Sample records for operation selected years

  1. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Site Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 126 Site Selection Date Last Modified Modified by: 09 References none #12;SOP 126: Site Selection 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure field conditions, and for ease of operation and maintenance. IMPROVE aerosol samplers are generally

  2. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  4. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Year-End Summary Report Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report LTS-O&M is at the core of LM efforts to fulfill a strategy that...

  5. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L ABORATORY Optimal Technology Selection and Operation ofEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division 15 January 2007for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions with funding

  6. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; Lai, Judy

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab has been developing the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) for several years. Given load curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (u grid), fuel costs and other economic inputs, and a menu of available technologies, DER-CAM finds the optimum equipment fleet and its optimum operating schedule using a mixed integer linear programming approach. This capability is being applied using a software as a service (SaaS) model. Optimisation problems are set up on a Berkeley Lab server and clients can execute their jobs as needed, typically daily. The evolution of this approach is demonstrated by description of three ongoing projects. The first is a public access web site focused on solar photovoltaic generation and battery viability at large commercial and industrial customer sites. The second is a building CO2 emissions reduction operations problem for a University of California, Davis student dining hall for which potential investments are also considered. And the third, is both a battery selection problem and a rolling operating schedule problem for a large County Jail. Together these examples show that optimization of building u grid design and operation can be effectively achieved using SaaS.

  7. Parameter Control Methods for Selection Operators in Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiben, A.E. "Guszti"

    of such methods on three groups of test functions and conclude that varying se- lection pressure during a GA run largely on their parameters, such as population size, selection pressure, crossover and mutation rates size determines the selection pressure, and can thus be used to control the selection operator [11

  8. Battery operation experience at SSAB, Luleaa six years after rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrini, H.; Sundgren, M. [SSAB Tunnplaat, Luleaa (Sweden); Meyer, G. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SSAB operates a coke oven plant in Luleaa, Sweden, consisting of one 7 m battery. Pushing the first coke in 1975, the battery encountered over the years more and more difficulties in keeping coking time and operation level at the design rate. In order to improve the coke supply a major repair of the battery was made. In 1989 the battery was fully rehabilitated by Krupp Koppers. The experience made during the years before and during repair contributed to a new policy for the operation of the plant. The policy has led to considerable improvements. It is clear that it is possible to successfully operate a rehabilitated battery.

  9. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan, 1990 -1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began work on this Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan to develop a levelized program that would assure high system reliability. During the Programs in Perspective (PIP) meetings in the late summer and fall of 1988, many of the concerns to be addressed in an Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement Plan were identified. Following these PIP meetings BPA established internal work groups. During the winter and spring of 1989, these work groups developed technical background and issue papers on topics that ranged from substation maintenance to environmental protection. In addition, a customer forum group was established and met on several occasions to review work on the plan, to offer ideas and points of view, and to assure that BPA understood customer concerns. Based on recommendations from the work group reports and customer input, BPA's O M Management Team developed the draft Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan that was released for public comment during the spring of 1990. During the public review period, BPA received a number of written comments from customers and the interested public. In addition, special meetings were held with interested customers. This final Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan reflects BPA's response to customers and interested public on each topic discussed in the 10-Year Plan. The plan is a distillation of BPA's strategies to achieve a levelized program over 10 years.

  10. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan, 1990--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began work on this Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan to develop a levelized program that would assure high system reliability. During the Programs in Perspective (PIP) meetings in the later summer and fall of 1988, many of the concerns to be addressed in an Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement Plan were identified. Following these PIP meetings BPA established internal work groups. During the winter and spring of 1989, these work groups developed technical background and issue papers on topics that ranged from substation maintenance to environmental protection. In addition, a customer forum group was established and met on several occasions to review work on the plan, to offer ideas and points of view, and to assure that BPA understood customer concerns. Based on recommendations from the work group reports and customer input, BPA's O M Management Team developed the draft Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan that was released for public comment during the spring of 1990. During the public review period, BPA received a number of written comments from customers and the interested public. In addition, special meetings were held with interested customers. This final Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year Plan reflects BPA's response to customers and interested public on each topic discussed in the 10-Year Plan. The plan is a distillation of BPA's strategies to achieve a levelized program over 10 years.

  11. Comparison of a Greedy Selection Operator to Tournament Selection and a Hill Climber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    genetic algorithm selection operator with very high selection pressure, dubbed the "Jugate Adaptive Method of the search space at large [1-3]. Genetic algorithms (GAs) address the need for exploration through random for exploitation by constantly generating mutants or neighbors of the current candidate solution and adopting

  12. Extreme Compass and Dynamic Multi-Armed Bandits for Adaptive Operator Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Extreme Compass and Dynamic Multi-Armed Bandits for Adaptive Operator Selection Jorge Maturana developed Adaptive Operator Selection methods are combined here: Compass evaluates the performance

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  14. Draft 1992 : Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two years ago, BPA released its first-ever Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement (OM&R) 10-Year Plan. That effort broke new ground and was an extensive look at the condition of Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement on BPA`s power system. This document -- the 1992 OM&R 10-Year Plan -- uses that original plan as its foundation. It takes a look at how well BPA has accomplished the challenging task set out in the 1990 Plan. The 1992 Plan also introduces the Construction Program. Construction`s critical role in these programs is explored, and the pressures of construction workload -- such as the seasonal nature of the work and the broad swings in workload between projects and years -- are discussed. The document then looks at how situations may have changed with issues explored initially in the 1990 Plan. Importantly, this Plan also surfaces and explains some new issues that threaten to impact BPA`s ability to accomplish its OM&R workload. Finally, the document focuses on the revised strategies for Operations, Maintenance, Replacement, Construction, and Environment for the 1992 to 2001 time period, including the financial and human resources needed to accomplish those strategies.

  15. Draft 1992 : Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two years ago, BPA released its first-ever Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement (OM R) 10-Year Plan. That effort broke new ground and was an extensive look at the condition of Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement on BPA's power system. This document -- the 1992 OM R 10-Year Plan -- uses that original plan as its foundation. It takes a look at how well BPA has accomplished the challenging task set out in the 1990 Plan. The 1992 Plan also introduces the Construction Program. Construction's critical role in these programs is explored, and the pressures of construction workload -- such as the seasonal nature of the work and the broad swings in workload between projects and years -- are discussed. The document then looks at how situations may have changed with issues explored initially in the 1990 Plan. Importantly, this Plan also surfaces and explains some new issues that threaten to impact BPA's ability to accomplish its OM R workload. Finally, the document focuses on the revised strategies for Operations, Maintenance, Replacement, Construction, and Environment for the 1992 to 2001 time period, including the financial and human resources needed to accomplish those strategies.

  16. Selected Operating Costs for Storage of Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Cunningham, William C.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected Operating Costs for Storage Of Sorghum Grain TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY This is the third of three bulletins reporting the results of a study of sorghum grain storage and handling practices in Texas. The first dealt with marketing and on...-farm storage; the second with com- mercial storage and handling practices. This bulletin reports the results of a study of the costs of com- mercial grain handling practices. Three areas representing a cross section of physical and economic conditions...

  17. Coal operators prepare for a prosperous new year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are given of the Coal Age 2008 annual Forecast Survey of 17 coal mining executives which reinforces that 2008 could be a very good year. Coal operators are planning to invest in new equipment, development and new coal mine start-ups, based on a number of demand- and supply-side fundamentals. 71% of those surveyed thought coal production in 2008 would increase from 2007 levels and US exports are expected to climb due to the weak dollar. If the tax credit on synfuels expires on 31 December 2007 production of coal synfuel will likely cease. Asked about expensive planned purchases, companies answers ranged from $80,000 for an underground scoop to $500 m for a new mine installation. However, most producers admit they will not be able to operate at full capacity. 7 figs.

  18. Last Year of PEP-II B-Factory Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeman, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC (3.1 GeV e{sup +} x 9.0 GeV e{sup -}) operated from 1999 to 2008, delivering luminosity to the BaBar experiment. The design luminosity was reached after one and a half years of operation. In the end PEP-II surpassed by four times its design luminosity reaching 1.21 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It also set stored beam current records of 2.1 A e{sup -} and 3.2 A e{sup +}. Continuous injection was implemented with BaBar taking data. The total delivered luminosity to the BaBar detector was 557.4 fb{sup -1} spanning five upsilon resonances. PEP-II was constructed by SLAC, LBNL, and LLNL with help from BINP, IHEP, the BaBar collaboration, and the US DOE OHEP.

  19. Reduce emissions and operating costs with appropriate glycol selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covington, K.; Lyddon, L. [Bryan Research and Engineering, Inc., TX (United States); Ebeling, H. [Latoka Engineering L.L.C., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) emissions from glycol dehydration units have become a major concern and some form of control is necessary in many cases. One method of reducing BTEX emissions that is often overlooked is in the selection of the proper dehydrating agent. BTEX compounds are less soluble in diethylene glycol (DEG) than triethylene glycol (TEG) and considerably less soluble in ethylene glycol (EG). If the use of DEG or EG achieves the required gas dew point in cases where BTEX emissions are a concern, a significant savings in both operating costs and the cost of treating still vent gases may be achieved. This paper compares plant operations using TEG, DEG and EG from the viewpoint of BTEX emissions, circulating rates, utilities and dehydration capabilities.

  20. Radiation protection issues after 20 years of LHC operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, D; Roesler, S; Theis, C; Ulrici, L; Vincke, H; Vincke, Hz

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since November 2009, the LHC commissioning progresses very well, both with proton and lead beams. It will continue in 2011 and nominal LHC operation is expected to be attained in 2013. In parallel, plans for various LHC upgrades are under discussion, suggesting a High-Luminosity (HL) upgrade first and a High-Energy (HE) upgrade in a later state. Whereas the upgrade in luminosity would require the modification of only some few key accelerator components like the inner triplets, the upgrade in beam energy from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV would require the exchange of all dipoles and of numerous other accelerator components. The paper gives an overview of the radiation protection issues related to the dismantling of LHC components prior to the installation of the HE-LHC components, i.e. after about 20 years of LHC operation. Two main topics will be discussed: (i) the exposure of workers to ionizing radiation during the dismantling of dipoles, inner triplets or collimators and experiments and (ii) the production, condition...

  1. United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992.

  2. SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

    1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

  3. Two years of AD operation Experience and progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belochitskii, P; Findlay, A; Holzer, E B; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Pasinelli, S; Pedersen, F; Tranquille, G

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The antiproton decelerator (AD) has been running successfully for physics for the past two years. After the end of the commissioning period [1] that finished in 2000, the machine has gradually been improved. The main efforts were concentrated on increasing the beam intensity, reducing the cycle length and improving the machine stability. The intensity of the injected beam has been significantly increased due to a higher beam intensity from the PS complex and also due to increased transverse acceptances in the AD machine. The beam losses during deceleration were reduced from 30-40 % down to a few percent, mainly due to improvements of the operation of the deceleration RF cavity. Altogether these improvements increased the intensity of the ejected beam by a factor of two. Improvements of the electron cooling were followed by a reduction of emittances and cycle duration (about 15%). Progress in beam diagnostics now allows the monitoring of the machine performance during the whole cycle. The stability of the mach...

  4. Four years of operations and results with FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

  5. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegerfeldt, G. C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, DE-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, ES-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  6. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  7. Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade21752 2,616 January 1996 January1996Percent

  8. FTCP OPERATIONAL PLAN and Closeout Summary, FISCAL YEAR 2009 | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAM FLASH2011-17-OPAMFTCPFace to Face

  9. FTCP Operational Plan and Closeout Summary, Fiscal Year 2011 | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAM FLASH2011-17-OPAMFTCPFace to FaceOPERATIONALof

  10. FTCP Operational Plan and Closeout Summary, Fiscal Year 2012 | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAM FLASH2011-17-OPAMFTCPFace to

  11. Annual Benefits Enrollment Form 2012 Plan Year Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Annual Benefits Enrollment Form 2012 Plan Year Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa BlueLincs HMO HMO Primary Care Physician #: Community Care HMO (Tulsa Area Only) HMO Primary Care

  12. Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of

  13. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning.

  14. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent report for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report tabulates both radioactive and nonradioactive liquid and airborne effluent data for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations at the Hanford Site. The 300 Area is primarily a research and development area. The 400 Area houses the Fast Flux Test Facility. The 1100 Area contains central stores and vehicle maintenance facilities. Releases to the environment from Westinghouse Hanford Company operations within these areas during calendar year 1989 were both consistent with previous years and within regulatory limits. 2 refs., 10 tabs.

  15. Hybrid Decision Algorithm for Access Selection in Multi-Operator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a hybrid decision algorithm for the selection of the access in multi-operator networks environment, where Resource Management (RRM) jointly done among the different RATs. It creates a multi-RATs environment under the management of a single operator, and a joint RRM begins by optimizing users association to the different RATs

  16. Prison Industries Metering at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice: Two Years of Operational Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, J.; McBride, J.; Merka, T.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRISON INDUSTRIES METERING AT THE TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE: TWO YEARS OF OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE John A. Bryant John R. McBride Tom Merka Assistant Professor Chief Executive Officer Director of Utilities & Energy Texas A... in the use of energy metering to promote cost-effective prison operation. REFERENCES 1. John A. Bryant, John McBride, Tom Merka, ?State-of-the-Art Energy Sub-metering Texas Department of Criminal Justice Industries,? Proceedings of the 1st...

  17. Boolean Operations on 3D Selective Nef Complexes: Data Structure, Algorithms, Optimized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehlhorn, Kurt

    polyhedra and complexes are quite general. They can model non­manifold solids, unbounded solids, openBoolean Operations on 3D Selective Nef Complexes: Data Structure, Algorithms, Optimized, open and closed sets, mixed­dimensional complexes, and they are closed under all boolean

  18. Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

  19. Criteria for Selection of a COTS Real-Time Operating System: a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beus-Dukic, Ljerka

    . The choices made for the criteria template used in our survey are briefly explained in the following sections1 Criteria for Selection of a COTS Real-Time Operating System: a Survey Ljerka Beus-Dukic School to provide the answers. The paper presents the results of this survey. The first section briefly describes

  20. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy continued to operate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 in Wyoming through its contractors. In addition, natural gas operations were conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. All productive acreage owned by the Government at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in California was produced under lease to private companies. The locations of all six Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves are shown in a figure. Under the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976, production was originally authorized for six years, and based on findings of national interest, the President was authorized to extend production in three-year increments. President Reagan exercised this authority three times (in 1981, 1984, and 1987) and President Bush authorized extended production once (in 1990). President Clinton exercised this authority in 1993 and again in October 1996; production is presently authorized through April 5, 2000. 4 figs. 30 tabs.

  1. Assessing selected technologies and operational strategies for improving the environmental performance of future aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aviation industry is expected to grow at a rate of 4-5% in the next 20 years. Such a growth rate may have important impacts on local air quality, climate change and community noise. This work assesses selected technologies ...

  2. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

  3. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I. [Central Design Bureau of Machine Building, Krasnogvardeyskaya Square 3, St. Petersburg, (Russia) 195272

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The LHC Cryogenic Operation Availability Results from the First Physics Run of Three Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delikaris, D; Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC (Large Hadron Collider) accelerator consists in eight cryogenically independent sectors, each 3.3 km long with a cold mass of 4’500 t cooled at 1.9 K. Each helium cryogenic plant combines an 18 kW at 4.5 K refrigerator and a 2.4 kW at 1.8 K refrigeration unit. Since early operation for physics in November 2009, the availability has been above 90% for more than 260 days per year, ending at 94.8% in 2012 and corresponding to an equivalent availability of more than 99% per independent sector. The operation and support methodology as well as the achieved performance results are presented. Emphasis is given on implementing operational return for short, medium and long term consolidations. Perspective for restart after the first long shutdown of the LHC works will be described.

  5. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  6. From 9-IM Topological Operators to Qualitative Spatial Relations using 3D Selective Nef Complexes and Logic Rules for bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    From 9-IM Topological Operators to Qualitative Spatial Relations using 3D Selective Nef Complexes.benhmida, boochs}@geoinform.fh-mainz.de Keywords: Topological relations ; 9-IM ; Selective Nef Complex ; Ontology Complexes Nef Polyhedra structure generated from standard Polyhedron. The Selective Nef Complexes is a data

  7. Evaluation of 27+ Years Old Photovoltaic Modules Operated in a Hot-Desert Climatic Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Raghutaman, B.; Kuitche, J.; TamizhMani, G.; Backus, C. E.; Osterwald, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of failure mechanisms from the long-term field deployed modules is of great importance to the photovoltaic industry. This paper investigates the modules removed from a water pumping array operated over 27+ years in a hot-desert climatic condition, Arizona. Thirty-two modules were evaluated in this investigation. Each module is comprised of silicone rubber superstrate/encapsulant, mono-Si cells, fiberglass-like substrate, potted junction box and neoprene cable. Ten of these thirty-two modules were either non-functional or near non-functional with less than 30% of the original power. The other twenty-two functional modules showed an average power degradation of 1.08% per year over 27 years of operation. After the damp-heat (1000 hours of 85degC/85%RH), thermal cycling (two-hundred cycles of 90degC/-40degC) and hot-spot stress tests the modules lost about 11%, 9.8% and 3.5% of power, respectively.

  8. FTCP OPERATIONAL PLAN and Summary, FISCAL YEAR 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAM FLASH2011-17-OPAMFTCPFace to FaceOPERATIONAL

  9. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  10. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

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  18. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  19. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report - calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1995 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water,groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  20. Steven Humphrey Named 2009 URITC Student of the Year The University of Rhode Island Transportation Center selected Steven Humphrey of Tiverton, RI as its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Transportation Center selected Steven Humphrey of Tiverton, RI as its 2009 Student of the Year in recognition

  1. Optical amplifier exhibiting net phase-mismatch selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feve, Jean-Philippe (Cupertino, CA); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Farrow; Roger L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical amplifier, such as an optical waveguide amplifier (e.g., an optical fiber amplifier or a planar waveguide) or a non-guiding optical amplifier, that exhibits a net phase-mismatch selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation thereof is disclosed. In one aspect of the invention, an optical amplifier structure includes at least one optical amplifier having a length and a gain region. The at least one optical amplifier exhibits a net phase-mismatch that varies along at least part of the length thereof selected to at least partially reduce gain-induced phase-matching during operation thereof.

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    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 59 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  7. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  8. Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report for Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsythe, Howard S.

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes maintenance, monitoring, and inspection activities performed to implement the selected remedy for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Results from monitoring perched water and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center are also presented.

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  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  2. An Overview of the Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Brownsville Irrigation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stubbs, Megan J.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    TR-274 August 2004 An Overview of the Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Brownsville Irrigation District Megan J. Stubbs M. Edward Rister Allen W... Grande Valley: Brownsville Irrigation District Megan J. Stubbs M. Edward Rister Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University System This research was financially supported...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43417

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  2. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  3. Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

  4. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    JUNCTION, Colo. - It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This...

  5. Facility Operations 1993 fiscal year work plan: WBS 1.3.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility Operations program is responsible for the safe, secure, and environmentally sound management of several former defense nuclear production facilities, and for the nuclear materials in those facilities. As the mission for Facility Operations plants has shifted from production to support of environmental restoration, each plant is making a transition to support the new mission. The facilities include: K Basins (N Reactor fuel storage); N Reactor; Plutonium-Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) Plant; Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant; 300 Area Fuels Supply (N Reactor fuel supply); Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

  6. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

  7. Table HIST002R_2. Death rates for 113 selected causes by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United States, 1979-98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    _2. Death rates for 113 selected causes, by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United States, 1979Table HIST002R_2. Death rates for 113 selected causes by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United though the cause-of-death titles may be the same. Deaths rates are per 100,000 population in specified

  8. Table HIST002R_1. Death rates for 113 selected causes by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United States, 1979-98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    _1. Death rates for 113 selected causes, by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United States, 1979Table HIST002R_1. Death rates for 113 selected causes by 5-year age groups, race and sex: United though the cause-of-death titles may be the same. Deaths rates are per 100,000 population in specified

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  10. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  11. Design, start up, and three years operating experience of an ammonia scrubbing, distillation, and destruction plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambert, G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When the rebuilt Coke Plant started operations in November of 1992, it featured a completely new closed circuit secondary cooler, ammonia scrubbing, ammonia distillation, and ammonia destruction plants. This is the second plant of this type to be built in North America. To remove the ammonia from the gas, it is scrubbed with three liquids: Approximately 185 gallons/minute of cooled stripped liquor from the ammonia stills; Light oil plant condensate; and Optionally, excess flushing liquor. These scrubbers typically reduce ammonia content in the gas from 270 Grains/100 standard cubic feet to 0.2 Grains/100 standard cubic feet.

  12. The first years of the Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office Health and Safety Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbud, M. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Health and Safety Laboratory (HASL) of the Atomic Energy Commission has provided much of the data on exposure assessment in uranium contractor facilities and on fallout radionuclides in the environment. The research performed in the beryllium industry 1947-1949 led to establishment of the protection standards that exist to this day. This laboratory was formed in 1947, as part of the Medical Division of the New York Operations Office, directed by B.S. Wolf, HASL was directed initially by Merril Eisenbud and subsequently by S. Allen Lough and John Harley. The history of the Laboratory is traced from its beginning, and the projects described that led to HASL's reputation as a trouble-shooting arm of the Atomic Energy Commission. 4 refs.

  13. On selection and operation of an international interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Joe, 1966-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of post-irradiation fuel from nuclear reactors has been an issue for the nuclear industry for many years. Most countries currently have no long-term disposal strategy in place. Therefore, the concept of an ...

  14. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. S. Yoder; M. K. Adler Flitton

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33˝ years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport.

  15. Eddy current inspection tool which is selectively operable in a discontinuity detection mode and a discontinuity magnitude mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrini, Richard R. (Livermore, CA); Van Lue, Dorin F. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniaturized inspection tool, for testing and inspection of metal objects in locations with difficult accessibility, which comprises eddy current sensing equipment (12) with a probe coil (11), and associated coaxial coil cable (13), coil energizing means (21), and circuit means (21, 12) responsive to impedance changes in the coil as effected by induced eddy currents in a test object to produce a data output signal proportional to such changes. The coil and cable are slideably received in the utility channel of the flexible insertion tube 17 of fiberoptic scope 10. The scope 10 is provided with light transmitting and receiving fiberoptics for viewing through the flexible tube, and articulation means (19, 20) for articulating the distal end of the tube and permitting close control of coil placement relative to a test object. The eddy current sensing equipment includes a tone generator 30 for generating audibly signals responsive to the data output signal. In one selected mode of operation, the tone generator responsive to the output signal above a selected level generates a constant single frequency tone for signalling detection of a discontinuity and, in a second selected mode, generates a tone whose frequency is proportional to the difference between the output signal and a predetermined selected threshold level.

  16. Eddy current inspection tool which is selectively operable in a discontinuity detection mode and a discontinuity magnitude mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrini, R.R.; Van Lue, D.F.

    1983-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniaturized inspection tool, for testing and inspection of metal objects in locations with difficult accessibility, which comprises eddy current sensing equipment with a probe coil, and associated coaxial coil cable, coil energizing means, and circuit means responsive to impedance changes in the coil as effected by induced eddy currents in a test object to produce a data output signal proportional to such changes. The coil and cable are slideably received in the utility channel of the flexible insertion tube of fiberoptic scope. The scope is provided with light transmitting and receiving fiberoptics for viewing through the flexible tube, and articulation means for articulating the distal end of the tube and permitting close control of coil placement relative to a test object. The eddy current sensing equipment includes a tone generator 30 for generating audibly signals responsive to the data output signal. In one selected mode of operation, the tone generator responsive to the output signal above a selected level generates a constant single frequency tone for signaling detection of a discontinuity and, in a second selected mode, generates a tone whose frequency is proportional to the difference between the output signal and a predetermined selected threshold level. 5 figs.

  17. Effect of design and operating variables on the performance of commercial absorbers used for selective chemical absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katti, S.S.; Langfitt, B.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Dow's GAS/SPEC Selective Solvent Technologies, processors are able to remove virtually all of the H/sub 2/S from sour gas streams, while retaining a desired amount of CO/sub 2/ in the sweet gas. An absorber simulator has been developed based on a rate approach. The details of the principles and approaches used in the simulator are reported in this paper. The simulator not only predicts the overall plant performance, but also the detailed temperature and composition profiles throughout the column. Some of the predicted profiles have been compared with actual profiles measured on an operating plant. This type of detailed and rigorous simulation has furthered the understanding of the controlling phenomena and performance of commercial absorbers used for selective absorption. For example, the absorption of H/sub 2/S is mostly gas-phase controlled and that of CO/sub 2/ is liquid-phase controlled in typical commercial tray absorbers using the Selective Solvent Technology. Gas and liquid temperature profiles cross each other near the temperature bulge. In several instances, the process selectivity is decreased as magnitude of the bulge in liquid temperature increases. This happens through the combined effects of kinetics and thermodynamics.

  18. Selected construction contract administration standard operation procedures for Texas Department of Transportation, Odessa District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reachi, Santiago

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . District Construction Office Staff (DCOS) 3. Director of Construction (DOC) 16 4. District Engineer (DE) 5. Construction Director (CST) 6. Assistant Executive Director, Engineering Operations (AED EO) If a CO needs to be expedited, please make... it known to the DCO; do not override approvals in SiteManager (SM) without DCO knowledge and consent. Chronological Procedure The AO notifies DCO via GroupWise (GW) that a draft CO is in SM for review. Use the Master Checklist to see the Standard...

  19. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  20. "Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal"1" " (Estimates5. Selected

  1. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development , fabrication , and disassembly of nuclear reactors , reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials . Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites . Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL . All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored , including air , soil, surface water, groundwater , direct radiation , transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal . No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  2. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids inCommercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui,Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of small (<1-2 MW) clusters of generators,heat and electrical storage, efficiency investments, and combined heatand power (CHP) applications (particularly involving heat activatedcooling) in commercial buildings promises significant benefits but posesmany technical and financial challenges, both in system choice and itsoperation; if successful, such systems may be precursors to widespreadmicrogrid deployment. The presented optimization approach to choosingsuch systems and their operating schedules uses Berkeley Lab'sDistributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model [DER-CAM], extendedto incorporate electrical storage options. DER-CAM chooses annual energybill minimizing systems in a fully technology-neutral manner. Anillustrative example for a San Francisco hotel is reported. The chosensystem includes two engines and an absorption chiller, providing anestimated 11 percent cost savings and 10 percent carbon emissionreductions, under idealized circumstances.

  3. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on the results of the pilot study, the recommendations for the revision of the work plan are as follows: • characterize the surface soil using field portable XRF measurements with confirmatory inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy sampling for the remedial investigation • establish decision units of similar defined areas • establish a process for field investigation of soil concentrations exceeding the screening criteria at the border of the 100-OL-1 OU • define data quality objectives for the work plan using the results of the pilot study and refining the sampling approach for the remedial investigation.

  4. Impact of component selection and operation on thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a half-factorial, two-level experimental design is used to determine the effects of changes in collector area, storage tank volume, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, and storage tank design on thermal rating of a solar drain-back water heating system. Experimental ratings are determined in accordance with the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation guidelines. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards. Statistical analyses indicate that a change in collector area accounts for nearly 90 percent of the variation in heat output. Doubling collector area from 2.78 m[sup 2] to 5.56 m[sup 2] increases delivered solar energy by 31 percent. Use of a stratification manifold increases the delivery of solar energy by six percent. Doubling collector flow rate from 0.057 to 0.114 1/s increases solar output by aproximately three percent; however, the increase in pumping energy outweighs the benefits of increasing collector flow rate. The effects of recirculation flow rate and tank volume are obscured by experimental error.

  5. Electrical power obtained from burning landfill gas into a gas turbine generator: Experience after one year of operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabbri, R.; Mignani, N.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical example of a ``waste to energy'' concept can be found also in the landfill environment. The biogas derived by fermentation process is usually burnt into gas engines. This choice is usually due to the electric efficiency that is normally higher than gas turbine application and to the size that usually, almost in Italian landfill size, does not allow power higher than 1,000 kW. On the other side gas turbine applications, typically based on generator sets greater than 1,000 kW do not require special biogas pre-treatment; require less maintenance and have an extremely higher reliability. The paper describes an application of a gas turbine generator of 4,800 kW outlining the experiences collected after one year of operation. During this period, the system fulfilled the target of a total operating time greater than 8,000 hours. Description is done of the biogas compression system feeding the turbine and also of the subsystem adopted to reach the above mentioned target reliability.

  6. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  7. Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. B. Mitchem

    2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

  8. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Forsythe

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  9. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

  10. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report for July through September 1994 (Fourth quarter of fiscal year 1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the US. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned, except for two Griffon vans. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: advancement of electric vehicle technologies; development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. The ultimate thrust of program activities varies among sites, reflecting not only the Operator`s business interests but also geographic and climate-related operating conditions. This fourth quarter report (FY-94) includes a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now found in Appendix A.

  11. Ten Years of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Operations at SunLine Transit Agency: April 2003--December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the lesson learned at the SunLine Transit Agency after it converted in 1994 its entire operating transit bus fleet to compressed natural gas (CNG).

  12. Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  13. ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FINAL GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION, TEST AREA NORTH, OPERABLE UNIT 1-07B, FISCAL YEAR 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORSYTHE, HOWARD S

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report presents the data and evaluates the progress of the three-component remedy implemented for remediation of groundwater contamination at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Overall, each component is achieving progress toward the goal of total plume remediation. In situ bioremediation operations in the hot spot continue to operate as planned. Progress toward the remedy objectives is being made, as evidenced by continued reduction in the amount of accessible residual source and decreases in downgradient contaminant flux, with the exception of TAN-28. The injection strategy is maintaining effective anaerobic reductive dechlorination conditions, as evidenced by complete degradation of trichloroethene and ethene production in the biologically active wells. In the medial zone, the New Pump and Treat Facility operated in standby mode. Trichloroethene concentrations in the medial zone wells are significantly lower than the historically defined concentration range of 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L. The trichloroethene concentrations in TAN-33, TAN-36, and TAN-44 continue to be below 200 ?g/L. Monitoring in the distal zone wells outside and downgradient of the plume boundary demonstrate that some plume expansion has occurred, but less than the amount allowed in the Record of Decision Amendment. Additional data need to be collected for wells in the monitored natural attenuation part of the plume to confirm that the monitored natural attenuation part of the remedy is proceeding as predicted in the modeling.

  14. Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 1--Single Inverter in Island Mode Operation: Base Year Report, December 2000 -- November 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataramanan, G.; Illindala, M. S.; Houle, C.; Lasseter, R. H.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the first year of a three-year project to develop control software for micro-source distributed generation systems. The focus of this phase was on internal energy storage requirements, the modification of an off-the-shelf motor drive system inverter to supply utility-grade ac power, and a single inverter system operating in island mode. The report provides a methodology for determining battery energy storage requirements, a method for converting a motor drive inverter into a utility-grade inverter, and typical characteristics and test results of using such an inverter in a complex load environment.

  15. Frit Development Efforts for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4): Operating Window Assessments fo Scenarios Leading Up to the Selected Preparation Plan for SB4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document technical information that has been provided to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Closure Business Unit (CBU) personnel as part of the frit development support for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The information presented in this report includes projected operating windows (expressed in terms of waste loading) for various sludge blending and/or washing options coupled with candidate frits of interest. Although the Nominal Stage assessment serves as the primary tool for these evaluations, select systems were also evaluated using a Variation Stage assessment in which compositional variations were introduced. In addition, assessments of the impacts of nepheline formation potential and the SO{sub 4}{sup -} solubility limit on the projected operating windows are also provided. Although this information was used as part of the technical basis leading to CBU's development of the preferred SB4 preparation plan, none of the options presented in this report was selected as the preferred plan. Therefore, the information is presented without significant interpretation of the resulting operating windows, but the projected windows are provided so additional insight can be explored if desired. Detailed assessments of the projected operating windows (using both Nominal and Variation Stage assessments) of the preferred sludge preparation plan with candidate frits are to be documented elsewhere. The information provided in this report is focused solely on model-based projections of the operating windows for various SB4 blending strategies of interest. Although nepheline formation potential is monitored via model predictions as a part of this assessment, experimental work investigating the impact of nepheline on glass quality is also being addressed in a parallel study. The results of this paper study and the experimental assessments of melt rate, SO{sub 4} solubility, and/or nepheline formation potential are all critical components of the inputs into the frit selection process for SB4.

  16. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

  17. OzDES multi-fibre spectroscopy for the Dark Energy Survey: first-year operation and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Fang; Davis, T M; Childress, M; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Carollo, D; Castander, F J; D'Andrea, C B; Diehl, H T; Cunha, C E; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Glazebrook, K; Gschwend, J; Hinton, S; Jouvel, S; Kessler, R; Kim, A G; King, A L; Kuehn, K; Kuhlmann, S; Lewis, G F; Lin, H; Martini, P; McMahon, R G; Mould, J; Nichol, R C; Norris, R P; O'Neill, C R; Ostrovski, F; Papadopoulos, A; Parkinson, D; Reed, S; Romer, A K; Rooney, P J; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Scalzo, R; Schmidt, B P; Scolnic, D; Seymour, N; Sharp, R; Sobreira, F; Sullivan, M; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D; Uddin, S A; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Wilcox, H; Zhang, B; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Kind, M Carrasco; Covarrubias, R; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OzDES is a five-year, 100-night, spectroscopic survey on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, whose primary aim is to measure redshifts of approximately 2,500 Type Ia supernovae host galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 Energy Survey for which we are also targeting cluster galaxies, radio galaxies, strong lenses, and unidentified transients, as well as measuring luminous red galaxies and emission line galaxies to help calibrate photometric redshifts. Here we present an overview of the OzDES program and our first-year results. Between Dec 2012 and Dec 2013, we observed over 10,000 objects and measured more than 6,000 redshifts. Our strategy of retargeting faint objects across many observing runs has allowed us to measure redshifts for galaxies as faint as m_r=25 mag. We outline ...

  18. OzDES multi-fibre spectroscopy for the Dark Energy Survey: first-year operation and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Fang; Davis, T M; Childress, M; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Buckley-Geer, E; Rosell, A Carnero; Carollo, D; Castander, F J; D'Andrea, C B; Diehl, H T; Cunha, C E; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Glazebrook, K; Gschwend, J; Hinton, S; Jouvel, S; Kessler, R; Kim, A G; King, A L; Kuehn, K; Kuhlmann, S; Lewis, G F; Lin, H; Martini, P; McMahon, R G; Mould, J; Nichol, R C; Norris, R P; O'Neill, C R; Ostrovski, F; Papadopoulos, A; Parkinson, D; Reed, S; Romer, A K; Rooney, P J; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Scalzo, R; Schmidt, B P; Scolnic, D; Seymour, N; Sharp, R; Sobreira, F; Sullivan, M; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D; Uddin, S A; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Wilcox, H; Zhang, B; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Kind, M Carrasco; Covarrubias, R; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OzDES is a five-year, 100-night, spectroscopic survey on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, whose primary aim is to measure redshifts of approximately 2,500 Type Ia supernovae host galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 1.2, and derive reverberation-mapped black hole masses for approximately 500 active galactic nuclei and quasars over 0.3 < z < 4.5. This treasure trove of data forms a major part of the spectroscopic follow-up for the Dark Energy Survey for which we are also targeting cluster galaxies, radio galaxies, strong lenses, and unidentified transients, as well as measuring luminous red galaxies and emission line galaxies to help calibrate photometric redshifts. Here we present an overview of the OzDES program and our first-year results. Between Dec 2012 and Dec 2013, we observed over 10,000 objects and measured more than 6,000 redshifts. Our strategy of retargeting faint objects across many observing runs has allowed us to measure redshifts for galaxies as faint as m_r=25 mag. We outline ...

  19. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and a more rigorous skin dose constraint of ?100%.

  20. The over 20 year operating experience with carbon steel tubings at Abu Attifel Field. Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T. [ENI-AGIP Div., Milan (Italy); Rumash, K. [AGIP Oil, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bazzoni, B. [Cescor srl, Milan (Italy)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abu Attifel onshore oil field (Libya) was discovered in 1968 and put in production in November 1972. The total average production is nowadays about 140,000 BOPD (22,260 m{sup 3}/d) with 46 producing wells. All the production wells were originally completed with carbon steel tubing, although the produced fluids contain CO{sub 2}-4% in the gas phase. After several years of production with minor downhole corrosion problems, several corrosion failures started to occur in the nineties at extremely high corrosion rate. In some cases corrosion attacks occurred although the water cut was negligible (lower than 1%). A detailed corrosion study was initiated to investigate the problem in order to identify the most critical production wells and the priority of intervention for well; this paper reports the corrosion assessment results and the actions undertaken to control the corrosion. A occurred corrosion events is also reported.

  1. A continuous traffic study as a source of input data for the computation of operating ratios for selected weight brackets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, James Davis

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose Scope Need for Adequate Cost Data Methods and Procedures HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF FREIGHT TRAFFIC STUDIES Xn tro due t ion Waybill Studies Special Purpose Studies General Purpose Studies Continuous Waybi, ll Sample Sample Selection... Uses of Waybill Data Freight Bill Studies One' Day Studies Fixed Period Studies Continuous Traffic Studies Continuous Traffic Study and the Regulatory Body Summary METHODOLOGY sge 1 2 4 ) 'I 1 1 2i 21 22 26 27 27 37 38 40 42...

  2. Selection and Traceability of Parameters To Support Hanford-Specific RESRAD Analyses -- Fiscal Year 2008 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal years 2007 and 2008, the Hanford Site Groundwater Remediation Project, formerly managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., requested the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the development and initial implementation of a strategy to establish and maintain, under configuration control, a set of Hanford-specific flow and transport parameter estimates that can be used to support Hanford Site assessments. This document provides a summary of those efforts, culminating in a set of best-estimate Hanford-specific parameters for use in place of the default parameters used in the RESRAD code. The RESRAD code is a computer model designed to estimate radiation doses and risks from RESidual RADioactive materials. The long-term goals of the PNNL work are to improve the consistency, defensibility, and traceability of parameters and their ranges of variability, and to ensure a sound basis for assigning parameters for flow and transport models in the code. The strategy was to start by identifying the existing parameter data sets most recently used in site assessments, documenting these parameter data sets and the raw data sets on which they were based, and using the existing parameter sets to define best-estimate parameters for use in the RESRAD code. The Hanford-specific assessment parameters compiled for use in RESRAD are traceable back to the professional judgment of the authors of published documents. Within the references, parameters are often not directly traceable back to the raw data and analytical approaches used to derive the assessment parameters. Future activities will work to continuously improve the defensibility and traceability of the parameter data sets and to address limitations and technical issues associated with the existing assessment parameter data sets.

  3. An Overview of Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Delta Lake Irrigation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Clint D.; Stubbs, Megan J.; Pennington, Ellen L.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rogers, Callie S.

    on Environmental Quality 2004). The Watermaster program is funded through flat rate and variable fees charged to water right holders within the Watermaster?s program area. The current annual base assessment fee is $50.00 per water rights holder, plus... an assessment fee that is based on the projected operating budget and the amount of water rights owned by the user (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality 2004). The 2003-2006 variable assessment fees are listed in Table 1. An exception to variable rate...

  4. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

  6. The MSc programme in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (SELECT) is a cooperation bet-ween seven top universities in Europe.It is a two year master programme including compulsory mobility for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    The MSc programme in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (SELECT Description Sustainable energy service is one of the key issues for humanity and central to the SELECT to estab- lish the environomical pathways towards future sustainable energy systems. Year 1 focuses

  7. An analysis of selected decision making variables and the effects they have on the post-secondary education plans of 16-21 year old youth from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takao, Marsha Jane McCord

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    influence the post-secondary education decisions made by 16-21 year old youth in the United States. In addition, selected outcome options were analyzed to determine the effect these options have on post-secondary education decisions made by 16-21 year old...

  8. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995 (first quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Site Operator Program quarterly report for USDOE electric and hybrid vehicle research. Its mission now includes the three major activity categories of advancement of electric vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 11 Site Operator Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of the site operators totals about 250 vehicles. The individual fleets are summarized.

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1992 (Second quarter of fiscal year 1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the Program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  10. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields, Black Warrior basin, Alabama. [Annual] yearly report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Class I PON, Anderman/Smith Operating Company is targeting three Carter sandstone oilfields (Black Warrior basin) for secondary recovery. Waterfloods are underway in two of the areas -- Central Bluff and North Fairview units. For the third area, South Bluff, negotiations are underway to unitize the field. Once South Bluff is unitized, waterflooding will commence.

  11. Electric and hybrid vehicle program, site operator program quarterly progress report for April through June 1996 (third quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The goals of the Site Operator Program include the field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments; the advancement of electric vehicle technologies; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The Site Operator Program currently consists of eleven participants under contract and two other organizations that have data-sharing agreements with the Program (Table ES-1). Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of electric vehicles, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for electric vehicles; and (2) DOE, the Department of Transportation, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of electric vehicles. The current focus of the Program is the collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real-world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus.

  12. Use the drop-down search menus and operators (AND, OR, NOT) to customize your search. Search by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields. Topic Enter your search words, joined, and subject terms; choose Title from the drop-down search menu to restrict your search to document titles only for the most comprehensive search. 1.To find all articles by Francis Harry Compton Crick, click , enter Crick F

  13. An inventory of soil and foliar nutrient levels of three year old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) on selected East Texas Flatwoods soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beacher, Gary Robert

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or fractions extracted with Bray P1 (0. 025 N HC1 + 0. 03N NH4F), North Carolina State double acid (0. 05 N HC1 ? 0. 025 N H2SO4), also referred to as D. A. , 20 ml CH3CCOH + 10g NaOH diluted to 20 liters, or NaOAc buffered at pH 4. 8. He also applied...). Ballard and Pritchett (1975) found that the Olsen (NaHCO3), Bray P1 (0. 03 N NH4F + 0. 025 N HC1) and the D. A. (0. 05 N HC1 + 0. 025 N H2SO4) methods were the est effective predictors of response to P fertilization in stands three and five years...

  14. An Overview of Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stubbs, Megan J.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    to both urban communities and agriculture (which includes most of the irrigation districts in the Lower Rio Grande Valley) brings forth more questions related to how each of these systems operate. Individual or groupings of irrigation districts..., infrastructure, adoptive rate of technology, etc. can vary significantly across irrigation districts. So, to completely understand and appreciate the collective Lower Rio Grande Valley irrigation district system, one must understand the idiosyncrasies...

  15. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

  16. THE IMPACT OF A TANK 40H DECANT ON THE PROJECTED OPERATING WINDOWS FOR SB4 AND GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY IN SUPPORT OF THE VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assess the impact of a 100K gallon decant volume from Tank 40H on the existing sludge-only Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)-Frit 510 flowsheet and the coupled operations flowsheet (SB4 with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)). Another potential SB4 flowsheet modification of interest includes the addition of 3 wt% sodium (on a calcined oxide basis) to a decanted sludge-only or coupled operations flowsheet. These potential SB4 flowsheet modifications could result in significant compositional shifts to the SB4 system. This paper study provides an assessment of the impact of these compositional changes to the projected glass operating windows and to the variability study for the Frit 510-SB4 system. The influence of the compositional changes on melt rate was not assessed in this study nor was it requested. Nominal Stage paper study assessments were completed using the projected compositions for the various flowsheet options coupled with Frit 510 (i.e., variation was not applied to the sludge and frit compositions). In order to gain insight into the impacts of sludge variation and/or frit variation (due to the procurement specifications) on the projected operating windows, three versions of the Variation Stage assessment were performed: (1) the traditional Variation Stage assessment in which the nominal Frit 510 composition was coupled with the extreme vertices (EVs) of each sludge, (2) an assessment of the impact of possible frit variation (within the accepted frit specification tolerances) on each nominal SB4 option, and (3) an assessment of the impact of possible variation in the Frit 510 composition due to the vendor's acceptance specifications coupled with the EVs of each sludge case. The results of the Nominal Stage assessment indicate very little difference among the various flowsheet options. All of the flowsheets provide DWPF with the possibility of targeting waste loadings (WLs) from the low 30s to the low 40s with Frit 510. In general, the Tank 40H decant has a slight negative impact on the operating window, but DWPF still has the ability to target current WLs (34%) and higher WLs if needed. While the decant does not affect practical WL targets in DWPF, melt rate could be reduced due to the lower Na{sub 2}O content. If true, the addition of 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to the glass system may regain melt rate, assuming that the source of alkali is independent of the impact on melt rate. Coupled operations with Frit 510 via the addition of ARP to the decanted SB4 flowsheet also appears to be viable based on the projected operating windows. The addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O to a decanted Tank 40H sludge may be problematic using Frit 510. Although the Nominal Stage assessments provide reasonable operating windows for the SB4 flowsheets being considered with Frit 510, introduction of potential sludge and/or frit compositional variation does have a negative impact. The magnitude of the impact on the projected operating windows is dependent on the specific flowsheet options as well as the applied variation. The results of the traditional Variation Stage assessments indicate that the three proposed Tank 40H decanted flowsheet options (Case No.2--100K gallon decant, Case No.3--100K gallon decant and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O addition and Case No.4--100K gallon decant and ARP) demonstrate a relatively high degree of robustness to possible sludge variation over WLs of interest with Frit 510. However, the case where the addition of both ARP and 3 wt% Na{sub 2}O is considered was problematic during the traditional Variation Stage assessment. The impact of coupling the frit specifications with the nominal SB4 flowsheet options on the projected operating windows is highly dependent on whether the upper WLs are low viscosity or liquidus temperature limited in the Nominal Stage assessments. Systems that are liquidus temperature limited exhibit a high degree of robustness to the applied frit and sludge variation, while those that are low viscosity li

  17. An operational method and device for the determination of an output signal in a selected spatial section of an information processing system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Zafiris

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Current strategies in system science with a focus on neuroscience do differ in their methodological approach when exploring and trying to analyze a system in order to detect supposed underlying principle processes in its inherent actions, which one might would call rules or laws. The here suggested procedure and measuring device, performs a mapping of characteristic parameters of the regional output signal, of the supposed structural properties, onto a selected regional part of the information processing system, in which the output signal and its characteristics occur. Explicitly it is pointed out here: Here are not considered input signals, which for instance might have an influence upon (few) nuclear kernels of the atom, electrons, protons, spins of these atomic structures or substructures, or phonons, or which in general represent the physical basis for example of NMR-Physics (NMR = nuclear magnetic resonance) or solid state physics. Examples for the type of input signals considered here are visual, olfactory, tactile or auditory input signals or simply a verbal instruction.

  18. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory selects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    selects small businesses for nuclear waste services February 16, 2012 Subcontract worth up to 200 million over five years LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 16, 2012-Los Alamos...

  20. Tree SelectionTree Selection Why is selection important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was planned ­ 200 years ago - to give owner and future generations a view of Mississippi River through grove;Tree Selection Style III Process Plan - for the future Purpose - planting goal Ponder - site There are lists from different locations. Utility company Local tree board Native trees #12;Utility Company

  1. Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

  2. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  3. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: OATI (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  4. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

  5. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as Reductants Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx...

  6. Utility vehicle safety Operator training program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Utility vehicle safety Operator training program #12;Permissible use Utility Vehicles may only Utility Vehicle operator · When equipped with the "Required Equipment" · On public roadways within Drivers" · Obey all traffic regulations · Trained; update training every two years · Operate vehicles

  7. Office of Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HA sessions of select LMP HA events to clarify the hazards of the glass-water reaction, maintenance operations, and potential criticality. The HAT discussed updated analysis to...

  8. The Swedish Program has Entered the Site Selection Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygards, P.; Hedman, T.; Eng, T.; Olsson, O.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilities for intermediate storage of spent fuel and HLW and for final disposal of ILW and LLW together with a system for sea transportation have been in operation in Sweden for more then 15 years. To complete the ''back end system'' the remaining parts are to build facilities for encapsulation and final storage of spent fuel and HLW. The Swedish reference method for final disposal of spent fuel, KBS-3, is to encapsulate the fuel elements in copper canisters and dispose them in a deep geological repository. The Swedish program up to 2001 was focused on the establishment of general acceptance of the reference method for final storage and SKB's selection of candidate sites for a deep geological repository. In the end of year 2000 SKB presented a report as a base for a Government decision about the siting process. This report gave the background for the selection of three candidate sites. It also presented the program for geological surveys of the candidate sites as well as the background for the choice of the method for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and HLW. In the end of 2001 the Swedish government endorsed the plan for the site selection phase and stated that the KBS-3 design of the repository shall be used as the planning base for the work. Permissions were also granted for the fieldwork from the municipalities of Forsmark and Oskarshamn where the candidate sites are located. Site investigations on these two sites started during 2002. The technical development and demonstration of the KBS 3-method is ongoing at the Dspv Hard Rock Laboratory and the Canister Laboratory. The goal for the coming five years period is to select the site for the repository and apply for licenses to construct and operate the facilities for encapsulation and final storage of spent fuel. The encapsulation plant and the repository are planned to be in operation around year 2015.

  9. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  10. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  11. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koreski, G.M.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

  12. Enhanced Building Operation Using "Operation Diagnostics" - A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, O.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations October 11-13, 2005, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Enhanced Building Operation Using ‘Operation Diagnostics’ – A Case Study Dipl.-Ing. Oliver Baumann Division for Building and System...- ing function implemented in the used visualization tool Pia [4] that enables to select and highlight data interactively in the diagram. Subsequently, numerical analysis gives the possibility to estimate optimization and saving potential...

  13. United States Geological Survey yearbook, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year 1980 Yearbook summarizes the activities of the US Geological Survey in response to its scientific and regulatory missions and its responsibility for exploration of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska. The main sections of this Yearbook are: (1) the year in review - a brief overview of the significant events of the Geological Survey during fiscal year 1980; (2) perspectives - essays focusing on specific events (rather than scientific topics) and programs involving multi-division participation; (3) missions, organization, and budget - a description of the Geological Survey's major duties and assignments and of the organizational structure that supports its missions; (4) division chapters - a description on the significant accomplishments (rather than a comprehensive program by program discussion) of each of the eight operating divisions and offices; and (5) appendices - provide supplementary information regarding key personnel, cooperators, and selected summary budgetary tables and an index.

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  15. Leadership Transitioning AdaptedfromBowlingGreenUniversity-OfficeofCampusInvolvement Your last year as an officer is coming to an end and new officers are being selected. How do

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Leadership Transitioning AdaptedfromBowlingGreenUniversity-OfficeofCampusInvolvement Your last year organization with strong leadership? Questions? Visit the Student Activities Office (Union 320) or call 940.565.3807 THOUROUGH LEADERSHIP TRANISITION HAS SEVERAL BENFITS: 1. The most obvious is that it provides for a transfer

  16. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  17. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  18. Operations Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and EvaluationOperational ManagementCenterOperations

  19. Electrochemical cell operation and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maru, Hansraj C. (Brookfield Center, CT)

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal control in fuel cell operation is affected through sensible heat of process gas by providing common input manifolding of the cell gas flow passage in communication with the cell electrolyte and an additional gas flow passage which is isolated from the cell electrolyte and in thermal communication with a heat-generating surface of the cell. Flow level in the cell gas flow passage is selected based on desired output electrical energy and flow level in the additional gas flow passage is selected in accordance with desired cell operating temperature.

  20. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  1. Josh Allen of Richland Operations Office Named 2014 Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE FR of the Year. He is responsible for operational oversight of the Richland Site's Solid Waste Operations Complex, which processes and stores nuclear and transuranic...

  2. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  3. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR SEPARATION BYAbrasionAuthor Select Last Name

  4. Author Select

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR SEPARATION BYAbrasionAuthor Select Last

  5. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

  6. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  7. Operating Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING PLAN

  8. Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING

  9. Author Select

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust August 2015 Events August 2015 eventStratus

  10. Operational Excellence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site » OpenOperational

  11. Operations Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING Who We

  12. Costing Summaries for Selected Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Engineering News-Record Construction Cost Index · Consumer Prices Index · Year Index = average of the monthly;Develop Costing Curves for : · Construction · Operation and Maintenance #12;Small Systems · Limited · Construction Costs · O&M Costs · General Design and Operational Information #12;Update The Costs for year 2000

  13. Combustion in a multiburner furnace with selective flow of oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a multiburner furnace with selective flow of oxygen Re-direct Destination: Improved operational characteristics such as improved fuel efficiency, reduction of NOx formation,...

  14. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  15. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  16. Parastillation Process in Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canfield, F.; Jenkins, O.

    PARASTII.IMICN PIO:ESS rn OPERATIONS Frank canfield ChenShare Coq:oration Houston, Texas The Parastillation process is a new rrethod for ITU.11ti-stage, counter-current contact between vapor and liquid that results in 33% rrore ideal stages... than distillation for a given tray spaci.n;J. Patents have been granted in the U.S.A., U.K., Europe and other countries. Perfonnance of the process has been confimm aver the past several years by eat1puter siITU.llation, by laboratory tests...

  17. Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas Proved Reserves, WetGasCubic Feet)Gas2

  18. Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008Facility EngineeringFacility Ops

  19. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colley, Robert W. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

  20. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colley, R.W.

    1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

  1. WIPP Marks 12 Years of Operations | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  2. KCP operations began 65 years ago today | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov OfficeAdministration Field Office

  3. Building operator certification offered in Santa Fe next year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,Envelope SHAREManufacturing | Department ofBuilding

  4. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  5. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year...

  6. Candidate Selection Instrument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The candidate selection instrument is designed to take the guesswork out of selecting candidates for the various career development programs of interest. The instrument is straightforward and...

  7. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich...

  8. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  9. Treatment/Disposal Plan for Drummed Waste from the 300-FF-1Operable Unit, 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Lerch.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this plan is to support selection of a safe, environmentally responsible, and cost-effective treatment and disposal method for drums containing depleted uranium metal chips submergedin oil that have been and will be excavated from the 618-4 Burial Ground. Remediation of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, 618-4 BurialGround was initiated in fiscal year (FY) 1998 as an excavation andremoval operation. Routine processes were established to excavateand ship contaminated soil and debris to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal.

  10. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  11. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

  12. ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Heileson

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

  13. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, S.V.; Savoie, M.T.; Hundal, R.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation. 9 refs.

  14. Emerging photovoltaic module technologies at PVUSA: A five-year assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, T.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) project tests two types of photovoltaic systems: new modules fielded as 20-kW Emerging Module Technology (EMT) arrays, and more mature technologies fielded as 20- to 500-kW turnkey Utility Scale (US) systems. This report summarizes experiences of the PVUSA project in operating the first six 20-kW EMT photovoltaic systems. Five systems are installed at Davis, California, and one at Kihei, Hawaii. Products selected for testing and demonstration were judged to have potential for significant technical advancement or reduction in manufacturing cost. Features leading to selection of each system and findings over the average 5 years of operation are compared in the report. Factory product qualification test experiences along with field acceptance test results are documented. Evaluation includes a broad range of performance parameters, including long-term efficiency, seasonal generation patterns, and maintenance. While some of the arrays have operated as well as any commercial system, others have fared poorly. Throughout the procurement and operation of these precommercial PV modules, PVUSA has provided feedback to vendors, critical for product improvement. The data and evaluations in this report will be of further benefit to manufacturers and provide general comparative information on a variety of technologies to researchers in utilities, government, and industry alike.

  15. DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Strengthen U.S.-Portugal Cooperation in Renewable Energy Technologies DOE to Pursue Zero-Net Energy Commercial Buildings U.S. Department of Energy Launches Real World Design...

  16. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kW) 9 hour CHP heat solar thermal thermal storage Fig. 3.Investments photovoltaics solar thermal absorption chillernatural gas combustion solar thermal CHP heat force low

  17. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ventilation, and air conditioning LBNL: Ernest Orlandoventilation and air conditioning system of a universityheating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system of a

  18. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential electricity consumption growth, plug-in electric vehicle charging and ground source heat pump

  19. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal power (kW) 9 hour CHP heat solar thermal thermalof combined heat and power (CHP), plus 2) the security,commercial sectors in which CHP applications particularly (

  20. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHP and SQRA reflects some real technical challenges posed by commercial and residentialon the residential and commercial sectors in which CHP

  1. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrically powered compressor cooling, direct fire orgas engine powered compressor cooling (not included in the

  2. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integrationand Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integration

  3. Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen and FuelDefense asDepartmentand

  4. Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen and FuelDefense asDepartmentandPaducah Site |

  5. Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bach, Joel Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to them, TABLE OF CO~S Page ABSTRACT DEDICATION 1V ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS vn1 LIST OF TABLES CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION xi Problem Statement Goals and Research Objectives Information Needs Process and Purpose of Research... Methods Impact Assessment Methods 14 18 19 20 24 24 IV RESEARCH FINDINGS 26 Case Studies and Enterprise Budget Explanations Respondent ff1 Case Study . . Budget Explanations 27 27 27 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page...

  6. DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »DepartmentLaboratory | Department oftheWaste

  7. Select an Operating System on PDSF Using CHOS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-Comments Sign InNuclearSynchrotronChos Chos PDSF

  8. DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition ofthe Nation's

  9. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLong Island

  10. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2014 Year-End

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLong IslandSummary Report |

  11. Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dossary, F. S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...

  12. Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dossary, F. S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...

  13. APS Operational Statistics for FY 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asdopslogo1.gif (2896 bytes) APS FY2005 Operational Statistics Back to Main Statistics Page FY 2005 Year-to-Date Statistics 2005 Statistics Summary HTML or PDF FY 2005...

  14. Training new operators - the first six months

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthel, B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Operations Department takes about two years to train a new Operator. The Operator's introductory (Concepts) On-the-Job-Training (OJT) gives him or her an overview of the laboratory, teaches the basic facts about all the accelerators, and it also teaches the new operator the training process used for all the rest of their OJT training. The Concepts OJT takes about four to six months for most people to complete. This paper will explain how this first six months of training sets the new employee on their path to becoming a fully trained Operator.

  15. Required Courses for the HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Major Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year Credits Fall Semester CO 150 College Composition FSHN 150 Survey of Human Nutrition MATH 117 Hotel Operations Foundations and Perspectives (Cat. 3-B,D,E)** Spring Semester ACT 205* Fundamentals of Accounting RRM 310 Food Service Systems-Operations SPCM 200 Public Speaking STAT 204 Statistics for Business

  16. Operations and compositions in transrecursive operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgin, M.S.; Borodyanskii, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study is a continuation of a study focusing on introduction and analysis of operations on transrecursive operators, which are similar to the operators considered in the theory of algorithms. Such operations may be standard product of algorithms) or special ({alpha}-disjunction and {alpha}-iteration. In some respects, these operations in the class of transrecursive operators are similar to their traditional analogs. In other respects, however, they are essentially different. For instance, they may have different types and modes. Specific features of operations on transrecursive operators are attributable to explicit omission of some restrictions on their construction compared with the construction of algorithms. The standard approaches to mathematical modeling of the concept of algorithm assume a number of essential restrictions. Specifically, they assume finiteness of (1) the input data arriving during a finite time interval; (2) the list of rules underlying the operations of the algorithm; (3) the transformations executed by a single operation; (4) the description of each rule; (5) the time to execute one operation; (6) the time to execute one operation; (7) the number of cycles that the algorithm executes in order to realize the mapping. In application to Turing machines, these restrictions imply finiteness of the initial word, finiteness of the command table of the read head, and ultimate stopping when the result is obtained after finitely many steps. Various classes of transrecursive operators are constructed by dropping various combinations of the {open_quotes}finiteness{close_quotes} restrictions. Two classes of transrecursive operators - the limit (inductive) Turing machines and transalgorithms - have been obtained by dropping respectively the assumption of finiteness of the number of execution cycles and the assumption of finiteness of the list of rules.

  17. Operating Permits (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The owner or operator of a facility subject to this article shall obtain and maintain an operating permit for the facility. The owner or operator of a facility subject to this article shall ensure...

  18. Cogeneration Operational Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both...

  19. Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ç. Aksak; S. Turgut

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

  20. Building Operator Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Operator Certification Energy Efficiency through Operator Training CATEE December 18, 2013 – San Antonio, TX Dennis Lilley, CEM, PMP ESL-KT-13-12-49 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Building Operator Certification Energy Efficiency through Operator Training What is Building Operator Certification? Industry-recognized credential in energy efficient building operation practices Created with 100 industry experts Launched in 1996 9...

  1. Operation and Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: WALC-DSW (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  2. Operations Information for Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Information for Studies This page contains historical information about hydropower operations. Reclamation UC Region 24-Month Studies FY2009 Load Information (pdf) SLIP...

  3. Operations Cost Allocation Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms...

  4. Operations Research Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as an Operations Research Analyst in the Generation Scheduling (PGS). The Operations Research Analyst is responsible for analytical work that involves...

  5. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  6. SWEIS annual review - CY2002 : a comparison of CY2002 operations to projections included in the site-wide environmental impact statement for continued operation of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayliss, Linda Sue (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM); White, Brenda Bailey (The Plus Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Guerrero, Joseph Vincent; Catechis, Christopher Spyros (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SNL/NM CY2002 SWEIS Annual Review discusses changes in facilities and facility operations that have occurred in selected and notable facilities since source data were collected for the SNL/NM SWEIS (DOE/EIS-0281). The following information is presented: {sm_bullet} An updated overview of SNL/NM selected and notable facilities and infrastructure capabilities. {sm_bullet} An overview of SNL/NM environment, safety, and health programs, including summaries of the purpose, operations, activities, hazards, and hazard controls at relevant facilities and risk management methods for SNL/NM. {sm_bullet} Updated base year activities data, together with related inventories, material consumption, emissions, waste, and resource consumption. {sm_bullet} Appendices summarizing activities and related hazards at SNL/NM individual special, general, and highbay laboratories, and chemical purchases.

  7. Optical Broadband Angular Selectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yichen

    Light selection based purely on the angle of propagation is a long-standing scientific challenge. In angularly selective systems, however, the transmission of light usually also depends on the light frequency. We tailored ...

  8. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Graduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

  9. Safety approaches for high power modular laser operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handren, R.T.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 20 years ago, a program was initiated at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study the feasibility of using lasers to separate isotopes of uranium and other materials. Of particular interest has been the development of a uranium enrichment method for the production of commercial nuclear power reactor fuel to replace current more expensive methods. The Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program has progressed to the point where a plant-scale facility to demonstrate commercial feasibility has been built and is being tested. The U-AVLIS Program uses copper vapor lasers which pump frequency selective dye lasers to photoionize uranium vapor produced by an electron beam. The selectively ionized isotopes are electrostatically collected. The copper lasers are arranged in oscillator/amplifier chains. The current configuration consists of 12 chains, each with a nominal output of 800 W for a system output in excess of 9 kW. The system requirements are for continuous operation (24 h a day, 7 days a week) and high availability. To meet these requirements, the lasers are designed in a modular form allowing for rapid change-out of the lasers requiring maintenance. Since beginning operation in early 1985, the copper lasers have accumulated over 2 million unit hours at a >90% availability. The dye laser system provides approximately 2.5 kW average power in the visible wavelength range. This large-scale laser system has many safety considerations, including high-power laser beams, high voltage, and large quantities ({approximately}3000 gal) of ethanol dye solutions. The Laboratory`s safety policy requires that safety controls be designed into any process, equipment, or apparatus in the form of engineering controls. Administrative controls further reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Selected examples of engineering and administrative controls currently being used in the U-AVLIS Program are described.

  10. DOE to Compete Contract for Management and Operation of Pacific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the management and operations contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington. The current five-year contract expires September 30, 2007. "The...

  11. From US NAVY Mate to Division Leader for Operations - Requirements, Development and Career Paths of LANL/LANSCE Accelerator Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    There are opportunities for advancement within the team. Operators advance by: (1) Becoming fully qualified - following the LANSCE Accelerator Operator Training Manual, Operator trainees go through 5 levels of qualification, from Radiation Security System to Experimental Area Operator. Must obtain Knowledge and Performance checkouts by an OSS or AOSS, and an End-of-Card checkout by the team leader or RSS engineer (level I). Program was inspired by US NAVY qualification program for nuclear reactor operators. Time to complete: 2-2.5 years. (2) Fully qualified operators are eligible to apply for vacant (OSS)/AOSS positions; and (3) Alternatively, experienced operators can sign up for the voluntary Senior Operator Qualification Program. They must demonstrate in-depth knowledge of all areas of the accelerator complex. Time to complete is 2-3 years (Minimum 4 years from fully qualified). Eligible for promotion to level between qualified operator and AOSS.

  12. Robust Critical Node Selection by Benders Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    critical node selection problem, we define the following decision variables ..... method to generate Pareto-optimal cuts thus achieving very good speed-ups compared to ... Barabási-Albert graphs generated using the Barabási graph generator (Dreier, 2006). ...... Computers & Operations Research, 38(12):1766 – 1774, 2011.

  13. ONLINE OPTIMIZATION AND SELECTION OF MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    117 Chapter 7 ON­LINE OPTIMIZATION AND SELECTION OF MEASUREMENTS This is the last of three chapters that discuss optimal operation of a general heat exchanger network. A method that combines the use of steady state optimization and decentralized feedback control is proposed. A general steady state model

  14. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  15. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    the operations and supply chain strategy. This survey course in operations management introduces students1 MGSC 395 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008 Course Syllabus Instructor: Professor Anand Nair Class MATERIALS Required Text Books Textbook: Krajewski, Lee, Ritzman, Larry, and Malhotra, Manoj. Operations

  16. Operator pencil passing through a given operator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, A., E-mail: khudian@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: adam.biggs@student.manchester.ac.uk; Khudaverdian, H. M., E-mail: khudian@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: adam.biggs@student.manchester.ac.uk [School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Let ? be a linear differential operator acting on the space of densities of a given weight ?{sub 0} on a manifold M. One can consider a pencil of operators ?-circumflex(?)=(?{sub ?}) passing through the operator ? such that any ?{sub ?} is a linear differential operator acting on densities of weight ?. This pencil can be identified with a linear differential operator ?-circumflex acting on the algebra of densities of all weights. The existence of an invariant scalar product in the algebra of densities implies a natural decomposition of operators, i.e., pencils of self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint operators. We study lifting maps that are on one hand equivariant with respect to divergenceless vector fields, and, on the other hand, with values in self-adjoint or anti-self-adjoint operators. In particular, we analyze the relation between these two concepts, and apply it to the study of diff?(M)-equivariant liftings. Finally, we briefly consider the case of liftings equivariant with respect to the algebra of projective transformations and describe all regular self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint liftings. Our constructions can be considered as a generalisation of equivariant quantisation.

  17. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  18. Selection of Working Fluids for the Organic Rankine Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, H. H.; Patton, J. M.; Starling, K. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of selecting working fluid and process operating conditions for the waste heat binary power cycle is addressed herein. The waste heat temperature range from 300 F to 500 F was considered the economic resource range. The available...

  19. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  20. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  1. Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category Please select a registration Department of Anesthesia will not assume any responsibility for any injuries or other negative occurrences indicate your affiliation with Stanford Anesthesia Anesthesia Resident Anesthesia Fellow Anesthesia Faculty

  2. Ways of arrangement : the basic operations of form-making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minghong

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Making forms is essentially a matter of arranging things, and arranging things is essentially to establish spatial relations among selected elements. The thesis provides a minimal set of basic operations believed to be ...

  3. Final Year Projects Class of 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Engineering Page 10 Message from our Sponsor SAP Page 13 Project Areas/Technology Categories Page 15 Operating Systems/Programmes Page 16 Project Index Page 17-18 Projects 1-82 Page 20-101 Companies Sponsoring PrizesFinal Year Projects Class of 2012 schools of computing, electronic engineering and mechanical

  4. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  5. An improved selective excitation double Mossbauer spectrometer J. van Lieropa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    An improved selective excitation double Mo¨ssbauer spectrometer J. van Lieropa) and D. H. Ryan, operation and performance of a selective excitation double Mo¨ssbauer SEDM spectrometer are described circuitry together with Wissel Mo¨ssbauer velocity transducers and electronics supplies energy

  6. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the field of gas desorption from metals; and, more particularly, to a method of enhancing the selective desorption of a particular isotope of a gas from metals. Enhanced selective desorption is especially useful in the operation of fusion devices.

  7. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  8. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  9. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander Ranking Member SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION...

  10. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR)...

  11. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR) 2.101 AND 3.104 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 (enter date here, centered revised template...

  12. Selecting and Applying Interfacings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selecting and using interfacing correctly is an important component of garment construction. The various types of interfacing are described and methods of applying them are discussed in detail....

  13. Turlock Lake Powerhouse. Turlock Irrigation District design report and operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of equipment selection and design is outlined and operational criteria for the hydroelectric power drop at the Turlock Lake California Powerhouse are established.

  14. Storage Ring Operation Modes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in...

  15. Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    -1123 Laboratory FAX (916) 752-4107 Standard Operating Procedures Technical Information Document TI 201A #12;TI 201.................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.0 Weekly Maintenance ProceduresIMPROVE Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual February 10, 1997 Air Quality Group Crocker Nuclear

  16. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  17. Reservoir Operation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    management of the surface water resources of the various river basins of the state. The operation of these essential water control facilities is examined in this report. Reservoir operation is viewed here from the perspective of deciding how much water...

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  19. Report on inspection of the performance based incentive program at the Richland Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Performance Based Incentive (PBI) Program at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Richland Operations Office (Richland) was initiated by Richland as one part of the broader DOE Contract Reform Initiative being implemented at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. This program was identified as an area of concern by the Office of Inspections as a result of previous inspection work. Specifically, during a limited review of the construction of an Effluent Treatment Facility at the Hanford Site, we were unable to identify any written policies describing PBI program controls or implementation procedures. We were told that Richland Operations Office Program Management personnel were not directly involved in the selection of the Effluent Treatment Facility project for the PBI Program, or in the determination that this particular PBI would be established with a potential fee of $1 million.

  20. SWPF Crane Lift Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple vview shot of the SWPF crane lift operation at the Savannah River Site. Funded by the Recovery Act.

  1. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

  2. Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2009 1 Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2009 The operator of an oil or...

  3. Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

  4. Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish selection, qualification, and training requirements for management and operating (M&O) contractor personnel involved in the operation, maintenance, and technical support of Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration Category A and B reactors and non-reactor nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE O 426.2

  5. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  6. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil absorption fieldTwo-compartment septic tank Perforated pipe for effluent disposal Sand/loam soil Gravel Geotextile fabric Onsite wastewater treatment systems Operation and maintenance L-5347 8-08 Figure 1: A septic tank and soil absorption... field system. I f your home or business uses an onsite wastewater treatment system, common- ly known as a septic system, you need to know how to operate and maintain the system properly to prevent pollution and sewage backups. For many years, people...

  7. STOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to incorporate paleo #12;iv reconstructed data. The selected methods are then employed to generate syntheticSTOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS By KENNETH C NOWAK B Flow Sequence Generation and Aspinall Unit Operations written by Kenneth C Nowak has been approved

  8. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  9. Approaches to LLW disposal site selection and current progress of host states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J.; Kerr, T.A.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and under the guidance of 10 CFR 61, States have begun entering into compacts to establish and operate regional disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The progress a state makes in implementing a process to identify a specific location for a disposal site is one indication of the level of a state's commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Federal law and interstate compact agreements. During the past few years, several States have been engaged in site selection processes. The purpose of this report is to summarize the site selection approaches of some of the Host States (California, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Illinois), and their progress to date. An additional purpose of the report is to discern whether the Host States's site selection processes were heavily influenced by any common factors. One factor each state held in common was that political and public processes exerted a powerful influence on the site selection process at virtually every stage. 1 ref.

  10. The ABCs of pump selection for mine dewatering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, S.E.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Choosing the right type of pump for removing water from mine operations can provide significant benefits in overall performance and cost of operation. The article describes the types of pump most commonly used: vertical turbine pumps, electric and hydraulic submersible pumps, horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps and horizontal single-stage centrifugal pumps. It gives points to consider when selecting a suitable pump, including solids handling capacity and acid content, portability, automatic operation, easy maintenance and parts availability. 1 photo.

  11. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, C.S.; Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses a selectable fragmentation warhead which is capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  12. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  13. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  14. B & W Y-12 and 14 Years in Oak Ridge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 and 14 Years in Oak Ridge I well recall the transition that began in November, 2000, when BWXT Y-12 (now B&W Y-12) took over the management and operating contract for what...

  15. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  16. Apollo Multiplexer operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.M.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the operation of the the Apollo Multiplexer, a microprocessor based communications device designed to process data between an Apollo computer and up to four Gandalf PACXIV data switches. Details are given on overall operation, hardware, and troubleshooting. The reader should gain sufficient knowledge from this report to understand the operation of the multiplexer and effectively analyze and correct any problems that might occur.

  17. Operating an induction melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, Jay A.; Richardson, John G.; Raivo, Brian D.; Soelberg, Nicholas R.

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  18. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  19. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  20. An evaluation of the effects of valve body erosion on motor-operated valve operability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.H.; Nitzel, M.E.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INEL engineers evaluated effects of erosion-induced valve wall thinning on motor-operated valve operability. The authors reviewed reports that identified the extent and location of erosion damage in nuclear plant valves and chose a globe valve with severe erosion damage to assess the potential for loss of operability. They developed a finite element model of the selected valve and performed structural analyses with valve closing forces, seismic effects, and increased erosion areas to analyze effects of erosion on structural integrity. Results indicate that while some local stresses at the points of maximum erosion exceeded yield, the general stresses were well below yield. Therefore, displacements will be small and bending will not occur. It is concluded that erosion-related wall thinning is not likely to create an operability problem for motor-operated valves.

  1. HQ- Human Resources Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HQs Human Recources Operations delivers services, including position management, recruitment, staffing and classification, and reduction in force at Headquarters.  Click the "Contacts" Link to find...

  2. Hyponormality of Toeplitz Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-40-52T23:59:59.000Z

    Amer. Math. Soc. 82(1976), 494-496. [12] S. C. Power. Hankel Operators on Hilbert Space, Pitman, Boston, 1982. [13] D. Sarason. Generalized interpolation in H.

  3. Spectral Operators of Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 10, 2014 ... a thorough study on a new class of matrix valued functions, coined as spectral operators of ..... not self-adjoint. ...... 9 (1981) 1135–1151.

  4. Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

  5. OCRWM annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the progress in the activities of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters include: Yucca Mountain site characterization project; Waste acceptance, storage and transportation project; Program management; Working with external parties; and Financial management. Also included in five appendices are: financial statements; key federal laws and regulations; fiscal year 1997 Congressional testimony and meetings with regulators and oversight bodies; OCREM publications for fiscal year 1997; and selected publications from other organizations during fiscal year 1997.

  6. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  7. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  8. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.`` The purpose is to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. Engineering development included bench-scale process development, component development adaptation or modification of existing unit operations, proof-of-concept (POC) module design, fabrication, testing, data evaluation, and conceptual design of a commercial facility. The information obtained during POC operation resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant. Throughout this project performance targets for the engineering development of selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR). Additional objectives included producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is suitable for conventional coal handling systems. The selective agglomeration process, as applied to coal cleaning, is based on differences in the surface chemistry of coal and its associated impurities. Coal particles are hydrophobic (i.e., repel water) while the majority of its impurities are hydrophilic (i.e., stabilized in water). During selective agglomeration, a liquid (the agglomerant) that is immiscible with water is introduced into a coal-water slurry and agitated to disperse it in the slurry, thereby allowing it to come into contact with all particles in the slurry. The coal particles, due to their hydrophobic nature, are attracted to the agglomerant phase. The hydrophilic mineral impurities remain in the water phase. Continued agitation of the agglomerant-coated coal particles causes them to coalesce to form agglomerates. Once the agglomerates are formed, they are separated from the mineral matter-bearing aqueous phase by subsequent processing steps.

  9. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  10. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  11. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1988 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), were in operation during the year. The Environmental Committee, which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB), continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY88 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations. Over the last two years the Department of Energy conducted major environmental audits at all of its facilities, including PPPL. No significant environmental concerns were noted as a result of the inspection and sampling at PPPL. 43 refs., 25 figs., 33 tabs.

  12. Ordered involutive operator spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blecher, David P; Neal, Matthew; Werner, Wend

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a companion to recent papers of the authors; here we construct the `noncommutative Shilov boundary' of a (possibly nonunital) selfadjoint ordered space of Hilbert space operators. The morphisms in the universal property of the boundary preserve order. As an application, we consider `maximal' and `minimal' unitizations of such ordered operator spaces.

  13. Operations Research + Information Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    and the equipment they operate to perform most efficiently. The allocation of resources may be represented of the techniques and modeling concepts needed to analyze and design complex systems. As an operations researcher. All business systems are complex and need sophisticated decision-making methods that enable employees

  14. Humanitarian Operations Pinar Keskinocak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    1 Humanitarian Operations Pinar Keskinocak H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems for Allocating Urban Emergency Units: A Survey Larson (1972), Urban Police Patrol Analysis Larson and Odoni (1981), Urban Operations Research Jones and Eden (1981), O.R. in the Community Pollock, Rothkopf, Barnett (1994

  15. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  16. PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    of each year by the Superintendent for Building Maintenance and Construction Work Control, Director of the craftspeople under their control and related operation costs for the following specific Physical Plant shops) Superintendent of Heating and Air Conditioning (a) Electronic Maintenance (b) HVAC (c) Insulation/Asbestos

  17. Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year...

  18. Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year...

  19. Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year...

  20. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1987 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1987. The Environmental Committee which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY87 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations. 41 refs., 24 figs., 34 tabs.

  1. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

  2. Selectivity in the evolution of Palaeozoic arthropod groups, with focus on mass extinctions and radiations: a phylogenetic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamsdell, James Christopher

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass extinctions are known to be extraordinary events during which the normal rules of natural selection do not apply. Evidence points to the operation of a different selective regime, one where clade-level properties are ...

  3. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  4. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it as one of our chos operating systems at PDSF. This requires a reboot of the interactive nodes and will be done as follows: The PDSF interactive nodes will be rebooted on...

  5. Selected Topics in Column Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 2, 2002 ... Page 1. Selected Topics in Column Generation. Marco E. Lübbecke ... is an ever recurring concept in our “selected topics.” OR/MS Subject ...

  6. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  7. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  8. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  9. Solar selective surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buskirk, O.R.

    1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Postformable solar selective coatings are disclosed for use on substrates such as aluminum. The coatings use a finely divided black inherently selective spinel pigment such as Co3O4, CuCr2O4 or CuxCo3-xO4 where X is 0.03 to 0.3 and preferably 0.10 to 0.30. The binders are soluble copolymers of vinylidene fluoride or blends thereof or vinylidene fluoride with a copolymer of methyl methacrylate.

  10. Thirty-year solid waste generation forecast for facilities at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information supplied by this 30-year solid waste forecast has been compiled as a source document to the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (WMEIS). The WMEIS will help to select a sitewide strategic approach to managing present and future Savannah River Site (SRS) waste generated from ongoing operations, environmental restoration (ER) activities, transition from nuclear production to other missions, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) programs. The EIS will support project-level decisions on the operation of specific treatment, storage, and disposal facilities within the near term (10 years or less). In addition, the EIS will provide a baseline for analysis of future waste management activities and a basis for the evaluation of the specific waste management alternatives. This 30-year solid waste forecast will be used as the initial basis for the EIS decision-making process. The Site generates and manages many types and categories of waste. With a few exceptions, waste types are divided into two broad groups-high-level waste and solid waste. High-level waste consists primarily of liquid radioactive waste, which is addressed in a separate forecast and is not discussed further in this document. The waste types discussed in this solid waste forecast are sanitary waste, hazardous waste, low-level mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste. As activities at SRS change from primarily production to primarily decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration, the volume of each waste s being managed will change significantly. This report acknowledges the changes in Site Missions when developing the 30-year solid waste forecast.

  11. 16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of operating NPP; · NPP decommissioning and waste treatment; · Novel reactor concepts and Nuclear Fuel CycleISTCISTC 16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology 13th CERNISTC SAC Seminar New Perspectives of High Energy Physics 01

  12. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  13. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  14. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  15. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  16. Operation Prognostics and Operation Diagnostics—Technologies for Enhanced Operations and Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, O.

    PROGNOSTICS AND OPERATION DIAGNOSTICS ? NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENHANCED OPERATIONS AND CONTROLS OLIVER BAUMANN, PRESIDENT 202-608-1334 EBERT & BAUMANN CONSULTING ENGINEERS, WASHINGTON D.C. The Methodologies of Operation Prognostics and Operation...

  17. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, 6-25-13

  18. Operation Research Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as an Operation Research Analyst in the Market Analysis and Pricing organization of Power Services. This organization is responsible for performing market...

  19. Operations Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies, responsibilities and authorities for implementing and sustaining the Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Security (OPSEC) Program. Cancels DOE O 5632.3B. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  20. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  1. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

  2. Continuity of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The notice defines requirements and responsibilities for continuity of operations planning within the DOE to ensure the capability to continue essential Departmental functions across a wide range of all hazard emergencies. Does not cancel other directives.

  3. Operations | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Argonne mentors students for the next generation of scientistsMay 28, 2015 On May 6, the accomplishments of seventeen Chicago-area high school students that had been...

  4. Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 &?ATES0Richland, Washington 99352 10O-AMSE-0054 A PR I Mr. J. G. Lehew III, President and Chief Executive Officer...

  5. SNS Target Systems Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    a failed gas seal on the shaft and leaking oil seals but has operated well since then · The moderator 7.5 k First target replacement · No observed corrosion · Internal Boroscope examination in progress · ~ 50 mm

  6. "Order Module--DOE O 426.2, PERSONNEL SELECTION, TRAINING, QUALIFICATION, AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "To establish selection, training, qualification, and certification requirements for contractor personnel who can impact the safety basis through their involvement in the operation, maintenance,...

  7. Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    file · Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti· 3-D Printing · Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

  8. Weather conditions affecting VTOL airbus operations in the Northeast Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R. W.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of hourly weather observations in the Northeast Corridor during the periods 0600-2400 for a ten year period 1944-1958 was made to study the implications of weather affecting the operations of a VSTOL Airbus ...

  9. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  10. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: QUASAR TARGET SELECTION FOR DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Carithers, William C.; Ho, Shirley [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton, NY 11375 (United States); Yeche, Christophe; Aubourg, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Strauss, Michael A.; Lee, Khee-Gan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bovy, Jo; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Croft, Rupert A. C. [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Da Silva, Robert [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dawson, Kyle [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F., E-mail: npross@lbl.gov [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg{sup 2}, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption from the spectra of a sample of {approx}150,000 z > 2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z Almost-Equal-To 2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3.5, where their colors tend to overlap those of the far more numerous stars. During the first year of the BOSS survey, quasar target selection (QTS) methods were developed and tested to meet the requirement of delivering at least 15 quasars deg{sup -2} in this redshift range, with a goal of 20 out of 40 targets deg{sup -2} allocated to the quasar survey. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g {<=} 22.0 or r {<=} 21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection algorithm, many other astrophysical studies do. We have therefore defined a uniformly selected subsample of 20 targets deg{sup -2}, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50% ({approx}10 z > 2.20 quasars deg{sup -2}). This 'CORE' subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. For the remaining 20 targets deg{sup -2}, we will continue to develop improved selection techniques, including the use of additional data sets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. In this paper, we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS QTS algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations (through 2011 July), in support of the science investigations based on these data, and we analyze the spectra obtained during the first year. During this year, 11,263 new z > 2.20 quasars were spectroscopically confirmed by BOSS, roughly double the number of previously known quasars with z > 2.20. Our current algorithms select an average of 15 z > 2.20 quasars deg{sup -2} from 40 targets deg{sup -2} using single-epoch SDSS imaging. Multi-epoch optical data and data at other wavelengths can further improve the efficiency and completeness of BOSS QTS.

  11. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

  12. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrock, Steven J.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA�¢����s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20���ºC to 120���ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA�¢����s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

  13. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  14. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  15. Haul truck selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, D.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Haul truck selection involves the consideration of a vast amount of information before the final decision is made. This judgment should not be made simply on the choice of power train, because to go for mechanical or electric drive has always been a case of horses for courses. Some sites are just better suited to electric drive. It could, for instance, be argued that coming out of deep mines with long haul roads is an ideal application for electric drive, but negotiating steep down gradients fully laden would favor mechanical drive. Engine selection on the other hand is easier to define but normally is the direct responsibility of the customer, with the truck manufacturer acting as impartial adviser. Understandably each will offer engines it believes to be well matched to the truck and to the site application requirements. Long term mine planning with careful attention to future equipment requirements is the key to all equipment purchases. This paper discusses the various considerations.

  16. Factors Affecting Auction Market Operating Costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wootan, Charley V.; McNeely, John G.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors Affecting Auction Market Operating Costs Texas Summary and Conclusions T THE TIME THE DATA for this study were collected A there were 178 livestock auctions operating in Texas; 140 were included in this analysis. They ranyed in size... from just over 5,000 animal units per year to alinost 350,000. It has been sl~own that opera- - tional efficiency, measured in terms of average cost per unit marketed, increases directly with firm size and that efficiency gains were most marked...

  17. Selecting a Consulting Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

  18. SSCL Commissioning and Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The SSC, with an energy of 20 TeV/Beam, requires a sequence of individual accelerators of increasing energy in the injector chain. These are the Linac, Low Energy Booster, Medium Energy Booster, and High Energy Booster. Each accelerator system must be completed in sequence in order to provide beam to the next higher energy accelerator. The collider itself is comprised of ten sectors, each of which in terms of superconducting magnet bending strength, is equivalent to two HEB injectors. The completion of all injectors and collider sectors is required before stored beams can circulate in preparation for colliding beam operation. Four experimental halls are planned for the detector systems. Each major detector will be assembled in one of the halls by a world-wide collaboration of scientists. In addition, above ground facilities provide shops and test facilities for accelerator technical systems, superconducting magnet and materials research and development, and for detector assembly and operations. The purpose of this report is to present a plan for the sequential commissioning and operation of these individual accelerators and other technical facilities of the SSC. A central objective of this plan is to describe the activities at the SSCL that are not included as part of the construction project TPC, even though they occur during the overall project construction time-frame. Examples of such activities include the operation of general laboratory facilities and services not specifically related to construction, the operating costs for the individual accelerators in the injector chain once these facilities have been commissioned, and the costs of SSCL physics research groups. The Department of Energy has provided the following decision with regard to these operations categories for the SSCL.

  19. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  20. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  1. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  2. Monitoring and Optimization of Building Operations of a Low-Energy School Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenigsdorff, R.; Heinrich, S.; Baumann, O.; Reiser, C.

    consumption was almost met during the second year of operation in 2006 and finally achieved in 2007, due to well-working optimization measures, which were identified through monitoring of the building operation. Heating and cooling energy is mainly provided...

  3. Deriving Optimal Operational Rules for Mitigating Inter-area Oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Chen, Yousu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a new method to mitigate inter-area oscillations of a large scale interconnected power system by means of generation re-dispatch. The optimal operational control procedures are derived as the shortest distance from the current operating condition to a desired damping ratio of the oscillation mode by adjusting generator outputs. A sensitivity based method is used to select the most effective generators for generation re-dispatch and decision tree is trained to approximate the security boundary in a space characterized by the selected generators. The optimal operational rules can be found by solving an optimization problem where the boundary constraints are provided by the decision tree rules. This method is tested on a Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) 179-bus simplified network model and simulation results have demonstrated the proof of concept and shown promising application in real time operation.

  4. Wavevector Selective Metasurfaces and Tunnel Vision Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedotov, Vassili A; Walther, Markus; Perino, Mauro; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metasurfaces offer unprecedented flexibility in the design and control of light propagation, replacing bulk optical components and exhibiting exotic optical effects. One of the basic properties of the metasurfaces, which renders them as frequency selective surfaces, is the ability to transmit or reflect radiation within a narrow spectral band that can be engineered on demand. Here we introduce and demonstrate experimentally in the THz domain the concept of wavevector selective surfaces -- metasurfaces transparent only within a narrow range of light propagation directions operating effectively as tunnel vision filters. Practical implementations of the new concept include applications in wavefront manipulation, observational instruments, vision and free-space communication in light-scattering environments, as well as passive camouflage.

  5. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-25-13, cancels DOE O 422.1. Certified 12-3-14.

  6. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, cancels Admin Chg 1.

  7. OPERATIONAL RISK RODNEY COLEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Rodney

    is entered into with the aim of generating wealth, in the pursuit of returns Wiley Encyclopedia of Operations, not only because losses are widely expressed in monetary terms but also since the industry is highly the loss events are penalties imposed for contravening regulations, they enter the public domain. Onetime

  8. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP­DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. ­ Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  9. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reniers, Michel

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  10. REACTOR OPERATIONS AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    REACTOR OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: core calculations, neural networks, control rod elevation of a control rod, or a group of control rods, is an important parameter from the viewpoint of reactor control DETERMINATION OF PWR CONTROL ROD POSITION BY CORE PHYSICS AND NEURAL NETWORK METHODS NINOS S. GARIS* and IMRE

  11. Installing and operating FEGTEMs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetherington, C.J.; Cullis, A.G.; Walker, S.; Turner, J.; Nelson, E.C.; O'Keefe, M.A.

    1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to operate at full potential, Field-Emission-Gun Transmission Electron Microscopes (FEG-TEMs) require special environments designed to minimize the effects of vibration and electromagnetic noise. This report shows how careful attention to these details can enable such instruments to achieve their design parameters and produce information transfer to sub-Angstrom resolutions.

  12. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazičre, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazičre

  13. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  14. Operation and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    in this Publication is provided as is and has been prepared solely for the purpose of evaluating data center designOperation and Maintenance InRow® RD Air Cooled ACRD100 ACRD101 #12;This manual is available assumes no liability for damages, violations of codes, improper installation, system failures, or any

  15. Intelligent Potroom Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan Berkow; Larry Banta

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intelligent Potroom Operation project focuses on maximizing the performance of an aluminum smelter by innovating components for an intelligent manufacturing system. The Intelligent Potroom Advisor (IPA) monitors process data to identify reduction cells exhibiting behaviors that require immediate attention. It then advises operational personnel on those heuristic-based actions to bring the cell back to an optimal operating state in order to reduce the duration and frequency of substandard reduction cell performance referred to as ''Off-Peak Modes'' (OPMs). Techniques developed to identify cells exhibiting OPMs include the use of a finite element model-based cell state estimator for defining the cell's current operating state via advanced cell noise analyses. In addition, rule induction was also employed to identify statistically significant complex behaviors that occur prior to OPMs. The intelligent manufacturing system design, concepts and formalisms developed in this project w ere used as a basis for an intelligent manufacturing system design. Future research will incorporate an adaptive component to automate continuous process improvement, a technology platform with the potential to improve process performance in many of the other Industries of the Future applications as well.

  16. Safe Chain Saw Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1409 B-1409 SAFE CHAIN SAW OPERATION Gary S. Nelson* A chain saw is a portable power cutting machine. Used properly, it will trim or cut down trees, clear land or cut fireplace wood. Improperly used, a chain saw can...

  17. DCO Operations Interesting Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRY BULB TEMPERATURE - °F 01 51 02 52 03 53 04 54 05 55 55 06 06 RIAYRDFODNUOPREPUTB-YPLAHTNE ENTHALPY - BTU PER POUND OF DRY AIR 51 02 52 03 53 04 54 05 RIA YRD F O DNU OP REP UTB- YPLAHTNE F°- ERUTAREP MET operate 1560 hard disks, totaling 530 TB of storage · Eight air conditioners within the zones process

  18. Concept of Operations: Essence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, William J.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This concept of operations is designed to give the reader a brief overview of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s Essence project and a description of the Essence device design. The data collected by the device, how the data are used, and how the data are protected are also discussed in this document.

  19. Office of Business Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Business Operations manages financial and acquisition management programs throughout the Associate Under Secretary for the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), including the formulation and execution of the AU budget; funding control and accounting activities; preparation of management studies; and provision of acquisition management support.

  20. Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

  1. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  2. Operations and Maintenance Program Structure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program recommends Federal operations and maintenance (O&M) programs comprise of five distinct functions: operations, maintenance, engineering, training, and...

  3. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Gerardin, A.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alessi, J. [BNL, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Faircloth, D. [RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kalvas, T. [University of Jyvaskyla, P.O.Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  4. Investigation of ISIS and Brookhaven National Laboratory ion source electrodes after extended operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry J.; Alessi J.; Faircloth, D.; Gerardin, A.; Kalvas, T.; Pereira, H.; Sgobba, S.

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Linac4 accelerator of Centre Europeen de Recherches Nucleaires is under construction and a RF-driven H{sup -} ion source is being developed. The beam current requirement for Linac4 is very challenging: 80 mA must be provided. Cesiated plasma discharge ion sources such as Penning or magnetron sources are also potential candidates. Accelerator ion sources must achieve typical reliability figures of 95% and above. Investigating and understanding the underlying mechanisms involved with source failure or ageing is critical when selecting the ion source technology. Plasma discharge driven surface ion sources rely on molybdenum cathodes. Deformation of the cathode surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. A metallurgical investigation of an ISIS ion source is presented. The origin of the deformation is twofold: Molybdenum sputtering by cesium ions digs few tenths of mm cavities while a growth of molybdenum is observed in the immediate vicinity. The molybdenum growth under hydrogen atmosphere is hard and loosely bound to the bulk. It is, therefore, likely to peel off and be transported within the plasma volume. The observation of the cathode, anode, and extraction electrodes of the magnetron source operated at BNL for two years are presented. A beam simulation of H{sup -}, electrons, and Cs{sup -} ions was performed with the IBSimu code package to qualitatively explain the observations. This paper describes the operation conditions of the ion sources and discusses the metallurgical analysis and beam simulation results.

  5. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  6. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  7. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  8. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  9. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  10. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  11. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  12. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  13. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  14. PDSF Selected Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860Selected Announcements PDSF

  15. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat PumpJorgeAtlGrad. StudentsSelection Process

  16. "ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,14,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"HYDROGEN (MMCFD)","Production Capacity, Current Year (barrels per steam day except sulfur and hydrogen)",23 "ALON...

  17. Hanford year 2000 Business Continuity Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGGENKAMP, S.L.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Year 2000 (Y2K) effort is to ensure that the Hanford site successfully continues its mission as we approach and enter the 21th century. The Y2K Business Continuity Planning process provides a structured approach to identify Y2K risks to the site and to mitigate these risks through Y2K Contingency Planning, ''Zero-Day'' Transition Planning and Emergency Preparedness. This document defines the responsibilities, processes and plans for Hanford's Y2K Business Continuity. It identifies proposed business continuity drills, tentative schedule and milestones.

  18. Sulfur-Free Selective Pulping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimmel, D. R.; Bozell, J. J.

    A joint research effort is being conducted on ways to produce cost-effective pulping catalysts from lignin. This project addresses improving selectivities and reducing the levels of sulfur chemicals used in pulping. Improved selectivity means...

  19. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 201 Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators Date Last.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures and schedules. The procedural steps for weekly maintenance and repairs performed by the site operator are included in TI 201A

  20. FFTF A History of Safety & Operational Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIELSEN, D L

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt, sodium-cooled, fast neutron flux reactor owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site. The reactor was designed and built in the late 1970s and brought on line in 1982 during a period when world interest in development of a liquid metal breeder reactor was high. For approximately 10 years, FFTF operated successfully as a national research facility testing advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, active and passive reactor safety technologies, and gaining operating experience for the next generation of nuclear reactors. FFTF also produced a wide variety of high purity medical isotopes, made tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and provided international testing support. The reactor was last operated in 1992 and is proceeding with deactivation.

  1. Norman Campus Entering Budget Year 2015 Standing Orders in CC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Norman Campus Entering Budget Year 2015 Standing Orders in CC 1. Create a new cart by entering your for validation. 5. Requisitions will remain in final approval step. Purchasing will approve once 2015 budget by starting out with FY15/and type of order as shown below. Click "Update". 3. Select SPO form and enter vital

  2. Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming 20 Years Later: Tipping Points Near Jim Hansen 23 June 2008 National Press Club, and House Select Committee on Energy Independence & Global Warming Washington, DC #12;1988 Testimony Has Big Effects Did Not Emphasize That Global Warming Enhances Both Extremes of Water Cycle - More

  3. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  4. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  5. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  6. Year 2000 assessment report, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weir, D.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to advise managers on the status of Year 2000 readiness at the Laboratory and provide a summary of critical issues to be addressed in order to ensure that the Year 2000 date rollover will not disrupt Laboratory Operations. The Laboratory`s Year 2000 council members are in the first phase of Year 2000 plans: gathering data and assessing the status of their divisions or programs. This first snapshot of the Laboratory Year 2000 readiness assessment is expected to grow and change over time as more refined assessments, plans, and schedules are developed and as more information becomes available. Here are findings to date: (1) Embedded systems` status not known. (2) Preliminary cost estimates for Year 2000 repairs, testing, and implementation are estimated to be at least $5.9 million, not including embedded systems. (3) The Laboratory is required to make unavoidable purchases of Year 2000-compliant products. (4) The Year 2000 short-term issue forces some long-term transition plans to be set aside. (5) The Laboratory is at risk for the following consequences if they can`t demonstrate an active Year 2000 program: risk of system failures; potential funding freezes by the OMB and DOE; legal liabilities; and risk to the UC contract. (6) The deadline for this project is immutable. (7) DOE is continually increasing reporting requirements, expanding from only DOE mission-essential to all operations. (7) DOE audit criticizes the Laboratory`s mission-essential systems planning.

  7. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  8. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  9. Hurricane slams gulf operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that reports of damage by Hurricane Andrew escalated last week as operators stepped up inspections of oil and gas installations in the Gulf of Mexico. By midweek, companies operating in the gulf and South Louisiana were beginning to agree that earlier assessments of damage only scratched the surface. Damage reports included scores of lost, toppled, or crippled platforms, pipeline ruptures, and oil slicks. By midweek the U.S. coast Guard had received reports of 79 oil spills. Even platforms capable of resuming production in some instances were begin curtailed because of damaged pipelines. Offshore service companies the another 2-4 weeks could be needed to fully assess Andrew's wrath. Lack of personnel and equipment was slowing damage assessment and repair.

  10. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  11. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  12. Operations Task Management (OTM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.B.; Duck, C.H.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the steps taken by management at Ashland Oil to reduce expenses, including an analysis of every aspect of the refinery. It was determined that the areas most adaptable to improvement were the maintenance department, storerooms, the laboratory and energy utilization. The authors focus, however, on the difficulties met in implementing an effective cost control program in the operations area, detailing the reasons why and examining the system ultimately installed in this area.

  13. Gaussian operations and privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navascues, Miguel; Acin, Antonio [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Jordi Girona 29, Edifici Nexus II, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibilities offered by Gaussian states and operations for two honest parties, Alice and Bob, to obtain privacy against a third eavesdropping party, Eve. We first extend the security analysis of the protocol proposed in [Navascues et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 010502 (2005)]. Then, we prove that a generalized version of this protocol does not allow one to distill a secret key out of bound entangled Gaussian states.

  14. Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

  15. 1997 Operating plan for the Office of International Health Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One year ago, the Office of International Health Programs provided you with our 1996 Operating Plan, which defined our ideas and ideals for conducting business in 1996. We have again this year undertaken an intensive planning effort, first reviewing our accomplishments and shortcomings during 1996, and then developing plans and priorities for the upcoming year, taking into account input from customers and outside review panels, and ensuring that the demands on the office have been balanced with anticipated human, financial, and material resources.

  16. Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

  17. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  18. Defining work from operational principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gallego; J. Eisert; H. Wilming

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years we have witnessed a concentrated effort to make sense of thermodynamics for small-scale systems. One of the main difficulties is that, at the nano-scale, thermal fluctuations of energy in general render it conceptually difficult to distinguish work from heat. Despite of several attempts to resolve this issue, many of which inspired by quantum information theory, there is still remarkable little consensus on it. In this work, we attempt to define work in a strictly operational way. In our resource-theoretic approach, agents wish to agree upon how much work needs to be invested to effect a transition from one state of an arbitrary quantum work-storage device to another. We introduce basic operational principles, and deduce from them a strict set of mathematical properties that any reasonable function quantifying such work has to fulfil. One of those generalises strong sub-additivity, a key property in quantum information theory, to the domain of thermodynamics. We show that one work quantifier fulfilling all the required properties is the difference of the non-equilibrium free energy of the initial and final state of the work-storage system. More generally, for any work quantifier fulfilling the stated properties, we can derive a quantitative second law in the sense of bounding the work that can be performed using some non-equilibrium resource by the work that is needed to create it. We furthermore discuss the role of path dependence for work quantifiers and the connection to the concept of probability-distributions of work. Our mathematical results can be formulated abstractly and carry over to other resource theories than quantum thermodynamics.

  19. Program selects proppants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.C.A.

    1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory-measured proppant flow data must be adjusted prudently to give correct in situ fracture proppant flow capacity data. These in situ data determine the actual performance of the proppant. The well data, fracture geometry, fracture proppant flow capacity, gas price, and proppant cost all determine the selection of an appropriate proppant. For closure stress below 8,000 psi, the choice of either sand or intermediate proppant is affected by all these factors. Thus, intermediate proppant in a well with low closure stress can be more beneficial than sand. A well with closure stress nearing 7,000 psi can use sand and be profitable. Above 8,000 psi closure stress, most experts agree that only intermediate or high strength proppant can be used.

  20. East Vacuum Grayburg San Andres Unit CO2 flood ten year performance review: Evolution of a reservoir management strategy and results of WAG optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpole, K.J.; Hallenbeck, L.D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The East Vacuum Grayburg San Andres Unit (EVGSAU) recently completed ten years of successful CO{sub 2} miscible WAG injection. This paper briefly reviews the original CO{sub 2} project design and field performance over the past ten years, and discusses the evolution of a CO{sub 2} reservoir management strategy from the original, fixed 2:1 WAG design to the current flexible, performance-driven WAG strategy. Variations in the magnitude and character of CO{sub 2} flood response across the Unit due to variability in local reservoir geology presented numerous reservoir management challenges. Problems were encountered in areas such as injection conformance, pattern balancing and sweep efficiency; managing large swings in gas production rates, and changes in injection gas composition and MMP due to construction of an NGL recovery facility. These challenges required a re-evaluation of our understanding of the reservoir and prompted a review of the original project design and operating philosophy by an interdisciplinary study team. Significant elements of this effort included surveillance and data collection on selected infill wells, extensive reservoir characterization work, and use of operations-oriented simulation modeling. This work resulted in the evolution of a more flexible reservoir management strategy for EVGSAU utilizing selective, geologically-targeted infill drilling, well conversions, pattern realignment, and a performance-driven WAG management strategy. Operating changes implemented over the past two years have produced significant improvements in profitability and performance in terms of both increased oil production and reduced gas handling problems and expenses.

  1. IBRD Operational Decision Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, R; Hibbard, W; Raber, E; Carlsen, T; Folks, K; MacQueen, D; Mancieri, S; Bunt, T; Richards, J; Hirabayashi-Dethier, J

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBRD Operational Decision Framework in this document is an expansion of an emerging general risk management framework under development by an interagency working group. It provides the level of detail necessary to develop a general Consequence Management Guidance Document for biological contamination remediation and restoration. It is the intent of this document to support both wide area and individual site remediation and restoration activities. This product was initiated as a portion of the IBRD Task 1 Systems Analysis to aid in identification of wide area remediation and restoration shortcomings and gaps. The draft interagency general risk management framework was used as the basis for the analysis. The initial Task 1 analysis document expanded the draft interagency framework to a higher level of resolution, building on both the logic structure and the accompanying text explanations. It was then employed in a qualitative manner to identify responsible agencies, data requirements, tool requirements, and current capabilities for each decision and task. This resulted in identifying shortcomings and gaps needing resolution. Several meetings of a joint LLNL/SNL working group reviewed and approved the initial content of this analysis. At the conclusion of Task 1, work continued on the expanded framework to generate this Operational Decision Framework which is consistent with the existing interagency general risk management framework. A large LLNL task group met repeatedly over a three-month period to develop the expanded framework, coordinate the framework with the biological remediation checklist, and synchronize the logic with the Consequence Management Plan table of contents. The expanded framework was briefed at a large table top exercise reviewing the interagency risk management framework. This exercise had representation from major US metropolitan areas as well as national agencies. This product received positive comments from the participants. Upon completion of the Operational Decision Framework, another joint LLNL/SNL working group conducted a day-long review. Identified modifications were made to the document, resulting in the included product.

  2. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  3. Thermal stability of nano-structured selective emitters for thermophotovoltaic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heon Ju, 1977-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental challenge in solar-thermal-electrical energy conversion is the thermal stability of materials and devices at high operational temperatures. This study focuses on the thermal stability of tungsten selective ...

  4. Project process mapping : evaluation, selection, implementation, and assessment of energy cost reduction opportunities in Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Steven J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company X uses large amounts of electricity in its manufacturing operations. Electricity prices at selected plants in the company's Region 1 territory rose by over 350% between 2000 and 2011, in part due to increasing ...

  5. Conduct and Approval of Select Agent and Toxin Work at Department of Energy Sites

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes expectations for the operating DOE research laboratories utilizing select agents and toxins (as regulated by the United States Department of Health and Human Services). Cancels DOE P 434.1.

  6. The selective use of thorium and heterogeneity in uranium-efficient pressurized water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Altamash

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic procedures have been developed and applied to assess the uranium utilization potential of a broad range of options involving the selective use of thorium in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating on the ...

  7. Operations | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site »Operations Welcome to

  8. Operations Research Analysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and EvaluationOperational ManagementCenter

  9. Oak Ridge Operations

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:or _^r a2012

  10. Oak Ridge Operations YTO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:or _^r a2012IC77GLged

  11. Oak Ridge Operations.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:or _^r a2012IC77GLged

  12. Route selection issues for NWPA shipments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, C.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions surrounding the designation of routes for the movement of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) have broad implications. Federal regulations prescribe rules to be applied in the selection of highway routes. In most cases, these rules will lead to a clear selection of one route between an origin and destination point. However, in other cases, strict application of the regulations does not result in a clear choice of a preferred route. The regulations also provide discretion to State governments and carriers to select alternative routes to enhance the safety of the shipment. Railroad shipments of radioactive materials are not subject to Federal routing regulations. Since the railroads operate on private property, it has been assumed that they know the best way to move freight on their system. This discretion, while desirable for addressing unique local safety concerns or for responding to temporary safety concerns such as road problems, weather conditions, or construction areas, leads to significant opportunity for misunderstandings and uneasiness on the part of local residents.

  13. Operational profiling and statistical analysis of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Travis J. (Travis John)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ship operational profiles are a valuable tool for ship designers and engineers when analyzing potential designs and ship system selections. The most common is the speed-time profile, normally depicted as a histogram showing ...

  14. Investigating alternative concepts of operations for a maritime security system of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekdeci, Brian Anthony

    For complex systems of systems, such as those required to perform maritime security, system architects have numerous choices they may select from, both in the components and in the way the system operates. Component choices, ...

  15. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  16. Developing ``SMART'' Equipment and Systems through Collaborative NERI Research and Development: A First Year of Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARMON,DARYL L.; GOLAY,MICHAEL W.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.; MAYNARD,KENNETH P.

    2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) in 1999 to conduct research and development with the objectives of: (1) overcoming the principal technical obstacles to expanded nuclear energy use, (2) advancing the state of nuclear technology to maintain its competitive position in domestic and world markets, and (3) improving the performance, efficiency, reliability, and economics of nuclear energy. The NERI program is now beginning its second year with increased funding and an emphasis on international participation. Among the programs selected for funding was the ``Smart Equipment and Systems to Improve Reliability and Safety in Future Nuclear Power Plant Operations''. This program is a 36 month collaborative effort bringing together the technical capabilities of Westinghouse Nuclear Automation, Sandia National Laboratories, Duke Engineering and Services (DE and S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The goal of the program is to design, develop, and evaluate an integrated set of tools and methodologies that can improve the reliability and safety of advanced nuclear power plants through the introduction of smart equipment and predictive maintenance technology. The results have implications for reduced construction costs. This paper discusses: (1) the goals and significance of the program, (2) the significant achievements of the program's first year and the current direction for its continuing efforts and (3) potential cooperation with the domestic nuclear and component manufacturing industries, and with international organizations.

  17. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  18. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  19. Crop-tree release thinning in 65-year-old commercial cherry-maple stands (5-year results). Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.; Miller, G.W.; Lamson, N.I.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes a crop-tree release plan which was applied to a 65-year-old cherry-maple stand in north central West Virginia. Criteria were developed for selecting crop trees for high quality sawtimber and veneer products. Five-year stand growth, mortality, and ingrowth using basal areas, volume, relative density, and number of trees were discussed for the treatments.

  20. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  1. Personality Predictors of First-Year Attrition From A Military Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalupa, Samantha Brooke

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    versus those who leave the Corps during the first semester their freshman year. The goal is to enhance the selection and retention of recruits in future military training programs as well as in business and industry....

  2. Disease Prediction Models and Operational Readiness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Pullum, Laura L.; Hartley, David M.; Benedum, Corey M.; Noonan, Christine F.; Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Lancaster, Mary J.

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. One of the primary goals of this research was to characterize the viability of biosurveillance models to provide operationally relevant information for decision makers to identify areas for future research. Two critical characteristics differentiate this work from other infectious disease modeling reviews. First, we reviewed models that attempted to predict the disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics. Second, we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011). Methods: We searched dozens of commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models utilizing terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche-modeling, The publication date of search results returned are bound by the dates of coverage of each database and the date in which the search was performed, however all searching was completed by December 31, 2010. This returned 13,767 webpages and 12,152 citations. After de-duplication and removal of extraneous material, a core collection of 6,503 items was established and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. Next, PNNL’s IN-SPIRE visual analytics software was used to cross-correlate these publications with the definition for a biosurveillance model resulting in the selection of 54 documents that matched the criteria resulting Ten of these documents, However, dealt purely with disease spread models, inactivation of bacteria, or the modeling of human immune system responses to pathogens rather than predicting disease events. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers and the results are presented in this analysis.

  3. Selection of 3013 Containers for Field Surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Peppers, Elizabeth Kelly, James McClard, Gary Friday, Theodore Venetz, and Jerry Stakebade

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and combines three earlier reports dealing with the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. It includes changes to the binning specification resulting from completion of the Savannah River Site packaging campaign and new information from the shelf-life program and field surveillance activities. The revised bin assignments result in changes to the random sample specification. These changes are necessary to meet the statistical requirements of the surveillance program. This report will be reviewed regularly and revised as needed. Section 1 of this report summarizes the results of an extensive effort to assign all of the current and projected 3013 containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) inventory to one of three bins (Innocuous, Pressure and Corrosion, or Pressure) based on potential failure mechanisms. Grouping containers into bins provides a framework to make a statistical selection of individual containers from the entire population for destructive and nondestructive field surveillance. The binning process consisted of three main steps. First, the packaged containers were binned using information in the Integrated Surveillance Program database and a decision tree. The second task was to assign those containers that could not be binned using the decision tree to a specific bin using container-by-container engineering review. The final task was to evaluate containers not yet packaged and assign them to bins using process knowledge. The technical basis for the decisions made during the binning process is included in Section 1. A composite decision tree and a summary table show all of the containers projected to be in the DOE inventory at the conclusion of packaging at all sites. Decision trees that provide an overview of the binning process and logic are included for each site. Section 2 of this report describes the approach to the statistical selection of containers for surveillance and consists of a revision of the earlier statistical sampling report. The requirement of 99.9% probability of observing at least one of the worst 5% (99.9/5%) of the containers with a potential for degradation is used to determine the number of containers in the random sample for the Pressure and Corrosion and the Pressure bins. Sampling requirements for the Innocuous bin are not based on the 99.9/5% requirement; rather, they are based on evaluating the assumption of no significant degradation of, or variability between, containers relative to corrosion or pressure generation within the Innocuous bin population as valid. Section 3 of this report focuses on the actual selection of 3013 containers for surveillance. Surveillance containers are identified by the year that the surveillance should be performed. In addition to the randomly selected containers, containers were selected from the entire population, based on engineering judgment for each of these years. The judgmental sampling targets containers with the greatest potential for gas generation and/or corrosion. The factors used for judgmental sample selection are documented in this section. A more detailed discussion of the FY 2005 sample selection process is contained in the previous FY 2005 sample selection report.

  4. RH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

  5. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  6. Gulf operators resuming production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Gulf of Mexico operators last week were gradually restoring production at installations struck by Hurricane Andrew. The Minerals Management Service continued receiving reports of more damage. By the end of the day Sept. 8, MMS had received reports of damage to 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. Damage reports listed 112 installations with structural damage, 13 platforms toppled and five leaning, and 30 satellite platforms toppled and 33 leaning. But despite the extent of damage the storm inflicted on oil and gas installations in the gulf, it pales in comparison to the misery and suffering the storm caused in Florida and Louisiana, an oil company official said.

  7. FRMAC Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frandsen, K.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a major radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) will coordinate the federal agencies that have various statutory responsibilities. The FRMAC is responsible for coordinating all environmental radiological monitoring, sampling, and assessment activities for the response. This manual describes the FRMAC’s response activities in a radiological incident. It also outlines how FRMAC fits in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) under the National Response Framework (NRF) and describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the affected areas. In the event of a potential or existing major radiological incident, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is responsible for establishing and managing the FRMAC during the initial phases.

  8. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  9. UESC Best Practices Subcontractor Selection

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Best Practices Subcontractor Selection Presented by: Patricia Nardone FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR May 7 - 8, 2014 Virginia Beach, VA Main Approaches * Utility...

  10. Personalized medicine: selected Web resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimson, Nancy F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genomic and Personalized Medicine. 1 st ed. Amsterdam, thePersonalized medicine: selected Web resources Nancy F.Keywords: personalized medicine; personalized health care;

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948 27069

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A79482693

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948269300

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196957

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695789

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.

  12. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

  13. TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-02.53 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public August 2009 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS Contents Page PREFACE ...........................................................................................................viii Chapter 1 APPLICATIONS FOR TACTICAL RADIO DEPLOYMENT.............................. 1-1 Modularity

  14. Operating Efficiency Comes From Teamwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relyea, D. L.; Stone, A.

    A group of operating and planning personnel formed the INter Plant Utilities Team [INPUT] to improve energy efficiency and reliability for Exxon's Baytown, Texas, refinery and chemical plants complex. The Team coordinates the day-to-day operations...

  15. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  16. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  17. Ex Ante Selection of Disputes for Litigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While selection effects have important implications for empirical studies of the litigation process, existing theories of case selection are incomplete. Existing theories focus on "ex post selection" - selection resulting from choices made...

  18. ENERGY MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    ENERGY MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE MANUAL Swansea University Estates Services Singleton Park Swansea SA2 8PP Tel 01792 295819 Fax 01792 295820 #12;Swansea University Energy Management Operational ......................................................................................11 #12;Swansea University Energy Management Operational Procedural Manual Estates Services April 2008

  19. Operating Reserves and Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

  20. Selection of a multiple disease resistant runner-type peanut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baring, Michael Robert

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Four F2:4 populations of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) resulting from the complex cross Tamrun 96 X Tx901639-3 X Sun Oleic 95R were grown in three disease nurseries over a 2 year period. Three separate selection techniques were applied to determine...