Sample records for operation refuse recovery

  1. Fluid system for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.H.; Smejkal, K.D.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid system is described for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations, comprising: water; a distribution of graded calcium carbonate particle sizes; and at least one modified lignosulfonate, which is a lignosulfonate modified by polymerizing it at least to an extent effective to reduce its water solubility.

  2. Collaborative Operations for Personnel Recovery Final Report on DARPA/AFRL 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Austin; Dalton, J; Stader, J; Wickler, G; Hansberger, J

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collaborative Operations for Personnel Recovery (Co-OPR) project sought to provide collaborative task support for a Search and Rescue coordination center. The project aimed to create a prototype “Personnel Recovery ...

  3. Idaho Operations Office: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Provencher, Rick

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An update from Idaho National Laboratory, Rick Provencher addresses the progress that has been made due to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  4. Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

  5. Sustainable operation of membrane distillation for enhancement of mineral recovery from hypersaline solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable operation of membrane distillation for enhancement of mineral recovery from hypersaline December 2013 Available online 25 December 2013 Keywords: Membrane distillation Desalination Hypersaline brine Scaling Membrane cleaning Evaporation pond a b s t r a c t Membrane distillation (MD

  6. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  7. Binder enhanced refuse derived fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Kenneth E. (Lewisville, TX); Venables, Barney J. (Denton, TX); Ohlsson, Oscar O. (Naperville, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A refuse derived fuel (RDF) pellet having about 11% or more particulate calcium hydroxide which is utilized in a combustionable mixture. The pellets are used in a particulate fuel bring a mixture of 10% or more, on a heat equivalent basis, of the RDF pellet which contains calcium hydroxide as a binder, with 50% or more, on a heat equivalent basis, of a sulphur containing coal. Combustion of the mixture is effective to produce an effluent gas from the combustion zone having a reduced SO.sub.2 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of effluent gas from similar combustion materials not containing the calcium hydroxide.

  8. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  9. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  10. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  11. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  12. Optimal Power Train Design of a Hybrid Refuse Collector Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Optimal Power Train Design of a Hybrid Refuse Collector Vehicle Tobias Knoke, Joachim Böcker 5251 60 2212 Abstract-- Due to the stop-and-go drive cycle of refuse collector vehicles, hybrid power), optimization, refuse collector vehicle I. INTRODUCTION Today, hybrid electric vehicles are accepted as a step

  13. Evaluation of water resources for enhanced oil recovery operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, D.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.; Prater, L.; Reddy, R.J.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, deliverability, and chemistry of the water potentially available for enhanced oil recovery in one or more Oklahoma oil fields. Subsequent to a review of several oil fields, the Cement Field was chosen for study because of its large size (25,000 acres), its extensive subsurface control (over 1850 wells), and its long history of production (since 1952) from several producing formations, some of which are already undergoing extensive waterflood operations. A preliminary review of the available data for this study suggested a threefold categorization of water resources, since the data for each category are distinctly different in nature, and, to some extent, different in source. The three categories are: surface water, ground water, and subsurface water. Flow, volume, and chemical analyses of each source are estimated.

  14. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Program Review Presentation NJ COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS REFUSE TRUCKS, SHUTTLE BUSES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Chuck Feinberg, Principal Investigator New Jersey Clean...

  15. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications CX-005345: Categorical Exclusion Determination NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure Business Case for Compressed...

  16. Tritium recovery from carbon particulate Until 2009 the JET machine has operated with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    objectives Design and construction of a facility to recover tritium from carbon. Including: · Commissioning of the material. case study DT fuel cycle Solution Significant R&D effort went into developing an oxidation: technologyservices@ccfe.ac.uk www.ccfe.ac.uk/technologyservices.aspx Recovery system during construction #12;

  17. Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Steelcase Closed Loop Energy Recovery System - What We Have Learned With Our Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornbos, D. L., Sr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy cost increases, future shortages, and environmental concerns are making it less attractive to landfill our fuel concentrated wastes. Our 2,000 #/hr modular waste burning incinerator has operated since July, 1980. To provide an understanding...

  20. Operational improvements at Jewell Coal and Coke Company`s non-recovery ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, C.E.; Pruitt, C.W.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational improvements at Jewell Coal and Coke Company over the past five years includes safety and environmental concerns, product quality, equipment availability, manpower utilization, and productivity. These improvements with Jewell`s unique process has allowed Jewell Coal and Coke Company to be a consistent, high quality coke producer. The paper briefly explains Jewell`s unique ovens, their operating mode, improved process control, their maintenance management program, and their increase in productivity.

  1. Clean Cities Niche Market Overview: Refuse Haulers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, S.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refuse haulers are ideal for the adoption of alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. By using fuels like natural gas, propane, or biodiesel, and technologies like hybrid electric and hydraulic hybrid systems, the refuse-hauling sector could substantially decrease its petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions. Fleet managers should explore the benefits of the fuels and technologies available, as well as the individual fleet needs, before adoption.

  2. The design and operation of a combustion tube for investigation of combustion oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penberthy, Walter Lawren

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the formation toward the producing wells. Ignition may be the result of electrical or gas operated heaters; or may result from 9 spontaneous ignition as a result of oxidation of the crude oil. Ignition in this case usually results a short time after... gravity increased from 0 0 20. 08 to 26. 08 API. The average gravity of the produced oil was 600 x tu 0 4 N PRODUCED GAS RATE 500 400 O tJ Q 2 0 ss 0, INJE N PRESSURE 0 0 300 4l 200 PRODUCTION PRESSURE 100 0 8 RUN TIME, HOURS GAS...

  3. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  4. Open air refuse burning video: Proton Dan the science man explores open air refuse burning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastburn, M.D.; Sipple, J.L.; Deramo, A.R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this video is to educate school children to the potential hazards of open air trash burning; to demonstrate alternative ways to dispose of trash; and to motivate students to take action to change the behavior of their parents with regard to trash burning. The burning of household trash, although illegal, is still a common practice in rural areas of Delaware. Enforcement has been difficult because the practice is often performed at night and is done across a wide rural area that is difficult to patrol on a continuing basis. The prohibition on trash burning (revised Regulation 13 of The Delaware Code of Regulations Governing The Control of Air Pollution) has been in effect since 1968, but the public has been slow to comply because trash burning has been practiced for many generations and because much of the public is unaware of the environmental impacts and/or the human health risks. This video may be valuable for other States to use as a public outreach tool regarding their problems with open air refuse burning. The focus of the video is a 7th grade science class is given various assignments relating to Earth Day and preservation of natural resources. Two children in particular are given the assignment to research and report on the hazards of open air trash burning and are asked to investigate alternative ways to dispose of refuse. Upon brainstorming how to find information on the topic, the kids decide to contact the host of a popular children's science show on broadcast television named Proton Dan the Science Man (a fictitious character and show based on Bill Nye the Science Guy). The host then invites the kids to the studio where he films his show and takes them through the topic. The TV host character takes the children to several external locations like a landfill, recycling centers, etc..

  5. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted that the CO{sub 2} injected into the reef would remain in the northern portion of the field. Two new wells, the State Charlton 4-30 and the Larsen 3-31, were drilled into the field in 2006 and 2008 respectively and supported this assessment. A second (or 'Monitor') 3D seismic survey was acquired during September 2007 over most of the field and duplicated the first (Base) survey, as much as possible. However, as the simulation and new well data available at that time indicated that the CO{sub 2} was concentrated in the northern portion of the field, the second seismic survey was not acquired over the extreme southern end of the area covered by the original (or Base) 3D survey. Basic processing was performed on the second 3D seismic survey and, finally, 4D processing methods were applied to both the Base and the Monitor surveys. In addition to this 3D data, a shear wave seismic data set was obtained at the same time. Interpretation of the 4D seismic data indicated that a significant amplitude change, not attributable to differences in acquisition or processing, existed at the locations within the reef predicted by the reservoir simulation. The reservoir simulation was based on the porosity distribution obtained from seismic attributes from the Base 3D survey. Using this validated reservoir simulation the location of oil within the reef at the time the Monitor survey was obtained and recommendations made for the drilling of additional EOR wells. The economic impact of this project has been estimated in terms of both enhanced oil recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. In the northern Michigan Basin alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. Potentially there is over 1 billion bbls of oil (original oil in place minus primary recovery) remains in the reefs in Michigan, much of which could be more efficiently mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

  6. Installation and Operation of Sorbathene Solvent Vapor Recovery Units to Recover and Recycle Volatile Organic Compounds at Operating Sites within the Dow Chemical Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T. L.; Larrinaga, L.

    the SORBATHENE vacuum swing adsorption as an economical alternative for the recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) from storage, loading, and process vents streams. This paper discusses the application of the technology on nineteen units to collect...

  7. Systems analysis for the development of small resource recovery systems: system performance data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crnkovich, P G; Helmstetter, A J

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies that should be developed to make small-scale solid waste processing facilities attractive and viable for small municipalities with solid waste between 50 and 250 tons per day are identified. The resource recovery systems investigated were divided into three categories: thermal processng, mechanical separation, and biological processing. Thermal processing systems investigated are: excess-air incineration; starved-air incineration/gasification; and pyrolysis (indirect heating). Mechanical processing systems investigated are: coarse refuse derived fuel; materials separation; dust refuse derived fuel; densified refuse derived fuel; and fine refuse derived fuel. Mechanical processing components investigated include: receiving module; primary size reduction module; combustible separation module; refuse derived fuel preparation module; fuel densification; fuel storage module; ferrous separation; and building and facilities. Pretreatment processes and principle methods of bioconversion of MSW dealing with biological processing are investigated. (MCW)

  8. Cancellation or Refusal of Enrolment Procedure Student Policy Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frean, Marcus

    this procedure is regarded as an extreme measure, and shall be taken only after careful consideration and Guidelines 4.1 Use of this procedure Cancelling an enrolment or refusing to permit an eligible person to enrol under this procedure is regarded as an extreme measure, and shall be taken only after careful

  9. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  10. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  11. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  12. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  13. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  14. Flash Steam Recovery Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronhold, C. J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /condensate recovery system, resulting in condensate flash steam losses to the atmosphere. Using computer simulation models and pinch analysis techniques, the Operational Excellence Group (Six Sigma) was able to identify a project to recover the flash steam losses as a...

  15. A preliminary evaluation of a combined tire- and refuse-derived fuel (TDF-RDF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stessel, R.I.; Amari, T.; Themelis, N.J.; Wearnick, I.K.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In dense urban areas of the US, it is now becoming clear that waste management is far from economically-optimum. Even with the popularity of inexpensive land disposal, hauling and recycling costs are driving up the average waste bill. An historic option has been refuse-derived fuel, or RDF. Difficulties included low energy content and difficulty obtaining uniformity. Today, many resource-recovery technologies used in RDF are finding their way into materials recovery facilities (MRFs), some of which are reviving the automated processing of waste. Any MRF, automated or not, will have residue streams. Currently, one of the most significant problems is waste tires. Local options are difficult to locate in dense urban areas. As fuels, tires typically have energy contents considerably above those for which most solid-fuel combustors are designed, leading to thermal imbalances and various forms of failure. This paper suggests a new fuel that can be either co-fired with coal, or used in its own right in a combustor primarily designed for coal: TDF-RDF. A preliminary examination is undertaken of thermal and emissions characteristics, and possible costs for a few applications of the fuel. Immediately, TDF is already cleaner-burning than many coals, even in sulfur emissions. RDF has been widely-regarded as being similarly cleanly. Posited MRF residue streams should be still cleaner, and more consistent, than RDF. Overall, there is quite a potential for developing a fuel that would allow old coal powerplants in historic urban centers to be better neighbors, while helping with a few problems in municipal waste management.

  16. Refuse or reuse: managing the quality of returns in product recovery systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing legislative and societal pressures are forcing manufacturers to become environmentally-conscious and take responsibility for the fate of their goods after they have been used by consumers. As a result, some ...

  17. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  18. SWPF Crane Lift Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple vview shot of the SWPF crane lift operation at the Savannah River Site. Funded by the Recovery Act.

  19. OPTIMAL OPERATION OF INTEGRATED PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    OPTIMAL OPERATION OF INTEGRATED PROCESSES Studies on Heat Recovery Systems by Bjørn Glemmestad exchanger network (HEN) for heat recovery. Within the process engineering community, much attention has been

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Recovery and Storage of Strontium-90 Fueled Radioisotope Thermal Electric Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of recovery and storage for disposal of six strontium-90 (Sr-90) fueled radioisotope thermal electric generators (RTGs) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) proposed to recover and store six Sr-90 RTGs from the commercial sector as part of its Offsite-Source Recovery Project (OSRP). The OSRP focuses on the proactive recovery and storage of unwanted radioactive sealed sources exceeding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits for Class C low-level waste (also known as Greater than Class C waste, or GTCC). In response to the events of September 11, 2001, NRC conducted a risk-based evaluation of potential vulnerabilities to terrorist threats involving NRC-licensed nuclear facilities and materials. NRC's evaluation concluded that possession of unwanted radioactive sealed sources with no disposal outlet presents a potential vulnerability (NRC 2002). In a November 25, 2003 letter to the manager of the NNSA's Los Alamos Site Office, the NRC Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response identified recovery of several Sr-90 RTGs as the highest priority and requested that DOE take whatever actions necessary to recovery these sources as soon as possible. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the offsite source recovery program evaluated in the SWEIS and a subsequent SA that evaluated a change to the approach of a portion of the recovery program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the Proposed Action and activities described in the previous SWEIS and SA analyses.

  1. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report No. 8, July 1996--August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to examine the possible formation of chlorinated organic compounds during the combustion of blends of refuse derived fuels (RDF) and coal under conditions similar to those of an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. A series of experiments were conducted using a TGA interfaced to FTIR. Additional experiments using a tube furnace preheated to AFBC operating temperatures were also conducted. The combustion products were cryogenically trapped and analyzed with a GC/MS system. The chlorination of phenols and the condensation reactions of chlorophenols were investigated in this study. A possible mechanism for the formation of chlorinated organic compounds such as dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, by chlorination and condensation reactions involving phenols, was proposed.

  2. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  3. Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Center Recovery Act Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related...

  4. Energy Recovery from Potato Chip Fryers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, H. B.; Kympton, H. W.; Arnold, J. W.; Paisan, J. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, operating characteristics, and energy savings from an energy recovery system employed on a potato chip fryer which became operational in December, 1979, is discussed. The design incorporates a modification to an odor control system which...

  5. Emissions Resulting from the Full-Scale Cofiring of Pelletized Refuse-Derived Fuel and Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlsson, O. O.; Daugherty, K.; Venables, B.

    Full-scale cofiring tests of binder-enhanced pellets of densified, refuse-derived fuel (dRDF) and high-sulfur coal were conducted during June and July of 1987 in Boiler #5 at Argonne National Laboratory. These tests were conducted with industry...

  6. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  7. Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running refuse haulers on compressed natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details the experience of New York City`s compressed natural gas refuse haulers. These 35 ton vehicles have engines that displace 10 liters and provide 240 horsepower. Fuel economy, range, cost, maintenance, repair issues, and emissions are discussed. Photographs and figures illustrate the attributes of these alternative fuel vehicles.

  8. Analyzing Social Network Structures in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma with Choice and Refusal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Analyzing Social Network Structures in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma with Choice and Refusal Mark structures emerge. We examine one particular IPD/CR environment and document the social network methods used within this environment. In particular, the social networks of interesting populations

  9. Prospects for the Gasification of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodruff, K. L.; Guard, R. F. W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized-bed gasification of wood waste is now a commercially proven technology. An Omnifuel gasifier in Hearst, Ontario, has been in operation since early 1981. It produces a low-BTU gas which is used to displace natural gas in existing boilers...

  10. Prospects for the Gasification of Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodruff, K. L.; Guard, R. F. W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized-bed gasification of wood waste is now a commercially proven technology. An Omnifuel gasifier in Hearst, Ontario, has been in operation since early 1981. It produces a low-BTU gas which is used to displace natural gas in existing boilers...

  11. Hardened, environmentally disposable composite granules of coal cleaning refuse, coal combustion waste, and other wastes, and method preparing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnet, George (Ames, IA); Gokhale, Ashok J. (College Station, TX)

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granule of coal cleaning refuse and coal combustion waste, and method for producing the same, wherein the coal combustion waste is first granulated. The coal cleaning refuse is pulverized into fine particles and is then bound, as an outer layer, to the granulated coal combustion waste granules. This combination is then combusted and sintered. After cooling, the combination results in hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granules having cores of coal combustion waste, and outer shells of coal cleaning refuse. The composite particles are durable and extremely resistant to environmental and chemical forces.

  12. Hardened, environmentally disposable composite granules of coal cleaning refuse, coal combustion waste, and other wastes, and method preparing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnet, G.; Gokhale, A.J.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granule of coal cleaning refuse and coal combustion waste and method for producing the same are disclosed, wherein the coal combustion waste is first granulated. The coal cleaning refuse is pulverized into fine particles and is then bound, as an outer layer, to the granulated coal combustion waste granules. This combination is then combusted and sintered. After cooling, the combination results in hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granules having cores of coal combustion waste, and outer shells of coal cleaning refuse. The composite particles are durable and extremely resistant to environmental and chemical forces. 3 figs.

  13. Operation and maintenance considerations for waste-to-energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, F.; O'Leary, P.; Walsh, P.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the author discusses environmental and safety issues surrounding waste-to-energy systems. A facility can be safe and compatible with the surrounding community if management has an ethic to provide for the disposal of refuse in an economic, safe, and environmentally sound manner and the operator is trained in the proper procedures for facility operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair.

  14. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  15. Fluid Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Computer Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samurin, N. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating conditions. The digital computer model simulates the performance of the axial compressor, power recovery expander, regenerator section, and system pressure drops. The program can simulate the process system design conditions for compatibility...

  16. Fluid Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Computer Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samurin, N. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating conditions. The digital computer model simulates the performance of the axial compressor, power recovery expander, regenerator section, and system pressure drops. The program can simulate the process system design conditions for compatibility...

  17. Grant Guidance to Administer the American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PROGRAM NOTICE 10-10: REPROGRAMMING TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FUNDS TO PROGRAM OPERATIONS Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)...

  18. Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    million Recovery Act project completed safely and on schedule, workers demolished 160 towers as tall as 120 feet that were used to operate the X-533 Electrical Switchyard....

  19. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  20. Mass and Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - 1 - MASS AND HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM SALAH MAHMOUD HINDAWI DIRECTOR HINDAWI FOR ENGINEERING SERVICES & CONTRACTING NEW DAMIETTA , EGYPT ABSTRACT : In the last few years heat recovery was under spot . and in air conditioning fields... ) as a heat recovery . and I use the water as a mass recovery . The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines . THE BENEFIT OF THIS SYSTEM ARE : 1) Using the heat energy from...

  1. A statistical and economic analysis of incremental waterflood infill drilling recoveries in West Texas carbonate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Robert Lane

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates of recoveries. Accurate infill recovery forecast models may assist operators in determining if well spacings are small enough to economically recover the maximum amount of oil possible. In addition, these models can help the operator evaluate... to determine their effect, if any, on primary, waterflood, and infill recoveries. These parameters were evaluated for their overall correlation to infill recoveries and interaction with other important parameters. Four recovery indicators were used to model...

  2. Non-parametric regression and neural-network inll drilling recovery models for carbonate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valkó, Peter

    , and operations e- ciency. Consequent to the primary recovery, water- ¯ood is often used as a secondary recoveryNon-parametric regression and neural-network in®ll drilling recovery models for carbonate ultimate oil recovery from reservoirs in San Andres and Clearfork carbonate formations in West Texas

  3. Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act State Memo Virgin Islands Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo West Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery...

  4. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  5. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Quarterly report, October - December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.-P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels project were two-fold. First, the effect of S0{sub 2} on the formation of chlorine during combustion processes was examined. To simulate the conditions used in the AFBC system, experiments were conducted in a quartz tube in an electrically heated furnace. The principle analytical technique used for identification of the products from this study was GC/MS. The evolved gas was trapped by an absorbent and analyzed with a GC/MS system. The preliminary results indicate an inhibiting effect of S0{sub 2} on the Deacon Reaction. Secondly, information on the evolution of chlorine, sulfur and organic compounds from coals 95031 and 95011 were studied with the AFBC system. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

    1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

  7. Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Rejai, Bahman (Lakewood, CO); Bain, Richard L. (Golden, CO); Overend, Ralph P. (Lakewood, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

  8. UCSC EMPLOYEE HOUSING APARTMENTS APPLICATION Rental rates include: rent, refuse collection, common area utilities, groundskeeping services, and repairs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UCSC EMPLOYEE HOUSING APARTMENTS APPLICATION Rental rates include: rent, refuse collection, common for current rental rates): 1 bedroom 1 bdrm deluxe 2 bdrm/1 bath 2 bdrm/2 bath) If you are interested in a two rates to eligible employees (see corresponding figures in table below). Please check the box below

  9. A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection vehicles in a Canadian city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection by the City of Surrey in British Columbia are utilized. c The life cycle energy use is similar for diesel and CNG RCVs. c A 24% reduction of GHG emissions (CO2-equivalent) may be realized by switching from diesel

  10. Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprague, Stephen M.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    to global climate change, diesel-fueled refuse trucks are one of the most concentrated sources of health-threatening air pollution in most cities. The landfills that they ultimately place their waste in are the second largest source of human-related methane...

  11. Recovery News Flashes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http:energy.govemdownloadstru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares...

  12. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  13. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  14. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  15. Strontium-90 and promethium-147 recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoisington, J.E.; McDonell, W.R.

    1982-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-90 and promethium-147 are fission product radionuclides with potential for use as heat source materials in high reliability, non-interruptible power supplies. Interest has recently been expressed in their utilization for Department of Defense (DOD) applications. This memorandum summarizes the current inventories, the annual production rates, and the possible recovery of Sr-90 and Pm-147 from nuclear materials production operations at Hanford and Savannah River. Recovery of these isotopes from LWR spend fuel utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant (BNFP) is also considered. Unit recovery costs at each site are provided.

  16. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    ADVANCED FLUIDIZED BED WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS G. R. PETERSON Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industri al Programs, has sponsored... the development of a Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTOP) Fluidized Bed Heat Exchanger (FBHX) system. Both systems recover energy from high-temperature flue gases...

  17. TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Citation: Hudson, R., and G. Horel. 2007. An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver Island and south

  18. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Bullock

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ï?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  19. A noise-gated PLL for clock recovery in a free-space laser communication system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Gavin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I developed a phase-locked loop system for data clock recovery in a free-space laser communication application. The clock recovery unit is designed to operate at extremely low optical received power, tolerate ...

  20. Methods and Analysis for Recovery Logistics Networks with Uncertainty and Channel Selection Considerations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Sung Ook

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we develop models and methodologies for effective design and efficient operation of product recovery logistics networks. Recovery networks, employed for recycle-reuse-refurbish-remanufacture purposes, constitute an ever...

  1. 2000-2011 New York Independent System Operator, Inc. All Rights Reserved. DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES ONLY Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PURPOSES ONLY Hurricane Sandy Preparations, Response & Recovery Wes Yeomans Vice President ­ Operations

  2. Recovery Act Project Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to federal agencies.

  3. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  4. Determinants of efficiency in the provision of municipal street-cleaning and refuse collection services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benito-Lopez, Bernardino, E-mail: benitobl@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain); Rocio Moreno-Enguix, Maria del, E-mail: mrmoreno@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain); Solana-Ibanez, Jose, E-mail: jsolana@um.es [University of Murcia (Spain)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective waste management systems can make critical contributions to public health, environmental sustainability and economic development. The challenge affects every person and institution in society, and measures cannot be undertaken without data collection and a quantitative analysis approach. In this paper, the two-stage double bootstrap procedure of is used to estimate the efficiency determinants of Spanish local entities in the provision of public street-cleaning and refuse collection services. The purpose is to identify factors that influence efficiency. The final sample comprised 1072 municipalities. In the first stage, robust efficiency estimates are obtained with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). We apply the second stage, based on a truncated-regression, to estimate the effect of a group of environmental factors on DEA estimates. The results show the existence of a significant relation between efficiency and all the variables analysed (per capita income, urban population density, the comparative index of the importance of tourism and that of the whole economic activity). We have also considered the influence of a dummy categorical variable - the political sign of the governing party - on the efficient provision of the services under study. The results from the methodology proposed show that municipalities governed by progressive parties are more efficient.

  5. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coals with refuse derived fuels were two-fold. First, the effects of different experimental parameters such as temperature, flow rates and reaction times on the formation of chlorinated organic compounds were studied using the tubular furnace as a reactor followed by GC/MS analysis. Secondly, the effect of fuel/air ratio on the flue gas composition and combustion efficiency were studied with the AFBC system.

  6. Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small Business Administration Recovery Act Implementation Small...

  7. Kraft lignin recovery by ultrafiltration: economic feasibility and impact on the kraft recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkman, A.G.; Gratzl, J.S.; Edwards, L.L.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of the kraft pulping process could provide a ready supply of lignin materials for many uses. Simulation studies demonstrate that recovery of the high-molecular-weight kraft lignin by ultrafiltration of a fraction of the black liquor flow is attractive from both an economic and an operational standpoint. Benefits are derived from relief of a furnace-limited recovery system and from the marketing of the lignin or modified lignin products. 10 references.

  8. Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

  9. A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Full Key Recovery Attack on HMAC-AURORA-512 Yu Sasaki NTT Information Sharing Platform.yu@lab.ntt.co.jp Abstract. In this note, we present a full key recovery attack on HMAC- AURORA-512 when 512-bit secret keys is 2259 AURORA-512 operations, which is significantly less than the complexity of the exhaustive search

  10. Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems Criticality Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems 5100 EX.A Criticality Designation 1. Primary source of PHI for pre-research; or secondary source of PHI for research/pre-research; secondary source of PHI for treatment, payment or healthcare operations; or teaching Criticality mapped to Recovery

  11. Mass and Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building...

  12. Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokhale, Bhushan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    sludge, and non hazardous industrial waste (8,9). The solid waste materials are classified under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (10). The next section describes different methods used for managing... REVIEW.......................................................................................4 Solid Waste Management.................................................................................4 LFG Cleaning Processes...

  13. Recovery Act Funds at Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) are being put to work to improve safety, reliability, and service in systems across the country. Here are case studies from a variety of Recovery Act programs.

  14. Recovery Boiler Superheater Ash Corrosion Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University] [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations] [FPInnovations

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the trend towards increasing the energy efficiency of black liquor recovery boilers operated in North America, there is a need to utilize superheater tubes with increased corrosion resistance that will permit operation at higher temperatures and pressures. In an effort to identify alloys with improved corrosion resistance under more harsh operating conditions, a field exposure was conducted that involved the insertion of an air-cooled probe, containing six candidate alloys, into the superheater section of an operating recovery boiler. A metallographic examination, complete with corrosion scale characterization using EMPA, was conducted after a 1,000 hour exposure period. Based on the results, a ranking of alloys based on corrosion performance was obtained.

  15. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the flow properties for compressor selection? What controls should be incorporated? How much operator and maintenance effort will be required for safe, efficient operation? What kind of process and hardware problems should be watched for? When...? This paper will touch on all these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set...

  16. Recovery Act State Memos Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * KENTUCKY RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)...

  17. Near Miscible CO2 Application to Improve Oil Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bui, Ly H.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for enhanced oil recovery is a proven technology. CO2 injection is normally operated at a pressure above the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP), which is determined by crude oil composition and reservoir conditions...

  18. The secondary recovery project at Ogharefe Field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aron, D.; Ashbourne, T.J.; Oloketuyi, D.O.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary recovery project involving water injection and gas-lift facilities was installed in the Ogharefe field in 1979 following detailed reservoir simulation studies. Two years' operation provides the opportunity to discuss the progress of the project so far.

  19. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  20. Recovery Act Project Clears Portsmouth Switchyard, Benefits Community...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operate. At the X-533 Electrical Switchyard, Recovery Act workers also re- moved 18 transformers, two switchgear houses, and a two-sto- ry control room. With the help of a 600-ton...

  1. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  2. Two Recovery Act Funding Case Studies Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utilities across America are using Recovery Act funds and smart grid technologies to deliver more reliable and affordable power, recover from major storms, and improve operations. Two case studies are now available.

  3. The secondary recovery project at the Ogharefe Field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aron, D.; Ashbourne, T.J.; Oloketuyi, D.O.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary recovery project involving water injection and gas lift facilities was installed in the Ogharefe Field in 1979 following detailed reservoir simulation studies. Two years of operation provide the opportunity to discuss the progress of the project so far.

  4. Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. tanning industry may be met through an active conservation program. This program would be directed at the recovery of the energy available in the leather waste; the raw and finished tanned leather trimmings and cuttings resulting from tannery operations...

  5. Recovery Boiler Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown...

  6. Recovery Boiler Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

    Preliminary computations of the cold flow in a simplified geometry of a recovery boiler are presented. The computations have been carried out using a new code containing multigrid methods and segmentation techniques. This approach is shown...

  7. Recovery Act State Memos Montana

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 5 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Green power transmission line given new life ......

  8. Coal-firing sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report {number_sign}7, [April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping, Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels project were two-fold. First, the organic compounds tentatively identified as combustion products in the previous report were confirmed by comparing retention times with pure samples. Secondly, a reduced amount of unburned carbon in the fly ash and an oxygen concentration at about 3--6% in the flue gases were achieved by the addition of removable heat exchange tubes in the AFBC system.

  9. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  10. Cogeneration energy-recovery facility feasibility study: Nashville Thermal Transfer Corporation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of a refuse-fueled district heating system is examined. The following tasks of the survey are reported: energy market survey, analysis of waste storage and handling requirements, analysis of land requirements, analysis of crane operation, site layout, analysis of in-plant piping and auxiliaries, analysis of future plant operating modes and demands, evaluate condensing water system requirements, evaluate boiler feed pump requirements, evaluate water softeners and condensate polishing requirements, evaluate electrostatic precipitator requirements, evaluate distribution system, evaluate turbine generator, cost analysis, distribution system cost estimate, transfer facility cost estimate, commercial viability analysis, environmental analysis, and construction project schedule. (MHR)

  11. Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

  12. ARM - Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become a UsergovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo

  13. Co-OPR: Design and Evaluation of Collaborative Sensemaking and Planning Tools for Personnel Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Austin; Buckingham Shum, S J; Dalton, J; Mancini, C; Selvin, A M

    Personnel recovery teams must operate under intense pressure, taking into account not only hard logistics, but ‘messy’ factors such as the social or political implications of a decision. The Collaborative Operations for ...

  14. Recovery Act Recipient Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Recipient Data Recovery Act Recipient Data A listing of all Recovery Act recipients and their allocations. Updated weekly. recoveryactfunding.xls More Documents &...

  15. Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, George G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1135 Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recoverys). Some Thoughts on Econometric Information Recovery GeorgeTheoretic Approach To Econometric Information Recovery

  16. HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnier, R. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . As shown in Chart 5, the power requirements to operate an energy recovery system are a significant factor in the economic evaluations of the project as well as the additional costs for auxiliary components. These extra costs must be included... in the overall feasibility analysis. Chart 5 - Auxiliary Components FAN TYPE SUPPLY EXHAUST STATIC PRESSURE EXCHANGER FAN FAN PUMP COMPRESSOR FILTERS CONTROLS REQUIREMENTS, IN WG SUPPLY EXHAUST STATIONARY ? ? ? 1 1.0- 2.0 l.0- 2.0 HEAT WHEEL HYGROSCOPIC...

  17. Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

  18. Sparse recovery and Fourier sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Eric C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade a broad literature has arisen studying sparse recovery, the estimation of sparse vectors from low dimensional linear projections. Sparse recovery has a wide variety of applications such as streaming ...

  19. Recovery Act State Memos Nebraska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 6 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Biofuels company builds new facility in Nebraska ... 7 * Nebraska appliance rebate...

  20. Recovery Act State Memos Arkansas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 RECOVERY ACT SUCCESS STORIES - ENERGY EMPOWERS * Program finds unique way to fund energy upgrades ... 7 * Green collar courses ......

  1. Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart E. Strand

    2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

  2. The Fernald wet records recovery project: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, H.J.; Devir, B.R.; Hawley, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Freesmeyer, M.T. [USDOE Ohio Field Office (United States)

    1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a project performed to recover wet records discovered in January 1995 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This paper discusses the emergency and record recovery phases of the project, the technical options considered for records recovery, and special measures which were required due to radiological contamination of the records. Also, the root causes and lessons learned from the incident, and path forward for future records management operations at Fernald, are discussed.

  3. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  4. Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Blatchford, R.P.; Spears, R.B. [Spears and Associates, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended to assist owners and operators of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations in acquiring some introductory knowledge of the various state agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the many environmental laws, rules and regulations which can have jurisdiction over their permitting and compliance activities. It is a compendium of summarizations of environmental rules. It is not intended to give readers specific working details of what is required from them, nor can it be used in that manner. Readers of this handbook are encouraged to contact environmental control offices nearest to locations of interest for current regulations affecting them.

  5. Novel Approach to Improve Deaerator Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, P.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around the vent recovery unit VENTMIZER 500. It follows that there is very low concentration of dissolved gases like oxygen and carbon dioxide in the vapor phase. From partial pressure considerations, the closed to pure steam environment within... at the same operating pressure as the existing deaerator and recovers up to 95% of the otherwise vented steam. Since the vent recovery unit operates at the same operating pressure as the deaerator, flow control of vent can be easily accomplished...

  6. Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Better Buildings Residential Network Program...

  7. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  8. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  9. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  10. Recovery Act Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-Setting Microscopy IlluminatesHandbookRODs Recovery

  11. Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 American & Efird, Inc., decided to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs...

  12. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  13. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  14. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-IIActRecovery Act

  15. Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the Passing of AdmiraltheOil and Less CO2Caustic Recovery

  16. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale, Phase 2. Construction, operation, testing, and environmental impact. Final report, August 1981-December 1982. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, A.L.; Zahradnik, R.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occidential Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) recently completed the demonstration of mining, rubblization, ignition, and simulataneous processing of two commericalized modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the Logas Wash facility near DeBeque, Colorado. Upon completion of Retort 6 in 1978, Occidential began incorporating all of the knowledge previously acquired in an effort to design two more commercial-sized MIS retorts. Any commercial venture of the future would require the ability to operate simultaneously more than one retort. Thus, Retorts 7 and 8 were developed during 1980 and 1981 through joint funding of the DOE and OOSI in Phase II. Rubblization of the retorts produced an average rubble void of 18.5% in the low grade shale (17 gallons per ton) at the Logan Wash site. After rubblization, bulkheads were constructed, inlet and offgas pipes were installed and connected to surface processing facilities and liquid product handling systems were connected to the retorts. Extensive instrumentation was installed in cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories for monitoring the complete operation of the retorts. After pre-ignition testing, Retort 8 was ignited in December of 1981 and Retort 7 was ignited in January of 1982. The retorts were operated without interruption from ignition until mid- November of 1982 at which time inlet gas injection was terminated and water quenching was begun. Total product yield from the two retorts was approximately 200,000 barrels of oil, or 70% of the Fischer Assay oil-in-place in the rubblized rock in the two retrots. Water quenching studies were conducted over a period of several months, with the objective of determining the rate of heat extraction from the retorts as well as determining the quantity and quality of offgas and water coming out from the quenching process. Data from these studies are also included in this Summary Report. 62 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Review article Induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing for the recovery of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    for secondary oil recovery (M 1.9e5.1); (d) reservoir impoundment (M 2.0e7.9); (e) waste disposal (M 2.0e5Review article Induced seismicity and hydraulic fracturing for the recovery of hydrocarbons Richard mining (M 1.0e5.2); (h) geothermal operations (M 1.0e4.6) and (i) hydraulic fracturing for recovery

  18. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    three Recovery Act-funded Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. February 28, 2014 Smart Meter Investments Yield Positive Results in Maine Central Maine Power's (CMP) SGIG...

  19. Economic Recovery Loan Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Recovery Loan Program provides subordinate financing to help businesses remain viable and improve productivity. Eligibility criteria are based on ability to repay, and the loan is...

  20. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  1. Recovery Act State Memos Florida

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of renewable energy. The Florida Energy and Climate Commission has awarded the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) 10 million in Recovery Act money, enabling the center to set...

  2. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  3. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report No. 5, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies involving the tubular furnace are in the process of identifying the ideal experimental coal-to-refuse derived fuel(RDF) ratio for use in the AFBC system. A series of experiments with this furnace has been performed to determine the possible chemical pathway for formation of chlorinated organic compounds during the combustion of various RDF sources. Phenol and chlorine appear to be likely reactants necessary for the formation of these compounds. The main goal of these experiment is to determine the exact experimental conditions for the formation of chlorinated organic compounds, as well as methods to inhibit their development. Work on the fluidized bed combustor has involved five combustion runs, in which a combustion efficiency of greater than 96% and with a consistent CO{sub 2} concentration of approximately 13% was obtained. Modifications responsible for these improvements include the addition of the underbed fuel feed system and revision of the flue gas sampling system. New methods of determining combustion efficiency and percentage of SO{sub 2} capture using TG techniques to analyze combustion products are being developed. The current outlook using this TGA/FTIR method is very promising, since previously obscured reactions are being studied. the analysis of combustion products is revealing a more complete picture of the combustion process within the AFBC system.

  4. Discussion of and reply to ``A new processing system for the production of improved refuse derived fuel and recyclables from municipal solid waste``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smisko, J. [Commerce Refuse to Energy Facility, CA (United States); Eley, M.H.; Guinn, G.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Johnson Research Center

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents some comments that contribute to the content and appropriate use of this paper by Michael H. Eley and Gerald R. Guinn. Some of the questions asked concern the following: contamination and marketability of the melted plastic lumps; plastics content of refuse; woody biomass reduced to mulch; quality of recycled material; odor and particulate control; ash content; and corrosion problems. This article also contains the original authors` reply to the comments and questions.

  5. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; D. McCune; D.W. Green; G.P. Willhite; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to study waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone. The major tasks undertaken are reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database; volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance; reservoir modeling; identification of operational problems; identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors; and identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process.

  6. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; D. McCune; D.W. Green; G.P. Willhite; L. Watney; R. Reynolds; m. Michnick

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to study waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone. The major tasks undertaken are reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database; volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance; reservoir modeling; identification of operational problems; identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors; and identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process.

  7. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; D. McCune; D.W. Green; G.P. Willhite; L. Watney; M. Cichnick; R. Reynolds

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to study waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone. The major tasks undertaken are reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database; volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance; reservoir modeling; identification of operational problems; identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors; and identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process.

  8. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  9. Hydraulic waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

  10. Speech recovery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frankle, Christen M.

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

  11. Waste Steam Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, J. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .15 Jet Ejector - 165 p~ia Saturated Motive (965 psia/925?F) JO 2].22 2].]0 23.35 35 23. 22 23.]0 23.35 45 23.22 23.]0 23.35 ($2.l2/MM Btu fuel, 85% boiler efficiency,) 55 23.22 23.30 2].]5 ., 23. 22 23. )0 2].35 80 23. 22 23. JO 23. ]5 1243... technique, and the costs of fuel and electrical power. If turbine flows are unaffected so that no by-product power generation is lost, direct exchange to process and jet ejector compression will always yield an energy profit. Recovery via mechanical...

  12. Energy recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

  13. Enhanced oil recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

  14. April 2011 Recovery News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant spanned roughly 65,000 square feet and operated from 1953-62 and 1968-73 to convert depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into uranium metal and uranium tetrafluoride. It is...

  15. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX); Clavenna, LeRoy R. (Baytown, TX); Gorbaty, Martin L. (Fanwood, NJ); Tsou, Joe M. (Galveston, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  16. Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) U.S. Department of...

  17. CALIFORNIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT California has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment...

  18. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

  19. ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARKANSAS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  20. IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IOWA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Iowa has substantial natural resources, including wind power and is the largest ethanol producer in the United States. The American Recovery &...

  1. Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry...

  2. Steelcase's Closed-Loop Energy Recovery System Results in $250,000 Savings Annually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wege, P. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steelcase Inc. put a closed-loop energy recovery system into operation in August, 1980, with the installation of a $1.1 million waste incinerator. The system provides steam for process applications in the company's main complex. Processable waste...

  3. Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste Shipments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations began...

  4. Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

  5. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  6. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

  7. Michigan Basin. Secondary recovery in reef trends yields more production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary recovery practices in reef trends in Michigan are described. Waterflooding in the Chester 18 Unit began in 1978; it currently has 6 injection wells and 11 production wells. The production wells use a submersible pumping unit, and current production levels are estimated at 3800 bopd. The present level of injection is ca. 17,000 bpd of water. The company operating the field has concluded that more barrels can be produced from a reef if a waterflood is started early. There are 55 to 60 such reefs with potential for supplemental recovery.

  8. Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant...

  9. Recovery and purification of ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reyneke, Rian (Katy, TX); Foral, Michael J. (Aurora, IL); Lee, Guang-Chung (Houston, TX); Eng, Wayne W. Y. (League City, TX); Sinclair, Iain (Warrington, GB); Lodgson, Jeffery S. (Naperville, IL)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the recovery and purification of ethylene and optionally propylene from a stream containing lighter and heavier components that employs an ethylene distributor column and a partially thermally coupled distributed distillation system.

  10. RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 1st, 2014, Testing at RMOTC has officially completed. We would like to thank all of our testing partners and everyone who helped make the...

  11. Low Level Heat Recovery Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, H. Z.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

  13. Uncertainty quantification for CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Zhenxue; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Jia, Wei; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Ampomah, William; Grigg, Reid

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops a statistical method to perform uncertainty quantification for understanding CO2 storage potential within an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) environment at the Farnsworth Unit of the Anadarko Basin in northern Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil-water flow and reactive transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major uncertainty metrics: net CO2 injection, cumulative oil production, cumulative gas (CH4) production, and net water injection. A global sensitivity and response surface analysis indicates that reservoir permeability, porosity, and thickness are the major intrinsic reservoir parameters that control net CO2 injection/storage and oil/gas recovery rates. The well spacing and the initial water saturation also have large impact on the oil/gas recovery rates. Further, this study has revealed key insights into the potential behavior and the operational parameters of CO2 sequestration at CO2-EOR s...

  14. Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Supporting Collaborative Operations within a Coalition Personnel Recovery Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickler, G; Tate, Austin; Hansberger, J

    Abstract—I-X is a framework that can be used to create an application in which multiple agents adopt a task-centric view of a situation, and which supports the necessary coordination of their activities to respond to that ...

  16. Method of controlling scale in oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of producing highly viscous minerals from a subterranean formation by injection of an acidic, thermal vapor stream without substantial scale buildup in downstream piping, pumps and well bore. The process comprises heating the formation by injection of heat, preferably in the form of a thermal vapor stream composed of combustion gases and steam and injecting an acidic compound simultaneously with the thermal vapor stream into the formation at a temperature above the dew point of the thermal vapor stream. The acidic, thermal vapor stream increases the solubility of metal ions in connate water and thus reduces scaling in the downstream equipment during the production of viscous hydrocarbons.

  17. Research Portfolio Report Small Producers: Operations/Improved Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s oPrecipitationWeatherTacklingAboutNRAP: MakingSmall

  18. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  19. Shock recovery experiments: An assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G.T. III

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic shock recovery experiments, in which microstructural and mechanical property effects are characterized quantitatively, constitute an important means of increasing our understanding of shock processes. Through studies of the effects of variations in metallurgical and shock loading parameters on structure/property relationships, the micromechanisms of shock deformation, and how they differ from conventional strain rate processes, are beginning to emerge. This paper will highlight the state-of-the-art in shock recovery of metallic and ceramic materials. Techniques will be described which are utilized to ''soft'' recover shock-loaded metallic samples possessing low residual strain; crucial to accurate ''post-mortem'' metallurgical investigations of the influence of shock loading on material behavior. Illustrations of the influence of shock assembly design on the structure/property relationships in shock-recovered copper samples including such issues as residual strain and contact stresses, and their consequences are discussed. Shock recovery techniques used on brittle materials will be reviewed and discussed in light of recent experimental results. Finally, shock recovery structure/property results and VISAR data on the /alpha/--/omega/ shock-induced phase transition in titanium will be used to illustrate the beneficial link between shock recovery and ''real-time'' shock data. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  20. DOE Policy Re Recovery Act Recipient Use of Recovery Act Logos on Signage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) policy regarding use of the Recovery Act logo by Recovery Act recipients and subgrantees.

  1. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel tubes. Also, these fluctuating air flow patterns can result in deposition of black liquor on the wall tubes, and during periods when deposition is high, there is a noticeable increase in the concentrations of sulfur-bearing gases like hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. Laboratory studies have shown that chromized and aluminized surface treatments on carbon steel improve the resistance to sulfidation attack. Studies of superheater corrosion and cracking have included laboratory analyses of cracked tubes, laboratory corrosion studies designed to simulate the superheater environment and field tests to study the movement of superheater tubes and to expose a corrosion probe to assess the corrosion behavior of alternate superheater alloys, particularly alloys that would be used for superheaters operating at higher temperatures and higher pressures than most current boilers. In the laboratory corrosion studies, samples of six alternate materials were immersed in an aggressive, low melting point salt mixture and exposed for times up to 336 h, at temperatures of 510, 530 or 560°C in an inert or reactive cover gas. Using weight change and results of metallographic examination, the samples were graded on their resistance to the various environments. For the superheater corrosion probe studies, samples of the same six materials were exposed on an air-cooled corrosion probe exposed in the superheater section of a recovery boiler for 1000 h. Post exposure examination showed cracking and/or subsurface attack in the samples exposed at the higher temperatures with the attack being more severe for samples 13 exposed above the first melting temperature of the deposits that collected on the superheater tubes. From these superheater studies, a ranking was developed for the six materials tested. The task addressing cracking and corrosion of primary air port tubes that was part of this project produced results that have been extensively implemented in recovery boilers in North America, the Nordic countries and many other parts of the world. By utilizing these results, boilers ar

  2. New Impetus for resource recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marier, D.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indications are that the resource recovery field is getting a renewed focus as communities again respond to continuing waste problems and as more companies offer recycling and waste-to-energy services. Recent entries to the field include new divisions of an Australian firm, a Finnish environmental services company, an Italian tire recycler. Two utility affiliates have entered the resource recovery field, and one major engineering and construction firm is entering the field at the same time another is leaving. These companies and their waste processes are briefly described.

  3. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energy Recovery ActCategoryRecovery Act

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  5. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  6. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  7. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  8. Energy recovery in SUDS towards smart water grids: A case study Helena M. Ramos a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggavi, Suhas

    Energy recovery in SUDS towards smart water grids: A case study Helena M. Ramos a,n , Charlotte and energy nexus for sustainable operation towards future smart cities. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 January 2013 Accepted 2 August 2013 Keywords: Energy recovery SUDS Smart water grids. a b s t r

  9. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. September 2010 American Recovery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    September 2010 i American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Naval by applying GSHP systems. The current HVAC system for the building is a conventional Air Handling Unit (AHU) system with chiller. The heating and the DHW are provided by district steam. The building is close

  11. Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

  12. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  13. District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia...

  14. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: OATI (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  15. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Recovery Act (ARRA) Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with: ARRA * awardees * contractors * DOE * Energy * Grid Integration * Partnership * photovoltaic * Photovoltaics * PV * Recovery Act * reliability * Renewable Energy * SAND...

  17. Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

  18. The recovery of crude oil spilled on a ground water aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malter, Paul Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over 25, 200 gallons of crude oil. The recovery well method of oil spill cleanup was analyzed for effectiveness at the Chadbourne Ranch. Draw- down measurements from observation wells and daily oil pro- duction data were recorded during the in... Lawn Memorial Park Spill. BACKGROUND . RESPONSE MECHANISM EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY NEW EQUIPMENT DEVELOPMENT Theory of Skimmer Operation ~ CHADBOURNE RANCH OIL SPILL CLEANUP ~ Site Stratigraphy . Methodology Selected for Oil Recovery . Equipment...

  19. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  20. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  1. Recovery Act ? An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Recovery Act An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and Outreach in Transportation Electrification Recovery Act An Interdisciplinary...

  2. Remote implementations of partially unknown quantum operations of multiqubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Min Wang

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and prove the protocol of remote implementations of partially unknown quantum operations of multiqubits belonging to the restricted sets. Moreover, we obtain the general and explicit forms of restricted sets and present evidence of their uniqueness and optimization. In addition, our protocol has universal recovery operations that can enhance the power of remote implementations of quantum operations.

  3. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  4. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  5. Study on Energy Saving of the Interlayer Ventilation Walla Used in Clean Operation Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, J.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery energy of the exhaust in air conditioning is very important to clean operating rooms. In disinfected operating rooms, we often use completely fresh air conditioning system in order to maintain cleanliness. All the return air of the air...

  6. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  7. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  8. Kraft recovery boiler physical and chemical processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.N.; Frederick, W.J. (Adams (Terry N.), Tacoma, WA (USA); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this book is on the recent research into the physical and chemical processes occurring in and around a black liquor recovery boiler. Almost all of the detailed technical information in this book has previously appeared in the open literature. The purpose here is not to present research for the first time, but to present it in a context of the other processes occurring in recovery boilers. Topics covered include: general characteristics of recovery boilers; black liquor thermal and transport properties; black liquor droplet formation and combustion; recovery boiler char bed processes; flow and mixing in Kraft recovery boilers; entrainment and carryover in recovery furnaces; fume formation and dust chemistry; deposits and boiler plugging; and recovery boiler thermal performance. 257 refs., 102 figs., 38 tabs.

  9. Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

  11. Improved oil recovery using horizontal wells at Elk Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangle, F.J.; Schultz, K.L.; McJannet, G.S.; Ezekwe, N.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight horizontal wells have been drilled and completed in a steeply dipping Stevens sand reservoir in the Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The subject reservoir, called the Stevens 26R, is a turbidite channel sand deposit one mile wide, three miles long, and one mile deep. Formation beds have a gross thickness up to 1,500 feet and dips as high as 60 degrees on the flanks. The original oil column of 1,810 feet has been pulled down to 200 feet by continual production since 1976. The reservoir management operating strategy has been full pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection since 1976. The steep dip of the formation makes gravity drainage the dominant drive mechanism. Additionally, improved recovery is coming from cycling dry gas through the large secondary gas cap region. The prudent placement of the horizontal wells above the oil/water contact promises to improve oil recovery and extend the operating life of the reservoir. Field results are given to compare the performance of the horizontal wells with the conventional wells. The horizontal wells produce at higher rates, lower draw downs, and lower gas/oil ratio which will extend the life of the project and result in higher recovery.

  12. Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprague, Stephen M.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -to-energy (LFGTE) projects are underway in an attempt to curb emissions and make better use of this energy. The methane that is extracted from these landfills can be converted into a transportation fuel, sold as a pipeline-quality natural gas, operate turbines...

  13. Implementation impacts of PRL methodology. [PRL (Plutonium Recovery Limit)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department's previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

  14. Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.D.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guide to environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is presented. The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, federal regulations, and state regulations are discussed. This handbook has been designed as a planning tool and a convenient reference source. The 16 states included comprise the major oil-producing states in various regions of the state. The major topics covered are: general guidelines for complying with environmental laws and regulations; air pollution control; water pollution control; protecting drinking water: underground injection control; hazardous waste management; and federal laws affecting siting or operation of EOR facilities. (DMC)

  15. Use and recovery of ammonia in power plant cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflug, H.D.; Bettenworth, H.J.; Syring, H.A. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hanover (Germany)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents some practical and theoretical aspects of the use of ammonia in power plant water/steam cycles. The plants considered are fully automated units with once-through boilers, which operate under complex conditions and are subject to frequent starts and load changes. The boilers are chemically conditioned with combined oxygen ammonia treatment and the condensate polishing plant is only operated during start-up, in the event of a condenser leak or to remove excess ammonia. The paper also covers the recovery of ammonia from the condensate polishing plant waste regenerants and reuse for conditioning the feedwater. In particular, the paper deals with the following points: theoretical analysis of the chemical equilibrium of ammonia and carbon dioxide in water, including calculation of the concentrations from the parameters normally measured, such as conductivities and pH; equipment for monitoring and controlling the amount of ammonia fed to the water/steam cycle, including the optimum positioning of the sampling and feed-points, the parameters suitable for feed control and their temperature dependence; the partial pressure and distribution coefficient of ammonia; the consumption and losses of ammonia through the water/steam cycle during operation; the recovery of ammonia from condensate polishing plant waste regenerants by steam stripping. The paper should be of interest to both planning engineers and plant operators.

  16. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  17. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  18. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  19. Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8, 2015JuneDepartmentRecovery

  20. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,Past Opportunities » Recovery Act

  1. IDAHO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SNAPSHOT Idaho has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  2. GEORGIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ACT SNAPSHOT Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power .The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  3. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act.

  4. Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project Project Technical Lead - Thermoelectric Analysis & Materials 27 February 2008 2008 DOE OVT Annual Merit Review 2008...

  5. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Financial Assistance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ARRAAttachment3.rtf FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement...

  6. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  7. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production.

  8. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  9. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  10. ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment...

  11. Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb...

  12. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging as well as next-generation oxygen-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy Microfluidics manipulation and manufacturing. Learn more detail about Recovery Act Instruments...

  13. Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Calculation Table Updated: March 20, 2015 FY 2016 February 2015 CRC Calculation Table (pdf) Final FY 2015 CRC Letter & Table (pdf) Note: The Cost...

  14. Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to examine a specific application of the use of an ORC heat recovery system and compare it to a stear), Rankine cycle heat recovery system. The particular application ~ssumed is heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust gas at a temPErature of 700F. Figure...,vaporized and superheated ina flue gas heat recovery su bsystem. he super heated fluid is expanded through a turbine for power p oduction, condensed in a water cooled condenser and return d to the vaporizer via feed pu mps. In the steam cycle, a port n of the Figure 1...

  15. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  16. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  17. Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the federal Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS), businesses may recover investments in certain property through depreciation deductions. The MACRS establishes a set of class l...

  18. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xudong, E-mail: chen.xudong@nies.go.jp [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan); Xi Fengming [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Geng Yong, E-mail: gengyong@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujita, Tsuyoshi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. {yields} Mechanical technology leads to more CO{sub 2} emission reduction. {yields} Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. {yields} Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. {yields} Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO{sub 2}e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  19. Geothermal energy for the increased recovery of copper by flotation enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible use of geothermal energy (a) to speed the recovery of copper from ore flotation and/or leaching of flotation tailings and (b) to utilize geothermal brines to replace valuable fresh water in copper flotation operations was evaluated. Geothermal energy could be used to enhance copper and molybdenum recovery in mineral flotation by increasing the kinetics of the flotation process. In another approach, geothermal energy could be used to heat the leaching solution which might permit greater copper recovery using the same residence time in a tailings leach facility. Since there is no restriction on the temperature of the leaching fluid, revenues generated from the additional copper recovered would be greater for tailings leach operations than for other types of leach operations (for example, dump leaching operation) for which temperature restrictions exist. The estimated increase in total revenues resulting from two percent increase copper recovery in a 50,000 tons ore/day plant was estimated to be over $2,000,000 annually. It would require an estimated geothermal investment of about $2,130,000 for a geothermal well and pumping system. Thus, the capital investment would be paid out in about one year. Furthermore, considerable savings of fresh waters and process equipment are possible if the geothermal waters can be used directly in the mine-mill operations, which is believed to be practical.

  20. Recovery Act State Memos Virginia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a series of short educational videos, will be produced on power grid operations and Smart Grid equipment demonstration, assembly, installation and use. In collaboration with...

  1. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  2. Direct condensation refrigerant recovery and restoration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, D.C.H.

    1992-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a refrigerant recovery and purification system for removing gaseous refrigerant from a disabled refrigeration unit, cleaning the refrigerant of contaminants, and converting the gaseous refrigerant to a liquid state for storage. It comprises a low pressure inlet section; a high pressure storage section; the low pressure inlet section comprising: an oil and refrigerant gas separator, including a separated oil removal means, first conduit means for connecting an inlet of the separator to the disabled refrigerant unit, a slack-sided accumulator, second conduit means connecting the separator to the slack-sided accumulator, a reclaim condenser, third conduit means connecting the separator and the reclaim condenser in series, an evaporator coil in the reclaim condenser connectable to a conventional operating refrigeration system for receiving a liquid refrigerant under pressure for expansion therein, the evaporator coil forming a condensing surface for condensing the refrigerant gas at near atmospheric pressure in the condenser, a liquid receiver, a reclaimed refrigerant storage tank, fourth conduit means further connecting the liquid receiver in series with the reclaim condenser, downstream thereof, means between the reclaim condenser and the liquid receiver.

  3. UF.sub.6 -Recovery process utilizing desublimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eby, Robert S. (11 Newhope La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Stephenson, Michael J. (115 Concord Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Andrews, Deborah H. (421 Cumberland St., Harriman, TN 37748); Hamilton, Thomas H. (821 Walker Springs Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a UF.sub.6 -recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF.sub.6 is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF.sub.6 directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF.sub.6, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF.sub.6 input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF.sub.6 from high-speed UF.sub.6 gas-centrifuge cascades.

  4. UF/sub 6/-recovery process utilizing desublimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eby, R.S.; Stephenson, M.J.; Andrews, D.H.; Hamilton, T.H.

    1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a UF/sub 6/-recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF/sub 6/ is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF/sub 6/ directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF/sub 6/, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF/sub 6/ input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF/sub 6/ from high-speed UF/sub 6/ gas-centrifuge cascades.

  5. USDOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project: Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}. Final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report provides available design, operational, and maintenance information, and marketing plans, on the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} demonstration Project at the Dragon Products company`s cement plant at Thomaston, Maine. In addition, data on pollutant removal efficiencies and system economics are reviewed. The Recovery Scrubber was developed to simultaneously address the emission of acid gas pollutants and the disposal of alkaline solid waste at a cement plant. The process, however, has general application to other combustion processes including waste or fossil fuel fired boilers. Selected chemistry of the exhaust gas, (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), selected chemistry of the cement plant kiln baghouse dust catch (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), and Dragon cement plant economics are presented. current marketing efforts and potential markets for the Recovery Scrubber in several industries are discussed.

  6. Why Do Kraft Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tubes Crack?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.

    2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cracks were first reported in 1992 in co-extruded 304L stainless steel/SA210 Gd Al carbon steel floor tubes of North American black liquor recovery boilers. Since then, a considerable amount of information has been collected on the tube environment, crack characteristics, the stress state of the tubes, and the crack initiation and propagation mechanisms. These studies have identified both operating procedures that apparently can greatly lessen the likelihood of crack formation in the stainless steel layer and alternate materials that appear to be much more resistant to cracking than is 304L stainless.

  7. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  8. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nocera, Dave

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    BOSTON- At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act. To learn about more ARPA-E projects through the Recovery Act: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  9. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

  10. Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy. About Anaerobic Digestion Biogas recovery systems manure in an oxygen-free environment. One of the natural prod- ucts of anaerobic digestion is biogas Digestion Biogas recovery systems are a proven technology. Currently, more than 30 digester systems

  11. Thermal recovery of oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, R.M. (Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (CA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is organized into the following chapters: Introduction to Thermal Recovery; Conduction of Heat Within Solids; Convective Heating within Reservoirs; Steamfloodings; The Displacement of Heavy Oil; Cyclic Steam Simulation; Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage; Steam Recovery Equipment and Facilities; and In Situ Combustion.

  12. Recovery in aluminium Ph.D. thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be superior. iii #12;The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness reduction of 38%. The sample was annealed at 300Recovery in aluminium Ph.D. thesis by Carsten Gundlach Supervisors: Henning Friis Poulsen Wolfgang

  13. Recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugasaka, K. (Government Industrial Research Inst., Shikoku, Japan); Katoh, S.; Takai, N.; Takahashi, H.; Umezawa, Y.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seawater contains various elements in solution. Deuterium, lithium, and uranium are the important ingredients for energy application at present and in the future. This paper deals with the recovery of uranium from seawater, with emphasis on the development of an adsorbent with high selectivity and rate of adsorption for uranium. Polyacrylamidoxime chelating resins were synthesized from various co-polymers of acrylonitrile and cross-linking agents. The resulting resins with the chelating amidoxime group showed selective adsorption for uranium in seawater. The amount of uranium adsorbed from seawater at room temperature reached 3.2 mg/g resin after 180 days. Polyacrylamidoxime fiber, which was prepared from polyacrylonitrile fiber and hydroxylamine, showed a high rate of adsorption for uranium. The polyacrylamidoxime fiber conditioned with 1 M HC1 and 1 M NaOH adsorbed 4 mg U/g fiber from seawater in ten days. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comberiati, Joseph R. (Morgantown, WV); Locke, Charles D. (Morgantown, WV); Kamath, Krishna I. (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  15. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  16. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  17. Private Key Recovery Combination Attacks: On Extreme Fragility of Popular Bitcoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Private Key Recovery Combination Attacks: On Extreme Fragility of Popular Bitcoin Key Management and practical operational security in bitcoin digital currency storage systems. We study the security two most used bitcoin HD Wallet key management solutions (e.g. in BIP032 and in earlier systems). These systems

  18. Time-lapse gravity monitoring of an aquifer storage recovery project in Leyden, Colorado Kristofer Davis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this stage, water injection will also help in removal of residual natural gas stored in the mine. The mine coal mine is being developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from. Efficient operation of the storage-recovery process requires knowledge of water concentration and movement

  19. Comparative sugar recovery data from laboratory scale application of leading pretreatment technologies to corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Comparative sugar recovery data from laboratory scale application of leading pretreatment societal benefits, but pretreatment operations essential to economically viable yields have a major impact on costs and per- formance of the entire system. However, little comparative data is available on promising

  20. Nonlinear inverse problem for a model of ion-exchange filter: numerical recovery of parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and pressure (15 MPa) of hot steam [2]. Some units are made of cheap corrosion and heat-resistant steel which1 Nonlinear inverse problem for a model of ion-exchange filter: numerical recovery of parameters]. Power-generating units of TPP operate under severe corrosive conditions: high temperature (515 - 530°C

  1. European Conference on the Mathematics of Oil Recovery --Amsterdam, The Netherlands 4 -7 September 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    of reservoir performance under different depletion and operating scenarios. This practical use of reservoir10th European Conference on the Mathematics of Oil Recovery -- Amsterdam, The Netherlands 4 - 7 University) SUMMARY Reservoir production forecasts are essentially uncertain due to the lack of data

  2. A HW/SW Checkpoint and Recovery Scheme for Embedded Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    -time, power, area, etc.), CR for embedded systems have to be small, fast and energy efficient. Using existing Parameswaran1 1 University of New South Wales, Australia {tuol,sridevan}@cse.unsw.edu.au 2 University, Australia #12;Abstract Checkpoint and Recovery (CR) allows computer systems to operate correctly even when

  3. Carbon dioxide for the recovery of crude oil. Annual report, November 1978-November 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doscher, T.M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The displacement of residual oil to waterflooding by miscible fluid injection has been studied using scaled physical models of line-drive systems. The effects of flow rate, mobility ratio, and density ratio, were investigated. This work was a first step in an overall program of studying miscible displacement in particular by carbon dioxide, of residual oil as a process for recovering additional crude oil from reservoirs which had been waterflooded. The ratios of gravitational and viscous forces which exist in tertiary recovery operations, using carbon dioxide as a recovery reagent, were approximated in a scaled physical model at ambient pressure and temperature. The viscosity ratio was now very unfavorable and displacement of moveable water was inefficient. Consequently, the displacement of the residual oil by the solvent, which was simulating the role of carbon dioxide, was also poor. The recovery efficiency could not be improved by reasonable increases in the fluid velocity because the unfavorable mobility-caused viscous fingering was so dominant. Insomuch as carbon dioxide flooding, an imperfectly miscible recovery process, cannot be expected to perform as well as a perfectly miscible recovery process, these experiments point to the need for imposing a strong measure of mobility control if the injection of carbon dioxide is to achieve widespread usage for the recovery of residual oil.

  4. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  5. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Microsoft Word - OE PSRP June 5 2009...

  6. Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number...

  7. South Carolina Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    South Carolina Recovery Act State Memo South Carolina has substantial nuclear and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful...

  8. Washington Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act State Memo Washington State has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  9. Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special...

  10. advanced oil recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 4 Enhanced oil recovery through water imbibition in fractured...

  11. actinides recovery rar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 111 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  12. abnormal metabolic recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 140 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  13. advanced secondary recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known 116 Key recovery in a business environment Computer Technologies...

  14. FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated...

  15. Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid...

  16. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July 2010 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Invesment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July...

  17. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA, clean energy projects, energy efficiency, smart grid, alternative fuels, geothermal energy American Recovery & Reinvestment Act, ARRA,...

  18. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

  19. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013. OE...

  20. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014. OE ARRA...

  1. Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico Energy Secretary Chu Announces 384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New...

  2. New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico Recovery Act State Memo New Mexico has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric...

  3. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery and Rein- vestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled...

  4. Arizona Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  5. Oklahoma Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Oklahoma has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  6. Texas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Texas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, solar, biomass, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making...

  7. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  8. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Exsolution Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concurrent CO2 Sequestration. Abstract: A novel EOR method using...

  9. Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  10. Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  11. Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office...

  12. Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project September...

  13. Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada...

  14. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under Irradiation and Implications for Long-Term Immobilization of Actinides. Dynamic Recovery in Silicate-Apatite Structures Under...

  15. President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar...

  16. President Obama Announces Over $467 Million in Recovery Act Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Geothermal and Solar Energy Projects President Obama Announces Over 467 Million in Recovery Act Funding for...

  17. DOE Offers $15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity DOE Offers 15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity August 25, 2010 - 11:11am Addthis Photo of geothermal power plant....

  18. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pdf More Documents &...

  19. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  20. Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  1. Alaska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo Alaska has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, coal, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  2. Kansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kansas has substantial natural resources, including oil, gas, biomass and wind power.The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making...

  3. Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana has substantial natural resources, including abundant oil, gas, coal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  4. Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas has substantial natural resources, including gas, oil, wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  5. addiction recovery principles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management, and recovery coaching helped, or are now helping, transform addiction treatment into a more person-centered, holistic, family-centered, and recovery-focused system...

  6. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  7. An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

  8. Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry 2005...

  9. Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty...

  10. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of progress...

  11. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War...

  12. Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry A...

  13. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Presentatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Presentation by Capstone Turbine Corporation, June 2011 High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery -...

  14. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards- By Category Updated July 2010 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards- By Category Updated...

  15. Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding. Blast Furnace Gas Recovery Boiler Provides Steam and Power at Steel Mill More Documents & Publications Capturing Waste Gas: Saves...

  16. americium recovery service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Asynchronous intrusion recovery for...

  17. Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California State Energy Program Audit Report: The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - California...

  18. Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Annual progress report, May 1982-May 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently conducting research for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on uranium recovery process wastes for both active and inactive operations. NRC-sponsored uranium recovery research at PNL is focused on NRC regulatory responsibilities for uranium-recovery operations: license active milling and in situ extraction operations; concur on the acceptability of DOE remedial-action plans for inactive sites; and license DOE to maintain inactive sites following remedial actions. PNL's program consists of four coordinated projects comprised of a program management task and nine research tasks that address the critical technical and safety issues for uranium recovery. Specifically, the projects endeavor to find and evaluate methods to: prevent erosion of tailings piles and prevent radon release from tailings piles; evaluate the effectiveness of interim stabilization techniques to prevent wind erosion and transport of dry tailings from active piles; estimate the dewatering and consolidation behavior of slurried tailings to promote early cover placement; design a cover-protection system to prevent erosion of the cover by expected environmental stresses; reduce seepage into ground water and prevent ground-water degradation; control solution movement and reaction with ground water in in-situ extraction operations; evaluate natural and induced restoration of ground water in in-situ extraction operations; and monitor releases to the environment from uranium recovery facilities.

  19. Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

    1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

  20. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

  2. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

    1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

  3. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

  4. Energy Recovery from Solid Waste for Small Cities - Has the Time Really Come?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, W. T., Jr.; Paxton, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider energy recovery from solid waste using modular, two stage incinerations with waste heat recovery....

  5. Operations Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and EvaluationOperational ManagementCenterOperations

  6. Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas...

  7. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demolished under the Recovery Act program at Los Alamos National Laboratory is now a pile of rubble. Built in 1965, the 34,000-square foot High Temperature Chemistry Facility...

  8. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  9. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  10. Unconventional gas recovery: state of knowledge document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, C.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synthesis of environmental data and information relevant to the four areas of unconventional gas recovery (UGR) resource recovery: methane from coal, tight western sands, Devonian shales and geopressurized aquifers. Where appropriate, it provides details of work reviewed; while in other cases, it refers the reader to relevant sources of information. This report consists of three main sections, 2, 3, and 4. Section 2 describes the energy resource base involved and characteristics of the technology and introduces the environmental concerns of implementing the technology. Section 3 reviews the concerns related to unconventional gas recovery systems which are of significance to the environment. The potential health and safety concerns of the recovery of natural gas from these resources are outlined in Section 4.

  11. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  12. Accuracy guarantees for l1-recovery ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 5, 2010 ... entries in the signal x (of norm x1 = 5s). On Figure 3 we present the recovery error as a function of s. We run the same simulations in the ...

  13. RECOVERY ACT: TAPOCO PROJECT: CHEOAH UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Paul; 740, 293 Highway; Baden, NC 28009

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Funding Opportunity Announcement Number: DE-FOA-0000120, Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Modernization, Alcoa Power Generating Inc. (APGI), a fully owned subsidiary of Alcoa Inc., implemented major upgrades at its Cheoah hydroelectric facility near Robbinsville, North Carolina.

  14. Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. April 14, 2011 Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment For the first...

  15. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have the refrigerant recovered in accordance with EPA's requirements for servicing. However, equipment that typically

  16. Autonomous Thruster Failure Recovery for Underactuated Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller September 2010 SSL #13­10 #12;2 #12;Autonomous Thruster Failure Recovery for Underactuated Spacecraft Christopher Masaru Pong, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12­11 This work is based

  17. Recovery Act State Memos South Dakota

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    solar-wind generates savings for S.D. city ... 6 Clean energy tax credits and grants: 1 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in South Dakota go to...

  18. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  19. Autonomous thruster failure recovery for underactuated spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pong, Christopher Masaru

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thruster failures historically account for a large percentage of failures that have occurred on orbit. Therefore, autonomous thruster failure detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) is an essential component to any robust ...

  20. Recovery Act-Funded HVAC projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies and...

  1. Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

  2. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

  3. Recovery Plan Scots Pine Blister Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Monitoring and Detection 7 V. Response 8 VI. USDA Pathogens Permits 9 VII. Economic Impact and Compensation Recovery System (NPDRS) called for in Homeland Security Presidential Directive Number 9 (HSPD-9

  4. Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) Launch Press Kit/AUGUst 2011 #12;http of its four channels to AC-3, making each channel's secondary audio MPEG 1 Layer II. For digital downlink

  5. Recovery Act Worker Update: Mike Gunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tire, Brian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mike Gunnels at the Savannah River Site tells how the Recovery Act got him out of unemployment and the benefits of training and teamwork in his new job with the Department of Energy.

  6. Recovery Act Worker Update: Mike Gunnels

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tire, Brian

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Mike Gunnels at the Savannah River Site tells how the Recovery Act got him out of unemployment and the benefits of training and teamwork in his new job with the Department of Energy.

  7. Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into working fluid technologies and applications. Projects funded by the...

  8. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details...

  9. Recovery Act-Funded Water Heating Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy was allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to conduct research into water heating technologies and applications. Projects funded by the...

  10. Recovery Act State Memos American Samoa

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act funds to set up eight anemometers to measure and quantify the territory's wind potential. Award(s): 9.6 million, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant...

  11. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  12. Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Heat Recovery- Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF) Thomas O?Brien Recycled Energy Development, LLC tobrien@recycled-energy.com Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000oF using...

  13. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat...

  14. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  15. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

  16. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, Ely; Mierlo, Frank van; Obama, Barack

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production. To read more about the project: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx#1366 To see more projects funded by the Recovery Act through ARPA-E: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  17. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sachs, Ely; Mierlo, Frank van; Obama, Barack

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production. To read more about the project: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx#1366 To see more projects funded by the Recovery Act through ARPA-E: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  18. Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

  19. Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

  20. Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

  1. LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 RECOVERY GOALS 5-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." This vision for recovery encompasses ESA de-listing goals in the sense that ESA de-listing could be achieved

  2. Sensing system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kychakoff, George; Afromowitz, Martin A; Hugle, Richard E

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers includes one or more deposit monitoring sensors operating in infrared regions and about 4 or 8.7 microns and directly producing images of the interior of the boiler. An image pre-processing circuit (95) in which a 2-D image formed by the video data input is captured, and includes a low pass filter for performing noise filtering of said video input. An image segmentation module (105) for separating the image of the recovery boiler interior into background, pendant tubes, and deposition. An image-understanding unit (115) matches derived regions to a 3-D model of said boiler. It derives a 3-D structure the deposition on pendant tubes in the boiler and provides the information about deposits to the plant distributed control system (130) for more efficient operation of the plant pendant tube cleaning and operating systems.

  3. PROCESS MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR RECOVERY OF PUBE SOURCES AT LOS ALAMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. KORNREICH; ET AL

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains one of the premier plutonium processing facilities in the country. The plutonium facility supports several defense- and nondefense-related missions. This paper describes process-modeling efforts focused on the operations related to the Radioactive Source Recovery Program, which recovers the plutonium from plutonium-beryllium neutron sources. This program accomplishes at least two goals: it is evidence of good stewardship of a national resource, plutonium, and destroys a potential health hazard, the neutron source, by separating the plutonium from the beryllium in sources that are no longer being used in various industries or the military. We examine the processes related to source recovery operations in terms of throughput, ionizing radiation exposure to workers, and mass balances using two discrete-event simulation tools: Extend{trademark}, which is commercially available; and ProMoS, which is in-house software specifically tailored for modeling nuclear-materials operations.

  4. Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Biomass Recovery DataContrasting Woody Biomass Recovery Data Forest Biomass Supply in the Southeastern4/11/2011 1 Evaluate Supply and Recovery of Woody Biomass for Energy Production from Natural. Other studies of biomass supply have supply have assumedassumed a technical recovery rate

  5. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  6. Operating Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING PLAN

  7. Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING

  8. User data package for implementation of electrolytic recovery technology in Navy electroplating shops. Final report, March 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K.; Koff, J.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY94 the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) completed tests on three electrolytic recovery systems used for the recovery of metals and destruction of cyanide from electroplating wastewaters. Field testing and evaluation was conducted at NSY Norfolk, NAWC Indianapolis, and NADEP Cherry Pt. for five metal recovery applications: silver cyanide, copper cyanide, acid copper, electroless nickel, and tin-lead fluoborate. Advanced design features for metal recovery, including enhanced fluidized circulation, specialized oxidizing anodes, and high porous surface area cathodes were evaluated to optimize performance. NFESC demonstrated that electrolytic recovery systems can be adapted for effective use in the Navy plating operations where production is often sporadic as contrasted to industrial plating processes. The electrolytic recovery units removed metal ions from the rinsewater to below 1 ppm for each application. Electrowinning, as an alternative technology, can reduce industrial waste treatment costs and hazardous sludge generated from conventional treatment This User Data Package (UDP) covers the design, operational and maintenance requirements for these electrolytic systems. This UDP will be applicable to small Navy plating shops where closed-loop waste recycling and point source minimization is necessary for environmental compliance and cost competitiveness.

  9. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

  10. Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Castonguay

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

  11. Offsite source recovery project - ten years of sealed source recovery and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Witkowski, Ioana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wald - Hopkins, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuthbertson, A [NNSA

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources (this number has since increased to more than 23,000). This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Decades later, these sources began to exceed their special form certifications or fall out of regular use. As OSRP has collected and stored sealed sources, initially using 'No Path Forward' waste exemptions for storage within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, it has consistently worked to create disposal pathways for the material it has recovered. The project was initially restricted to recovering sealed sources that would meet the definition of Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste, assisting DOE in meeting its obligations under the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act Amendments (PL 99-240) to provide disposal for this type of waste. After being transferred from DOE-Environmental Management (EM) to the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as GTCC when it became waste, but also any other materials that might constitute a 'national security consideration.' It was recognized at the time that the GTCC category was a waste designation having to do with environmental consequence, rather than the threat posed by deliberate or accidental misuse. The project faces barriers to recovery in many areas, but disposal continues to be one of the more difficult to overcome. This paper discusses OSRP's disposal efforts over its 10-year history. For sources meeting the DOE definition of 'transuranic,' OSRP has achieved many milestones, including defense determinations for various isotopes, a WIPP RCRA permit modification to accommodate headspace gas sampling requirements, and approval of a peer-reviewed non-assay radiological characterization methodology. For non-transuranic sources, which OSRP began to recover in 2004, OSRP has achieved NEP A coverage for storage and implemented consolidated storage at both DOE and commercial locations, as well as completing several specific disposal operations. The closure of the Barnwell low-level waste disposal site in 2008 has left 36 states with absolutely no commercial disposal pathway for most sealed sources, increasing the demands on OSRP. This and other current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

  12. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 4, A laboratory study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 1 titled: Inhibition of acid production in coal refuse amended with calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate - containing FGD solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of S02 emission from coal combustion requires desulfurization of coal before its combustion to produce coal refuse. Alternatively, gaseous emissions from coal combustion may be scrubbed to yield flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products that include calcium sulfite (CaSO3?0.5H2O or simply CaS03). Acid production in coal refuse due to pyrite oxidation and disposal of large amounts of FGD can cause environmental degradation. Addition of CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD to coal refuse may reduce the amounts of oxygen and ferric ion available to oxidize pyrite because the sulfite moiety in CaS03 is a strong reductant and thus may mitigate acid production in coal refuse. In Chapter 1, it was shown that CaS03 efficiently scavenged dissolved oxygen and ferric ion in water under the conditions commonly encountered in a coal refuse disposal environment. In the presence ofCaS03, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water exposed to the atmosphere declined to below 0.01 mg L"1 at pH <8.0. In Chapter 2, it was demonstrated that CaS03 prevented a pH drop in coal refuse slurry when 0.2 gCaS03 was added to a 2% fresh coal refuse slurry every three days. Calcium sulfite also inhibited acid leaching from fresh coal refuse in bench-scale columns under controlled conditions. During the initial 13 weeks of leaching, the total amounts of titratable acidity, soluble H\\ Fe, and Al from CaS03-treated refuse (6.4 gin 50 g fresh coal refuse) were only 26%,10%, 32%, and 39% of those of the control columns, respectively. A combination of CaS03 with CaC03 or fly ash enhanced the inhibitory effect of CaS03 on acid leaching. Calcium sulfite-containing FGD which combined CaS03, CaC03, fly ash, and gypsum showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on acid leaching than CaS03 alone. This combination effect was partially due to the positive interaction of CaS03 with CaC03 and fly ash on inhibition of acid leaching. In Chapter 3, CaS03-containing FGD was found to inhibit acid leaching from both fresh and aged coal refuse in large scale columns under simulated field conditions. During 39 weeks of leaching, the reduction of leachate acidity and Fe concentration and the increase ofleachate pH were significant (p <0.05) for the 22% FGD treatment with a linear response to increasing FGD rates (0%, 5.5%, 11%, and 22%). I conclude that CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD have the ability to inhibit acid production in coal refuse and the inhibitory effect shown in this experiment is likely to occur under field conditions. Thus, the research results present a potential new method for mitigation of acid production in coal refuse and another beneficial utilization of FGD by-products.

  13. Operational Excellence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site » OpenOperational

  14. Operations Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ globalOPERATING Who We

  15. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  16. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  17. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

  18. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  19. Water quality for secondary and tertiary oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michnick, M.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key element in many secondary and tertiary oil recovery processes is the injection of water into an oil-bearing formation. Water is the fluid which displaces the oil in the pore space of the rock. A successful waterflood requires more than the availability of water and the pumps and piping to inject the water into the formation. It requires an understanding of how water enters the oil bearing formation and what happens once the injected water comes into contact with the rock or sand, the oil, and the water already in the reservoir. Problems in injectivity will arise unless care and constant monitoring are exercised in the water system for a flood operation. This study examines water availability and quality in relation to waterflooding.

  20. Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor; Silin, Dimitriy Borisovic; De, Asoke Kumar

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

  1. Waterflood control system for maximizing total oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz Wiktor (Oakland, CA); Silin, Dimitriy Borisovich (Pleasant Hill, CA); De, Asoke Kumar (San Jose, CA)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system and method for determining optimal fluid injection pressure is based upon a model of a growing hydrofracture due to waterflood injection pressure. This model is used to develop a control system optimizing the injection pressure by using a prescribed injection goal coupled with the historical times, pressures, and volume of injected fluid at a single well. In this control method, the historical data is used to derive two major flow components: the transitional component, where cumulative injection volume is scaled as the square root of time, and a steady-state breakthrough component, which scales linearly with respect to time. These components provide diagnostic information and allow for the prevention of rapid fracture growth and associated massive water break through that is an important part of a successful waterflood, thereby extending the life of both injection and associated production wells in waterflood secondary oil recovery operations.

  2. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

  3. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY Digesters Do Not Address theMethane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE

  4. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  5. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  6. Effects of vaned diffuser pressure recovery on centrifugal compressor stage performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eason, Robyn Monique

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orientation of Channel Taps and Sealed Holes ? ? ? ? ? 28 11 Control Rxan 12 Inlet and Exit Velocity Triangles 13 Impeller Meridional Profile- 14 Prescribed Flow Functians 30 35 36 15 Vened Diffuser Geanetry 41 16 Leading Edge Circumf erentia1 Static... of vened diffuser static pressure recovery on centrifugal ccxn- pressor stage performance are presented. A single-stage radial canpres- sor experiencing actual operating conditions in a Ford regenerative gas turbine engine was utilized...

  7. Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatini, David M.

    Asynchronous intrusion recovery for interconnected web services Ramesh Chandra, Taesoo Kim, and tracking down and recovering from such an attack re- quires significant manual effort. Web services for such web services. Aire addresses several challenges, such as propagating repair across services when some

  8. After a Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    /recovery_assistance Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension Service se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  9. An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, A. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

  10. After a Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    /recovery_assistance Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension Service se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas AgriLife Extension Service est...

  11. Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

    of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800...

  12. The Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Jose G.; Lovell, Ashley C.; Kensing, Robert H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station B-1456 The Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 Better Estate Plannin CONTENTS Increase in Unified Credit... .................................................................... 7 Repeal of Orphans' Exclusion ............................................................. 7 Delay in the Imposition of New Generation-Skipping Tax .................................... 7 Technical Changes in Special Use Valuation Provisions...

  13. Disaster Resiliency and Recovery: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's leader in energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, practices, and strategies. For the last 15 years, NREL has provided expertise, tools, and innovations to private industry; federal, state, and local governments; non-profit organizations; and communities during the planning, recovery, and rebuilding stages after disaster strikes.

  14. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  15. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 West Drilling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    President of Cascade Drilling, Bruce, talks about his contract with the Department of Energy and what his team is doing to improve water treatment and environmental cleanup. The small business owner hits on how the Recovery Act saved him from downsizing and helped him stay competitive and safe on site.

  16. Energy Recovery from Potato Chip Fryers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, H. B.; Kympton, H. W.; Arnold, J. W.; Paisan, J. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permits heat recovery from the fryer cooking fumes. The fumes consist primarily of water vapor (11 psia) and air (3.7 psia) at a temperature of 275 F. About 10% of the available energy is dissipated in a scrubber which removes particulate material...

  17. Waste water treatment and metal recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Waste water treatment and metal recovery Nickel catalysts for hydrogen production Nickel and single versions of which contained cobalt, chromium, carbon, molybdenum, tungsten, and nickel. In 1911 and 1912% on their stainless steel production. The company paid sizable dividends to its owners until it was dissolved

  18. Avoided Gigawatts Through Utility Capital Recovery Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frosenfeld, A. N.; Verdict, M. E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structure is possible through the use of capital recovery fees for new electric meter hookups similar to those commonly used for new water and wastewater hookups where the developer/owner is required to capitalize the marginal cost of new demand. By giving...

  19. Special Report "The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Department of Energy"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law on February 17, 2009, as a way to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in science and health, and invest in the Nation's energy future. This national effort will require an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to ensure that U.S. citizens know where their tax dollars are going and how they are being spent. As part of the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive more than $38 billion to support a number of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. Additionally, the Department's authority to make or guarantee energy-related loans has increased to about $127 billion. The Department plans to disburse the vast majority of the funds it receives through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other financial instruments. The supplemental funding provided to the Department of Energy under the Recovery Act dwarfs the Department's annual budget of about $27 billion. The infusion of these funds and the corresponding increase in effort required to ensure that they are properly controlled and disbursed in a timely manner will, without doubt, strain existing resources. It will also have an equally challenging impact on the inherent risks associated with operating the Department's sizable portfolio of missions and activities and, this is complicated by the fact that, in many respects, the Recovery Act requirements represent a fundamental transformation of the Department's mission. If these challenges are to be met successfully, all levels of the Department's structure and its many constituents, including the existing contractor community; the national laboratory system; state and local governments; community action groups and literally thousands of other contract, grant, loan and cooperative agreement recipients throughout the Nation will have to strengthen existing or design new controls to safeguard Recovery Act funds.

  20. Securing the Sustainability of Global Medical Nuclear Supply Chains Through Economic Cost Recovery, Risk Management, and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , Radioactive decay 1 #12;1. Introduction Each day, 41,000 nuclear medical procedures are performedSecuring the Sustainability of Global Medical Nuclear Supply Chains Through Economic Cost Recovery of the complex operations of medical nuclear supply chains in the case of the radioisotope molybdenum

  1. European Conference on the Mathematics of Oil Recovery --Freiberg, Germany, 3 -6 September 2002 Prediction under Uncertainty in Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    is routinely employed in the prediction of reservoir performance under different depletion and operating1 8 th European Conference on the Mathematics of Oil Recovery -- Freiberg, Germany, 3 - 6 September 2002 Prediction under Uncertainty in Reservoir Modeling Mike Christie1 , Sam Subbey1 , Malcolm

  2. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 21, 2011 Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers re- cently cleaned up a second...

  3. Industrial HVAC Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Retrofit Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, E. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrofitting air-to-air energy recovery equipment is relatively simply to design and easy to install. Additionally, HVAC energy recovery is almost risk free when compared to process retrofit. Life cycle cost analysis is the best way to illustrate...

  4. ADAPTIVE SENSING FOR SPARSE SIGNAL RECOVERY Jarvis Haupt, Robert Nowak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Rui

    ADAPTIVE SENSING FOR SPARSE SIGNAL RECOVERY Jarvis Haupt, Robert Nowak University of Wisconsin remains stable in the presence of random noise; i.e., the recovery degrades gracefully, but markedly

  5. advanced heat recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling,000 tons (Standby) (average) Heat Recovery 13.5 MW 5.6MW 1 MW...

  6. BRIEF REPORT Autonomic recovery and habituation in social anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    trait socially anxious (HTSA) and low trait socially anxious (LTSA) individuals show comparable between groups might emerge during recovery or habituation, 35 HTSA and LTSA participants gave two the LTSA participants, autonomic measures showed comparable reactivity, habituation, and recovery

  7. Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Jatara Rob

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -bed reactors located in College Station, TX and Wyndmoor, PA. Nutrient recoveries, on a feedstock basis, were calculated for a comparison of reactor efficiencies. In addition to nutrient recoveries, physical and chemical properties of input biomass and of bio...

  8. Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Mller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure Henrik B. Møller Danish Institute This thesis, entitled "Methane productivity and nutrient recovery from manure" is presented in partial of digested and separated products.................... 13 3. Methane productivity and greenhouse gas emissions

  9. 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies...

  10. Secretary Chu Announces $93 Million from Recovery Act to Support...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    93 Million from Recovery Act to Support Wind Energy Projects Secretary Chu Announces 93 Million from Recovery Act to Support Wind Energy Projects April 29, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis...

  11. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant...

  12. VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enneking, J. C.

    A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

  13. VOC Emission Control with the Brayton Cycle Pilot Plant Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enneking, J. C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile pilot plant capable of removing VOC emissions from exhaust air streams was cooperatively funded by SCE, EPRI, 3M, and NUCON. Valuable information about the process and the recovery operation has been gained by performing tests at a number...

  14. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInerney, M.J.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.

    2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research was to develop effective biosurfactant production for enhanced oil recovery in the United States.

  15. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) -...

  16. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications...

  17. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  18. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

  19. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat...

  20. Optimization Online - Sparse Recovery on Euclidean Jordan Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingchen Kong

    2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 3, 2013 ... Keywords: Sparse recovery on Euclidean Jordan algebra, nuclear norm minimization, restricted isometry property, null space property, ...

  1. 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today Vice President Biden announced that the Weatherization Assistance Program has weatherized 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act.

  2. The physical separation and recovery of metals from wastes. Process engineering for the chemical, metals and minerals industries, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veasey, T.J.; Wilson, R.J. (eds.) (Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Engineering); Squires, D.M. (ed.) (Newell Engineering Ltd., Redditch (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book deals with the physical processes used for the separation of secondary metals from waste sources. The introduction briefly considers the history of the secondary metals industries, defines the terms used in materials recycling and discusses the potential for resource recovery and improved processing. A comprehensive survey is given of the unit operations employed for metals recovery and reclamation, and this is followed by detailed descriptions of processes used to treat fragmentized metal wastes and granulated metal wastes. The final chapter reviews the processing of urban wastes for metals recovery, and gives details of modern plant and practices. The volume aims to bring together technical information on metals recovery from a wide range of sources in order to give a unified review of an important engineering and environmental topic. Topics include: general definitions used in materials recycling; the potential for resource recovery; secondary metals; ranking of scrap; the potential for improved processing; comminution; physical separation methods; the scrap industry; automobile composition; shredders; non-magnetic processing; metal reclamation processes; waste tire processing; battery processing; thermal processing systems; composition of urban waste; and material recovery.

  3. Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented by Katie Aurand katherine and size for EOR applications Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented = particle modification and testing 3 Determining the optimum nanofluid for enhanced oil recovery Presented

  4. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is not just to commercially produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production volumes and costs.

  5. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low-Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is not just to produce oil from the Pru Fee property, but rather to test which operational strategies best optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  6. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  7. Proposed Guideline Clarifications for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Erik; Kansa, Eric C; Yee, Raymond

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    th align="right" valign="top">CFDA: Design Recovery> 1642990396473 CFDA>2004031CFDA> CFDA-title>Design Recovery Transparency

  8. Imaging of CO2 injection during an enhanced-oil-recovery experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection during an Enhanced-Oil-Recovery Experiment RolandEnergy (DOE) as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project, was

  9. Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, John

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittal’s Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

  10. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between research'' and field applications.'' In addition, several modeling and state-of-the-art'' presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Microbial enhanced oil recovery and compositions therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryant, Rebecca S. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for microbial enhanced oil recovery, wherein a combination of microorganisms is empirically formulated based on survivability under reservoir conditions and oil recovery efficiency, such that injection of the microbial combination may be made, in the presence of essentially only nutrient solution, directly into an injection well of an oil bearing reservoir having oil present at waterflood residual oil saturation concentration. The microbial combination is capable of displacing residual oil from reservoir rock, which oil may be recovered by waterflooding without causing plugging of the reservoir rock. Further, the microorganisms are capable of being transported through the pores of the reservoir rock between said injection well and associated production wells, during waterflooding, which results in a larger area of the reservoir being covered by the oil-mobilizing microorganisms.

  12. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

  13. Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). Sections 2-8. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P. Shaw, H.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program objectives were: (1) determine the technical, economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery using line focusing distributed collectors at Exxon's Edison Field, and (2) estimate the quantity of solar heat which might be applied to domestic enhanced oil recovery. This volume of the report summarizes all of the work done under the contract Statement of Work. Topics include the selection of the solar system, trade-off studies, preliminary design for steam raising, cost estimate for STEOR at Edison Field, the development plan, and a market and economics analysis. (WHK)

  14. Investigations of nonsurgical embryo recovery in swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altenhof, Russell Lynn

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject. : Animal Science INVESTIGATIONS OF NONSURGICAL EMBRYO RECOVERY IN SWINE A Thesis by RUSSELL LYNN ALTENHOF Approved as to style and content by: D C. K ae er (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. D. Tanksle , Jr. (Co-Chairman of Committee... and Krall, 1977). Recent evidence indicates that beta adrenegic agonists stimulate cANP- + + dependent phosphorylation and Na /K transport that + + in turn stimulated Na /Ca exchange at the plasma membrane or in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (Scheid et al...

  15. Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

  16. Financial Recovery: Homeowner's Property Insurance Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    - owner?s property insurance. Does my property insurance cover water damage? Basic property policies do not insure against flood damage. Homeown- ers have to rely on flood coverage purchased separately through FEMA?s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP... ER-035 9-23 Financial Recovery: Homeowner?s Property Insurance Issues Nancy L. Granovsky, Professor and Extension Family Economics Specialist, The Texas A&M University System People affected by hurricanes have many questions about their home...

  17. Walk, Haydel Approach to Process Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldsmith, R. W.; Hendrickson, M. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    velocities. In a grass roots design, equipment is designed for specific needs, but in a revamp there are usually several alter nate ways existing equipment can be utilized. A11 of the important alternates must be eva1 uated before selecting... bundles are encountered, methods balance costs against incremental heat recovery. Other logic re duces multiple parallel streams and adjusts arrangements considering both temperature level and overall coefficient. The log ic and eva1uat ion...

  18. (Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams, in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of coal from the effluent stream samples will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of raw coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the combustible matter. The process parameters will be modified so that this technology can be applied to preparation plant effluents in order to recover a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal that is, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal currently produced from the preparation plant. The main activities during this period were setting up the static tube test unit to conduct the experimental work as outlined in the project work plan. The first of four effluent slurry samples collected from four operating Illinois preparation plants was tested at Michigan Technological University. The first batch of tests resulted in a clean coal containing 7.5% ash at 94.5% combustible matter recovery. Another test aimed at lowering the ash further analyzed at 3.0% ash and 0.92% total sulfur. In addition, analyses of particle size distribution and sink-float testing of the +200 mesh material were undertaken as a part of the effluent characterization work. 5 tabs.

  19. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer has been selected to study micellar-polymer chemical flooding. The physical properties and phase behavior of this system have been determined. A surfactant-polymer slug has been designed to achieve high efficiency recovery by improving phase behavior and mobility control. Recovery experiments have been performed on linear cores and a quarter 5-spot. The same recovery experiments have been simulated using a commercially available simulator (UTCHEM). Good agreement between experimental data and simulation results has been achieved.

  20. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua-Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore »recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. Quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  1. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  2. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Forthomme, Damien [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hause, Michael L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, Hua-Gen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dagdigian, Paul J. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Sears, Trevor J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Hall, Gregory E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. Quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  3. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  4. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

  5. Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Steven

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

  6. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  7. Surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethl, V.K.; Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological studies have shown that there are many surface or near-surface deposits in the United States that contain large quantities of petroleum. In the State of Wyoming, a high concentration of such deposits exists in the Wind River, Big Horn, and Powder River Basins. These shallow deposits typically occur as unconsolidated or friable formations that contain millions of barrels of oil. Conventional petroleum production techniques have been attempted in many of these deposits with little or no economic success. In an attempt to improve the production economics, the Western Research Institute was solicited to develop a technique for the recovery of oil from these deposits. WRI, with support from the Economic and Community Development Division of the State of Wyoming, and as a part of the WRI/US Department of Energy, Jointly Sponsored Research program, proposed to develop, test, and demonstrate a viable and economical technology for the recovery of oil using mining and surface recovery processes. Reneau Energy, Inc. of La Quinta, California, agreed to participate in the project in providing a test site and mined materials. The goal of the proposed project to be completed in two phases, was to develop existing energy resources which are not presently being utilized. Phase 1 of the project, consisting of six specific tasks, was conducted to evaluate the suitability of various surface processing schemes. Phase 1 also included gravity drainage tests to determine if recovery techniques such as horizontal drilling could be applied. Phase 1 work was completed, and a final report was prepared and submitted to the funding agencies. Based on the results obtained in Phase 1 of the project, fluidized-bed based thermal recovery appeared to be a viable option. A 100 tons per day pilot plant was designed, constructed, and operated in the field. This report describes the results and experiences of the Phase 2 testing.

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC FEED CONDITIONS ON WATER RECOVERY FROM IC ENGINE EXHAUST BY CAPILLARY CONDENSATION WITH INORGANIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL] [ORNL; Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inorganic membrane water recovery concept is evaluated as a method to recovering water from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Integrating the system on-board a vehicle would create a self-sustaining water supply that would make engine water injection technologies consumer transparent . In laboratory experiments, water recovery from humidified air was measured to evaluate how different operating parameters affect the membrane system s efficiency. The observed impact of transmembrane pressure and gas flow rate suggest that gas residence time is more important than water flux through the membrane. Heat transfer modeling suggests that increasing membrane length can be used to improve efficiency and allow greater flow per membrane, an important parameter for practical applications where space is limited. The membrane water recovery concept was also experimentally validated by extracting water from diesel exhaust coming from a stationary generator. The insight afforded by these studies provides a basis for developing improved membrane designs that balance both efficiency and cost.

  9. Second Law Comparisons of Volumetric and Flame Combustion in an Ideal Engine with Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Graves, Ronald L [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of a theoretical second law (exergy) analysis of an idealized internal combustion engine operating in flame versus volumetric (e.g., HCCI-like) combustion modes. We also consider the impact of exhaust heat recovery. Our primary objective is to better understand the fundamental differences (if any) in thermodynamic irreversibility among these different combustion modes and the resulting impact on engine work output. By combustion irreversibility, we mean that portion of the fuel energy that becomes unavailable for producing useful work due to entropy generation in the combustion process, exclusive of all other heat and friction losses. A key question is whether or not volumetric combustion offers any significant irreversibility advantage over conventional flame combustion. Another key issue is how exhaust heat recovery would be expected to change the net work output of an ideal piston engine. Based on these results, we recommend specific research directions for improving the fuel efficiency of advanced engines.

  10. Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

  11. Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

  12. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  13. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  14. An investigation of parameters affecting oil recovery efficiency of carbon dioxide flooding in cross-sectional reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almalik, M.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low oil recovery efficiency is attributed to low vertical and areal sweep efficiency. The major causes of the low recovery efficiencies may be classified into three categories: (1) gravity segregation, (2) reservoir heterogeneity, and (3) unstable viscous fingering. Water alternate with gas (WAG) injection processes have been employed in field operations to improve the recovery efficiency and cut the cost of gas injection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of reservoir and process parameters on the oil recovery efficiency of carbon dioxide WAG processes in cross-sectional reservoirs. To accomplish this, a two-dimensional compositional numerical simulator was developed. The simulator was functional and verified in this study. The simulator was then used to generate simulation data for studying the effects of seven dimensionless parameters on the oil recovery efficiency: (1) reservoir length to height ratio, (2) sine of the reservoir dip angle, (3) vertical to horizontal permeability ratio, (4) gravity to viscosity ratio (GVR), (5) injection rate, (6) water to gas (WAG) injection ration, and (7) pore volumes injected. Results of the investigation showed that oil recovery efficiency as a percentage of the oil place (OIP) is affected to different degrees by the seven parameters. Two correlations of the oil recovery efficiency versus the seven dimensionless parameters were established. The first was established for pore volumes injection ranging from 0 to 1.0 and the second from 0 to 0.7. The second correlation showed better agreement with the simulation results. The correlations will provide useful information in the design of the carbon dioxide WAG processes in cross-sectional reservoirs.

  15. Case studies of sewage treatment with recovery of energy from methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.; Webster, N.; Wander, J.

    1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Southeast, there are about 3,000 wastewater plants with a capacity of over one million gallons per day. Under this study, operating data and available financial information on a variety of technologies for large and small plans was documented for ten facilities. Studies were done on wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with design capacities ranging from 9.5--120 million gallons per day. All of these WWTPs recover the gas produced in their anaerobic digesters and use at least part of it as fuel for boilers and/or internal combustion engines. The engines power generators, blowers, or pumps, and most are equipped with heat recovery systems. Based on the historical data provided by the participants in this study and from the authors` own technical analysis, methane recovery and utilization systems appear to be cost effective, although the degree of cost effectiveness varies widely. The types of energy recovery systems are not uniform among all the participants so that the cases in this limited survey are not precisely comparable to each other. Also, reliance on historical data and cost information generated from portions of total plant operations and estimates makes it difficult to complete analysis of specific variables. The fact remains, however, that regardless of the individual type(s) of digester gas energy recovery system in use, data from seven of the ten participants reflected annual savings ranging from $67,200 to more than $700,000. Further, Wander Associates current analysis reflects that nine of the ten realized annual savings ranging from $5,000 to more than $600,000.

  16. Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, P. H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (still)for separation of light oil from the wash oil,which is then returned to absorber tower.The debenzolised wash 0 0 oil is cooled indirectly to 20 C/30 C before returning to the absorber tower. This is toprevent condensation of water from the gas... Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 -- c.O.G. LIGHT OIL SCRUBBER COKE OVEN GAS(C.O.G,J BENZINE COOLING WATER BENZOLISED ~WASH OILSTRIPPER CONVENTIONAL LIGHT OIL RECOVERY PLANT DEBENZOLISED WASH OIL / COOLING WATER...

  17. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  18. Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig.

  19. Enhanced oil recovery projects data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, J.F.; Sellers, C.A.; Nautiyal, C.; Allison, E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project data base is maintained and updated at the Bartlesville Project Office of the Department of Energy. This data base provides an information resource that is used to analyze the advancement and application of EOR technology. The data base has extensive information on 1,388 EOR projects in 569 different oil fields from 1949 until the present, and over 90% of that information is contained in tables and graphs of this report. The projects are presented by EOR process, and an index by location is provided.

  20. material recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy9 EvaluationWHITE ROCK LOSmarit8recovery |

  1. Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| Department ofRightsSmartManagement RecordsRecovery

  2. Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratory DirectorsRecovery Act demolition

  3. Lab completes Recovery Act-funded demolition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab SubcontractoractiveLabRecovery

  4. RECOVERY ACT: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Progress ReportRECOVERY ACT:

  5. Recovery Act: Demonstrating The Commercial Feasibility Of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,Past Opportunities » Recovery

  6. Supercritical Recovery Systems LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co Ltd Place: Wuxi,Energy InformationRecovery

  7. The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hole 70 Neasured and Calculated Productivities Obtained on Wells Completed Through Perforations 39 Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughf low for Stratified Reservoirs- lj. O Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil... index meas- ured on the wells is equal to ths productivity index estimated from cores, In reviewing the published work on the oil recovery by water in]ec- tion to be expected from non-oolitic carbonate formations, dependable methods of prediction...

  8. Disaster Response and Recovery Webinar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate, assess, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on their disaster recovery and response programs. Under the Stafford Act,...

  9. Maine Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State Memo Maine has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  10. Oregon Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oregon has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  11. New Hampshire Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Memo New Hampshire has substantial natural resources, including wind, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  12. Idaho Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Memo Idaho has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  13. Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    has substantial natural resources, including solar, biomass , geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  14. Missouri Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act State Memo Missouri has substantial natural resources, including wind and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  15. South Dakota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dakota has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  16. Georgia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Georgia has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  17. Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Wisconsin has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down...

  18. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Construction of the largest ground- water treatment facility at...

  19. RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Energy Recovery Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases The typical internal combustion engine wastes about 30 percent of its chemical energy in the form of hot exhaust...

  1. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State - Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By State - Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  2. Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Category Updated November 2011 Recovery Act Selections for Smart Grid Investment Grant Awards - By Category Updated November 2011 List of selections for the Smart Grid Investment...

  3. West Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    West Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the...

  4. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds; the projects accelerate advanced biofuels RD&D, speed the deployment of commercialization of biofuels, and further the U.S....

  5. Nebraska Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Memo Nebraska has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, wind, and hydro electric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful...

  6. Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhancing State Energy Assurance Recovery Act: Enhancing State Energy Assurance States are using these funds to plan for energy supply disruption risks and vulnerabilities to...

  7. Virginia Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act State Memo Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

  8. Utah Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act State Memo Utah has substantial natural resources, including oil, coal, natural gas, wind, geothermal, and solar power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  9. Mississippi Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mississippi has substantial natural resources, including biomass, oil, coal, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on...

  10. Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    attended the meeting, where presenters commended the Recovery Act for accelerating Cold War cleanup at SRS and boosting employment and business in the local community. "I go out...

  11. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American...

  12. Iowa Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Memo Iowa has substantial natural resources, including wind power and is the largest ethanol producer in the United States. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  13. Minnesota Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind power, and is a large ethanol producer. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  14. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Geothermal Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014 Geothermal...

  15. Enhanced oil recovery. Progress review, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details current research in the area of enhanced recovery of petroleum as sponsored by the DOE. Progress reports are provided for over thirty projects.

  16. Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado using Remote Sensing and On- Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis F. Lee Robinson - PI Flint...

  17. Successful Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project Could...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the energy industry, and the general public with reliable information about industrial carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery." In the first phase of the research...

  18. LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis...

  19. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery - Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency. The microturbine technology will maximize usable exhaust energy and achieve ultra-low emissions levels. High Efficiency Microturbine with Integral Heat Recovery More...

  20. EM Recovery Act Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 1, 2011 DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites - Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last...