOW TO NAVIGATE THIS SITE Resources > Navigation There are five main topical areas on this web site: Events, People, Places, Processes, and Science. These are further divided into sub-sections, each with its own introduction. The main topical areas can be accessed by clicking on a button on the horizontal bar above. Sub-sections can be accessed by clicking on a topic in the vertical column to your left. If you would like to begin with a quick survey of the Manhattan Project, try reading, in order, the eight Event sub-section pages, beginning with Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939. In addition to the main topical areas, the Resources section on the above button bar provides access to a variety of resource materials, including photos, documents, maps, and published histories.

47

Manhattan Project: Groves and the MED, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The summer of 1942 proved to be a troublesome one for the fledgling bomb project. Colonel James C. Marshall (right) received the assignment of directing the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Metals, or DSM, the military's initial cover name for the project. Marshall immediately moved from Syracuse, where he served in the Corps's Syracuse Engineer District, to New York City. Concerned that the name DSM would attract too much attention, the military set up the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), established by general order on August 13. Marshall, like most other Army officers, knew nothing of nuclear physics. Furthermore, Marshall and his Army superiors were disposed to move cautiously. In one case, for instance, Marshall delayed purchase of an excellent production site in Tennessee pending further study, while the scientists who had been involved in the project from the start were pressing for immediate purchase. Although Vannevar Bush had carefully managed the transition to Army control, there was not yet a mechanism to arbitrate disagreements between the S-1 Committee and the military. The resulting lack of coordination complicated attempts to gain a higher priority for scarce materials and boded ill for the future of the entire bomb project.

48

EA-1903: Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, 3: Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan, Kansas EA-1903: Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan, Kansas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use Congressional Directed funds to develop the Great Plains Wind Energy Consortium aimed at increasing the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation throughout the region. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 21, 2013 EA-1903: Notice of Extension Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan, Kansas September 11, 2013 EA-1903: Draft Environmental Assessment Kansas State University Zond Wind Energy Project, Manhattan, Kansas September 11, 2013

49

New Manhattan Project Resource Page Launched | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project Resource Page Launched Manhattan Project Resource Page Launched New Manhattan Project Resource Page Launched July 16, 2013 - 5:48pm Addthis General Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer are pictured here at the Trinity Test site in New Mexico, 1945. General Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer are pictured here at the Trinity Test site in New Mexico, 1945. Terry Fehner Terry Fehner Historian, Federal Preservation Officer Andy Weston-Dawkes Director of the Office of Classification What are the key facts? From Trinity to today -- learn about the Department's direct connection with the Manhattan Project here. Sixty-eight years ago today, on an isolated corner of the Alamogordo Bombing Range in southern New Mexico, the atomic age began. At precisely 5:30 a.m., a device fueled with about 13½ pounds of plutonium, in a weapon

50

MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

PARK MANHATTAN PROJECT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK Shift change at the Y-12 facility in Oak Ridge, TN, where uranium-235 was separated from uranium-238. August 1945. Shift change...

51

Manhattan Project: Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer EVALUATIONS OF TRINITY Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer EVALUATIONS OF TRINITY (July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Only minutes after the world's first ever atomic explosion, Leslie Groves and Robert Oppenheimer (above) began composing their report for the Secretary of War and President Truman. There was a sense of urgency surrounding this notification, as Truman had already arrived at Potsdam (outside of Berlin) to confer with other Allied leaders on the conclusion of the war with Japan. Now that the potential of the bomb had been proven, the calculations behind the Potsdam negotiations were dramatically different.

52

Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

McGehee, Ellen

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bernard Baruch presents the United States plan for international control of atomic energy to the United Nations, June 14, 1946. NEGOTIATING INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Bernard Baruch presents the United States plan for international control of atomic energy to the United Nations, June 14, 1946. NEGOTIATING INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (December 1945-1946) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present After American, British, and Canadian officials agreed at the November 1945 Washington meeting to a negotiating approach on international control, Secretary of State James F. Byrnes quickly arranged for the Big Three foreign ministers to meet in Moscow in mid-December. Atomic energy, which the Soviets placed last on a long list of agenda items, was discussed only in terms of the United Nations proposal. Surprising Byrnes with their willingness to cooperate, the Soviets acquiesced to the American proposal, which was based on the Washington joint declaration, but with one exception. They agreed that the commission should be set up by the United Nations General Assembly, but, counter to the American plan, they insisted that the commission report to the Security Council and be accountable to it "in matters affecting security." This was no mere procedural difference. Most of the members in the General Assembly, where decisions were made by majority rule, were more closely aligned to the United States than to the Soviet Union. In the Security Council, the Soviet Union possessed the veto and could effectively halt any commission actions that it found objectionable.

54

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes arrive at the Gatow Airport in Berlin for the Potsdam Conference, July 15, 1945. SEARCH FOR A POLICY ON INTERNATIONAL CONTROL Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes arrive at the Gatow Airport in Berlin for the Potsdam Conference, July 15, 1945. SEARCH FOR A POLICY ON INTERNATIONAL CONTROL (August to November 1945) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present In the immediate aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, President Harry S. Truman and his top officials viewed the Soviet Union as the primary stumbling block in the move toward international control of the atomic bomb. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes represented the two poles of an uncertain and divided policy. Despite his ongoing misgivings concerning the Soviets, Stimson determined that unless the United States offered full partnership in the development of atomic energy the Soviet Union would begin "a secret armament race of a rather desperate character." Byrnes, on the eve of the first postwar foreign ministers conference to be held in London, remained adamant in opposition to any attempt to cooperate with the Soviets on atomic energy and viewed the bomb as a diplomatic asset that would make the Soviets more amenable. As Stimson observed in his diary, Byrnes went to London fully set on having "the implied threat of the bomb in his pocket during the conference."

55

Manhattan Project: Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Entrance to the Los Alamos "Tech Area" ESTABLISHING LOS ALAMOS Entrance to the Los Alamos "Tech Area" ESTABLISHING LOS ALAMOS (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1942-1943) Events > Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Map of Los Alamos, New Mexico. The final link in the Manhattan Project's far-flung network was the bomb research and development laboratory at Los Alamos, located in the mountains of northern New Mexico. Codenamed "Project Y," the laboratory that designed and fabricated the first atomic bombs began to take shape in spring 1942 when James Conant suggested to Vannevar Bush that the Office of Scientific and Research Development and the Army form a committee to study bomb development. Bush agreed and forwarded the recommendation to Vice President Henry Wallace, Secretary of War Henry Stimson, and General George Marshall (the Top Policy Group). By the time of his appointment in late September, Leslie Groves had orders to set up a committee to study military applications of the bomb. Meanwhile, sentiment was growing among the Manhattan Project scientists that research on the bomb project needed to be better coordinated. Robert Oppenheimer, among others, advocated a central facility where theoretical and experimental work could be conducted according to standard scientific protocols. This would insure accuracy and speed progress. Oppenheimer suggested that the bomb design laboratory operate secretly in an isolated area but allow free exchange of ideas among the scientists on the staff. Groves accepted Oppenheimer's suggestion and began seeking an appropriate location. By the end of the year, they had settled on an unlikely site for the laboratory: an isolated boys' school on a mesa high in the Jemez Mountains (map at left).

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Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production complex at Hanford. The "boxy" building between the two water towers on the right is the plutonium production reactor; the long building in the center of the photograph is the water treatment plant. The photograph was reproduced from Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted."

57

Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone Recovery Act milestone: Excavation begins at Manhattan Project landfill The six-acre site contains a series of trenches used from 1944 to 1948 to dispose of hazardous and non-hazardous trash from Manhattan Project labs and buildings. July 1, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

58

Manhattan Project: Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE The Smyth Report, August 1945. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND THE PUBLIC'S RIGHT TO KNOW Resources > Openness Given ongoing concerns with terrorism and nuclear proliferation, a word about secrecy, the information presented on this web site, and the public's right to know is in order. The information on this web site is currently available, and has long been available, in any major university library. The basic story of the Manhattan Project was first released to the public in August 1945 in the "Smyth Report" (right), a book-length study of the Manhattan Project. It was personally reviewed by Leslie Groves, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest O. Lawrence, and others, to ensure that it contained no information that would be of assistance to anyone who might try to build a nuclear weapon. The information from the Smyth Report and other contemporary MED press releases has been supplemented in subsequent years by numerous other histories of the Manhattan Project, including a comprehensive official history produced by the Atomic Energy Henry D. Smyth confers with Ernest O. Lawrence about the Smyth Report, Berkeley, fall 1944. Commission (AEC) historians Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson, Jr. As for the most potentially-sensitive category of entries on this web site, "Science," most of the text for these entries was taken directly from an unclassified 1963 AEC publication, The Atomic Energy Deskbook. Created under the personal supervision of AEC Chairman Glenn T. Seaborg, the Deskbook was intended from the start to be a reference work for the public. The intent of all of these publications was to reveal what could be revealed and to keep secret what needed to be kept secret. Accordingly, this web site has been reviewed by the Department of Energy's Office of Classification and confirmed to be unclassified. (For more information on Manhattan Project-related publications, see the list of "Suggested Readings.")

59

Manhattan Project: The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Diffusion columns, S-50 Thermal Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, 1945. THE NAVY AND THERMAL DIFFUSION Diffusion columns, S-50 Thermal Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, 1945. THE NAVY AND THERMAL DIFFUSION (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 As problems with both Y-12 and K-25 reached crisis proportions in spring and summer 1944, the Manhattan Project received help from an unexpected source: the United States Navy. President Roosevelt had instructed that the atomic bomb effort be an Army program and that the Navy be excluded from deliberations. Navy research on atomic power, conducted primarily for submarines, received no direct aid from Leslie Groves, who, in fact, was not up-to-date on the state of Navy efforts when he received a letter on the subject from Robert Oppenheimer late in April 1944.

60

Manhattan Project: The "Big House"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THE "BIG HOUSE" THE "BIG HOUSE" Los Alamos Boys Ranch School and Los Alamos (The Town) Resources > Photo Gallery The "Big House," Los Alamos. The "Big House" was the dormitory for the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School. Students slept year-round on its unheated porches. During the Manhattan Project, the Big House contained, among other things, a library, the Chaplain's Office, and the Red Cross headquarters. Privileged guests and high-ranking civilians also sometimes stayed there. The photograph above is reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society), 58. The photograph below is of a group of Ranch School students in front of the Big House; it is reproduced from "Dateline: Los Alamos," a special issue of the monthly publication of Los Alamos National Laboratory (1995), 7. At the bottom is an "establishing shot" of Los Alamos in which Fuller Lodge and the Big House are visible in the distance to the left and the right, respectively; click here for more information on this photograph.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Manhattan Project: Adventures Inside the Atom  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM General Electric, National Archives (1948) Resources > Library Below is Adventures Inside the Atom, a comic book history of nuclear energy that was produced in 1948 by the General Electric Company. Scroll down to view the full-size images of each page. This publication was produced at the request of the the Assistant Manager for Public Education, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission. It is reproduced here via the National Archives. Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 1 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 2 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 3 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 4 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 5 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 6 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 7 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 8 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 9

62

Manhattan Project: Picking Horses, November 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

General Leslie Groves PICKING HORSES General Leslie Groves PICKING HORSES (November 1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Leslie Groves (right) moved swiftly to make good on his new timetable by scheduling a decisive meeting of the Military Policy Committee for November 12, 1942, and of the S-1 Executive Committee for November 14. The scientists at each of the institutions doing isotope separation research knew these meetings would determine the uranium-235 separation method to be used in the bomb project; therefore, the keen competition among the institutions added to the sense of urgency created by the war. Ernest Lawrence's team working on the electromagnetic method at the University of California, Berkeley, remained the most optimistic team working on uranium enrichment. The gaseous diffusion research being conducted at Columbia University continued to meet serious difficulties, but it was still considered a viable option. The big loser of the November meetings was the centrifuge process, which was finally dropped from consideration.

63

Manhattan Project: Y-12 Construction, 1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Groundbreaking for Y-12, Oak Ridge Y-12: CONSTRUCTION Groundbreaking for Y-12, Oak Ridge Y-12: CONSTRUCTION (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1943) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 Groundbreaking for the Alpha plant of the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant took place at Oak Ridge on February 18, 1943 (right). Soon blueprints could not be produced fast enough to keep up with construction as Stone & Webster labored to meet Leslie Groves's deadline. The Beta facility was actually begun before formal authorization. While laborers were aggressively recruited, there was always a shortage of workers skilled Y-12 construction, Oak Ridge enough to perform jobs according to the rigid specifications. (A further complication was that some tasks could be performed only by workers with security clearances.) Huge amounts of material had to be obtained (38 million board feet of lumber, for instance), and the magnets needed so much copper for windings that the Army had to borrow almost 15,000 tons of silver bullion from the United States Treasury to fabricate into strips and wind on to coils as a substitute for copper. Treasury silver was also used to manufacture the busbars that ran around the top of the racetracks.

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Manhattan Project: The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

American troops approaching the beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944. THE WAR ENTERS ITS FINAL PHASE American troops approaching the beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944. THE WAR ENTERS ITS FINAL PHASE (1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Harry Truman being sworn in as president, April 12, 1945. On April 12, 1945, only weeks before Germany's unconditional surrender on May 7, President Franklin Roosevelt died suddenly in Warm Springs, Georgia. Vice President Harry S. Truman, a veteran of the United States Senate, was now president. Truman had not been privy to many of Roosevelt's internal policy deliberations and had to be briefed extensively in his first weeks in office. One of these briefings, provided by Secretary of War Henry Stimson on April 25, concerned S-1 (the Manhattan Project). Stimson, with Leslie Groves present during part of the meeting, traced the history of the Manhattan Project, summarized its status, and detailed the timetable for testing and combat delivery. Truman asked numerous questions during the forty-five minute meeting and made it clear that he understood the relevance of the atomic bomb to upcoming diplomatic and military initiatives.

65

Manhattan Project: Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity test radiation safety team SAFETY AND THE TRINITY TEST Trinity test radiation safety team SAFETY AND THE TRINITY TEST (Trinity Test Site, July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Bunker at S-10,000 The "Trinity" atomic test was the most violent man-made explosion in history to that date. It also posed the single most significant safety hazard of the entire Manhattan Project. Understanding this, test planners chose a flat, desert scrub region in the northwest corner of the isolated Alamogordo Bombing Range in south central New Mexico for the test. This location, 210 miles south of Los Alamos, was only twenty miles from the nearest offsite habitation. If the explosion was considerably larger than predicted, the dangers could be extreme to the test personnel and surrounding areas.

66

Manhattan Project: Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity, July 16, 1945 DAWN OF THE ATOMIC ERA (1945) Events The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 As the war entered its final phase, the Manhattan Project became an increasingly important and controversial element in American strategy. Debate over how to use the bomb began in earnest in early summer of 1945. The Trinity atomic test of July 16 (right) confirmed that the stakes for this decision were very high. With a blast equivalent of approximately 21 kilotons of TNT, the test explosion was greater than had been predicted, and the dispersal of radioactive fallout following the test made safety something of a near thing. News of the success at Trinity reached President Harry S. Truman at the Potsdam Conference.

67

Manhattan Project: Postscript--The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE (1945-Present) Events Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joe 1, the first Soviet atomic test, August 29, 1949. The end of the Second World War brought with it a whole new set of issues and problems, not least of which was the dilemma of what to do with the nuclear genie now that he had been let out of the bottle. In the United States, and around the world, news of the atomic bomb created among the public a sense of shock and awe. Manhattan Engineer District officials took certain obvious steps such as slowing down the program from its wartime pace, but the assembly of additional nuclear weapons did quietly continue.

68

Manhattan Project: Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl Compton, and Alfred Loomis, Berkeley, 1940 DEBATE OVER HOW TO USE THE BOMB Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl Compton, and Alfred Loomis, Berkeley, 1940 DEBATE OVER HOW TO USE THE BOMB (Washington, D.C., Late Spring 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, and Ernest Lawrence In early May 1945, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, with the approval of President Harry S. Truman, formed an Interim Committee of top officials charged with recommending the proper use of atomic weapons in wartime and developing a position for the United States on postwar atomic policy. Stimson headed the advisory group composed of Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl T. Compton, Under Secretary of the Navy Ralph A. Bard, Assistant Secretary of State William L. Clayton, and future Secretary of State James F. Byrnes. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, Arthur Compton, and Ernest Lawrence served as scientific advisors (the Scientific Panel), while General George Marshall represented the military. The committee met on May 31 and then again the next day with leaders from the business side of the Manhattan Project, including Walter S. Carpenter of DuPont, James C. White of Tennessee Eastman, George H. Bucher of Westinghouse, and James A. Rafferty of Union Carbide.

69

Manhattan Project: Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Norris Bradbury, Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Feynman, Enrico Fermi, and others, Los Alamos, 1946 BASIC RESEARCH AT LOS ALAMOS Norris Bradbury, Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Feynman, Enrico Fermi, and others, Los Alamos, 1946 BASIC RESEARCH AT LOS ALAMOS (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Enrico Fermi The first few months at Los Alamos were occupied with briefings on nuclear physics for the technical staff and with planning research priorities and organizing the laboratory. Leslie Groves called once again on Warren Lewis to head a committee, this time to evaluate the Los Alamos program. The committee's recommendations resulted in the coordinated effort envisioned by those who advocated a unified laboratory for bomb research. Enrico Fermi (left) took control of critical mass experiments and standardization of measurement Hans Bethe techniques. Plutonium purification work, begun at the Met Lab, became high priority at Los Alamos, and increased attention was paid to metallurgy. The committee also recommended that an engineering division be organized to collaborate with physicists on bomb design and fabrication. The laboratory was thus organized into four divisions: theoretical (Hans A. Bethe, right); experimental physics (Robert F. Bacher); chemistry and metallurgy (Joseph W. Kennedy); and ordnance (Navy Captain William S. "Deke" Parsons). Like other Manhattan Project installations, Los Alamos soon began to expand beyond initial expectations.

70

Special Resource Study/Environmental Assessment for Manhattan Project Sites, DOE/EA-1868 (September 2010)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this study is to comply with the Manhattan Project National Historical Park Study Act (Public Law 108-340), passed in 2004, which directed the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a...

71

Manhattan Project: The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF NAGASAKI Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF NAGASAKI (Nagasaki, Japan, August 9, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 The next break in the weather over Japan was due to appear just three days after the attack on Hiroshima, to be followed by at least five more days of prohibitive weather. The plutonium implosion bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man," was rushed into readiness to take advantage of this window. No further orders were required for the attack. Truman's order of July 25th had authorized the dropping of additional bombs as soon as they were ready. At 3:47 a.m. on August 9, 1945, a B-29 named Bock's Car lifted off from Tinian and headed toward the primary target: Kokura Arsenal, a massive collection of war industries adjacent to the city of Kokura.

72

Manhattan Project: Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Japanese envoys arrive on board the U.S.S. Missouri for the surrender ceremony, Tokyo Bay, September 2, 1945. JAPAN SURRENDERS Japanese envoys arrive on board the U.S.S. Missouri for the surrender ceremony, Tokyo Bay, September 2, 1945. JAPAN SURRENDERS (August 10-15, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Prior to the atomic attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, elements existed within the Japanese government that were trying to find a way to end the war. In June and July 1945, Japan attempted to enlist the help of the Soviet Union to serve as an intermediary in negotiations. No direct communication occurred with the United States about peace talks, but American leaders knew of these maneuvers because the United States for a long time had been intercepting and decoding many internal Japanese diplomatic communications. From these intercepts, the United States learned that some within the Japanese government advocated outright surrender. A few diplomats overseas cabled home to urge just that.

73

Manhattan Project: The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA (Hiroshima, Japan, August 6, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 In the early morning hours of August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber named Enola Gay took off from the island of Tinian and headed north by northwest toward Japan. The bomber's primary target was the city of Hiroshima, located on the deltas of southwestern Honshu Island facing the Inland Sea. Hiroshima had a civilian population of almost 300,000 and was an important military center, containing about 43,000 soldiers.

74

Manhattan Project: Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, 1944 OAK RIDGE AND HANFORD COME THROUGH Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, 1944 OAK RIDGE AND HANFORD COME THROUGH (Oak Ridge [Clinton] and Hanford, 1944-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 None of Los Alamos's bomb design work would be of any use if Oak Ridge or Hanford did not come through with enough uranium-235 or plutonium for at least one bomb. Spending on the Manhattan Project reached $100 million per month by mid-1944, yet it was still far from clear that enough of either fissionable substance could be produced before war's end. In the summer of 1944, Oak Ridge's Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant (above) was plagued by operational problems, and the ongoing barrier crisis at the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant threatened to render it useless. At Hanford, the first production reactor had not yet been completed. In addition, officials feared that not enough of the uranium-containing slugs to feed the pile would be available. Even assuming that enough uranium or plutonium could be delivered by Oak Ridge or Hanford, there was no guarantee that the Los Alamos laboratory would be able to design and fabricate weapons in time. Only the most optimistic in the Manhattan Project would have predicted, as Groves did when he met with Marshall in August of 1944, that a bomb or bombs powerful enough to make a difference in the current war would be ready by August 1, 1945.

75

Manhattan Project: Implosion Becomes a Necessity, Los Alamos, 1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Implosion IMPLOSION BECOMES A NECESSITY Implosion IMPLOSION BECOMES A NECESSITY (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 An early implosion experiment, Los Alamos, 1944 Because the gun-type bomb design seemed so simple and practical, Deke Parsons had assigned implosion studies a low priority and placed the emphasis on the more familiar artillery method. Consequently, Seth H. Neddermeyer performed his early implosion tests in relative obscurity. Neddermeyer found it difficult to achieve symmetrical implosions at the low velocities he had achieved. When the Princeton mathematician John von Neumann, a Hungarian refugee, visited Los Alamos late in 1943, he suggested that high-speed assembly and high velocities would prevent predetonation and achieve more symmetrical explosions. A relatively small, subcritical mass could be placed under so much pressure by a symmetrical implosion that an efficient detonation would occur. Less fissionable material would be required, bombs could be ready earlier, and extreme purification of plutonium would be unnecessary. Von Neumann's theories excited Robert Oppenheimer, who assigned Parsons's deputy, George B. Kistiakowsky, the task of perfecting implosion techniques. (Kistiakowsky would later become President Dwight D. Eisenhower's science adviser.) Because Parsons and Neddermeyer did not get along, it was Kistiakowsky who worked with the scientists on the implosion project.

76

Manhattan Project: Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Eric Jette, Charles Critchfield, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, Los Alamos BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER Eric Jette, Charles Critchfield, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, Los Alamos BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER (1942-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 No matter how much enriched uranium and plutonium might be produced at Oak Ridge and Hanford, it would all come to nothing if workable weapon designs could not be developed in time. To this end, in late 1942 Leslie Groves established a bomb research and development laboratory at Los Alamos in the remote mountains of northern New Mexico. The early work at Los Alamos concentrated primarily on defining the problems that needed to be solved. Basic research on a variety of theoretical issues continued throughout 1943. By 1944, it had become clear that, while a simple and reliable "gun-type" design could be used for a uranium bomb, the considerably more complicated implosion method would be required to produce a plutonium weapon. With the successful Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer Allied landings in France on "D-Day," June 6, 1944, the war in Europe appeared to be entering its final phase. Germany ceased to be the primary intended target. General Groves and his advisers turned their sights on Japan, and the rush was on to complete the atomic bomb in time to end the war in the Pacific.

77

Manhattan Project: The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity test, July 16, 1945 THE TRINITY TEST Trinity test, July 16, 1945 THE TRINITY TEST (Trinity Test Site, July 16, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Bunker at S-10,000 Until the atomic bomb could be tested, doubt would remain about its effectiveness. The world had never seen a nuclear explosion before, and estimates varied widely on how much energy would be released. Some scientists at Los Alamos continued privately to have doubts that it would work at all. There was only enough weapons-grade uranium available for one bomb, and confidence in the gun-type design was high, so on July 14, 1945, most of the uranium bomb ("Little Boy") began its trip westward to the Pacific without its design having ever been fully tested. A test of the plutonium bomb seemed vital, however, both to confirm its novel implosion design and to gather data on nuclear explosions in general. Several plutonium bombs were now "in the pipeline" and would be available over the next few weeks and months. It was therefore decided to test one of these.

78

Manhattan Project: The Cold War, 1945-1990  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

West Berliner talks to the East, Berlin Wall, November 1962 THE COLD WAR West Berliner talks to the East, Berlin Wall, November 1962 THE COLD WAR (1945-1990) Events > Postscript -- The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joseph Stalin (with Vyacheslav Molotov), February 1945 The postwar organization of atomic energy took place against the backdrop of growing tension with the Soviet Union. Relations between the United States and the Soviet Union had been strained ever since the revolution of 1917 had first brought communists to power in Russia. This mutual distrust further deepened following the Soviet "non-aggression" treaty with Nazi Germany in August 1939 and the Soviet Union's subsequent invasions of Poland, Finland, and the Baltic Republics. Although Britain was allied with the Soviet Union following Germany's June 1941 invasion of Russia, as was the United States in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, mutual suspicion lingered throughout the Second World War. The failure of the United States and Britain to tell the Soviet Union about the atomic bomb in anything other than the most vague terms only heightened the extreme suspicions of the Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin (right). Not only did the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki help end the Second World War, but they also played a role in setting the stage for the half-century of conflict with the Soviet Union that followed it -- the Cold War.

79

The Manhattan Project By Terrence R. Fehner and F.G. Gosling  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project Manhattan Project By Terrence R. Fehner and F.G. Gosling April 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, both journalists and the public ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the end of the Second World War as the top news stories of the twentieth-century. The Manhattan Project is the story of some of the most renowned scientists of the century combining with industry, the military, and tens of thousands of ordinary Americans working at sites across the country to translate original

80

Mitigation of Selected Hanford Site Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first time that Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts from the Hanford Site have been assembled within a publication. The publication presents photographic and written documentation of a number of Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts that were identified and tagged during assessment walk throughs of historic buildings on the Hanford Site but which could not be curated within the Hanford collection because they were too large for long-term storage and/or exhibit purposes or were radiologically contaminated. The significance of the artifacts in this publication and a proposed future appendix is based not on the individual significance of any single artifact but on their collective contribution to the science and engineering of creating plutonium and advancing nuclear technology in nuclear fuel and power.

Kennedy, Ellen P.; Harvey, David W.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Manhattan Project buildings and facilities at the Hanford Site: A construction history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document thoroughly examines the role that the Hanford Engineer Works played in the Manhattan project. The historical aspects of the buildings and facilities are characterized. An in depth look at the facilities, including their functions, methods of fabrication and appearance is given for the 100 AREAS, 200 AREAS, 300 AREAS, 500, 800 and 900 AREAS, 600 AREA, 700 AREA, 1100 AREA and temporary construction structures.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Workers Safely Tear Down Towers at Manhattan Project Site | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

uncontaminated and in a non-posted area. Addthis Related Articles Oak Ridge's K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. Oak Ridge's...

83

Manhattan Project: CP-1 Goes Critical, Met Lab, December 2, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Painting of CP-1 going critical CP-1 GOES CRITICAL Painting of CP-1 going critical CP-1 GOES CRITICAL (Met Lab, December 2, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 While arrangements were proceeding for the construction of full-size plutonium production reactors, critical questions remained about their basic design. The Italian physicist Enrico Fermi hoped to answer some of these questions with CP-1, his experimental "Chicago Pile #1" at the University of Chicago. On December 2, 1942, after a series of frustrating delays, CP-1 first achieved a self-sustaining fission chain reaction. After the end of the war, Leslie Groves, commander of the Manhattan Project, described the first time CP-1 went critical as the single most important scientific event in the development of atomic power.

84

Manhattan Project: Production Reactor (Pile) Design, Met Lab, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge PRODUCTION REACTOR (PILE) DESIGN (Met Lab, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 By 1942, scientists had established that some of the uranium exposed to radioactivity in a reactor (pile) would eventually decay into plutonium, which could then be separated by chemical means from the uranium. Important theoretical research on this was ongoing, but the work was scattered at various universities from coast to coast. In early 1942, Arthur Compton arranged for all pile research to be moved to the Met Lab at the University of Chicago.

85

Manhattan Project: Y-12: Design, 1942-1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Lawrence slumps in his chair from fatigue in front of a cyclotron control panel while conducting calutron-related experiments, Berkeley, 1943. Y-12: DESIGN Ernest Lawrence slumps in his chair from fatigue in front of a cyclotron control panel while conducting calutron-related experiments, Berkeley, 1943. Y-12: DESIGN (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1942-1943) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 Although the Lewis Report had placed gaseous diffusion ahead of the electromagnetic approach, many were still betting in early 1943 that Ernest Lawrence (right) and his "calutron" would eventually predominate. Lawrence and his laboratory of mechanics at the University of California, Berkeley, continued to experiment with the giant 184-inch cyclotron magnet, trying to reach a consensus on which shims, sources, and Electromagnetic method for the enrichment of uranium collectors to incorporate into the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant that was to be built at Oak Ridge. Research on magnet size and placement and beam resolution led Lawrence and his group in fall 1942 to propose an arrangement of huge electromagnetic coils connected by a bus bar in an oval racetrack configuration, as seen from above. Forty-eight gaps in the racetrack between the coils would each contain two vacuum tanks. With two racetracks per building, ten buildings would be necessary to provide the estimated 2,000 sources and collectors needed to separate 100 grams of uranium-235 daily. The Berkeley researchers hoped that improvements in calutron design, or placing multiple sources and collectors in each tank, might increase efficiency and reduce the number of tanks and buildings required, but experimental results were inconclusive even as Stone & Webster of Boston, the Y-12 contractor at Oak Ridge, prepared to break ground.

86

Manhattan Project: Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION (Germany and Japan, 1938-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 For most of the Second World War, scientists and administrators of the Manhattan Project firmly believed that they were in a race with Germany to develop the atomic bomb. As it turns out, the German atomic program did not come close to developing a useable weapon. Allied planners were only able to confirm this, however, through the ALSOS intelligence mission to Europe toward the end of the war. Atomic research was also conducted in Japan, but as was suspected by the Allies, it did not get very far.

87

Manhattan Project: Early Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Little Boy at Tinian Island, August 1945 EARLY BOMB DESIGN Little Boy at Tinian Island, August 1945 EARLY BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944) Events > Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Early work on the design of the atomic bomb began even as scientists continued to arrive at Los Alamos throughout 1943. The properties of uranium were reasonably well understood, those of plutonium less so, and knowledge of fission explosions entirely theoretical. That 2.2 secondary neutrons were produced when uranium-235 fissioned was accepted, but while Glenn Seaborg's team had proven in March 1941 that plutonium underwent neutron-induced fission, it was not known yet if plutonium released secondary neutrons during bombardment. Further, the exact sizes of the "cross sections" of various fissionable substances had yet to be determined in experiments using the various particle accelerators then being shipped to Los Alamos. The theoretical consensus was that fission Fission chain reaction chain reactions (left) did take place with sufficient speed to produce powerful releases of energy (and not simply result in the explosion of the critical mass itself), but only experiments could test this theory. The optimum size of the critical mass remained to be established, as did the optimum shape. When enough data were gathered to establish optimum critical mass, optimum effective mass still had to be determined. That is, it was not enough simply to start a chain reaction in a critical mass; it was necessary to start one in a mass that would release the greatest possible amount of energy before it was destroyed in the explosion.

88

Manhattan Project: Potsdam and the Final Decision to Use the Bomb, July  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Joseph Stalin, Harry Truman, and Winston Churchill at the Potsdam Conference, July 1945 POTSDAM AND THE FINAL DECISION TO USE THE BOMB Joseph Stalin, Harry Truman, and Winston Churchill at the Potsdam Conference, July 1945 POTSDAM AND THE FINAL DECISION TO USE THE BOMB (Potsdam, Germany, July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Potsdam, July 19, 1945. Truman wrote a note on the back of the photograph in which he states incorrectly that Stalin did not know about the atomic bomb. After President Harry S. Truman received word of the success of the Trinity test, his need for the help of the Soviet Union in the war against Japan was greatly diminished. The Soviet leader, Joseph Stalin, had promised to join the war against Japan by August 15th. Truman and his advisors now were not sure they wanted this help. If use of the atomic bomb made victory possible without an invasion, then accepting Soviet help would only invite them into the discussions regarding the postwar fate of Japan. During the second week of Allied deliberations at Potsdam, on the evening of July 24, 1945, Truman approached Stalin without an interpreter and, as casually as he could, told him that the United States had a "new weapon of unusual destructive force." Stalin showed little interest, replying only that he hoped the United States would make "good use of it against the Japanese." The reason for Stalin's composure became clear later: Soviet intelligence had been receiving information about the atomic bomb program since fall 1941.

89

Manhattan Project: Final Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 American troops approaching the beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944. Late in 1944, Los Alamos began to shift from research to development and bomb production. Increased production at Oak Ridge and Hanford seemed to promise that enough plutonium and enriched uranium would be available for at least one bomb using each. Germany no longer was the intended primary target. The war in Europe (left) appeared to be entering its final phase, and evidence uncovered by the ALSOS mission in November 1944 indicated that the German atomic program had not gone beyond the research phase. Already by summer 1944, Groves and his advisers had turned their sights toward Japan. The atomic bomb would justify the years of effort, including both the vast expenditures and the judgment of everyone responsible, by bringing the war in the Pacific to a fiery end. J. Robert Oppenheimer Ongoing problems continued to complicate the efforts of Robert Oppenheimer (right) to finalize bomb design. Foremost among these were continuing personnel shortages, particularly of physicists, and supply difficulties. The procurement system, designed to protect the secrecy of the Los Alamos project, led to frustrating delays and, when Herb Lehr, SED, holding the Gadget's core, July 1945. combined with persistent late war shortages, proved a constant headache. The lack of contact between the remote laboratory and its supply sources exacerbated the problem, as did the relative lack of experience the academic scientists had with logistical matters. Leslie Groves and James Conant were determined not to let mundane problems compromise the bomb effort, and in fall 1944 they made several changes to prevent this possibility. Conant shipped as many scientists as could be spared from the Met Lab and Oak Ridge to Los Alamos, hired every civilian machinist he could lay his hands on, and arranged for Army enlisted men to supplement the work force (these GIs were known as SEDS ("Special Engineering Detachment"). Hartley Rowe, an experienced industrial engineer, provided help in easing the transition from research to production. Los Alamos also arranged for a rocket research team at the California Institute of Technology to aid in procurement, test fuses, and contribute to component development. These changes kept Los Alamos on track as design work reached its final stages.

90

Manhattan Project: DuPont and Hanford, Hanford Engineer Works, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The president of DuPont, Walter Carpenter, with Generals Levin H. Campbell, Everett Hughes, and Charles T. Harris. DUPONT AND HANFORD The president of DuPont, Walter Carpenter, with Generals Levin H. Campbell, Everett Hughes, and Charles T. Harris. DUPONT AND HANFORD (Hanford Engineer Works, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 The scientists of the Met Lab had the technical expertise to design a production pile, but construction and management on an industrial scale required an outside contractor. The DuPont Corporation was an ideal candidate, but the giant chemical firm was hesitant to join the project due to concern over accusations that it had profiteered during World War I. On October 3, 1942, DuPont agreed to design and build the chemical separation plant for the production pile facility then planned for Oak Ridge. Leslie Groves tried to entice further DuPont participation by having the firm prepare an appraisal of the pile (reactor) project and by placing three DuPont staff members on the Lewis Committee. DuPont ultimately agreed to become the primary contractor for plutonium-related work, but because of continuing sensitivity about its public image its contract called for a total payment of only dollar over actual costs. In addition, DuPont vowed to stay out of the bomb business after the war and offered all patents to the United States government.

91

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

92

Manhattan Project: A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb<!--Include title  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB Washington, D.C.(1941-1942) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 Vannevar Bush moved swiftly to take advantage of the positive MAUD Report. Without waiting for Arthur Compton's latest committee to finish its work confirming the MAUD Committee's conclusions, Bush on October 9, 1941, met with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Vice President Henry A. Wallace (who had been briefed on uranium research in July). Bush summarized the British findings, discussed cost and duration of a bomb project, and emphasized the uncertainty of the situation. He also received the President's permission to explore construction needs with the Army. Roosevelt instructed him to move as quickly as possible but not to go beyond research and development. Bush, then, was to find out if a bomb could be built and at what cost but not to proceed to the production stage without further presidential authorization. Roosevelt indicated that he could find a way to finance the project and asked Bush to draft a letter so that the British government could be approached "at the top.

93

Manhattan Project: Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge WORKING K-25 INTO THE MIX K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge WORKING K-25 INTO THE MIX (Oak Ridge: Clinton, 1943-1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 In 1941 and 1942, gaseous diffusion had been considered by many as the most promising method of enriching uranium. The British in the influential 1941 MAUD Report had advocated the use of gaseous diffusion alone, and the 1942 Lewis committee placed it first among isotope separation methods. Despite the soundness of the theory, the process had yet to produce any samples of enriched uranium when the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant was authorized in late 1942.

94

Manhattan Project: The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge THE URANIUM PATH TO THE BOMB Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge THE URANIUM PATH TO THE BOMB (1942-1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 The uranium path to the atomic bomb ran through Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Only if the new plants built at Oak Ridge produced enough enriched uranium-235 would a uranium bomb be possible. General Groves placed two methods into production: 1) electromagnetic, based on the principle that charged particles of the lighter isotope would be deflected more when passing through a magnetic field; and 2) gaseous diffusion, based on the principle that molecules of the lighter isotope, uranium-235, would pass more readily through a porous barrier. Full-scale electromagnetic and gaseous diffusion production plants were built at Oak Ridge at sites designated as "Y-12" and "K-25", respectively.

95

Manhattan Project: Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, Met Lab, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Glenn T. Seaborg looks through a microscope at the world's first sample of pure plutonium, Met Lab, August 20, 1942. SEABORG AND PLUTONIUM CHEMISTRY Glenn T. Seaborg looks through a microscope at the world's first sample of pure plutonium, Met Lab, August 20, 1942. SEABORG AND PLUTONIUM CHEMISTRY (Met Lab, 1942-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 While the Met Lab labored to make headway on pile (reactor) design, Glenn T. Seaborg (right) and his coworkers were trying to learn enough about transuranium chemistry to ensure that plutonium could be chemically separated from the uranium that would be irradiated in a production pile. Using lanthanum fluoride as a carrier, Seaborg isolated a weighable sample of plutonium in August 1942. At the same time, Isadore Perlman and William J. Knox explored the peroxide method of separation; John E. Willard studied various materials to determine which best adsorbed (gathered on its surface) plutonium; Theodore T. Magel and Daniel K. Koshland, Jr., researched solvent-extraction processes; and Harrison S. Brown and Orville F. Hill performed experiments into volatility reactions. Basic research on plutonium's chemistry continued as did work on radiation and fission products.

96

Manhattan Project: The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Painting of CP-1 going critical THE PLUTONIUM PATH TO THE BOMB Painting of CP-1 going critical THE PLUTONIUM PATH TO THE BOMB (1942-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 Plutonium, produced in a uranium-fueled reactor (pile), was the second path taken toward achieving an atomic bomb. Design work on a full-scale plutonium production reactor began at the Met Lab in June 1942. Scientists at the Met Lab had the technical expertise to design a production pile, but construction and management on an industrial scale required an outside contractor. General Groves convinced the DuPont Corporation to become the primary contractor for plutonium production. With input from the Met Lab and DuPont, Groves selected a site at Hanford, Washington, on the Columbia River, to build the full-scale production reactors.

97

Manhattan Project: Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge FINAL REACTOR DESIGN AND X-10 Schematic of the X-10 Graphite Reactor, Oak Ridge FINAL REACTOR DESIGN AND X-10 (Met Lab and Oak Ridge [Clinton], 1942-1943) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 Before any plutonium could be chemically separated from uranium for a bomb, however, that uranium would first have to be irradiated in a production pile. CP-1 had been a success as a scientific experiment, but the pile was built on such a small scale that recovering any significant amounts of plutonium from it was impractical. In the fall of 1942, scientists of the Met Lab had decided to build a second Fermi pile at Argonne as soon as his experiments on the first were completed and to proceed with the "Mae West" design for a helium-cooled production pile as well. When DuPont engineers assessed the Met Lab's plans in the late fall, they agreed that helium should be given first priority. They placed heavy water second and urged an all-out effort to produce more of this highly effective moderator. Bismuth and water were ranked third and fourth in DuPont's analysis. Priorities began to change when Enrico Fermi's CP-1 calculations demonstrated a higher value for the neutron reproduction factor k (for a theoretical reactor of infinite size) than anyone had anticipated. Met Lab scientists concluded that a water-cooled pile was now feasible. Crawford Greenewalt, head of the DuPont effort, continued, however, to support helium cooling.

98

Manhattan Project: Nagasaki  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NAGASAKI IMAGES NAGASAKI IMAGES Nagasaki, Japan (August 9, 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery Aerial photographs of the mushroom cloud forming over Nagasaki, August 9, 1945. The photographs are courtesy the Federation of American Scientists, except for the last one, which is courtesy the Office of War Information (via the National Archives). Scroll down to see each image separately. At the bottom is an additional photograph similar to the fourth photograph, courtesy the Library of Congress. (Click here for a 1.9 MB .tif version of the this image.) First Nagasaki Cloud Photograph Second Nagasaki Cloud Photograph Third Nagasaki Cloud Photograph Fourth Nagasaki Cloud Photograph Mushroom Cloud over Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Mushroom Cloud over Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Click on a link below to return to:

99

Manhattan Project: Blast  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Blast (Animation) Blast (Animation) Yucca Flat, Nevada (March 17, 1953) Resources > Photo Gallery Blast Animation The eight images above are a sequence of photographs of a house constructed 3,500 feet from "ground zero" at the Nevada Test Site being destroyed by the Annie test shot. The only source of light was the blast itself, detonated on March 17, 1953. The final image is two-and-one-third seconds after detonation. In the second image the house is actually on fire, but in the third image the fire has already been blown out by the blast. Annie, part of the "Upshot-Knothole" test series, had a yield of 16 kilotons, roughly the same size as the Trinity, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki explosions. Two photographs of the Annie mushroom cloud are at the bottom of this page.

100

Manhattan Project: Photo Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer PHOTO GALLERY Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer PHOTO GALLERY Resources Additional information is available regarding the following "animated gifs" and other photographs: Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Berkeley Meeting The "Big House" Blast (Animation) Events Images First Atomic Energy Commissioners Fuller Lodge F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex Hiroshima Images Image Retouching Kasparov, Kamen, and Kheifits Los Alamos Scientists Los Alamos Street Scene "Met Lab" Alumni Nagasaki Images Nixon and the Atomic Pioneers People Images Places Images Potsdam Note "Rad Lab" Staff S-1 Committee San Ildefonso Pueblo Party Science Images Solvay Physics Conference Tech Area Gallery (Large) Tech Area Gallery (Small) Trinity Images Trinity (Color Photograph)

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101

Manhattan Project: Places Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PLACES IMAGES PLACES IMAGES Resources > Photo Gallery Scroll down to see each of these images individually. The images are: 1. Remains of a Shinto Shrine, Nagasaki, October 1945 (courtesy the United States Marine Corps, Lieutenant R. J. Battersby, photographer, via the National Archives); 2. University of California, Berkeley, 1940 (courtesy the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); 3. Aerial photograph of the Trinity Site after the test (courtesy the Federation of American Scientists); 4. Aerial photograph of Hiroshima before the bombing; 5. Columbia University, 1903 (courtesy the Library of Congress; this photograph originated from the Detroit Publishing Company; it was a 1949 gift to the Library of Congress from the State Historical Society of Colorado).

102

Manhattan Project: Trinity Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IMAGES IMAGES Trinity Test Site (July 16, 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery The first 0.11 seconds of the Nuclear Age These seven photographs of the Trinity test were taken by time-lapse cameras. The last is 109 milliseconds, or 0.109 seconds, after detonation. Scroll down to view each individual image. The photographs are courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory, via the Federation of American Scientists web site. The animation is original to the Office of History and Heritage Resources. The dawn of the Nuclear Age (Trinity image #1) The dawn of the Nuclear Age Trinity image #2 Trinity image #3 Trinity image #4 Trinity image #5 Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #6) Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation Trinity, 0.11 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #7)

103

Manhattan Project: Events Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources Resources About this Site How to Navigate this Site Library Maps Note on Sources Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Photo Gallery Site Map Sources and Notes Suggested Readings EVENTS IMAGES Resources > Photo Gallery Page Content Here Scroll down to see each of these images individually. The images are: 1. Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard (courtesy the Federation of American Scientists); 2. Painting of CP-1 going critical (courtesy the National Archives); 3. An Alpha Racetrack inside the Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; 4. Eric Jette, Charles Critchfield, and J. Robert Oppenheimer, Los Alamos, New Mexico (this photograph is reprinted from Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos: Beginning of an Era, 1943-1945 (Los Alamos: Public Relations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, ca. 1967-1971), 20);

104

Manhattan Project: Science Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SCIENCE IMAGES SCIENCE IMAGES Resources > Photo Gallery Scroll down to see each of these images individually. The images are: 1. Fission (this graphic is adapted from a graphic originally produced by the Washington State Department of Health; the modifications are original to the History Division, now Office of History and Heritage Resources, 2003); 2. Fat Man (plutonium bomb), August 1945 (courtesy the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (via theNational Archives)); 3. F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex Hanford, Washington, 1945; 4. A Cockroft-Walton machine at Los Alamos, New Mexico (courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory; it is reprinted in John F. Hogerton, ed., "Cockroft-Walton Machine," The Atomic Energy Deskbook (New York: Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1963, prepared under the auspices of the Division of Technical Information, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission), 102);

105

Manhattan Project: Resources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

web site, a number of additional resources are also provided: Reference Materials Maps Photo Gallery To Learn More Library Suggested Readings Background on this Site About this...

106

The Walls Come Tumbling Down: Decontamination and Demolition of 29 Manhattan Project and Cold War-Era Buildings and Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory-12301  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the nation's top scientists and military leaders converged on Los Alamos, New Mexico in the 1943, to work on the Manhattan Project, the facilities they used to conduct their top-secret work were quickly constructed and located in the middle of what eventually became the Los Alamos town site. After one of these early facilities caught on fire, it seemed wise to build labs and production facilities farther away from the homes of the town's residents. They chose to build facilities on what was then known as Delta Prime (DP) Mesa and called it Technical Area 21, or TA-21. With wartime urgency, a number of buildings were built at TA-21, some in as little as a few months. Before long, DP Mesa was populated with several nondescript metal and cinder-block buildings, including what became, immediately following the war, the world's first plutonium production facility. TA-21 also housed labs that used hazardous chemicals and analyzed americium, tritium and plutonium. TA-21 was a bustling center of research and production for the next several decades. Additional buildings were built there in the 1960's, but by the 1990's many of them had reached the end of their service lives. Labs and offices were moved to newer, more modern buildings. When Los Alamos National Laboratory received $212 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in July 2009 for environmental cleanup projects, about $73 million of the funds were earmarked to decontaminate and demolish 21 of the old buildings at TA-21. Although some D and D of TA-21 buildings was performed in the 1990's, many of the facilities at DP Site remained relatively untouched for nearly three decades following their final operational use. In 2006, there were over three dozen buildings or structures on the mesa to be removed so that soil cleanup could be completed (and the land made available for transfer and reuse). The total footprint of buildings across the mesa was approximately 18,580 m{sup 2} (200,000 ft{sup 2}). The initially approved baseline for the ARRA D and D Project was to remove 22 buildings and structures that included approximately 14,680 m{sup 2} (158,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint. By employing efficiencies during subcontracting, demolition, and waste segregation, the savings allowed an additional 1,580 m{sup 2} (17,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint to be removed using ARRA funds. Additionally, the lessons learned from this experience were used to apply NNSA funding to the removal of six additional non-contaminated buildings and structures. In the end, 29 buildings and structures, including stacks, cooling towers and tanks, were removed from the mesa. The entire DP East area was cleared of buildings and sub-grade structures and the soils cleaned to residential standards. The total footprint reduction at TA-21 as a result of this effort was in excess of 17,650 m{sup 2} (190,000 ft{sup 2}). The use of a Laboratory self-performance team to start demolition of non-contaminated structures resulted in steady work performance early in the project while subcontracts were being put in place to perform more complicated abatement and contaminated demolition activities. Most importantly, there were no serious worker injuries and the minor injuries recorded were those common to construction type activities. Extensive monitoring along the site boundary demonstrated that no hazardous chemicals or radioactive contamination were released and radiological dose to the public was negligible. The ARRA demolition activities were completed six months in advance of the deadline for employing ARRA funds. Additionally, over 17,585 m{sup 3} (23,000 yds{sup 3}) of building demolition debris was safely removed from DP Mesa. All of the major buildings have been removed, unencumbered access to the SWMUs that are required to be cleaned up by the Consent Order with the state of New Mexico, has been achieved, and a significant portion of the mesa has been prepared to support a process that will eventually transfer this land from federal government control for further use. (authors)

Chaloupka, Allan B.; Finn, Kevin P.; Parsons, Duane A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan Project Speak of the Nation's History Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan Project Speak of the Nation's History November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Manhattan Project veteran Ralph Gates (far right) celebrates Christmas in 1945. Gates contributed to the Voices of the Manhattan Project, a storytelling project launched by the Atomic Heritage Foundation and Los Alamos Historical Society. Manhattan Project veteran Ralph Gates (far right) celebrates Christmas in 1945. Gates contributed to the Voices of the Manhattan Project, a storytelling project launched by the Atomic Heritage Foundation and Los Alamos Historical Society. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A year out of high school in 1944, Nashville native

108

Manhattan Project: S-1 Committee  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources Resources About this Site How to Navigate this Site Library Maps Note on Sources Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Photo Gallery Site Map Sources and Notes Suggested Readings S-1 COMMITTEE Bohemian Grove (September 13, 1942) Resources > Photo Gallery S-1 Committee, Bohemian Grove, September 13, 1942 S-1 Committee members at Bohemian Grove, September 13, 1942. Left to right: Harold C. Urey, Ernest O. Lawrence, James B. Conant, Lyman J. Briggs, Eger V. Murphree, and Arthur H. Compton. The photograph is courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Click on a link below to return to: Civilian Organizations Enter the Army, 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD)

109

Manhattan Project: Los Alamos Scientists  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources Resources About this Site How to Navigate this Site Library Maps Note on Sources Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Photo Gallery Site Map Sources and Notes Suggested Readings LOS ALAMOS SCIENTISTS Los Alamos (Laboratory) (August 1946) Resources > Photo Gallery Los Alamos, August 1946 Scientists attending a colloquium at Los Alamos, August 1946. Left to right, first row: Norris E. Bradbury, John H. Manley, Enrico Fermi, J. M. B. Kellogg. Second row: Robert Oppenheimer, Richard P. Feynman, Phil B. Porter. Third row: Gregory Breit (partially hidden), Arthur Hemmendinger, Arthur D. Schelberg. The photograph is courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. The identifications are from Richard G. Hewlett and Francis Duncan, Atomic Shield, 1947-1952: Volume II, A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission (Washington: U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1972), opposite page 46.

110

Manhattan Project: Facts About Fallout  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT FACTS ABOUT FALLOUT Federal Civil Defense Administration, National Archives (1955) Resources > Library Below is Facts About Fallout, an eight-page civil defense pamphlet on fallout published by the Federal Civil Defense Administration in 1955. At the bottom of this page there are also three photographs of government-suggested fallout shelter designs and a "Fallout Shelter" sign. The pamphlet is courtesy the National Archives, as are the three photographs of the fallout shelters (courtesy the Federal Emergency Management Agency). The image of the "fallout shelter" sign is courtesy the Environmental Protection Agency. Facts About Fallout, p. 1 Facts About Fallout, p. 2 Facts About Fallout, p. 3 Facts About Fallout, p. 4 Facts About Fallout, p. 5

111

Manhattan Project: Difficult Choices, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES (1942) Events More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 By early 1942, as the United States suffered a series of military defeats in the Pacific, top officials in Washington tentatively had decided to proceed with the construction of an atomic bomb. Two paths seemed possible. A uranium bomb could be achieved if sufficient uranium-235 could be produced by one or more of the three isotope separation methods under consideration: gaseous diffusion, centrifuge, and electromagnetic. A plutonium bomb might provide a quicker route, but it required demonstration that plutonium could be produced in a uranium pile and then be separated in usable quantities. To this end, Arthur Compton consolidated most plutonium research at the new Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) at the University of Chicago.

112

Manhattan Project: Trinity (Color Photograph)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(COLOR PHOTOGRAPH) (COLOR PHOTOGRAPH) Trinity Test Site (July 16, 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery Trinity, July 16, 1945 (This is the page for the photograph only; see "The Trinity Test" for more information about the test itself.) The photo is courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratories; it is reproduced on the front cover of Los Alamos: Beginning of an Era, 1943-1945 (Los Alamos: Public Relations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, ca. 1967-1971). The inside of the front cover describes the history of the photograph this way: Although colored movies were taken of the Trinity test, they were of poor quality and have since deteriorated. This cover photograph, also showing the ravages of time, is the only existing color shot of the test. It was taken, surprisingly enough, by an amateur using his own camera. Jack Aeby, now [ca. 1967-1971] of H-6, was working at Trinity with Emilio Segrè studying delayed gamma rays. Segrè secured permission for Aeby to carry his camera to the site to record the group's activities. Came the test and, as Aeby says, 'it was there so I shot it.' The picture was taken from just outside Base Camp with a Perfex 33 camera using 33 mm film. The photograph provided the basis for the Theoretical Division's earliest calculations of the Trinity weapon's yield and was shortly confiscated by the Army and first published after the announcement was made of the bombing of Japan.

113

Manhattan Project: Einstein's Letter, 1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein's letter to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939 EINSTEIN'S LETTER Einstein's letter to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939 EINSTEIN'S LETTER (1939) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 On October 11, 1939, Alexander Sachs, Wall Street economist and longtime friend and unofficial advisor to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, met with the President to discuss a letter written by Albert Einstein the previous August (right). Einstein had written to inform Roosevelt that recent research on fission chain reactions utilizing uranium made it probable that large amounts of power could be produced by a chain reaction and that, by harnessing this power, the construction of "extremely powerful bombs" was conceivable. Einstein believed the German government was actively supporting research in this area and urged the United States government to do likewise. Sachs read from a cover letter he had prepared and briefed Roosevelt on the main points contained in Einstein's letter. Initially the President was noncommittal and expressed concern over locating the necessary funds, but at a second meeting over breakfast the next morning Roosevelt became convinced of the value of exploring atomic energy.

114

Thailand gas project now operational  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Now operational, Phase 1 of Thailand's first major natural gas system comprises one of the world's longest (264 miles) offshore gas lines. Built for the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT), this system delivers gas from the Erawan field in the Gulf of Thailand to two electrical power plants near Bangkok, operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project required laying about 360 miles of pipeline, 34-in., 0.625 in.-thick API-5LX-60 pipe offshore and 28-in., 0.406 in.-thick API-5LX-60 onshore. The offshore pipe received a coal-tar coating, a 3.5-5.0 in. concrete coating, and zinc sacrificial-anode bracelets. The onshore line was coated with the same coal-tar enamel and, where necessary, with concrete up to 4.5 in. thick. Because EGAT's two power plants are the system's only customers, no more pipeline will be constructed until deliveries, currently averaging about 100 million CF/day, reach the 250 million CF/day level. The project's second phase will include additional pipelines as well as an onshore distribution network to industrial customers.

Horner, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EVM project analysis is to provide consistent and timely insight to project status in order to enable timely, effective management decisions. In conjunction with conducting...

116

Office of Employee Development Operational Efficiency Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office of Employee Development Operational Efficiency Project Survey Summary from Supervisory Staff the University titled "Operational Efficiency Project." Its mandate was to gather information, evaluate current operations, review benchmarks and best practices, and develop organizational and/or cost saving alternatives

Huang, Jianyu

117

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source UF Minor Projects for UF 50,000 Minor projects for facilities located and education. Typical projects consist of Gainesville/ Typical projects other funding greenhouses, general

Slatton, Clint

118

Stratigraphy, structural geology and metamorphism of the Inwood Marble Formation, northern Manhattan, NYC, NY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recrystallized dolomite and subordinate calcite marble the Inwood Marble was used for quarrying and mineral of northern Manhattan and by the late 1700s commercial quarries were in full operation. This work continued

Merguerian, Charles

119

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance California Codes that includes the energy standards amendment and a study with supporting energy saving data

120

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11 TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TA-1 MANHATTAN LABORATORY (NM.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Main Technical Area LASL LANL NM.11-1 NM.11-2 NM.11-3 Location: Los Alamos , New Mexico NM.11-3 Evaluation Year: 1985 NM.11-1 Site Operations: Nuclear weapons research and development. NM.11-1 NM.11-3 Site Disposition: Site Disposition NM.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium , Plutonium, Fission Products NM.11-1 NM.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.11-2 NM.11-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NM.11-1 Also see Documents Related to TA-1 MANHATTAN LABORATORY NM.11-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; Jones to File; Subject:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Manhattan Project: More Piles and Plutonium, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 At the University of Chicago, meanwhile, Arthur Compton had consolidated most fission research at his new Metallurgical Laboratory(Met Lab). Compton decided to combine all pile research by stages. He continued to fund Enrico Fermi's pile research at Columbia University, while Fermi began preparations to move his work to Chicago. Funding continued as well for the theoretical work of Eugene Wigner at Princeton and of J. Robert Oppenheimer at the University of California, Berkeley. Compton also appointed Leo Szilard head of materials acquisition and arranged for Glenn T. Seaborg to move his plutonium work from Berkeley to Chicago in April 1942.

122

Manhattan Project: The Maud Report, 1941  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The first page of the MAUD Report. THE MAUD REPORT The first page of the MAUD Report. THE MAUD REPORT (1941) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 The most influential study of the feasibility of the atomic bomb originated on the other side of the Atlantic. In July 1941, just days after finding the second National Academy of Sciences report so disappointing, Vannevar Bush received a copy of a draft report forwarded from the National Defense Research Committee liaison office in London. The report, prepared by a group codenamed the MAUD Committee and set up by the British in spring 1940 to study the possibility of developing a nuclear weapon, maintained that a sufficiently purified critical mass of uranium-235 could fission even with fast neutrons. Building upon theoretical work on atomic bombs performed by refugee physicists Rudolf Peierls and Otto Frisch in 1940 and 1941, the MAUD report estimated that a critical mass of ten kilograms would be large enough to produce an enormous explosion. A bomb this size could be loaded on existing aircraft and be ready in approximately two years.

123

Manhattan Project: More Uranium Research, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 During the first half of 1942, several routes to a bomb via uranium continued to be explored. At Columbia University, Harold Urey worked on the gaseous diffusion and centrifuge systems for isotope separation in the codenamed SAM (Substitute or Special Alloy Metals) Laboratory. At Berkeley, Ernest Lawrence continued his investigations on electromagnetic separation using the "calutron" he had converted from his thirty-seven-inch cyclotron. Phillip Abelson, who had moved from the Carnegie Institution and the National Bureau of Standards to the Naval Research Laboratory, continued his work on liquid thermal diffusion but with few positive results, and he had lost all contact with the S-1 Section of the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Meanwhile Eger Murphree's group hurriedly studied ways to move from laboratory experiments to production facilities.

124

Manhattan Project: Los Alamos Street Scene  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LOS ALAMOS STREET SCENE LOS ALAMOS STREET SCENE Los Alamos (The Town) Resources > Photo Gallery Los Alamos street scene. Fuller Lodge and the "Big House" are visible in the distance (see below). Above is a view of Los Alamos (looking north). In the distance, Fuller Lodge and the "Big House" are visible to the left and right, respectively (see below). The photograph is reproduced from Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos: Beginning of an Era, 1943-1945 (Los Alamos: Public Relations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, ca. 1967-1971), 13. The labels and "close-ups" below were made by the Office of History and Heritage Resources. Los Alamos street scene (labeled) Close-up of Fuller Lodge Close-up of the "Big House" Click on a link below to return to:

125

Manhattan Project: Einstein's Letter to Roosevelt  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

EINSTEIN'S LETTER TO ROOSEVELT Albert Einstein (with Leo Szilard) to President Franklin Roosevelt, August 2, 1939 Resources > Library Below are photographs of both pages of the letter written by Albert Einstein, with the help of Leo Szilard, to President Franklin Roosevelt on August 2, 1939, warning Roosevelt of the dangers posed by nuclear energy. Click here for more background on the writing of this letter. The photographs of the pages themselves are courtesy the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. First page of Einstein's letter to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939. Second page of Einstein's letter to Roosevelt, August 2, 1939. Click on a link below to return to Einstein's Letter, 1939 Albert Einstein Library Sources and notes for this page.

126

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

127

Manhattan Project: Fission Comes to America, 1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. FISSION COMES TO AMERICA Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. FISSION COMES TO AMERICA (1939) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 News of the fission experiments of Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann, and of the Meitner-Frisch calculations that confirmed them, spread rapidly. Meitner and Frisch communicated their results to Niels Bohr, who was in Copenhagen preparing to depart for the United States via Sweden and England. Bohr confirmed the validity of the findings while sailing to New York City, arriving on January 16, 1939. Ten days later Bohr, accompanied by Enrico Fermi, communicated the latest developments to some European émigré scientists who had preceded him to this country and to members of the American scientific community at the opening session of a conference on theoretical physics in Washington, D.C.

128

Manhattan Project: Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT (1932-1938) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 M. Stanley Livingston and Ernest O. Lawrence in front of a 27-inch cyclotron, Rad Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 1934. In the 1930s, scientists learned a tremendous amount about the structure of the atom by bombarding it with sub-atomic particles. Ernest O. Lawrence's cyclotron, the Cockroft-Walton machine, and the Van de Graaff generator, developed by Robert J. Van de Graaff at Princeton University, were particle accelerators designed to bombard the nuclei of various elements to disintegrate atoms. Attempts of the early 1930s to split atoms, however, required huge amounts of energy because the first accelerators used proton beams and alpha particles as sources of energy. Since protons and alpha particles are positively charged, they Albert Einstein met substantial resistance from the positively charged target nucleus when they attempted to penetrate atoms. Even high-speed protons and alpha particles scored direct hits on a nucleus only approximately once in a million tries. Most simply passed by the target nucleus. Not surprisingly, Ernest Rutherford, Albert Einstein (right), and Niels Bohr regarded particle bombardment as useful in furthering knowledge of nuclear physics but believed it unlikely to meet public expectations of harnessing the power of the atom for practical purposes anytime in the near future. In a 1933 interview, Rutherford called such expectations "moonshine." Einstein compared particle bombardment with shooting in the dark at scarce birds, while Bohr, the Danish Nobel laureate, agreed that the chances of taming atomic energy were remote.

129

Manhattan Project: Enter the Army, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The decision to proceed with planning for the production of enriched uranium and of plutonium led directly to the involvement of the Army, specifically the Corps of Engineers. President Roosevelt had approved Army involvement on October 9, 1941, and Vannevar Bush had arranged for Army participation at S-1 meetings beginning in March 1942. The need for security suggested placing the S-1 program within one of the armed forces, and the construction expertise of the Corps of Engineers made it the logical choice to build the production facilities envisioned in the Conant report of May 23.

130

The Manhattan Project | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fehner and Gosling, Origins of the Nevada Test Site Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site,...

131

Manhattan Project | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

celebration of Y-12's 70th anniversary, a short film capturing highlights of the site's history now is available for viewing on the Y-12 public Web site at http:www.y12.doe.gov...

132

A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan Project Sites Gain International Media Attention A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan Project Sites Gain International Media Attention September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Traditionally, a platinum anniversary marks 70-years. The Manhattan roject legacy reached that special milestone this summer, highlighting a remarkable history nvolving the Oak Ridge and Hanford sites and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Bipartisan legislation making its way through Congress could commemorate America's atomic history by turning these sites into a national park, a prospect that continues to gain national and international media attention in print, online and on TV and

133

EMAB Briefing on Capital Assets Projects and Operations Activities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Asset Projects and Operations Activities www.em.doe.gov 1 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Boards Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration...

134

AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AWEA Wind Project O&M and Safety Seminar is designed for owners, operators, turbine manufactures, material suppliers, wind technicians, managers, supervisors, engineers, and occupational...

135

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II More Documents & Publications

136

Manhattan, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manhattan, Kansas: Energy Resources Manhattan, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1836082°, -96.5716694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1836082,"lon":-96.5716694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE NAMES NEW IDAHO CLEANUP PROJECT MANAGER June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Brad Bugger (208) 526-0833 Idaho Falls, ID - The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office today announced that James Cooper has been named deputy manager of its highly-successful Idaho Cleanup Project, which oversees the environmental cleanup and waste management mission at DOE's Idaho site. Cooper has more than 30 years of experience in commercial and government engineering and management, including an eight month stint as acting Deputy Manager for EM. He has extensive experience in business management associated with program planning, development and administration. His experience includes all project phases from conceptual planning, cost and

138

Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operator Smart Grid Project Operator Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Country United States Headquarters Location Carmel, Indiana Additional Benefit Places Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Wisconsin Recovery Act Funding $17,271,738.00 Total Project Value $34,543,476.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Coordinates 39.978371°, -86.1180435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

139

Toledo Bend Project Joint Oper | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bend Project Joint Oper Bend Project Joint Oper Jump to: navigation, search Name Toledo Bend Project Joint Oper Place Texas Utility Id 19048 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Toledo_Bend_Project_Joint_Oper&oldid=411678"

140

Hanford tank waste operation simulator operational waste volume projection verification and validation procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator is tested to determine if it can replace the FORTRAN-based Operational Waste Volume Projection computer simulation that has traditionally served to project double-shell tank utilization. Three Test Cases are used to compare the results of the two simulators; one incorporates the cleanup schedule of the Tri Party Agreement.

HARMSEN, R.W.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

142

Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Country United States Headquarters Location Tucker, Georgia Recovery Act Funding $6,456,501.00 Total Project Value $12,913,003.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 33.8545479°, -84.2171424° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

143

The Ames Project (1942-1946)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Ames Laboratory was officially founded on May 17, 1947, following development of a process to purify uranium metal for the historic Manhattan Project. From 1942 to 1946, Ames Lab scientists produced over two-million pounds of uranium metal. A U.S. Department of Energy national research laboratory, the Ames Laboratory creates materials and energy solutions. Iowa State University operates Ames Laboratory under contract with the DOE.

None

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

MATLAB Project #2: Matrix Operations To learn basic matrix operations and more useful features of MATLAB.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MATLAB Project #2: Matrix Operations Purpose: To learn basic matrix operations and more useful features of MATLAB. Part 1. Matrix arithmetic. = 65 43 21 A , - - = 654 321 B the above matrices using MATLAB commands first. Then type each line and record the result; if you get

Yang, Shih-Hsuan

145

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

146

Projection Operator Formalisms and the Nuclear Shell Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shell model solve the nuclear many-body problem in a restricted model space and takes into account the restricted nature of the space by using effective interactions and operators. In this paper two different methods for generating the effective interactions are considered. One is based on a partial solution of the Schrodinger equation (Bloch-Horowitz or the Feshbach projection formalism) and other on linear algebra (Lee-Suzuki). The two methods are derived in a parallel manner so that the difference and similarities become apparent. The connections with the renormalization group are also pointed out.

B. K. Jennings

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

148

Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

Bowman, T.J.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Manhattan Project: Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Rutherford (and James Chadwick, on the far right) EXPLORING THE ATOM Ernest Rutherford (and James Chadwick, on the far right) EXPLORING THE ATOM (1919-1932) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The road to the atomic bomb began in earnest in 1919 with the first artificial transmutation of an element. The New Zealander Ernest Rutherford, working in the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University in England, changed several atoms of nitrogen into oxygen. The final addition to the atomic "miniature solar system" first proposed by Niels Bohr came in 1932 when James Chadwick, Rutherford's colleague at Cambridge, identified the third and final basic particle of the atom: the neutron.

150

Manhattan Project: "Met Lab" Alumni  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources Resources About this Site How to Navigate this Site Library Maps Note on Sources Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Photo Gallery Site Map Sources and Notes Suggested Readings "MET LAB" ALUMNI University of Chicago (December 2, 1946) Resources > Photo Gallery Met Lab alumni pose at the University of Chicago, December 2, 1946. Alumni of the Met Lab pose on the steps of Eckhart Hall on the campus of the University of Chicago on December 2, 1946 (the fourth anniversary of CP-1 first going critical). Front row, left to right: Enrico Fermi, Walter Zinn, Albert Wattenberg, and Herbert Anderson. Middle row, left to right: Harold Agnew, William Sturm, Harold Lichtenberger, Leona W. Marshall, and Leo Szilard. Back row, left to right: Norman Hilberry, Samuel Allison, Thomas Brill, Robert Nobles, Warren Nyer, and Marvin Wilkening.

151

Manhattan Project: Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Enrico Fermi PILES AND PLUTONIUM Enrico Fermi PILES AND PLUTONIUM (1939-1942) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 The Uranium Committee's first report, issued on November 1, 1939, recommended that, despite the uncertainty of success, the government should immediately obtain four tons of graphite and fifty tons of uranium oxide. This recommendation led to the first outlay of government funds -- $6,000 in February 1940 -- and reflected the importance attached to the Fermi-Szilard pile (reactor) experiments already underway at Columbia University. Building upon the Fission chain reaction work performed in 1934 demonstrating the value of moderators in producing slow neutrons, Enrico Fermi thought that a mixture of the right moderator and natural uranium could produce a self-sustaining fission chain reaction. Fermi and Leo Szilard increasingly focused their attention on carbon in the form of graphite. Perhaps graphite could slow down, or moderate, the neutrons coming from the fission reaction, increasing the probability of their causing additional fissions in sustaining the chain reaction. A pile containing a large amount of natural uranium could then produce enough secondary neutrons to keep a reaction going.

152

Manhattan Project: A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

John Joseph Thomson A MINIATURE SOLAR SYSTEM John Joseph Thomson A MINIATURE SOLAR SYSTEM (1890s-1919) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The modern effort to uncover the inner structure of the atom began with the discovery of the electron by the English physicist J. J. Thomson (above) in 1897. Thomson proved that cathode rays were not some sort of undefined process occurring in "ether" but were in fact composed of extremely small, negatively charged particles. Dubbed electrons, their exact charge and mass were soon determined by John Townsend and Robert Millikan. Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. At the same time, discoveries relating to the curious phenomenon of radioactivity had also begun to propel atomic research forward. In 1896, the French physicist Antoine Becquerel detected the three basic forms of radioactivity, which were soon named alpha, beta, and gamma by Ernest Rutherford, a student of Thomson from New Zealand. Also in 1896, the husband-and-wife team of Marie and Pierre Curie began work in Paris on the emission of radiation by uranium and thorium. The Curies soon announced their discoveries of radium and polonium; they also proved that beta particles were negatively charged. In 1900, Becquerel realized that beta particles and electrons were the same things.

153

Manhattan Project: Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

REORGANIZATION AND ACCELERATION REORGANIZATION AND ACCELERATION (1940-1941) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 Ernest Lawrence, 1935 During 1939 and 1940, most of the work done on uranium isotope separation and the chain reaction pile was performed in university laboratories by academic scientists funded primarily by private foundations. Although the federal government began supporting uranium research in 1940, the pace appeared too leisurely to the scientific community and failed to convince scientists that their work was of high priority. Certainly few were more inclined to this view than Ernest O. Lawrence (right), director of the Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. Lawrence was among those who thought that it was merely a matter of time before the United States was drawn into World War II, and he wanted the government to mobilize its scientific forces as rapidly as possible.

154

Manhattan Project: Order to Drop the Atomic Bomb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ORDER TO DROP THE ATOMIC BOMB Handy to Spaatz, National Archives (July 25, 1945) Resources > Library The document below is the order to attack Japanese cities with atomic bombs. In it, the Acting Army Chief of Staff, Thomas Handy, orders Commanding General Carl Spaatz, Army Strategic Air Forces, to "deliver [the] first special bomb as soon as weather will permit . . . after about 3 August 1945." The target list: "Hiroshima, Kokura, Niigata, and Nagasaki." Further attacks were also authorized: "additional bombs will be delivered on the above targets as soon as made ready." Handy was the acting chief of staff because George Marshall was with President Harry S. Truman at the Potsdam Conference. The letter explicitly notes that this order was approved by Marshall and Secretary of War Henry Stimson. Truman, of course, provided the ultimate authorization for dropping the bomb.

155

Manhattan Project: "Rad Lab" Staff  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"RAD LAB" STAFF "RAD LAB" STAFF University of California, Berkeley (1939) Resources > Photo Gallery Rad Lab Staff, 1939 Lawrence Radiation Laboratory caption: "Early Radiation Laboratory staff framed by the magnet for 60-inch cyclotron in 1939. Front row, left to right: John H. Lawrence, Robert Serber, Franz N. D. Kurie, Raymond T. Birge, Ernest O. Lawrence, Donald Cooksey, Arthur H. Snell, Luis W. Alvarez, Philip H. Abelson. Second Row: John Backus, Wilfred B. Mann, Paul C. Aebersold, Edwin M. McMillan, Ernest Lyman, Martin D. Kamen, D. C. Kalbfell, W. W. Salisbury. Last row: Alex S. Langsdorf, Jr., Sam Simmons, Joseph G. Hamilton, David H. Sloan, J. Robert Oppenheimer, William Brobeck, Robert Cornog, Robert R. Wilson, Eugene Viez, J. J. Livingood."

156

Manhattan Project: The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn, Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute, Berlin THE DISCOVERY OF FISSION Berlin, Germany (1938-1939) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The English word "atom" derives from the Greek word "atomon" ("ατομον"), which means "that which cannot be divided." In 1938, the scientific community proved the Greek philosophers wrong by dividing the atom. Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. Fission, the basis of the atomic bomb, was discovered in Nazi Germany less than a year before the beginning of the Second World War. It was December 1938 when the radiochemists Otto Hahn (above, with Lise Meitner) and Fritz Strassmann, while bombarding elements with neutrons in their Berlin laboratory, made their unexpected discovery. They found that while the nuclei of most elements changed somewhat during neutron bombardment, uranium nuclei changed greatly and broke into two roughly equal pieces. They split and became not the new transuranic elements that some thought Enrico Fermi had discovered but radioactive barium isotopes (barium has the atomic number 56) and other fragments of the uranium itself. The substances Fermi had created in his experiments, that is, did more than resemble lighter elements -- they were lighter elements. The products of the Hahn-Strassmann experiment weighed less than that of the original uranium nucleus, and herein lay the primary significance of their findings. It folIowed from Albert Einstein's E=mc2 equation that the loss of mass resulting from the splitting process must have been converted into energy in the form of kinetic energy that could in turn be converted into heat.

157

Manhattan Project: San Ildefonso Pueblo Party</FONT>  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SAN ILDEFONSO PUEBLO PARTY SAN ILDEFONSO PUEBLO PARTY Los Alamos (December 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery San Ildefonso Pueblo party, December 1945 A special 1995 issue of the monthly publication of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, "Dateline: Los Alamos," described the party this way: "On a cold December night in 1945, the San Ildefonso Pueblo, a tribe of Native Americans living next to Los Alamos, invited a group of Los Alamos square dancers to their pueblo for an evening of fun and entertainment. The two communities had seen a lot of each other during the war as men and women from the pueblo commuted daily to work at Los Alamos. The association produced a cross fertilization of cultures. "Bernice Brode wrote: 'Some of us had more Indian crafts in our Army apartments than the Indians had in their homes, (and) modern American conveniences such as refrigerators and linoleum began cropping up in the pueblo.' At the dance, the Indians performed for the square dancers and the square dancers performed for the Indians. After the demonstrations, members from the two groups began dancing with each other. Charlie Masters, a teacher at the Los Alamos school, wrote: 'This fiesta-hoedown I like to remember as the climax of our relations with the natives.'

158

Manhattan Project: Early Government Support, 1939-1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard EARLY GOVERNMENT SUPPORT Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard EARLY GOVERNMENT SUPPORT (1939-1942) Events Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 As the news of the fission breakthrough spread from Berlin in early 1939, many physicists within the United States (and elsewhere) immediately realized the potential danger posed by atomic energy. Especially concerned were émigré physicists who had fled their native countries because of the expansion of Nazi Germany and sought to obtain governmental support for further, secret nuclear research. Convincing busy government officials of the seriousness of this esoteric new scientific development was at first slow going. One month before the Second World War formally began with the September 1, 1939, invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, Leo Szilard enlisted the help of Albert Einstein in personally calling President Franklin Roosevelt's attention to the matter. Roosevelt responded by creating a government committee to coordinate and provide modest funding for early uranium research. Work also proceeded during this period on the design of an atomic pile that could demonstrate the potential of atomic energy and possibly provide a second path to the atomic bomb besides uranium.

159

Manhattan Project: Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, and James Conant discuss uranium research, Berkeley, March 29, 1940. EARLY URANIUM RESEARCH Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, and James Conant discuss uranium research, Berkeley, March 29, 1940. EARLY URANIUM RESEARCH (1939-1941) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt responded to the call for government support of uranium research quickly but cautiously. He appointed Lyman J. Briggs, director of the National Bureau of Standards, head of the Advisory Committee on Uranium, which met for the first time on October 21, 1939. The committee, including both civilian and military representation, was to coordinate its activities with Alexander Sachs and look into the current state of research on uranium to recommend an appropriate role for the federal government. In early 1940, only months after the outbreak of war in Europe, the Uranium Committee recommended that the government fund limited research on isotope separation as well as Enrico Fermi's and Leo Szilard's work on fission chain reactions at Columbia University (below).

160

Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

truck we found was used for," said Bruce Schappell, LANL's deputy associate director for Environmental Programs. "It's in pretty bad shape." The truck will be crushed, packaged...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

truck we found was used for," said Bruce Schappell, LANL's deputy associate director for Environmental Programs. "It's in pretty bad shape." The truck will be crushed, packaged...

162

Work of Manhattan Project-era photographer Ed Westcott lives...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Media Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Work...

163

An Open Source Laboratory for Operating Systems Projects Mark Claypool, David Finkel and Craig Wills *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An Open Source Laboratory for Operating Systems Projects Mark Claypool, David Finkel and Craig 100 Institute Road Worcester, MA 01609 Abstract Typical undergraduate operating systems projects use services provided by an operating system via system calls or develop code in a simulated operating system

Claypool, Mark

164

Memo Issuance of EM Capital and Major Operating Project Standard Review Plan Edition Two  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAR 2 4 201011 MAR 2 4 201011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DR. STEVEN L. KRAHN DEPUTY ASSISTANT SAFETY AND SECU EIVVIROIVMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Issuance of Environmental Management Capital and Major Operating Project Standard Review Plan Edition Two The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing the design, construction, operation, and eventual disposition of mission critical projects/facilities. Effective management of these projects requires multiple disciplines to be integrated and engaged at various project lifecycle phases. These disciplines include project management, engineering, design, safety, environment, safeguards and security, and quality assurance. The lessons-learned to date from ongoing Headquarters (HQ) and Field project reviews [e.g., Construction Project

165

Manhattan Beach, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manhattan Beach, California: Energy Resources Manhattan Beach, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8847361°, -118.4109089° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.8847361,"lon":-118.4109089,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for (title of project, experiment, reaction or process) Date of Preparation: ____________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for (title of project, experiment, reaction or process and ensuring that this procedure is carried out: _________________________________________________ HEALTH

Sura, Philip

167

EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

168

EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction 30: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to expand and upgrade the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facilities and operations in Grand Junction, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 8, 1996 EA-0930: Finding of No Significant Impact Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado June 8, 1996 EA-0930: Final Environmental Assessment Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand

169

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with partners at the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University, under the 2012 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids funding opportunity, is investigating the use of metal alloys as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems operating at temperatures in excess of 800C. By allowing higher temperature operation, CSP systems can achieve greater efficiencies and thereby reduce the overall cost of electricity production.

171

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EnergySmart Schools fact sheet on how school operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel can play a greater role in managing ever-increasing energy costs.

172

Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar on Project Implementation and Operations & Maintenance on Aug. 8  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department's Office of Indian Energy, Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, Project Implementation and Operations & Maintenance, on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time. The webinar will focus on the last two steps of a five-step tribal energy project development framework: Project Implementation and Operations and Maintenance (O&M).

173

Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

investigating the use of metal alloys as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems operating at temperatures in excess of 800C. By allowing higher...

174

New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Smart Grid Project New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Country United States Headquarters Location Rensselaer, New York Recovery Act Funding $37,382,908.00 Total Project Value $75,710,735.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 42.6425794°, -73.742898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

175

Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.4 Deep Water................................................................................................. 143 1.2.3.4 Deep WaterMEFEPO Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881 Work Package 1

Hansen, René Rydhof

176

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November, 2003 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TRU ALPHA LLWT Project.

177

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

178

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, April 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 11/17/2010 - 04/07/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: On November 17, 2010, a HSS representative participated in a tour of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Project Engineer, the CHPRC STP Design

179

A machine learning model of Manhattan air pollution at high spatial resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A machine-learning model was created to predict air pollution at high spatial resolution in Manhattan, New York using taxi trip data. Urban air pollution increases morbidity and mortality through respiratory and cardiovascular ...

Keeler, Rachel H. (Rachel Heiden)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

UNITED STATE% ENGINEER OFFICE I" RaCLI MANHATTAN D' ISTRICT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A-; . - .-.. w-1 - ,.. P..*e ,e.arzUE.m -JuTm-&a- . . . UNITED STATE% ENGINEER OFFICE I" RaCLI MANHATTAN D' ISTRICT RLFSR TO ; I. 0. eox a ,. STATJON J N E W YORK, N....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Department Human Resources Bulletin, #027, FY06, dated August 1,2006 DOC Demonstration Project Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Operating Procedures Purpose This issuance provides NOAA managers with pay setting flexibilitywhen Demonstration Project OperatingProcedures. . . . , . . Background On August 1,2006, the Department issued Human setting pay for Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) who are covered by the DOC Demonstration Project

182

Design aspects of upgradation from 6 pulse to 12 pulse operation of NHVDC project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In India, the first HVDC project was a back to back link between the northern grid and the Western grid at Vindhyachal. This project was commissioned by an external agency. By 1982 it was abundantly clear that HVDC would find a significant place in Indian power system. Government of India in its wisdom approved a proposal for an experimental HVDC line project to give Indian planners, manufacturers and utilities an opportunity to absorb the technology. The stage-1 of this National HVDC (NHVDC) project was successfully commissioned in October 1990, and has since been operating quite satisfactorily. In continuation of that effort, Government of India has since approved stage-2 of NHVDC project, which is under execution, at present. In stage-1, the challenge was to do the system studies, manufacture main circuit equipment and develop a controller. In stage-2 the focus will be on modernization and project engineering. The major change in stage-2 shall be the modernization of the controls. Upgradation details and the care being taken to have minimum disturbance to the existing setup, it discussed in this paper. The operational requirements, system solutions and control system aspects which have been considered and are being implemented for this project are also covered.

Singhal, A.; Gera, R.; Tripathy, A.K.; Adhikari, T.; Hanif, M. [Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., New Delhi (India). Transmission Projects Dept.; Prakash, K.S.; Das, R.L. [Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Bangalore (India). Electronics Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

Wight, R.H.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Project Annual Operating Report CY 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Legacy of a Bomb: The Manhattan Projects Impact on the Scientific Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1993. Atomic Harvest: Hanford and the Lethal Toll ofs technological innovations. Hanford Site remained a nucleartechnology. Some in Hanford and most of the structures were

Gao, Jany Huan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EMAB Briefing on Capital Assets Projects and Operations Activities Presentation by Mark Gilbertson  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capital Asset Projects and Operations Activities Capital Asset Projects and Operations Activities www.em.doe.gov 1 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Boards Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 We reduce risks and protect our workers, our communities and the environment through cleanup Our work is urgent and essential to the health and economic vitality of our communities and the nation and positions our Sites for future missions and use Our mission is not discretionary - it is a congressional mandate to D&D the gaseous diffusion plant under the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 1992 and a federal obligation to address the cold war environmental legacy cleanup and honor our regulatory commitments Environmental Management:

188

Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project, July 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WVDP-2012-07-30 WVDP-2012-07-30 Site: West Valley Demonstration Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project Dates of Activity : 07/30/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was for the HS-45 Site Lead to meet with Department of Energy (DOE) site personnel, tour the facilities, and obtain a status report on the upcoming activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Major decommissioning activities underway include removal of asbestos-containing materials, disassembly of the dissolver,

189

Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project, July 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WVDP-2012-07-30 WVDP-2012-07-30 Site: West Valley Demonstration Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project Dates of Activity : 07/30/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was for the HS-45 Site Lead to meet with Department of Energy (DOE) site personnel, tour the facilities, and obtain a status report on the upcoming activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Major decommissioning activities underway include removal of asbestos-containing materials, disassembly of the dissolver,

190

The Projection Operator Method and the Ashtekar-Horowitz-Boulware Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent work of Louko and Molgado, we consider the Ashtekar-Horowitz-Boulware model using the projection operator formalism. This paper uses the techniques developed in a recent paper of Klauder and Little to overcome the potential difficulties of this particular model. We also extend the model by including a larger class of functions than previously considered and evaluate the classical limit of the model.

J. Scott Little

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Design review report: 200 East upgrades for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the contractor design verification methodology and records associated with project W-314`s 200 East (200E) Upgrades design package. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for this design. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the signatures of the participating reviewers. Project W-314 is a project within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Retrieval Program. This project provides capital upgrades for the existing Hanford tank farm waste transfer, instrumentation, ventilation, and electrical infrastructure systems. To support established TWRS programmatic objectives, the project is organized into two distinct phases. The initial focus of the project (i.e., Phase 1) is on waste transfer system upgrades needed to support the TWRS Privatization waste feed delivery system. Phase 2 of the project will provide upgrades to support resolution of regulatory compliance issues, improve tank infrastructure reliability, and reduce overall plant operating/maintenance costs. Within Phase 1 of the W-314 project, the waste transfer system upgrades are further broken down into six major packages which align with the project`s work breakdown structure. Each of these six sub-elements includes the design, procurement, and construction activities necessary to accomplish the specific tank farm upgrades contained within the package. The first design package (AN Valve Pit Upgrades) was completed in November 1997, and the associated design verification activities are documented in HNF-1893. The second design package, 200 East (200E) Upgrades, was completed in March 1998. This design package identifies modifications to existing valve pits 241-AX-B and 241-A-B, as well as several new waste transfer pipelines to be constructed within the A Farm Complex of the 200E Area. The scope of the valve pit modifications includes new pit cover blocks, valve manifolds, leak detectors, and special protective coatings similar to those previously approved for the AN Valve Pit Upgrades design package. The new transfer lines included in this package (with official line number designations) are described within.

Boes, K.A.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Summary of operations and performance of the Murdock site restoration project in 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater and surface water restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Murdock, Nebraska, during the third full year of system operation, from January 1 through December 31, 2008. Performance in June 2005 through December 2007 was reported previously (Argonne 2007, 2008). In the Murdock project, several innovative technologies are being used to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town, as well as from water naturally discharged to the surface at the headwaters of a small creek (a tributary to Pawnee Creek) north of the town (Figure 1.1). The restoration activities at Murdock are being conducted by the CCC/USDA as a non-time-critical removal action under the regulatory authority and supervision of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the restoration effort and facilities during this review period. Included in this report are the results of all sampling and monitoring activities performed in accord with the EPA-approved Monitoring Plan for this site (Argonne 2006), as well as additional investigative activities conducted during the review period. The annual performance reports for the Murdock project assemble information that will become part of the five-year review and evaluation of the remediation effort. This review will occur in 2010. This document presents overviews of the treatment facilities (Section 2) and site operations and activities (Section 3), then describes the groundwater, surface water, vegetation, and atmospheric monitoring results (Section 4) and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 5). Section 6 summarizes the current period of operation. A gallery of photographs of the Murdock project is in Appendix A.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01 M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B203 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B203 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B203 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B203 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT.

Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optimizing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance at Offshore Wind Projects in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the United States to ensure that the substantial rollout of offshore wind energy projects envisioned by the DOE is carried out in an efficient and cost-effective manner, it is important to observe the current and emerging practices in the international offshore wind energy industry. In this manner, the United States can draw from the experience already gained around the world, combined with experience from the sizeable U.S. land-based wind industry, to develop a strong offshore wind sector. The work detailed in this report will support that learning curve by enabling optimization of the cost-effectiveness of installation, operation, and maintenance activities for offshore wind farms.

195

A framework and methodology for enhancing operational requirements development : United States Coast Guard cutter project case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within any major United States Coast Guard cutter acquisition project, developing the operational requirements in the early phases of acquisition is difficult as the complexity of the system is not easily understood until ...

Schofield, Douglas M. (Douglas MacLean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Process for Predicting Manhole Events in Manhattan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a knowledge discovery and data mining process developed as part of the Columbia/Con Edison project on manhole event prediction. This process can assist with real-world prioritization problems that involve raw ...

Isaac, Delfina

197

The method of dynamic projection operators in the theory of hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations with variable coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a generalization of the projecting operators method for the case of Cauchy problem for systems of 1D evolution differential equations of first order with variable coefficients. It is supposed that the coefficients dependence on the only variable x is weak, that is described by a small parameter introduction. Such problem corresponds, for example, to the case of wave propagation in a weakly inhomogeneous medium. As an example, we specify the problem to adiabatic acoustics. For the Cauchy problem, to fix unidirectional modes, the projection operators are constructed. The method of successive approximations (perturbation theory) is developed and based on pseudodifferential operators theory. The application of these projection operators allows to obtain approximate evolution equations corresponding to the separated directed waves.

Sergey Leble; Irina Vereshchagina

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.

Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454.

Gilbert, J.L.

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Maintenance and operations contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford management contract (PHMC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan has been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and its subcontractors ICF Kaiser Hanford (ICF KH) and BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), at the direction of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). WHC and its subcontractors are hereafter referred to as the Maintenance and Operations (M and O) Contractor. The plan identifies actions involving the M and O Contractor that are critical to (1) prepare for a smooth transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), and (2) support and assist the PHMC and RL in achieving transition as planned, with no or minimal impact to ongoing baseline activities. The plan is structured around two primary phases. The first is the pre-award phase, which started in mid-February 1996 and is currently scheduled to be completed on June 1, 1996, at which time the contract is currently planned to be awarded. The second is the follow-on four-month post-award phase from June 1, 1996, until October 1, 1996. Considering the magnitude and complexity of the scope of work being transitioned, completion in four months will require significant effort by all parties. To better ensure success, the M and O Contractor has developed a pre-award phase that is intended to maximize readiness for transition. Priority is given to preparation for facility assessments and processing of personnel, as these areas are determined to be on the critical path for transition. In addition, the M and O Contractor will put emphasis during the pre-award phase to close out open items prior to contract award, to include grievances, employee concerns, audit findings, compliance issues, etc.

Waite, J.L.

1996-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Optimal Operation of Variable Speed Pumping System in Chinas Eastern Route Project of S?to?N Water Diversion Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic planning model for optimizing operation of variable speed pumping system aiming at minimum power consumption was proposed to achieve economic operation. The No. 4 Jiangdu Pumping Station a source pumping station in Chinas Eastern Route of South?to?North Water Diversion Project is taken as a study case. Since the sump water level of Jiangdu Pumping Station is affected by the tide of Yangtze River the daily?average heads of the pumping system varies yearly from 3.8m to 7.8m and the tide level difference in one day up to 1.2m. Comparisons of operation electricity cost between optimized variable speed and fixed speed operations of pumping system were made. When the full load operation mode is adopted whether or not electricity prices in peak?valley periods are considered the benefits of variable speed operation cannot compensate the energy consumption of the VFD. And when the pumping system operates in part load and the peak?valley electricity prices are considered the pumping system should cease operation or lower its rotational speed in peak load hours since the electricity price are much higher and to the contrary the pumping system should raise its rotational speed in valley load hours to pump more water. The computed results show that if the pumping system operates in 80% or 60% loads the energy consumption cost of specified volume of water will save 14.01% and 26.69% averagely by means of optimal variable speed operation and the investment on VFD will be paid back in 2 or 3 years. However if the pumping system operates in 80% or 60% loads and the energy cost is calculated in non peak?valley electricity price the repayment will be lengthened up to 18 years. In Chinas S?to?N Water Diversion Project when the market operation and peak?valley electricity prices are taken into effect to supply water and regulate water levels in regulation reservoirs as Hongzehu Lake Luomahu Lake etc. the economic operation of water?diversion pumping stations will be vital and the adoption of VFDs to achieve optimal operation may be a good choice.

Jilin Cheng; Lihua Zhang; Rentian Zhang; Yi Gong; Honggeng Zhu; Dongsheng Deng; Xuesong Feng; Jinxian Qiu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Manhattan Project: Final Approval to Build the Bomb, Washington, D.C.,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB (Washington, D.C., December 1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Anxious as he was to get moving, Leslie Groves decided to make one final quality control check. On November 18, 1942, Groves appointed Warren K. Lewis of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to head a final review committee, comprised of himself and three DuPont representatives. During the final two weeks of November, the committee traveled from New York to Chicago to Berkeley and back again through Chicago. It endorsed the work on gaseous diffusion at Columbia, though it made some organizational recommendations; in fact, the Lewis committee advocated elevating gaseous diffusion to first priority and expressed reservations about the electromagnetic program despite an impassioned presentation by Ernest Lawrence in Berkeley. Upon returning to Chicago, Crawford H. Greenewalt, a member of the Lewis committee, was present at Stagg Field when CP-1 (Chicago Pile #1) first went critical. (For more on CP-1, skip ahead to "Early Pile Design, 1942.") Significant as this moment was in the history of physics, it came after the Lewis committee endorsed moving piles to the pilot stage and one day after Groves instructed DuPont to move into pile design and construction.

204

Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Office. "It has also allowed us to contribute to the two primary goals of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-- support jobs and spur...

205

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Management and operating contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford Management Contractor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Revision 1 to the M{ampersand}O Contractor Plan for Transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor.

Waite, J.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Structure finance for hybrid infrastructure models : the application of project finance into public-private partnerships for the construction and operation of infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies the application of project finance as the most efficient financing method for the construction and operation of infrastructure projects such as motorways, airports, power plants, pipelines, wastewater/sewage ...

Patramanis, Theodoros

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Project Execution Plan, Waste Management Division, Nevada Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy, April 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Waste Management Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the ''Life Cycle Asset Management,'' U.S. Department of Energy Order O430.1A; the Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order O430.1, and the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the state of Nevada; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification of roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls.

DOE /NV

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

project has a successful safety record, management continues to seek ways to improve the safety culture and identify and address potential vulnerabilities. "We cannot rest on our...

211

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kVlineisupgraded. TheTehachapiRenewableTransmissionTransmissionProjectandthePaloVerde/Harquahala?DeversNo. 2 500kVline

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Systems Engineering Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safety Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314 has been prepared within the guidelines of HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, TWRS Systems Engineering Management Plan. The activities within this SEMP have been tailored, in accordance with the TWRS SEMP and DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management, to meet the needs of the project.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Configuration Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Configuration Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable configuration management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume 111, Section 3.1, ''Configuration Management Implementation''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Risk Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable risk management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume IV, Section 2.6, ''Risk Management''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

FY 2014 Projects for Improving the Design, Construction, and Operation of Fossil Energy Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In FY 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy selected 38 new projects from across the nation under the Crosscutting Research Program that target innovative concepts and technologies to improve...

216

Regional Field Verification Project--Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A poster describing two years of operating data for four Bergey, 10-kW wind turbines on different host sites in the Pacific Northwest.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing Operation at High Temperature  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City College of New York (CCNY), under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing and testing a novel thermal storage method that allows operation at very high temperatures.

218

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operatingattributes: Loadfollowing. Spinningandnon?dispatchable,thenloadfollowing,regulation,rampingregulation,ramping,loadfollowing,voltagesupportand

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

220

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Database Aids Building Owners and Operators in Energy-Efficiency Project Decision Making  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE's Buildings Performance Database, launched in June 2013, provides access to empirical data on the actual energy performance, as well as physical and operational characteristics of commercial and residential buildings.

222

Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This represents roughly 2.2 million hours of safe work.

223

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Help Operators See Oil, Gas Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Six Research Teams to Develop Advanced Diagnostics And Imaging Technologies for Oil, Gas Fields TULSA, OK - If oil and gas producers could "see" hydrocarbon-bearing formations more accurately from the surface or from nearby wellbores, they can position new wells more precisely to produce more oil or gas with less risk and ultimately, at lower costs. For many producers in the United States, especially smaller producers operating on razor-thin margins, advanced diagnostics and imaging systems can help them in business. By visualizing the barriers and pathways for the flow of oil and gas through underground rock formations, producers can avoid dry holes and increase ultimate recovery.

224

Audit of Electrical System Construction Projects at the Nevada Operations Office, WR-B-97-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ELECTRICAL SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS AT THE NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost-effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vm1.hqadmin.doe.gov Department of Energy Human Resources and Administration Home Page http://www.hr.doe.gov/refshelf.html Your comments would be appreciated and can be provided on the Customer Response form attached to the report. This report can be obtained from the U.S. Department of Energy

225

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

226

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

THE CFB SUMMERSIDE PROJECT INITIAL OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH 18 TPH AFBC HEATING BOILERS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Initial operating experience with Canada's first commercial FBC boiler plant, located at CFB Summerside, PEI, is described. The plant, consisting of two boilers rated at 18,000 kg/h of steam at MCR, operating at 965 kPa saturated steam, is designed for high-sulphur coal with supplementary firing of wood chips. The boilers were operated intermittently from December 1982 until May 1983, and in May one boiler was subjected to an acceptance test campaign of about two weeks, during which it performed satisfactorily, at loads ranging from 110% MCR to the maximum design turndown ratio of 4.5:1. Assessment of its performance in terms of efficiency and emissions awaits completion of laboratory analyses and data reduction. Careful control of limestone sizing is required to avoid the problems with cold fluidization which were encountered during commissioning. Also, high moisture and fines in the coal caused significant problems in the materials handling system. Some erosion of boiler tubes in the bed zone was observed. The affected areas were covered with a thin layer of hard refractory to prevent further deterioration. This does not appear to have a detrimental effect on steam output. Further work remains to be done, but it appears likely that during the next heating season both boilers will be fully commissioned and all requirements for acceptance will be met. KEYWORDS Fluidized-bed combustion, coal combustion, boiler operation.

V.V. Razbin; F.D. Friedrich

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cook Cook 1 , Gilles Guerin 1 , Stefan Mrozewski 1 , Timothy Collett 2 , & Ray Boswell 3 Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: 1 Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, NY 10964 E-mail: Cook: acook@ldeo.columbia.edu Guerin: guerin@ldeo.columbia.edu Mrozewski: stefan@ldeo.columbia.edu 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 E-mail: ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov 2 US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center, MS-939 Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 E-mail:

229

Report on Inspection of an Intelligence Work-For-Others Project at the Idaho Operations Office, IG-0367  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPORT ON INSPECTION OF AN INTELLIGENCE WORK-FOR-OTHERS PROJECT AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE The Office of Inspections wants to make the distribution of its inspection reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, we are making this report available electronically through the Internet at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vml.hqadmin.doe.gov We are experimenting with various options to facilitate audit report distribution. Your comments would be appreciated and can be provided on the Customer Comment Form attached to the

230

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Arizona, California, and Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westerns Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

233

Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

Gydesen, S.P.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

235

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5 operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20.imperial.ac.uk/biomedeng Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £13,095,963 Funding Source: SRIF II and Capital

236

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California is on a path to increase utilization of renewable resources. California will need to integrate approximately 30,000 megawatts (MW) of new renewable generation in the next 20 years. Renewable resources are typically located in remote locations, not near the load centers. Nearly two/thirds or 20,000 MW of new renewable resources needed are likely to be delivered to Los Angeles Basin transmission gateways. Integration of renewable resources requires interconnection to the power grid, expansion of the transmission system capability between the backbone power grid and transmission gateways, and increase in delivery capacity from transmission gateways to the local load centers. To scope the transmission, operations, and reliability issues for renewables integration, this research focused on the Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateways where most of new renewables are likely. Necessary actions for successful renewables integration include: (1) Expand Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateway and nomogram limits by 10,000 to 20,000 MW; (2) Upgrade local transmission network for deliverability to load centers; (3) Secure additional storage, demand management, automatic load control, dynamic pricing, and other resources that meet regulation and ramping needed in real time operations; (4) Enhance local voltage support; and (5) Expand deliverability from Los Angeles to San Diego and Northern California.

Eto, Joseph; Budhraja, Vikram; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Mobasheri, Fred; Eto, Joseph

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Size quantization effects in atomic level broadening near thin metallic films Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.R. ¡ Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 and Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 P. Ku¨rpick* J.R. ¡ Macdonald Laboratory, Department

Thumm, Uwe

238

Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

239

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

H. R. 3113: an act providing for the coordinated operation of the Central Valley project and the State water project in California. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 25, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources rewrote the Bill coordinating operations of the Central Valley Project in California and the state water project, and limited the Secretary of the Interior to no more than 75% of the Central Valley Project's annual yield. The Bill specifies procedures for water delivery contracts and reimbursements. Title II deals with the preservation of the Suisin Marsh District; Title III with the reclamation of small projects; and Title IV with contract validation. The document contains both the original and the amended wording of H.R. 3113.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Lessons Learned Report on the Combined Construction and Operating License/Design Certification Demonstration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report August 30, 2012 Prepared by Longenecker and Associates DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

242

Operational Awareness Oversight of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Performance of the Contractor Assurance System Program, April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HIAR PORTS-2012-09-24 HIAR PORTS-2012-09-24 Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) Performance of the Contractor Assurance System (CAS) Program Dates of Activity : 09/24/12 - 10/04/12 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) shadowed PPPO's review of specific elements of the Fluor-B&W Portsmouth (FBP) CAS program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The review was limited to three requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy:

243

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 5 of Volume IV, discusses: Corrective maintenance procedures; Calibration procedures; Surveillance procedures; Equipment changeover procedures; Decontamination procedures; Recovery procedures; and Cable schedule.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls, South Carolina: Final operations and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prior to construction, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (BREC) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Number FC07-80ID12125 which provided $1,052,664 toward the construction of the facility. This agreement requires that BREC document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operating and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. A complete reporting covering the design, technical, construction, legal, institutional, environmental and other related aspects of the total project was furnished to DOE previously for publication as the ''Final Technical and Construction Cost Report''. For this reason these elements will not be addressed in detail in this report. In order to make this account a more meaningful discussion of the initial two-year and four month production period, it is necessary to detail several unique events concerning the project which set Cherokee Falls apart from other projects developed under similar Cooperative Agreements with DOE. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance cost and value of the power produced for the first 28 months of operation. 3 figs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Background report for the formerly utilized Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission sites program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is conducting a program to determine radiological conditions at sites formerly used by the Army Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission in the early years of nuclear energy development. Also included in the program are sites used in the Los Alamos plutonium development program and the Trinity atomic bomb test site. Materials, equipment, buildings, and land became contaminated, primarily with naturally occurring radioactive nuclides. They were later decontaminated in accordance with the standards and survey methods in use at that time. Since then, however, radiological criteria, and proposed guidelines for release of such sites for unrestricted use have become more stringent as research on the effects of low-level radiation has progressed. In addition, records documenting some of these decontamination efforts cannot be found, and the final radiological conditions of the sites could not be adequately determined from the records. As a result, the Formerly Utilized Sites Program was initiated in 1974 to identify these formerly used sites and to reevaluate their radiological status. This report covers efforts through June 1980 to determine the radiological status of sites for which the existing conditions could not be clearly defined. Principal contractor facilities and associated properties have already been identified and activities are continuing to identify additional sites. Any new sites located will probably be subcontractor facilities and areas used for disposal of contractor waste or equipment; however, only limited information regarding this equipment and material has been collected to date. As additional information becomes available, supplemental reports will be published.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

DOE/EA-1628: Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC. (September 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Notice of Wetlands and Notice of Wetlands Involvement Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC. Emmetsburg, Iowa Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy by September 2008 September 2008 i POET Project LIBERTY - Final EA 9-26-08.doc Contents Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................i Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Terms............................................................................................................iv 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Background......................................................................................................................................

248

Hermitian Young operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Starting from conventional Young operators, we construct Hermitian operators which project orthogonally onto irreducible representations of the (special) unitary group.

Keppeler, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.keppeler@uni-tuebingen.de [Mathematisches Institut, Universitt Tbingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tbingen (Germany)] [Mathematisches Institut, Universitt Tbingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tbingen (Germany); Sjdahl, Malin, E-mail: malin.sjodahl@thep.lu.se [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Slvegatan 14A, 22362 Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Slvegatan 14A, 22362 Lund (Sweden)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Site surveillance and maintenance program for Palos Park, report for 1985. [Part of Manhattan Engineering District project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Park area for CY 1985 are presented. The monitoring program is the ongoing remedial action that resulted from the radiological characterization of the site. The current program consists of sample collection and analysis of air, surface and subsurface water, and bottom sediment to determine the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the wells, establish if other buried radionuclides have migrated, and otherwise characterize the radiological environment of the area. Earlier studies had determined that hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) migrated from the burial ground and was detected in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic well continued to show the same pattern of elevated levels in the winter and low concentrations in the summer, but the magnitude of the winter peak (2.5 nCi/L) was significantly less than in earlier years. Tritiated water continues to be monitored at a number of wells, boreholes, and surface streams where it has been detected in the past. For many years it was the only radionuclide found to have migrated until recent measurements indicated the presence of strontium-90 in borehole water next to Plot M. The presence of the strontium-90 is an indicator of migration of radionuclides other than tritiated water from the Plot. However, the results of the program indicates that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site or those living in the vicinity.

Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Relationships between Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing program and hydropower operations at Salt Lake City area integrated projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum provides background information on the Western Area Power Administration (Western) and the physical characteristics of the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydropower plants, which include the Colorado River Storage Project, the Rio Grande Project, and the Collbran Project. In addition, the history, electrical capacity, storage capacity, and flow restrictions at each dam are presented. An overview of Western`s current programs and services, including a review of statutory authorities, agency discretion, and obligations, is also provided. The variability of SLCA/IP hourly generation under various alternative marketing strategies and purchasing programs is discussed. The effects of Western`s services, such as area load control, outage assistance, and transmission, on SLCA/IP power plant operations are analyzed.

Veselka, T.D.; Folga, S.; Poch, L.A. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

spotlights The Manhattan Project spotlights The Manhattan Project by Rita Hohenbrink on Tue, 30 Jul, 2013 Calutron (Y-12) Operators Manhattan Project Sixty-eight years ago, an atomic bomb was detonated on an isolated corner of southern New Mexico in a weapon test named Trinity. This month, The Manhattan Project: Resources, a web-based, joint collaboration between the Department's Office of Classification and Office of History and Heritage Resources has been launched. The site is designed to disseminate information and documentation on the Manhattan Project to a broad audience including scholars, students, and the general public. OSTI is hosting this information as part of the OpenNet web site. Manhattan Project Resources consists of two parts: 1) a multi-page, easy to read and navigate Manhattan Project: An Interactive History providing a

255

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

256

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

257

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OpenNet Topic OpenNet Topic OpenNet spotlights The Manhattan Project by Rita Hohenbrink 30 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content Calutron (Y-12) Operators Manhattan Project Sixty-eight years ago, an atomic bomb was detonated on an isolated corner of southern New Mexico in a weapon test named Trinity. Related Topics: atomic bomb, Calutron (Y-12) Operators, Leslie Groves, Manhattan Project, OpenNet, OpenNet Read more... OpenNet spotlights The Manhattan Project by Rita Hohenbrink 30 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content Calutron (Y-12) Operators Manhattan Project Sixty-eight years ago, an atomic bomb was detonated on an isolated corner of southern New Mexico in a weapon test named Trinity. Related Topics: atomic bomb, Calutron (Y-12) Operators, Leslie Groves, Manhattan Project, OpenNet, OpenNet Read more...

258

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 1, 2004 through to April 14, 2004 and a total of 250,249 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2002 egg source and included captive brood (133,781) and conventional (116,468) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2004 began May 10, the first Chinook was captured on May 19, 2004 and the last Chinook was captured on September 16, 2004. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2004. A total of 1,091 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 299 natural origin fish and 792 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 46 natural and 69 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to Lookingglass Hatchery for holding and spawning, 537 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 447 hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 107 adults retained (eight additional hatchery females were collected and then later returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally) for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 22 natural females and 30 supplementation females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 221,889 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 94.9% which yielded a total of 210,661 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,267 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage and then transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they will be reared to the fingerling stage. They will then be transported back to LGH and reared to the smolt stage and then transported to the Lostine acclimation facility for release in the spring of 2006. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 3, 2003 through to April 14, 2003 and a total of 242,776 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2001 egg source and included captive broodstock (141,860) and conventional broodstock (100,916) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2003 began April 30th, the first Chinook was captured on May 16, 2003 and the last Chinook was captured on September 21, 2003. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2003. A total of 464 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 239 natural origin fish and 225 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 45 natural and 4 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 366 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 49 hatchery origin adult jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 49 adults retained for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 21 natural females and no hatchery origin females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 106,609 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 95.50% which yielded a total of 101,811 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 5,077 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage. At eye they were transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they were reared to the fingerling state at which time they were transported back to LGH until they were smolts in the spring of 2005. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2005.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from 3/5/07 through to 4/17/07 and a total of 230,010 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2005 egg source and included captive brood (24,604) and conventional (205,406) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2007 began May 14th. The first Chinook was captured on June 2, 2007 and the last Chinook was captured on September 25, 2007. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2007. A total of 637 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 240 natural origin fish and 397 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 41 natural and 81 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 403 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and only hatchery origin jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek in underseeded habitat. Of the 122 adult fish retained for broodstock, 20 natural females and 40 supplementation females were represented in spawning. The eggs from these females produced a total of 267,350 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 86.73% which yielded a total of 231,882 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,456 eggs per female. These eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until they are smolts in the spring of 2009. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2009. Due to the success of the 2007 egg collection, the number of fish produced exceeded program needs and facility capabilities. As a result, there are plans to outplant fry in 2008 and parr in early 2009 to underseeded habitat in the Wallowa River.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Project W-519 CDR supplement: Raw water and electrical services for privatization contractor, AP tank farm operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supplement to the Project W-519 Conceptual Design will identify a means to provide RW and Electrical services to serve the needs of the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) at AP Tank Farm as directed by DOE-RL. The RW will serve the fire suppression and untreated process water requirements for the PC. The purpose of this CDR supplement is to identify Raw Water (RW) and Electrical service line routes to the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) feed delivery tanks, AP-106 and/or AP-108, and establish associated cost impacts to the Project W-519 baseline.

Parazin, R.J.

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Honeywell Proprietary honeywell.de/hbs#0;? 2 Improving energy efficiency: Where to start with? ? A study (1) identified energy saving potentials within non- residential office buildings high as: ? 30...-residential buildings. ESL-IC-08-10-67a Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Honeywell Proprietary honeywell.de/hbs#0;? 3 Low capital investment actions (1) ? 50% of the electrical...

Muller, C.

264

Project Title: Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: Mining Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of small scale power generation from low temperature co-produced fluids. Phase I is to Develop, Design and Test an economically feasible low temperature ORC solution to generate power from lower temperature co-produced geothermal fluids. Phase II &III are to fabricate, test and site a fully operational demonstrator unit on a gold mine working site and operate, remotely monitor and collect data per the DOE recommended data package for one year.

Clark, Thomas M [Principal Investigator; Erlach, Celeste [Communications Mgr.

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Operation Castle. Project 7. 1. Electromagnetic radiation calibration, Pacific )roving ground. Report for March-May 1954  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 17 stations, one close-in (320 km from Bikini and 23 km from Eniwetok) and the balance at distances, were operated for the electromagnetic experimental effort. Seventy-four sets of data were obtained from a possible total of 102. Of the remaining 28 sets, no data were obtained because equipment was not in operation, records were not readable, the alert notifications were not received, signals were not discernible, or equipment malfunctioned.

Olseon, M.H.

1984-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Distinguished Achievements of a Quarter-Century Operation and a Promising Project Named MK-III in JOYO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental fast reactor JOYO at the O-arai Engineering Center of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute is the first liquid sodium fast reactor in Japan. The purpose of constructing JOYO was to obtain technical information about liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) through experience with their design, construction, and operation and to use the reactor as a fast neutron irradiation facility for the development of fuels, materials, and other components required for the LMFBR program. Through design, construction, testing, operation, and maintenance experience, JOYO has contributed much to the LMFBR development program. In addition to providing operating experience, many kinds of irradiation tests have been conducted for the development of fuels and materials under the conditions of higher fast neutron flux and temperature than those in light water reactors. JOYO has been operated successfully for a quarter-century without any serious problem, and this operation demonstrated the safety and reliability of the sodium-cooled fast reactor.The reactor has just been upgraded to the MK-III core to increase irradiation capability for playing a greater role in providing an irradiation field as a fast reactor. Given the worldwide trend of fast reactor shutdowns, JOYO is an increasingly valuable world resource for current and future reactor development.

Maeda, Yukimoto; Aoyama, Takafumi; Odo, Toshihiro; Nakai, Satoru; Suzuki, Soju [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

FY09 WDI PROJECT FUNDING CUNY Unit Project Name  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY09 WDI PROJECT FUNDING CUNY Unit Project Name International Trade Operation & Procedures Program Simulation Lab College Initiative Bridge Program Workshop Project for Direct Care Workers Green Initiatives

Rosen, Jay

268

Lessons from Iowa : development of a 270 megawatt compressed air energy storage project in midwest Independent System Operator : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iowa Stored Energy Park was an innovative, 270 Megawatt, $400 million compressed air energy storage (CAES) project proposed for in-service near Des Moines, Iowa, in 2015. After eight years in development the project was terminated because of site geological limitations. However, much was learned in the development process regarding what it takes to do a utility-scale, bulk energy storage facility and coordinate it with regional renewable wind energy resources in an Independent System Operator (ISO) marketplace. Lessons include the costs and long-term economics of a CAES facility compared to conventional natural gas-fired generation alternatives; market, legislative, and contract issues related to enabling energy storage in an ISO market; the importance of due diligence in project management; and community relations and marketing for siting of large energy projects. Although many of the lessons relate to CAES applications in particular, most of the lessons learned are independent of site location or geology, or even the particular energy storage technology involved.

Holst, Kent (Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency, Traer, IA); Huff, Georgianne; Schulte, Robert H. (Schulte Associates LLC, Northfield, MN); Critelli, Nicholas (Critelli Law Office PC, Des Moines, IA)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Uinit Contractor Operational Readiness Review, June 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contractor Contractor Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

270

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Uinit Contractor Operational Readiness Review, June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Contractor Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

271

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

de Weck, Olivier L.

272

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westerns Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

273

Project title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

274

THE IMPACT OF A TANK 40H DECANT ON THE PROJECTED OPERATING WINDOWS FOR SB4 AND GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY IN SUPPORT OF THE VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assess the impact of a 100K gallon decant volume from Tank 40H on the existing sludge-only Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)-Frit 510 flowsheet and the coupled operations flowsheet (SB4 with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)). Another potential SB4 flowsheet modification of interest includes the addition of 3 wt% sodium (on a calcined oxide basis) to a decanted sludge-only or coupled operations flowsheet. These potential SB4 flowsheet modifications could result in significant compositional shifts to the SB4 system. This paper study provides an assessment of the impact of these compositional changes to the projected glass operating windows and to the variability study for the Frit 510-SB4 system. The influence of the compositional changes on melt rate was not assessed in this study nor was it requested. Nominal Stage paper study assessments were completed using the projected compositions for the various flowsheet options coupled with Frit 510 (i.e., variation was not applied to the sludge and frit compositions). In order to gain insight into the impacts of sludge variation and/or frit variation (due to the procurement specifications) on the projected operating windows, three versions of the Variation Stage assessment were performed: (1) the traditional Variation Stage assessment in which the nominal Frit 510 composition was coupled with the extreme vertices (EVs) of each sludge, (2) an assessment of the impact of possible frit variation (within the accepted frit specification tolerances) on each nominal SB4 option, and (3) an assessment of the impact of possible variation in the Frit 510 composition due to the vendor's acceptance specifications coupled with the EVs of each sludge case. The results of the Nominal Stage assessment indicate very little difference among the various flowsheet options. All of the flowsheets provide DWPF with the possibility of targeting waste loadings (WLs) from the low 30s to the low 40s with Frit 510. In general, the Tank 40H decant has a slight negative impact on the operating window, but DWPF still has the ability to target current WLs (34%) and higher WLs if needed. While the decant does not affect practical WL targets in DWPF, melt rate could be reduced due to the lower Na{sub 2}O content. If true, the addition of 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to the glass system may regain melt rate, assuming that the source of alkali is independent of the impact on melt rate. Coupled operations with Frit 510 via the addition of ARP to the decanted SB4 flowsheet also appears to be viable based on the projected operating windows. The addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to a decanted Tank 40H sludge may be problematic using Frit 510. Although the Nominal Stage assessments provide reasonable operating windows for the SB4 flowsheets being considered with Frit 510, introduction of potential sludge and/or frit compositional variation does have a negative impact. The magnitude of the impact on the projected operating windows is dependent on the specific flowsheet options as well as the applied variation. The results of the traditional Variation Stage assessments indicate that the three proposed Tank 40H decanted flowsheet options (Case No.2--100K gallon decant, Case No.3--100K gallon decant and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O addition and Case No.4--100K gallon decant and ARP) demonstrate a relatively high degree of robustness to possible sludge variation over WLs of interest with Frit 510. However, the case where the addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O is considered was problematic during the traditional Variation Stage assessment. The impact of coupling the frit specifications with the nominal SB4 flowsheet options on the projected operating windows is highly dependent on whether the upper WLs are low viscosity or liquidus temperature limited in the Nominal Stage assessments. Systems that are liquidus temperature limited exhibit a high degree of robustness to the applied frit and sludge variation, while those that are low viscosity li

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Project 1640 Palomar Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project 1640 Palomar Procedures Version 0.1 7/7/08 2:11:08 PM #12;2 Project 1640 Design and Operations Table of Contents Project 1640..................................................................................................................... 1 Palomar Procedures

277

A Complexity Science-Based Framework for Global Joint Operations Analysis to Support Force Projection: LDRD Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

Lawton, Craig R.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Power Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

280

Notice of Intent for the Construction and Operation of the Proposed Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project, South Dakota and Minnesota (5/27/05)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

16 16 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 102 / Friday, May 27, 2005 / Notices Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Note that also there is an ''eSubscription'' link on the web site that enables subscribers to receive e- mail notification when a document is added to a subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov, or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: June 9, 2005. Magalie R. Salas, Secretary. [FR Doc. E5-2702 Filed 5-26-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Construction and Operation of the Proposed Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project, South Dakota and Minnesota

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Operational strategy for soil concentration predictions of strontium/yttrium-90 and cesium-137 in surface soil at the West Valley Demonstration Project site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are difficulties associated with the assessment of the interpretation of field measurements, determination of guideline protocols and control and disposal of low level radioactive contaminated soil in the environmental health physics field. Questions are raised among scientists and in public forums concerning the necessity and high costs of large area soil remediation versus the risks of low-dose radiation health effects. As a result, accurate soil activity assessments become imperative in decontamination situations. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a US Department of Energy facility located in West Valley, New York is managed and operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. (WVNS). WVNS has identified contaminated on-site soil areas with a mixed variety of radionuclides (primarily fission product). Through the use of data obtained from a previous project performed during the summer of 1994 entitled ``Field Survey Correlation and Instrumentation Response for an In Situ Soil Measurement Program`` (Myers), the WVDP offers a unique research opportunity to investigate the possibility of soil concentration predictions based on exposure or count rate responses returned from a survey detector probe. In this study, correlations are developed between laboratory measured soil beta activity and survey probe response for the purposes of determining the optimal detector for field use and using these correlations to establish predictability of soil activity levels.

Myers, J.A.

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) Project Title: Beacon Solar Energy Project (Beacon)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) FACT SHEET Project Title: Beacon Solar Energy Project and operate the Beacon Solar Energy Project (Beacon). Location: The project is located in eastern Kern County;BEACON SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT (08-AFC-2) FACT SHEET Licensing: The Beacon project would have a nominal

283

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational...

285

Looking beyond 'information provision': the importance of being a kiosk operator in the sustainable access in rural India (SARI) project, Tamilnadu, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development projects based on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) attract significant funding support. Many such projects are initiated on the premise that ICTs can play an important role in reducing acute information asymmetries in low-income ... Keywords: India, egovernance, gender, information asymmetries, kiosk projects

Janaki Srinivasan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Requirements Verification Report AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System for Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Requirements Verification Report (RVR) for Project W-314 ''AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System'' package provides documented verification of design compliance to all the applicable Project Development Specification (PDS) requirements. Additional PDS requirements verification will be performed during the project's procurement, construction, and testing phases, and the RVR will be updated to reflect this information as appropriate.

MCGREW, D.L.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Manhattan Project Topic Manhattan Project Topic OpenNet spotlights The Manhattan Project by Rita Hohenbrink 30 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content Calutron (Y-12) Operators Manhattan Project Sixty-eight years ago, an atomic bomb was detonated on an isolated corner of southern New Mexico in a weapon test named Trinity. Related Topics: atomic bomb, Calutron (Y-12) Operators, Leslie Groves, Manhattan Project, OpenNet, OpenNet Read more... 100th DOE R&D Accomplishments Feature Page Celebration by Linda McBrearty 08 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content DOE R&D Accomplishments 100th Feature Page DOE R&D Accomplishments is a unique website and database in the OSTI collection. For over 14 years, special Feature pages have been methodically researched and useful information collected on scientists, discoveries, and historical events to include in this searchable resource. It is a rich source of DOE trivia unto itself.

288

Preliminary Screening for Project Feasibility and Applications for Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Super ESPC Best Practices Super ESPC Best Practices Preliminary Screening for Project Feasibility and Applications for Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Projects GHPs Should Always be Considered for Federal Sites Geothermal or ground-source heat pumps (GHPs) are a highly efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. The technology has been applied successfully in a wide variety of building types - single- and multi-family dwellings, schools, offices, department and convenience stores, hotels, post offices, and libraries among others - and in climates and geographical zones across the United States, from the deserts of Fort Irwin, California, to downtown Manhattan, and from South Texas to Northern Minnesota. Given their energy and cost savings potential, and their wide range of applicability, GHPs should always be considered as a

289

TIP #: Project Name  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Customers **Cost sharing partners. Project Synopsis Evaluate the performance and demand response (DR) of the Gen II GE GeoSpring(tm) HPWH under a number of operating...

290

Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

291

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

292

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

293

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

294

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

295

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research project whose overarching goals are to improve the accuracy of short-term wind energy forecasts, and to demonstrate the economic value of these improvements.

296

"1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560 "3. Martin Lake","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",2425 "4. Comanche Peak","Nuclear","TXU Generation Co LP",2406 "5. Monticello","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",1890 "6. Sabine","Gas","Entergy Texas Inc.",1814 "7. Limestone","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",1689 "8. Fayette Power Project","Coal","Lower Colorado River Authority",1641 "9. Forney Energy Center","Gas","FPLE Forney LP",1640

297

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Karl) Zhang, Undergraduate Student, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering; Cheryl Kim Audio, Digital Video Project Abstract The goal of this project is to develop online modular units

Gray, Jeffrey J.

298

Line Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Line Projects BPA identifies critical infrastructure and...

299

Hallmark Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

300

Cloudnet Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

Hogan, Robin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

302

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

303

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

304

PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hr GRC 3 PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing-seeded into spring wheat stubble at Havre in 2002 is presented in Table 1. The `Morris Gumbo Boot' was included

Maxwell, Bruce D.

305

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

306

Projectivities and Projective Embeddings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we aim to prove some of the main achievements in the theory of generalized polygons. First, we want to show what the little projective group and the groups of projectivities of some Moufang po...

Hendrik van Maldeghem

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Project Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Questions Keeler-Pennwalt Wood Pole Removal Line Projects Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Spacer Damper Replacement Program Wind Projects Project Overview BPA...

308

Operations and maintenance philosophy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Philosophy document is intended to establish a future O&M vision, with an increased focus on minimizing worker exposure, ensuring uninterrupted retrieval operations, and minimizing operation life-cycle cost. It is intended that this document would incorporate O&M lessons learned into on-going and future project upgrades.

DUNCAN, G.P.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

310

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

311

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve into teams and having each team use a different m-health data collection tool (e.g., cellular phones, smart health patterns. The Tech Fellow, Jacqueline Ferguson, will assist in creating an m-health project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

312

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

313

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Proposal · Project Logistics: ­ 2-3 person teams ­ Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

314

2011 M&I Water Supply This report provides data on projects operated and maintained by the U. S. Army Corps of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water supply conservation pool. The Chief of Engineers has discretionary authority to reallocate up to 50,000 acre-feet or 15% of the conservation pool, whichever is less. The 1983 reallocated covered2011 M&I Water Supply Database 2012-R-02 April 2012 #12;This report provides data on projects

US Army Corps of Engineers

315

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A...

316

Earned Value Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP)- March 2014 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard Operating...

317

Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2012 Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project - July 2012 July 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project HIAR...

319

Independent Oversight Assessment, Portsmouth/Paducah Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Office - May 2012 May 2012 Assessment of the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants...

320

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project September 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Operational Awareness Review and Sludge Treatment Project Independent Project Review [HIAR-RL-2013-09-18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design...

323

Project 301  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2006 2006 Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Arun C. Bose Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4467 arun.bose@netl.doe.gov ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION Background Over the past years, environmental concerns regarding pollutants have grown dramatically. Current annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are 12% higher than they were in 1992. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are projected to increase by an additional 34% over the next 20 years. About one third of carbon emissions in the

324

Plant Operations Executive Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus North Campus Recycling Operations Materials Human Resources Payroll Misc Svs Special Projects Planning Spray Shop Glass Shop Upholstery Shop Plant IT Painting Services G. Weincouff Human Resources Business Services Estimating Shutdown Coordination Scheduling L. Rastique Human Resources 67398 M

Awtar, Shorya

325

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project Completions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2, 2012 August 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently paused to observe a notable achievement: completion of more than 100 projects in its $6 billion cleanup of the Manhattan Project and Cold War legacy. "We marked an important milestone when we safely completed a significant amount of work - 103 of the 129 projects and activities that comprise the Recovery Act- funded cleanup in 12 states across the DOE Complex," EM Recovery Act Program Director Thomas Johnson said. "In addition, we are on schedule to complete the bulk of the remaining projects in this fiscal year and the last few in fiscal year 2013." Johnson noted other significant accomplishments in the program. More than 90

327

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office - April 2011 April 2011 Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 This Independent Activity Report...

328

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Project Brochures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems. The Integrated Energy SystemsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Project Brochures Integrated Energy Systems: Productivity and Building of a larger research effort called Integrated Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program

329

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Town Sites and Communities * Irrigation Manhattan Project & Cold War Era: 1943-1990 * Hanford Construction Camp * Manhattan Project * Cold War Modern Day Hanford: 1990-Present...

330

DSW Power Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

331

ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS: HYDROLOGY, GROUNDWATER OPERATING RULE affect California's SWP (State Water Project) and CVP (Central Valley Project) water supply deliveries-operation of groundwater storage, both north and south of the Delta, can increase long-term average project deliveries

Lund, Jay R.

332

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Ian Sims, Student, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title and Jazz Theory/Keyboard I & II. Technologies Used Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML

Gray, Jeffrey J.

333

Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Renewable Energy Project Funding | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Project Funding Renewable Energy Project Funding Renewable Energy Project Funding October 16, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Renewable Energy Project Funding Planning, Programming & Budgeting Building Design Project Construction Commissioning Operations & Maintenance Federal energy projects require funding to generate results. Agencies trying to stretch their capital budget for a construction project should investigate renewable energy project funding options outside the traditional appropriated budget process. Carefully matching available funding tools with specific project needs can make the difference between a stalled, unfunded renewable energy project and a successful project that generates energy and cost savings. Federal agencies may be able to use tools to finance renewable energy

336

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1.1M Funding Source: Departmental Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: November 2010 End Date : March 2011 Occupation Date: March 2011 For further information contact Project Manager as listed above

337

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

338

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels Penn State University & Georgia Tech 4 Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels Penn State University & Georgia Tech Dom Santavicca (PSU) & Tim Lieuwen (Georgia Tech) Project Dates: 10/1/2008 - 9/30/2011 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: The objectives of this project are 1) to obtain fundamental understanding of the response of lean premixed multi-nozzle combustors operating on high hydrogen, coal derived fuels to both transverse and longitudinal fluctuations of the air flow rate and 2) to use this understanding to formulate and validate longitudinal and transverse flame response models that can be used to predict instability in multi-nozzle annular and can combustors. Such models are an essential tool

339

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Integration - Safety Integration - Implementation of Controls Examples Example 24 5 Health & Safety This section describes the work controls associated with the 771/774 Closure Project. As prescribed in DOE Order 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, the project must comply with the OSHA construction standards for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926. Under these standards, a Building 771/774 Closure Project-Specific HASP has been prepared to address the safety and health hazards of each phase of operations. In addition, the DOE Order for Construction Project Safety and Health Management, 5480.9A, applies to this project. This order requires the preparation of JHAs to identify each task, the hazards associated with each task, and the precautions necessary to mitigate the

340

DAF Glovebox Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines how the glovebox project will be managed and executed. It provides a path forward for establishing a glovebox capability in Building 341 of the DAF in time to meet JASPER programmatic requirements as the first user. Note that some elements of the glovebox project have been under way for some time and are more mature than others; other elements are being worked concurrently. This plan serves the following purposes: Assign organizational and individual responsibilities for bringing the glovebox capability online; Coordinate activities between organizations; Facilitate communication between project members and management; and Identify the mechanisms used to manage and control the project. The scope of this plan includes all activities conducted to achieve project objectives, culminating in DOE/NV approval to operate. This plan does not address the issues associated with the steady-state operation of the glovebox.

Martinez, M.W.; Higgs, R.L.

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FLUXNET Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation > FLUXNET Validation > FLUXNET The FLUXNET Project Overview [FLUXNET Logo] FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological tower sites that use eddy covariance methods to measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. More that 500 tower sites from about 30 regional networks across five continents are currently operating on a long-term basis. The overarching goal of FLUXNET is to provide information for validating remote sensing products for net primary productivity (npp), evaporation, and energy absorption. FLUXNET provides information to FLUXNET investigators and to the public. The primary functions of FLUXNET are: To provide information about tower location, site characteristics, data availability, and where to obtain the data

342

Project 397  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Gary J. Stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov John Stipanovich Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-6027 john.stipanovich@netl.doe.gov Derek Aldred Principal Investigator Stamet, Inc. 8210 Lankershim Blvd. #9 North Hollywood, CA 91605 818-768-1025 dlaldred@stametinc.com CONTINUOUS PRESSURE INJECTION OF SOLID FUELS INTO ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEM PRESSURES Description Operators and designers of high-pressure combustion systems universally agree that one of the major problems inhibiting the success of this technology relates to solid

343

Project311  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lang Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov John Bowser Principal Investigator Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. 325 Water Street Wilmington, DE 19804 302-999-7996 john.bowser@compactmembrane.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM LARGE POINT SOURCES Background Capture of carbon dioxide at the source of its emission has been a major focus in greenhouse gas emission control. Current technologies used for capturing CO 2 suffer from inefficient mass transfer and economics. In Phase I, Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. will fabricate and test a membrane-based absorption system for the removal of carbon dioxide from a simulated power-plant flue gas. The stability of the membrane system under various operating conditions

344

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

345

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information systems (GIS) tools to design maps that integrate data for visualizing geographic concepts School of Engineering Project Title GIS & Introductory Geography Audience Undergraduate students on how to use the Internet for geographic research, and an interactive introduction to GIS through online

Gray, Jeffrey J.

346

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Inspired by agile methods #12;Background · Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling · The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems ­incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? · Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

347

IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems? From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to progressive N limitation. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Operations Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Standards BPA Operations Information (OPI) Transmission Services operates and plans for regional and national system needs. Transmission Services coordinates system operation and...

349

MULTIPLE LETTERS Mr. James Speir, Vice President Phosphate Operations  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

52. 52. APR 9 1986 MULTIPLE LETTERS Mr. James Speir, Vice President Phosphate Operations International Minerals and Chemical Corporation P.O. Box 7047 Lakeland, Florida 33807 Dear Mr. Speir: The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. As you may be aware through previous correspondence, the International Minerals and Chemical Corporation facility in Mulberry, Florida, was identified as one such site, as a result of some research, development, and pilot plant work conducted at the

350

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project Objectives The 1996 and 1997 Iowa General Assembly-share basis to livestock producers and operators selected to carry out various demonstration projects. Organization The Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project was administered by ISU Extension. Stewart

Lin, Zhiqun

351

Project Accounts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

352

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

353

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

354

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

355

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Operations Information for Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Information for Studies Operations Information for Studies This page contains historical information about hydropower operations. Reclamation UC Region 24-Month Studies FY2009 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2009 (Oct, 2008-Sept, 2009) FY2010 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2010 (Oct, 2009-Sept, 2010) FY2011 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct, 2010-Sept, 2011) FY2012 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2012 (Oct, 2011-Sept, 2012) FY2013 Load Information (pdf) SLIP total customer loads for Fiscal Year 2013 (Oct, 2012-Sept, 2013) CRSP Projected Power Releases From USBR (Excel) The most recent file of projected future power releases from CRSP Dams, median projection

357

100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on the results of the pilot study, the recommendations for the revision of the work plan are as follows: characterize the surface soil using field portable XRF measurements with confirmatory inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy sampling for the remedial investigation establish decision units of similar defined areas establish a process for field investigation of soil concentrations exceeding the screening criteria at the border of the 100-OL-1 OU define data quality objectives for the work plan using the results of the pilot study and refining the sampling approach for the remedial investigation.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

gaseous diffusion Topic gaseous diffusion Topic The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations by Mary Schorn 29 Nov, 2012 in Science Communications Major operations for the Manhattan Engineer District (Manhattan Project) took place in remote site locations in the states of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington, with additional research being conducted in university laboratories at Chicago and Berkeley. At the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago, Enrico Fermi's experiments at the CP-1 pile took place to determine the exact amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction. A second pile (CP-2), with external cooling, was built at Argonne in order to move the continuing experiments away from populated areas. Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electromagnetic, gaseous diffusion, Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II Read more...

359

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

nuclear chain reaction Topic nuclear chain reaction Topic The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations by Mary Schorn 29 Nov, 2012 in Science Communications Major operations for the Manhattan Engineer District (Manhattan Project) took place in remote site locations in the states of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington, with additional research being conducted in university laboratories at Chicago and Berkeley. At the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago, Enrico Fermi's experiments at the CP-1 pile took place to determine the exact amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction. A second pile (CP-2), with external cooling, was built at Argonne in order to move the continuing experiments away from populated areas. Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electromagnetic, gaseous diffusion, Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II Read more...

360

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

electromagnetic Topic electromagnetic Topic The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations by Mary Schorn 29 Nov, 2012 in Science Communications Major operations for the Manhattan Engineer District (Manhattan Project) took place in remote site locations in the states of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington, with additional research being conducted in university laboratories at Chicago and Berkeley. At the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago, Enrico Fermi's experiments at the CP-1 pile took place to determine the exact amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction. A second pile (CP-2), with external cooling, was built at Argonne in order to move the continuing experiments away from populated areas. Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electromagnetic, gaseous diffusion, Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II Read more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

San Luis Transmission Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Luis Transmission Project EIS/EIR Luis Transmission Project EIS/EIR San Luis Transmission Project EIS/EIR Western proposes to construct, own, operate, and maintain a new 230-kilovolt transmission line about 62 miles in length between Western's Tracy Substation and Western's San Luis Substation and a new 70-kV transmission line about 5 miles in length between the San Luis and O'Neill Substations. Western also will consider other transmission construction options including: A new 500-kV transmission line about 62 miles in length operated at 230-kV between Western's Tracy and San Luis Substations; A new 500-kV transmission line operated at 500-kV about 62 miles in length between the Tracy Substation and Pacific Gas and Electric's Los Banos Substation; and A new 230-kV transmission line about 18 miles in length between San Luis Substation and Dos Amigos Substation.

362

Project Controls  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cash Flow Projection for Operating Loan Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,700 700 400 46,550 800 26,000 50,800 16 CASH OUTFLOW ITEMS ESTIMATEDTOTAL CASH OUTFLOW 17 Breeding fees, livestock marketing, and other livestock expense 4,600 500 700 500 200 200 1,000 1,100 400 17 18 Chemicals?herbicides, insecticides, etc. 4,000 500 2... Breeding fees, livestock marketing, and other livestock expense 4,600 500 700 500 200 200 1,000 1,100 400 17 18 Chemicals?herbicides, insecticides, etc. 4,000 500 2,700 800 18 19 Conservation expense 500 500 19 20 Custom hire, trucking, freight, lease 2...

Klinefelter, Danny A.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Transforming the Commercial Building Operations - 2014 BTO Peer...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Objective The overall goal of this project is to train building operations staff and service providers in a systematic process for...

365

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Smart Grid Project Charlotte North Carolina Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project New Orleans Louisiana ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project Holyoke Massachusetts Connecticut Maine New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Midwest Energy Inc Smart Grid Project Hays Kansas Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Smart Grid Project Carmel Indiana Iowa Illinois Michigan Minnesota Missouri Montana North Dakota Ohio Pennsylvania South Dakota Wisconsin New York Independent System Operator Inc Smart Grid Project New York

366

Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks Committee on Energy and Commerce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park By: Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of Management

367

Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands- Committee on Natural Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park By: Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of Management

368

US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects - Equipment Manufacturing | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia_System_Operations_Corporation_Inc._Smart_Grid_Project\" Georgia_System_Operations_Corporation_Inc._Smart_Grid_Project\" title=\"Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project\">Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project","title":"Georgia System Operations Corporation Inc. Smart Grid Project","link":null,"lat":33.8545479,"lon":-84.2171424,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""},{"text":"Project\" title=\"Whirlpool Corporation Smart Grid Project\">Whirlpool Corporation Smart Grid

369

LIMB demonstration project extension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Berkeley Lab - ARRA - Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Projects infrastructure Advanced Light Source User Support Building Total Project Cost: $35.1 million ARRA funding: $14.7 million The Advanced Light Source (ALS) User Support Building is a three-story, 30,928 gross-square-foot building that will house user-support operations at the ALS. It will include office and lab space for some 80 researchers. The $35-million project is funded by the DOE Office of Science. It will house experiment assembly spaces, conference rooms, and labs. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2011. Go here for more information. Bevatron demolition Total Project Cost: $50 million ARRA funding: $14.3 million Building 51, which houses the Bevatron, is an approximately 125,000 gross-square-foot, steel-frame structure built in the early 1950s. The

371

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects Principal Associate Director - Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Before coming to the Lab in 2011, he served as manager of the $3.2 billion project to safely destroy the stockpile of deadly mustard chemical agent at the Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado. Paul Henry Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects Paul Henry, Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects As Principal Associate Director for Capital Projects, Henry is responsible for institutional large-project construction and management and environmental cleanup functions.

372

Concept of Operations: Essence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This concept of operations is designed to give the reader a brief overview of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Associations Essence project and a description of the Essence device design. The data collected by the device, how the data are used, and how the data are protected are also discussed in this document.

Hutton, William J.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Conduct of Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, cancels Admin Chg 1.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Science Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

375

Projection Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a general rule, broad-band sources which employ projection optics are the most difficult to evaluate. In addition to the problems encountered in evaluating exposed lamps, one must characterize the projected...

David Sliney; Myron Wolbarsht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Circle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied...

377

Hydropower Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

378

Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review Transforming Commercial Building Operations - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for...

379

Instream Flow Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As a part of the Department of Energys Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations.

380

QUEST2 Energy Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In late 2004, Eastman Chemical Companys Kingsport Site Utilities Division embarked on a project to investigate operations in one of the large refrigeration systems serving one of the process areas. The intent of this effort was to develop a...

Clary, A. T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ARPA-E Project Selections  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Selections Project Selections September 23, 2010 These projects have been selected for negotiation of awards; final award amounts may vary. Lead Research Organization (Partner Organizations) Amount Lead Organization Location (City, State) Technology Focus - Application: Project Title Project Description 1) Innovative Cybersecurity Solutions Grid Protection Alliance (University of Illinois, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PJM Interconnection, AREVA T&D) $3,215,000 Chattanooga, TN SIEGate: Secure Information Exchange for Electric Grid Operations The Grid Protection Alliance will research, develop, and commercialize a Secure Information Exchange Gateway (SIEGate) that provides secure communication of data between control centers.

382

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project HIAR-RL-2011-08-25 This Independent Activity Report...

383

General Engineer (Federal Project Director)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the overall Project Manager and expert responsible for providing leadership to program oversight activities for the operations of facilities to...

384

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

385

Special Report Post-project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to check tbat proper controls are in place wbile a project is in operation. When our managers audit an oil refinery, for example, tbey gatber detailed informa- tion about how the oil and gas is col- lected

Rudowsky, Ira

386

Automated Operating Procedures for Transfer Limits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Operating Procedures for Transfer Limits Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering · Illinois · Iowa State · Texas A&M · Washington State · Wisconsin Automated Operating Procedures

387

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sludge Treatment Project - Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review [HIAR-RL-2012-02-27] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011

388

Project Safety Oversight Activities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Activities For all DOE-funded projects, the Fuel Cell Technologies Office implements procedures and practices to ensure safety in the operation, handling, and use of hydrogen...

389

Building Energy Modeling Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable Support and Training Services Platform Center-Led Projects CERC: Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation CBERD: Building Energy Simulation &...

390

OPT's Reedsport Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPT's Reedsport Project OPT's Reedsport Project Summary of Licensing and Permitting As of April 13, 2011 Single PowerBuoy ® and DOE Project The scope of the DOE Reedsport Deployment and Ocean Test project (DE-EE0003646) is the installation of a single autonomous PowerBuoy at Reedsport, Oregon followed by two (2) years of operation in the Oregon Territorial Sea (TRL 7/8 Relevant Environment). Since the single PowerBuoy will not be grid connected, the lead Federal Agency for this effort is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. OPT filed a Joint Permit Application and draft Biological Assessment with the Corps and has secured the following permits and/or authorizations for the single PowerBuoy deployment which are posted on the DOE's NEPA EF1 website: o Corps Permit NWP-2007-62, which includes conditions from National Marine Fisheries

391

Windy Gap Firming Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Windy Gap Firming Project Windy Gap Firming Project Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Windy Gap Firming Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0370 (cooperating agency) Western's proposed action is to relocate approximately 3.8 miles of the existing Estes to Lyons 115-kilovolt transmission line, if the Chimney Hollow Reservoir alternative is constructed. The line would be moved outside the area proposed for the reservoir, and Western would ensure the new location would allow the agency to continue to operate and maintain it. Section 2.4.1.4 of the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 1 provides more information on the transmission line relocation proposal. The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation is the Lead Agency for the National Environmental Policy Act Review. Cooperating agencies are Western, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Grand County, Colo.

392

The Mississippi CCS Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Independent Oversight Assessment, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office- May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants

394

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

395

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

396

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

397

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

398

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

399

Discontinued Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page lists projects that received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

400

project management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Baseline Change Proposal process. Two 400,000-gallon fire protection water supply tanks and associated pumping facilities were added. Later in the project, an additional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Incentive Payment - The ESIP works with utility, industry, and BPA to complete the measurement and verification, reporting and development of a custom project completion...

402

OPERATIONS (OPS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPS) OPS) OBJECTIVE OPS.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. (CR 13) Scope: The Conduct of Operations Program was evaluated during the recent KE Basin FTS ORR and was found to be adequately implemented. Based on this result and the subsequent program enhancements, the scope of the review is to be limited to the SWS operating and maintenance evolutions. Criteria * Programmatic elements of conduct of operations are in place for SWS operations. (DOE Order 5480.19) * The SWS operations personnel adequately demonstrate the principles of conduct of operations requirements during the shift performance period. (DOE Order 5480.19)

403

Operations Research Analysts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Operations Research Analysts Operations Research Analysts The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Operations Research Analyst, whose work is associated with the development and main- tenance of energy modeling systems. Responsibilities: Operations Research Analysts perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Develop, design, perform, and document a broad range of analyses and studies involving current and projected energy pricing, production, supply, and distribution, and consumption * Using computer programming skills and knowledge of energy industries and markets, designs and develops math-

404

Whistling Ridge Energy Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Whistling Ridge Energy Project Bonneville Power...

405

National Spherical Torus Experiment NSTX UPGRADE PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

test plans, and operating procedures relevant to the safe conduct of operations. It will also include not be applicable. PPPL uses ESHD 5008 (PPPL Environment, Safety & Health Manual) Section 11 ("Operations Hazard) Guiding Principle for Operations Authorization of experimental projects. The PPPL approval process

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

406

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

407

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

408

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

409

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

410

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

411

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

412

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

413

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

NAVARRO, J.E.

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

SPEAR Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interface 1113 N. Kurita J. Langton Vacuum TSP's 1120 J. Corbett A. Terebilo MATLAB Applications - Basics 1121 F. Rafael Booster Kicker Upgrade, Operation Manual 1121...

415

operations center  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1%2A en Operations Center http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorismoperationscenter

...

416

UCPath Project Status Report Report Date August 23, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unfilled critical positions. Development of UCPath Center operating procedures. UCPath project health check1 UCPath Project Status Report Report Date August 23, 2013 Project Director Anthony Lo Anthony.Lo@ucop.edu Executive Sponsors Nathan Brostrom Peter Taylor Project Summary Tony Lo has resigned as Project Director

Russell, Lynn

417

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

418

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

419

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

420

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operators manhattan project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

422

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

423

Header with Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5NT42646 Zero Emissions Coal Syngas-Oxygen Turbo Machinery 5NT42646 Zero Emissions Coal Syngas-Oxygen Turbo Machinery FACT SHEET (42646) Oct. 2006 I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. B. Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. C. Clean Energy Systems, Inc. II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective(s) - To develop a cost effective and highly efficient turbo machinery system that will work with an oxy-fuel combustor that generates very high temperature CO2 and steam mixture as the working fluid. After expansion of the working fluid, the CO2 is captured allowing near-zero emissions of NOx and carbon. The project will complete conceptual designs of alternate steam cycles and select one cycle for detailed design based on cost and feasibility studies. B. Relevancy - 1. Background: CES, Inc. has an operational oxy-fuel combustor that generates

424

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

425

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

426

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

427

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

428

LUCF Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

429

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

430

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

431

Project X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by Project X would be a cost- effective approach toin Section I and for the cost estimate necessary as part ofby DOE order 413.3b. The cost range required for CD-0 will

Holmes, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

433

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

434

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project

435

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the organization of the decommissioning project; decommissioning operations concept; safety and environmental assessment; information and guidance for the DOC; work breakdown structure; decommissioning operation schedule; decommissiong operations estimate; and training requirements.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medical and dental centre; shop and café area for students and vacation accommodation centre. The new & Figures: Budget: £51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on Site

437

Preparing for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference...

438

Design operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design operators is a thesis that investigates the nature and characteristics of the design process by examining the interaction of computation with architectural design. The effects of the introduction of these media in ...

Dritsas, Stylianos, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Business Operations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Office of Business Operations is the central organization for all Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) business products, processes, and systems. The three main offices of...

440

Project title: Cottonwood-Roseville Optical Groundwire Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cottonwood-Roseville Optical Groundwire Project Cottonwood-Roseville Optical Groundwire Project Requested By: Joe Oloriz Mail Code: N5706 Phone: 916-353-4773 Date Submitted: 7-3-13 Date Required: 7-8-13 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. The process of marketing and delivering electric power through transmission facilities requires a great

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441

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

442

Project Homepage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

443

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

444

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

445

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

446

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

447

Research projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

448

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

449

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

450

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

451

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

452

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

453

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

454

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

455

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

456

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

457

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

458

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

459

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,