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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Operations and Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lower operations and maintenance (O&M) costs are critical to reducing a solar system's lifecycle cost of ownership. O&M costs are influenced by up-front investments in design, engineering,...

2

Will 10 MW Wind Turbines Bring Down the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Offshore Wind Farms?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Larger wind turbines are believed to be advantageous from an investment and installation perspective, since costs for installation and inner cabling are dependent mainly on the number of wind turbines and not their size. Analogously, scaling up the turbines may also be argued to be advantageous from an operation and maintenance (O&M) perspective. For a given total power production of the wind farm, larger wind turbines give a smaller number of individual machines that needs to be maintained and could therefore give smaller O&M costs. However, the O&M costs are directly dependent on how failure rates, spare part costs, and time needed by technicians to perform each maintenance task and will develop for larger wind turbines. A simulation study is carried out with a discrete-event simulation model for the operational phase of an offshore wind farm, comparing the O&M costs of a wind farm consisting of 5 MW turbines with a wind farm consisting of 10 MW turbines. Simulation results confirm that O&M costs decrease when replacing two 5 MW turbines by one 10 MW turbine, if the total production capacity and all other parameters are kept equal. However, whether larger wind turbines can contribute to a reduction of cost of energy from an O&M perspective is first and foremost dependent on how the failure rates and maintenance durations for such wind turbines will develop compared to 5 MW wind turbines. Based on the results of this analysis, it is concluded that higher failure rates and maintenance durations rapidly are counterbalancing the benefits of larger wind turbines.

Matthias Hofmann; Iver Bakken Sperstad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Operations and maintenance philosophy  

SciTech Connect

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Philosophy document is intended to establish a future O&M vision, with an increased focus on minimizing worker exposure, ensuring uninterrupted retrieval operations, and minimizing operation life-cycle cost. It is intended that this document would incorporate O&M lessons learned into on-going and future project upgrades.

DUNCAN, G.P.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Operations & Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Information Transmission Planning Western OATT Revision Maintenance Services Meter policy (pdf) Meter application agreement Behind the Meter Generation policy (doc)...

5

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source UF Minor Projects for UF 50,000 Minor projects for facilities located and education. Typical projects consist of Gainesville/ Typical projects other funding greenhouses, general

Slatton, Clint

8

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Operating Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Turfgrass: Maintenance Costs in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LAW FOR VARIOUS M-AINTENANCE ITEMS BASED ON O\\!'\\'S. ERSHIP AND TYPE OF GRASS WITHIN EACH REGION Maintenance items TY PC Percent Lot size, Region of oz;r- of lawns square Com~osty Fertilizer Chemicals Water Average grass in region feet cost cost... LAW FOR VARIOUS M-AINTENANCE ITEMS BASED ON O\\!'\\'S. ERSHIP AND TYPE OF GRASS WITHIN EACH REGION Maintenance items TY PC Percent Lot size, Region of oz;r- of lawns square Com~osty Fertilizer Chemicals Water Average grass in region feet cost cost...

Holt, Ethan C.; Allen, W. Wayne; Ferguson, Marvin H.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Operations and Maintenance Program Structure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program recommends Federal operations and maintenance (O&M) programs comprise of five distinct functions: operations, maintenance, engineering, training, and...

12

Minimization of Transportation, Installation and Maintenance Operations Costs for Offshore Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although it is a sustainable source and there is abundant potential for energy, cost of energy generated from offshore wind is still high compared to (more)

Faiz, Tasnim Ibn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Maintenance cost studies of present aircraft subsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes two detailed studies of actual maintenance costs for present transport aircraft. The first part describes maintenance costs for jet transport aircraft broken down into subsystem costs according to an ...

Pearlman, Chaim Herman Shalom

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mechanical Operations and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Holiday Work Status Holiday Work Status Mechanical Operations & Maintenance Group APS Storage Ring Magnets The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory is a national synchrotron-radiation research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Using high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, an international community of scientists conducts forefront basic and applied research in the fields of material science, biological science, physics, chemistry, environmental, geophysical and planetary science. The 1.1-km circumference APS facility consists of several major subsystems including magnets, vacuum chambers, radio-frequency cavities, diagnostics instrumentation, x-ray absorbers and apertures, and cooling water subsystems. Each of these subsystems contains hundreds of mechanical

16

Operation and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information Transmission Planning Western OATT Revision Maintenance Services Meter Policy...

17

Improve Operations & Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improve Operations & Maintenance Improve Operations & Maintenance Improve Operations & Maintenance Photo of an equipment room in a high-rise commercial office building with red and green equipment. Every building's energy consumption can benefit from rigorous operations and maintenance (O&M) practices. Properly planned and executed O&M is one of the most cost-effective strategies for ensuring equipment longevity, reliability, safety, and energy efficiency in commercial buildings. By one estimate, O&M measures cost about 20 times less and achieve roughly the same energy savings as energy efficiency upgrades. There are various opportunities to improve efficiency through O&M that can be discovered through efforts such as engaging tenants, training building staff, and

18

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Major Equipment Types Resources

19

Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance Federal facilities rely on pumps, motors, fans, and other mechanical systems for everyday operations. These systems must be...

20

Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance Federal facilities rely on pumps, motors, fans, and other mechanical systems for everyday operations. These systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 3 of the Operations & Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

22

Operations and Maintenance Management Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal operations and maintenance (O&M) programs must gain full support from management to succeed. Management understanding and buying into the program elevates O&M importance and allows...

23

Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operations and maintenance (O&M) measurement tends to focus on reliability as the sole metric. Every Federal agency wants a reliable facility, but this metric alone is not enough to build a...

24

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 9 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

25

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Front Matter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes the front matter of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: a Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

26

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Appendix c  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes Appendix C of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

27

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 7 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

28

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 5 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

29

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 8  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 8 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

30

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 10 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

31

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes chapter 6 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

32

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Appendix a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide describes Appendix A of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

33

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

34

Facilities Cost Pool: Maintenance Service Responsibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C 16 EXTERIOR LANDSCAPING University Standard FM FM C 17 EXTERIOR STD BUILDING SIGNS FM FM FM FM FMD 22 DATA POINT MONITORING Environmental building standard FM FM C Cost Pool: Maintenance Service Responsibilities 2 Table of Contents 3 Building Shell

Gulliver, Robert

35

Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance October 16, 2013 - 5:01pm Addthis Project Construction Commissioning Operations & Maintenance Operations and maintenance (O&M) programs are critical to successfully integrating renewable energy into new Federal building construction and major renovations. This overview covers the importance of O&M programs for renewable energy projects, creating a successful O&M program, and identifying the right team to carry out the program. It highlights typical renewable energy issues and recommends following the design, specifications, and recommendations from product manufacturers. Key Actions in Operations and Maintenance Make O&M a priority to protect agency investment. Include O&M input in design reviews.

36

Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement October 4, 2013 - 5:19pm Addthis Operations and maintenance (O&M) measurement tends to focus on reliability as the sole metric. Every Federal agency wants a reliable facility, but this metric alone is not enough to build a successful O&M program. O&M managers must think beyond reliability. Successful programs incorporate reliability along with controlling costs, evaluating and implementing new technologies, tracking and reporting health and safety issues, and more. Not only are these metrics useful in assessing effectiveness, but also in equipment cost justification, program modifications, and staff hiring. Common Metrics The following metrics are common in evaluating effective O&M programs. Not

37

Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Operations and Maintenance Program Areas » Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance October 4, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Federal facilities rely on pumps, motors, fans, and other mechanical systems for everyday operations. These systems must be maintained and operated correctly to reach their full potential. Well-executed operations and maintenance (O&M) programs promote energy efficiency and life cycle performance and can save Federal agencies 5% to 20% on annual energy bills without significant capital investments. Learn about: Federal Requirements: Look up O&M-related requirements that Federal agencies must meet as outlined by law and executive order Management Process: Learn about the operations and maintenance management process Commissioning: Get an overview of commissioning processes

38

Sustainable Operations & Maintenance Implementation Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and purchasing policy: Energy efficiency cannot exist without accountability and organizational support energy efficiency in buildings. Organizational innovation for energy conservation; Organizations face of energy efficiency. Meetings with facilities personnel, maintenance staff, building managers, building oc

39

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EnergySmart Schools fact sheet on how school operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel can play a greater role in managing ever-increasing energy costs.

40

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Why O&M? 2 Why O&M? � 2.1 Introduction Effective O&M is one of the most cost-effective methods for ensuring reliability, safety, and energy efficiency. Inadequate maintenance of energy-using systems is a major cause of energy waste in both the Federal Government and the private sector. Energy losses from steam, water and air leaks, uninsulated lines, maladjusted or inoperable controls, and other losses from poor maintenance are often considerable. Good maintenance practices can generate substantial energy savings and should be considered a resource. Moreover, improvements to facility maintenance programs can often be accomplished immediately and at a relatively low cost. 2.2 Definitions Operations and Maintenance are the decisions and actions regarding the control and upkeep of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Federal Requirements for Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations & Maintenance » Federal Requirements Operations & Maintenance » Federal Requirements for Operations and Maintenance Federal Requirements for Operations and Maintenance October 4, 2013 - 5:09pm Addthis The following laws and regulations set advanced metering and measurement requirements for Federal agencies. Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005: Requires all Federal buildings to be metered by October 1, 2012, to ensure efficient energy use and reduce the cost of electricity used in Federal facilities. Advanced meters or metering devices must provide data at least daily and measure the consumption of electricity at least hourly. These devices must be used to the maximum extent practical. Requires Federal agencies to submit to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an implementation plan identifying personnel responsible for achieving

42

Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program's Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Best Practices Guide outlines best practices to help Federal agencies implement effective O&M for systems and...

43

Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc.

44

Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Contacts to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Contacts on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types

46

34 - Pipeline Commissioning, Operations, and Maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The commissioning of a pipeline involves the activities after installation required to place the system into services, which activities include hydrostatic testing, cleaning and drying, and the introduction of the product to be transported into the pipeline. Pipeline operations are generally carried out by the pipeline operating company. Detailed operation and maintenance procedures specific to the pipeline should be available for use before the pipeline is commissioned and handed over to operation. Manuals for operation and maintenance should be prepared, setting out the schedules, procedures, and instructions on which activities are to be carried out, including liaison with third parties. In this chapter, the procedures of commissioning, operation, and maintenance of subsea pipeline are detailed.

Qiang Bai; Yong Bai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Structure to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements

48

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

49

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources on Resources on Operations and Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning

50

FY 2014 Real Property Data Related to Operations and Maintenance...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY 2014 Real Property Data Related to Operations and Maintenance Guidance FY 2014 Real Property Data Related to Operations and Maintenance Guidance FY2014DataRelatedtoOperatio...

51

Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Types Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly...

52

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Operations and Maintenance Manual | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Manual Operations and Maintenance Manual October 16, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis Closeout of the construction phase for renewable energy projects includes the creation of a comprehensive operations and maintenance (O&M) manual. Although specific content varies depending on the size, scope, and complexity of the project, the O&M manual typically includes manufacturer literature, basic operating procedures, troubleshooting techniques, measurement and verification (M&V) system documentation, and maintenance information. The general contractor should compile O&M documentation, gather as-built drawings for equipment and systems, and take the lead in organizing the manual. The commissioning agent reviews the manual to verify that it includes all necessary documentation, including:

54

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement to someone by E-mail Measurement to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

55

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Support to someone by E-mail Management Support to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Management Support on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

56

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guide covers version 3.0 of the Operations and Maintenance Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency.

57

Operations and Maintenance Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Team Operations and Maintenance Team October 16, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis Assembling the right set of skills and resources to operate and maintain a renewable energy system is critical. Renewable energy technologies only perform as specified when managed by a well-trained, highly motivated operations and maintenance (O&M) team. For a renewable energy project financed through an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) or a power purchase agreement (PPA), primary O&M services are typically delivered as part of the agreement, but in-house staff will need some familiarity with the system. For agency-funded projects, O&M services may be provided by in-house facilities staff, a contracted service provider, or a combination of the two. Experienced O&M staff can provide valuable input and should be included in

58

Resources on Operations and Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations & Maintenance » Resources on Operations & Maintenance » Resources on Operations and Maintenance Resources on Operations and Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:55am Addthis Many helpful resources about operations and maintenance are available. Also see Contacts. Best Practices Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Document outlines best practices to help Federal agencies implement effective O&M for systems and equipment found at their facilities. Federal Facilities Council: Website featuring events, reports, and links to National Academy websites. Commissioning Commissioning for Federal Facilities: Comprehensive information about ongoing commissioning processes to resolve operating problems, improve comfort, optimize energy use, and identify retrofits for commercial and

59

Operations and Maintenance Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Training Operations and Maintenance Training October 16, 2013 - 5:01pm Addthis Key Actions in O&M Training Have O&M staff shadow Commissioning Agent during commissioning for early interaction with new renewable energy equipment. Train facility staff fully on O&M manual and building systems, regardless of O&M contracts on renewable energy systems. Provide key facility staff with general renewable energy and LEED training prior to building start-up. Look for opportunities for O&M staff to learn from external O&M contractors. To keep a renewable energy system performing at optimal levels, operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel must receive thorough training. A renewable energy system may be properly installed, but without a robust O&M program in place, it will not perform as specified over the long-term.

60

Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement January 6, 2010 - 8:26am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the past few weeks, my forced-air gas furnace has been on the fritz. I blame this on the fact that I haven't been as diligent as I should have been with regular furnace maintenance, which includes: Checking the condition of the vent connection pipe and chimney Checking the physical integrity of the heat exchanger Adjusting the controls to provide optimum water and air temperature settings for both efficiency and comfort Having a technician perform a combustion-efficiency test Checking the combustion chamber for cracks. Testing for carbon monoxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

WESTRA, A.G.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies October 7, 2013 - 1:17pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 4 To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy. Table 1. Types and Ranges of Initial Investment Requirements and Annual Operating Costs and Savings. Strategies Initial Investment Operating Costs Operating Savings Consolidate trips Time to research & coordinate routes None Eliminate fleet vehicle trips; reduce cost & time (fuel, maintenance, etc) associated with fleet vehicle use. Could result in decreasing inventory & need for vehicles leading to long-term savings

63

TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Major Equipment Types to someone by E-mail for Major Equipment Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

65

An integrated cost model for production scheduling and perfect maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production scheduling deals with scheduling production jobs on a machine (single or multiple) in order to optimise a specific objective such as total weighted completion times or total weighted tardiness. The assumption that machines are always available for processing jobs is generally used in the production scheduling literature. In reality, machines often are unavailable due to preventive maintenance activities or machine failure. Production scheduling and preventive maintenance planning are interrelated, but are most often treated separately. This interdependency seems to be overlooked in the literature. This work integrates, simultaneously, the decisions of preventive maintenance and job order sequencing for a single machine. The objective is to find the job order sequence and maintenance decisions that would minimise the expected cost.

Laith A. Hadidi; Umar M. Al-Turki; M. Abdur Rahim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Operations and Maintenance Program Structure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Program Structure Operations and Maintenance Program Structure Operations and Maintenance Program Structure October 4, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program recommends Federal operations and maintenance (O&M) programs comprise of five distinct functions: operations, maintenance, engineering, training, and administration. This approach is commonly referred to as the OMETA principle. Common roles and responsibilities for each function within the OMETA principle are outlined below. Operations The operations function of the O&M program covers the following responsibilities: Administration: Responsible for ensuring effective implementation and control of O&M activities Conduct of Operations: Responsible for ensuring efficient, safe, and reliable process operations across the O&M program

67

Technical information report: Plasma melter operation, reliability, and maintenance analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a technical report of operability, reliability, and maintenance of a plasma melter for low-level waste vitrification, in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. A process description is provided that minimizes maintenance and downtime and includes material and energy balances, equipment sizes and arrangement, startup/operation/maintence/shutdown cycle descriptions, and basis for scale-up to a 200 metric ton/day production facility. Operational requirements are provided including utilities, feeds, labor, and maintenance. Equipment reliability estimates and maintenance requirements are provided which includes a list of failure modes, responses, and consequences.

Hendrickson, D.W. [ed.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multi-canister overpack operations and maintenance manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides general operating and maintenance instructions for the Multi-Canister Overpack. Procedure outlines included are conceptual in nature and will be modified, expanded, and refined during preparation of detailed operating procedures.

PIERCE, S.R.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide October 7, 2013 - 9:56am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program's Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Best Practices Guide outlines best practices to help Federal agencies implement effective O&M for systems and equipment found at their facilities. Following these best practices can help agencies gain management buy-in for O&M programs and save an estimated 5% to 20% on energy bills without a significant capital investment. Depending on the facility, these savings can represent thousands to hundreds-of-thousands of dollars each year. Read the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0. See individual chapters: Front Matter

70

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 5 Types of Maintenance Programs Chapter 5 Types of Maintenance Programs � 5.1 Introduction What is maintenance and why is it performed? Past and current maintenance practices in both the private and government sectors would imply that maintenance is the actions associated with equipment repair after it is broken. The dictionary defines maintenance as follows: "the work of keeping something in proper condition; upkeep." This would imply that maintenance should be actions taken to prevent a device or component from failing or to repair normal equipment degradation experienced with the operation of the device to keep it in proper working order. Unfortunately, data obtained in many studies over the past decade indicates that most private and government facilities do not expend the necessary resources to maintain equipment in proper working

71

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 5 Types of Maintenance Programs Chapter 5 Types of Maintenance Programs � 5.1 Introduction What is maintenance and why is it performed? Past and current maintenance practices in both the private and government sectors would imply that maintenance is the actions associated with equipment repair after it is broken. The dictionary defines maintenance as follows: "the work of keeping something in proper condition; upkeep." This would imply that maintenance should be actions taken to prevent a device or component from failing or to repair normal equipment degradation experienced with the operation of the device to keep it in proper working order. Unfortunately, data obtained in many studies over the past decade indicates that most private and government facilities do not expend the necessary resources to maintain equipment in proper working

72

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 1 Introduction and Overview The purpose of this guide is to provide you, the Operations and Maintenance (O&M)/Energy manager and practitioner, with useful information about O&M management, technologies, energy and water efficiency, and cost-reduction approaches. To make this guide useful and to reflect your needs and concerns, the authors met with O&M and Energy managers via Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) workshops. In addition, the authors conducted extensive literature searches and contacted numerous vendors and industry experts. The information and case studies that appear in this guide resulted from these activities. It needs to be stated at the outset that this guide is designed to provide information on effective

73

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 O&M Ideas for Major Equipment Types 9 O&M Ideas for Major Equipment Types 9.1 Introduction At the heart of all O&M lies the equipment. Across the Federal sector, this equipment varies greatly in age, size, type, model, fuel used, condition, etc. While it is well beyond the scope of this guide to study all equipment types, we tried to focus our efforts on the more common types prevalent in the Federal sector. The objectives of this chapter are the following: * Present general equipment descriptions and operating principles for the major equipment types. * Discuss the key maintenance components of that equipment. * Highlight important safety issues. * Point out cost and energy efficiency issues. * Highlight any water-related efficiency impacts issues. * Provide recommended general O&M activities in the form of checklists.

74

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Introduction and Overview 1 Introduction and Overview The purpose of this guide is to provide you, the Operations and Maintenance (O&M)/Energy manager and practitioner, with useful information about O&M management, technologies, energy and water efficiency, and cost-reduction approaches. To make this guide useful and to reflect your needs and concerns, the authors met with O&M and Energy managers via Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) workshops. In addition, the authors conducted extensive literature searches and contacted numerous vendors and industry experts. The information and case studies that appear in this guide resulted from these activities. It needs to be stated at the outset that this guide is designed to provide information on effective O&M as it applies to systems and equipment typically found at Federal facilities. This guide is not

75

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.1 1.1 Chapter 11 Ten Steps to Operational Efficiency Step 1: Strive to increase management awareness and appreciation of the operations and maintenance program/department. * Consider developing a maintenance mission statement and requesting/requiring management sign-off. * Consider developing a maintenance plan and requesting/requiring management sign-off. * Begin the development of the OMETA linkages. - Develop key points of contact within other departments that can participate in the O&M mission. Step 2: Commit to begin tracking Operations and Maintenance activities. * Need to understand where O&M time is spent. * Need to understand where O&M dollars are spent. * Consider (strongly) purchasing or enhancing a Computerized Maintenance Management

76

Training on PV Systems: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Training on PV Systems: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance Training on PV Systems: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Training on PV Systems: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance Agency/Company /Organization: Leonardo Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/node/5948 Training on PV Systems: Design, Construction, Operation and Maintenance Screenshot References: PV Training [1] Overview "A free series of six webinars will be delivered to provide the required knowledge to design a high performance photovoltaic (PV) installation, entering into economic evaluation and project cash-flow. Additionally, very practical aspects such as the construction, start-up, quality management and testing will be reviewed. Plant operation is described in detail, with

77

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Operations and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance Graphic of the eTraining logo Training Available Advanced Electric Metering in Federal Facilities: Learn how to take full advantage of advanced electric metering systems by taking this FEMP eTraining course. Many helpful resources about operations and maintenance are available. Best Practices Operations and Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Outlines best practices to help Federal agencies implement effective O&M for systems and equipment found at their facilities. Federal Facilities Council: Website features events, reports, and links to National Academy websites. Commissioning Commissioning for Federal Facilities: Comprehensive information on ongoing commissioning processes to resolve operating problems, improve comfort, optimize energy use, and identify retrofits for commercial and institutional buildings and central plant facilities.

78

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Maintenance and Operations of Schools for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in more than 100 Texas public school districts. The most commonly observed problems in maintaining and operating public schools for energy efficiency are presented along with successful basic methods of inspecting schools for energy efficient maintenance...

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Release 3.0 Operations & Maintenance Best Practices A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency August 2010 Release 3.0 Operations & Maintenance Best Practices A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency G. P. Sullivan (a) R. Pugh A. P. Melendez W. D. Hunt August 2010 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy (a) Efficiency Solutions, LLC Disclaimer This report was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Federal Energy Management Program. Neither the United States Government nor any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To prevent health hazards to people and pollution in the environment, septic tank systems must be operated and maintained properly. This publication explains how septic systems work and how to keep them running properly....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

On risk-based operation and maintenance of offshore wind turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operation and maintenance are significant contributors to the cost of energy for offshore wind turbines. Optimal planning could rationally be based on Bayesian pre-posterior decision theory, and all costs through the lifetime of the structures should be included. This paper contains a study of a generic case where the costs are evaluated for a single wind turbine with a single component. Costs due to inspections, repairs, and lost production are included in the model. The costs are compared for two distinct maintenance strategies, namely with and without inclusion of periodic imperfect inspections. Finally the influence of different important parameters, e.g. failure rate, reliability of inspections, inspection interval, and decision rule for repairs, is evaluated.

Jannie Jessen Nielsen; John Dalsgaard Srensen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A survey of HVDC operating and maintenance practices and their impact on reliability and performance  

SciTech Connect

A questionnaire about operating, maintenance, and spare parts practices and station performance was sent to all HVDC converter stations worldwide. This survey is sponsored by IEEE Working Groups 15.05.08, Economics and Operating Strategies, and I7, Reliability of HVDC Converter Stations. Responses from 38 stations are analyzed, and information bout the most popular practices is reported. One important conclusion is that energy contracts, ac system constraints, and dedicated generation frequency have strong influences on the operation and maintenance practices of HVDC stations. A search is made for correlations between the operating, maintenance, and spare parts practices, including spending, and the stations` performance and availability. No conclusions about the most cost-effective practices can be made. The results are compared with those of a study published in 1992 which covered a few of the same topics.

Cochrane, J.J.; Emerson, M.P. [New England Power Co., Ayer, MA (United States)] [New England Power Co., Ayer, MA (United States); Donahue, J.A. [New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States)] [New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States); Wolf, G. [Public Service of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Public Service of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan, 1990 -1999.  

SciTech Connect

In 1988 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began work on this Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan to develop a levelized program that would assure high system reliability. During the Programs in Perspective (PIP) meetings in the late summer and fall of 1988, many of the concerns to be addressed in an Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement Plan were identified. Following these PIP meetings BPA established internal work groups. During the winter and spring of 1989, these work groups developed technical background and issue papers on topics that ranged from substation maintenance to environmental protection. In addition, a customer forum group was established and met on several occasions to review work on the plan, to offer ideas and points of view, and to assure that BPA understood customer concerns. Based on recommendations from the work group reports and customer input, BPA's O M Management Team developed the draft Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan that was released for public comment during the spring of 1990. During the public review period, BPA received a number of written comments from customers and the interested public. In addition, special meetings were held with interested customers. This final Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan reflects BPA's response to customers and interested public on each topic discussed in the 10-Year Plan. The plan is a distillation of BPA's strategies to achieve a levelized program over 10 years.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan, 1990--1999  

SciTech Connect

In 1988 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began work on this Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan to develop a levelized program that would assure high system reliability. During the Programs in Perspective (PIP) meetings in the later summer and fall of 1988, many of the concerns to be addressed in an Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement Plan were identified. Following these PIP meetings BPA established internal work groups. During the winter and spring of 1989, these work groups developed technical background and issue papers on topics that ranged from substation maintenance to environmental protection. In addition, a customer forum group was established and met on several occasions to review work on the plan, to offer ideas and points of view, and to assure that BPA understood customer concerns. Based on recommendations from the work group reports and customer input, BPA's O M Management Team developed the draft Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan that was released for public comment during the spring of 1990. During the public review period, BPA received a number of written comments from customers and the interested public. In addition, special meetings were held with interested customers. This final Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year Plan reflects BPA's response to customers and interested public on each topic discussed in the 10-Year Plan. The plan is a distillation of BPA's strategies to achieve a levelized program over 10 years.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Request for Information - Operations and Maintenance (O & M) Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Request for Information - Operations and Maintenance (O & M) Request for Information - Operations and Maintenance (O & M) Support Services for the iManage Request for Information - Operations and Maintenance (O & M) Support Services for the iManage Request for Information (THIS IS NOT A NOTICE OF SOLICITATION ISSUANCE) This is a Special Notice that includes a Request for Information (RFI) to receive comments regarding the attached draft Performance Work Statement (PWS), notice regarding an upcoming Industry Day, and notice regarding one-on-one conferences. This Special Notice is issued solely for information and planning purposes - it does not constitute a Request for Proposal (RFP) or a promise to issue an RFP in the future. This RFI does not commit the Government to contract for any supply or service

87

Operations and Maintenance Program Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Management Program Management Operations and Maintenance Program Management October 4, 2013 - 5:11pm Addthis Effective management is critical to any operations and maintenance (O&M) program. The management function should bind the distinct parts of the O&M program into a cohesive entity. The following section outlines the major components of effective O&M management, including: Program Structure: Outlines five distinctive functions making up the O&M organization: Operations, Maintenance, Engineering, Training, and Administration (OMETA) Management Support: Details the importance of gaining management support to an effective O&M program, and how to gain that support Program Implementation: Provides an overview of implementing an effective O&M program and how to maintain that program into the future

88

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 6.1 O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 6.1 Chapter 6 Predictive Maintenance Technologies 6.1 Introduction Predictive maintenance attempts to detect the onset of a degradation mechanism with the goal of correcting that degradation prior to significant deterioration in the component or equipment. The diagnostic capabilities of predictive maintenance technologies have increased in recent years with advances made in sensor technologies. These advances, breakthroughs in component sensitivities, size reductions, and most importantly, cost, have opened up an entirely new area of diagnostics to the O&M practitioner. As with the introduction of any new technology, proper application and TRAINING is of

89

Definition: Reduced T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced T&D Equipment Maintenance Cost The cost of sending technicians into the field to check equipment condition is high. Moreover, to ensure that they maintain equipment sufficiently, and identify failure precursors, some utilities may conduct equipment testing and maintenance more often than is necessary. Online diagnosis and reporting of equipment condition would reduce or eliminate the need to send people out to check equipment resulting in a cost savings.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_T%26D_Equipment_Maintenance_Cost&oldid=417296"

90

How to Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Chapter 3 DRAFT Measurement & Verification Guidelines Version 4.0...

91

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 4 Computerized Maintenance Chapter 4 Computerized Maintenance � Management System � 4.1 Introduction A computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) is a type of management software that performs functions in support of management and tracking of O&M activities. 4.2 CMMS Needs Assessment In determining the need for a CMMS, facility managers should assess their current mode of operation. Key questions to ask include: * Do you have an effective way to generate and track work orders? How do you verify the work was done efficiently and correctly? What is the notification function upon completion? * Are you able to access historical information on the last time a system was serviced, by whom, and for what condition? * How are your spare-parts inventories managed and controlled? Do you have

92

14 - Cost modelling of coal power plant start-up in cyclical operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: It has long been recognized that large coal plants that are exposed to cyclic operation incur more damage and have higher maintenance costs than units which operate in a base load regimen. This chapter reviews historical studies that have attempted to model the costs of cycling for these units from both bottom-up and top-down perspectives. It describes recent research at the component, unit and system level which attempts to forecast maintenance costs in the high-cycling scenarios likely to result from changes in the relative cost of fuel and the expansion of renewable energy sources.

P. Keatley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Implementation Program Implementation Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation October 4, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis Implementing an effective operations and maintenance (O&M) program requires patience and persistence. This is especially true since no universal plan fits all Federal agencies. While no universal plan exists, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) recommends the following common steps for implementing O&M programs: Start small: Choose a project that is manageable and can be completed in a short period of time (e.g., six months to one year) Select troubled equipment: Choose a project with visibility because of problematic equipment history Minimize risk: Choose a project that provides immediate and positive results; this project must be successful, so risk of failure should be

94

Operations and Maintenance Management Support | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Support Management Support Operations and Maintenance Management Support October 4, 2013 - 5:14pm Addthis Federal operations and maintenance (O&M) programs must gain full support from management to succeed. Management understanding and buying into the program elevates O&M importance and allows activities to be scheduled with the same priority as other management actions. Mission Statement Federal O&M programs should start with a mission statement. This succinct statement should outline the program's main goals, which should be aligned to the overarching goals of site management. Aligning O&M program goals with site goals allows management to understand how O&M supports the facility across the board. It is important to involve both management and facility staff during

95

Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Major Equipment Types for Major Equipment Types Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types October 7, 2013 - 9:53am Addthis Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc. No single resource covers all equipment in use by Federal agencies, and listing major equipment types is beyond the scope of this website. Instead, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) outlines major equipment types within chapter 9 of the Federal Energy Management Programs's (FEMP) O&M Best Practices Guide. The FEMP O&M Best Practices Guide focuses on: Boilers Steam traps Chillers Cooling towers Energy management and building automation systems Air handling systems

96

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 8 Metering for Operations and Maintenance Chapter 8 Metering for Operations and Maintenance 8.1 Introduction Metering and sub-metering of energy and resource use is a critical component of a comprehensive O&M program. Metering for O&M and energy/resource efficiency refers to the measurement of quantities of energy delivered, for example, kilowatt-hours of electricity, cubic feet of natural gas, pounds of steam, and gallons of water. Metering may also involve identifying times- of-use for the various energy sources, the instantaneous demand for energy, as well as identify energy use for a collection of buildings, individual buildings, rooms, or specific equipment (e.g., a boiler, chiller, or motor). Facility resource metering has a variety of applications for the Federal facility energy

97

Longview District Operations and Maintenance Headquarters: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) operations and maintenance staff are presently based at a headquarters next to the Longview Substation. These headquarters buildings, however, were built in 1941 and have deteriorated to the point of needing extensive repair. They also lack sufficient inside storage space. New buildings cannot be constructed on the site because of surrounding development. In addition, the site is within an area exposed to industrial fallout (coal tar pitch and metallic particles) that may be damaging buildings, equipment, and vehicles. BPA is concerned about the potential health risk to headquarters staff from the fallout. In light of these problems, BPA proposes to construct a new operations and maintenance headquarters at a different location, and to demolish the existing headquarters. This paper discusses the environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Longview District Operations and Maintenance Headquarters : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) operations and maintenance staff are presently based at a headquarters next to the Longview Substation. These headquarters buildings, however, were built in 1941 and have deteriorated to the point of needing extensive repair. They also lack sufficient inside storage space. New buildings cannot be constructed on the site because of surrounding development. In addition, the site is within an area exposed to industrial fallout (coal tar pitch and metallic particles) that may be damaging buildings, equipment, and vehicles. BPA is concerned about the potential health risk to headquarters staff from the fallout. In light of these problems, BPA proposes to construct a new operations and maintenance headquarters at a different location, and to demolish the existing headquarters. This paper discusses the environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Draft 1992 : Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan.  

SciTech Connect

Two years ago, BPA released its first-ever Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement (OM R) 10-Year Plan. That effort broke new ground and was an extensive look at the condition of Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement on BPA's power system. This document -- the 1992 OM R 10-Year Plan -- uses that original plan as its foundation. It takes a look at how well BPA has accomplished the challenging task set out in the 1990 Plan. The 1992 Plan also introduces the Construction Program. Construction's critical role in these programs is explored, and the pressures of construction workload -- such as the seasonal nature of the work and the broad swings in workload between projects and years -- are discussed. The document then looks at how situations may have changed with issues explored initially in the 1990 Plan. Importantly, this Plan also surfaces and explains some new issues that threaten to impact BPA's ability to accomplish its OM R workload. Finally, the document focuses on the revised strategies for Operations, Maintenance, Replacement, Construction, and Environment for the 1992 to 2001 time period, including the financial and human resources needed to accomplish those strategies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Draft 1992 : Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan.  

SciTech Connect

Two years ago, BPA released its first-ever Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement (OM&R) 10-Year Plan. That effort broke new ground and was an extensive look at the condition of Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement on BPA`s power system. This document -- the 1992 OM&R 10-Year Plan -- uses that original plan as its foundation. It takes a look at how well BPA has accomplished the challenging task set out in the 1990 Plan. The 1992 Plan also introduces the Construction Program. Construction`s critical role in these programs is explored, and the pressures of construction workload -- such as the seasonal nature of the work and the broad swings in workload between projects and years -- are discussed. The document then looks at how situations may have changed with issues explored initially in the 1990 Plan. Importantly, this Plan also surfaces and explains some new issues that threaten to impact BPA`s ability to accomplish its OM&R workload. Finally, the document focuses on the revised strategies for Operations, Maintenance, Replacement, Construction, and Environment for the 1992 to 2001 time period, including the financial and human resources needed to accomplish those strategies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Optimizing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance at Offshore Wind Projects in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the United States to ensure that the substantial rollout of offshore wind energy projects envisioned by the DOE is carried out in an efficient and cost-effective manner, it is important to observe the current and emerging practices in the international offshore wind energy industry. In this manner, the United States can draw from the experience already gained around the world, combined with experience from the sizeable U.S. land-based wind industry, to develop a strong offshore wind sector. The work detailed in this report will support that learning curve by enabling optimization of the cost-effectiveness of installation, operation, and maintenance activities for offshore wind farms.

103

Optimization of Electricity and Server Maintenance Costs in Hybrid Cooling Data Centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electricity cost of data centers dominated by server power and cooling power is growing rapidly. To tackle this problem, inlet air with moderate temperature and server consolidation are widely adopted. However, the benefit of these two methods is ... Keywords: Data centers, electricity cost, server maintenance cost, joint optimization

Shaoming Chen; Yue Hu; Lu Peng

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190...

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Constrained-cost maintenance and measurability of degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the timing problem of when to repair and the neural net handles which bridges in the net- work to repair. MAINTENANCE AND MEASURABILITY...track, bridge, or stretch of pipeline--is classified as being...chosen one of a finite set R of repair actions. The transition probability......

J. I. ANSELL; T. W. ARCHIBALD; L. C. THOMAS

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2014 Year-End Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTSO&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of...

108

Integrated spare parts logistics and operations planning for maintenance service providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper considers the problem of coordinated spare-part logistics and operations planning for third-party maintenance providers. Due to the multi-indenture structure of the equipment, different types of components might randomly fail to perform at different points of time. The spare part logistics literature has been focused on spare part inventory management in an in-house maintenance context. In this article, a mathematical programming model is first developed to formulate the problem in the context of a third-party maintenance provider who is faced with strict due dates for the delivery of repaired equipment. The model seeks the optimal number of maintenance jobs that can be completed to deliver at each period, as well as the order quantity of spare parts so as to minimize the procurement, inventory, and equipment late delivery costs, while taking into account the spare part supply lead-time. Next, we model the spare part demand uncertainty as a non-stationary stochastic process in each period in the planning horizon. The deterministic model is then reformulated as a multi-stage stochastic program with recourse. We also discuss the complexity of the stochastic model and propose a preprocessing approach to reduce its size for large instances. Numerical results demonstrate how the proposed model links the spare part logistics and equipment delivery decisions under spare part demand uncertainty.

Masoumeh Kazemi Zanjani; Mustapha Nourelfath

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 3.1 O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 3.1 Chapter 3 O&M Management 3.1 Introduction O&M management is a critical component of the overall program. The management function should bind the distinct parts of the program into a cohesive entity. From our experience, the overall program should contain five very distinct functions making up the organization: Operations, Maintenance, Engineering, Training, and Administration-OMETA. Beyond establishing and facilitating the OMETA links, O&M managers have the responsibility of interfacing with other department managers and making their case for ever-shrinking budgets. Their roles also include project implementation functions as well as the need to maintain persistence of the

110

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 3.1 O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 3.1 Chapter 3 O&M Management 3.1 Introduction O&M management is a critical component of the overall program. The management function should bind the distinct parts of the program into a cohesive entity. From our experience, the overall program should contain five very distinct functions making up the organization: Operations, Maintenance, Engineering, Training, and Administration-OMETA. Beyond establishing and facilitating the OMETA links, O&M managers have the responsibility of interfacing with other department managers and making their case for ever-shrinking budgets. Their roles also include project implementation functions as well as the need to maintain persistence of the

111

EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Operating Costs for Trucks David Levinson*, Michael Corbett, Maryam Hashami  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author Abstract This study estimates the operating costs for commercial vehicle operators in Minnesota, but variable costs change with the level of output. Daniels (1974) divided vehicle operating cost into two different categories, running costs (includes fuel consumption, engine oil consumption, tire costs

Levinson, David M.

113

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance – Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) DOE established the Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) in Grand Junction, Colorado, in 1991 to support its programs. ESL scientists perform applied research and laboratory-scale demonstrations of soil and groundwater remediation and treatment technologies. Capabilities Installation, monitoring, and operation of permeable reactive barriers Research of permeable reactive barriers and treatment cells Performance assessment and optimization of groundwater remediation systems Groundwater characterization Coupled hydrogeochemical modeling for groundwater remediation

114

ANALYSIS OF SAFETY RELIEF VALVE PROOF TEST DATA TO OPTIMIZE LIFECYCLE MAINTENANCE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Proof test results were analyzed and compared with a proposed life cycle curve or hazard function and the limit of useful life. Relief valve proof testing procedures, statistical modeling, data collection processes, and time-in-service trends are presented. The resulting analysis of test data allows for the estimation of the PFD. Extended maintenance intervals to the limit of useful life as well as methodologies and practices for improving relief valve performance and reliability are discussed. A generic cost-benefit analysis and an expected life cycle cost reduction concludes that $90 million maintenance dollars might be avoided for a population of 3000 valves over 20 years.

Gross, Robert; Harris, Stephen

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Operation and maintenance of Fermilab`s satellite refrigerator expansion engines  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab`s superconducting Tevatron accelerator is cooled to liquid helium temperatures by 24 satellite refrigerators, each of which uses for normal operations a reciprocating `wet` expansion engine. These expanders are basically Process System (formerly Koch) Model 1400 expanders installed in standalone cryostats designed by Fermilab. This paper will summarize recent experience with operations and maintenance of these expansion engines. Some of the statistics presented will include total engine hours, mean time between major and minor maintenance, and frequent causes of major maintenance.

Soyars, W.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report LTS-O&M is at the core of LM efforts to fulfill a strategy that includes objectives published in the 2011-2020...

118

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for Maintenance, Operation and Minor Installation Work for CERN Cooling and HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for Maintenance, Operation and Minor Installation Work for CERN Cooling and HVAC Systems

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guidelines describe the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Working Group on planning and reporting for O&M during the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

120

Network Operation and Maintenance System of Meticulous Management Based on Data Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to rapid development of the domestic communication industry, energy consumption on network operation and maintenance has become one of the ... s crucial for us to develop an intelligent system for data analys...

Qi-Te Wang; Ke-Bin Jia; Ye Yuan; Yu-Xin Song

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar on Project Implementation and Operations & Maintenance on Aug. 8  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department's Office of Indian Energy, Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, Project Implementation and Operations & Maintenance, on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time. The webinar will focus on the last two steps of a five-step tribal energy project development framework: Project Implementation and Operations and Maintenance (O&M).

122

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

Dessouky, Maged

123

AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The AWEA Wind Project O&M and Safety Seminar is designed for owners, operators, turbine manufactures, material suppliers, wind technicians, managers, supervisors, engineers, and occupational...

124

Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

125

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls, South Carolina: Final operations and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prior to construction, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (BREC) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Number FC07-80ID12125 which provided $1,052,664 toward the construction of the facility. This agreement requires that BREC document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operating and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. A complete reporting covering the design, technical, construction, legal, institutional, environmental and other related aspects of the total project was furnished to DOE previously for publication as the ''Final Technical and Construction Cost Report''. For this reason these elements will not be addressed in detail in this report. In order to make this account a more meaningful discussion of the initial two-year and four month production period, it is necessary to detail several unique events concerning the project which set Cherokee Falls apart from other projects developed under similar Cooperative Agreements with DOE. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance cost and value of the power produced for the first 28 months of operation. 3 figs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

THE EFFECTS OF MAINTENANCE ACTIONS ON THE PFDavg OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES  

SciTech Connect

The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accounted for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.

Harris, S.; Gross, R.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan 1990-1999 : Environmental Strategy. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

In operating and maintaining its regional power transmission system, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must address environmental concerns. Pollution sources and pathways for pollution migration, including potential contamination from hazardous or toxic materials, are present. BPA must develop and follow precautionary measures, respond to emergencies, minimize wastes, redress past problems, alert and train employees to problems and safety needs, constantly evaluate this effort and update the program for improvements and changes in regulations and technology. Part of BPA's mission is to conduct its operation, maintenance, and replacement programs in an environmentally sound manner. BPA recognizes its responsibility to be good stewards of the environment. BPA will meet its environmental obligations as set forth in environmental laws and regulations. BPA intends to make consistent and measurable progress toward meeting these responsibilities. The target for the 10-Year Plan is to achieve environmental compliance and meet the following goals: (1) protect human health and the environment; (2) avoid or limit liability (3) set up an effective internal management structure to maintain compliance; and (4) achieve cost-effective compliance. 6 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Maintenance Types  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proper operations and maintenance (O&M) goes beyond repairing equipment after it breaks. Several maintenance strategies exist to prevent systems disrepair and degradation. A combination of the...

129

Operational and maintenance manual, 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect

The 100 ton hydraulic trailer is used to remove the mitigation pump from Tank 241SY101. This manual explains how to inspect, operate, and maintain the trailer in a state of readiness.

Koons, B.M.

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

� � FEMP Staff Contact List � O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0 B.1 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. General Contact Information EE-2L 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

131

Computer-aided acquisition and logistics support (CALS): Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This CALS Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance provides the foundation strategy and the near term tactical plan for CALS implementation in the depot maintenance environment. The user requirements enumerated and the overarching architecture outlined serve as the primary framework for implementation planning. The seamless integration of depot maintenance business processes and supporting information systems with the emerging global CALS environment will be critical to the efficient realization of depot user's information requirements, and as, such will be a fundamental theme in depot implementations.

Bourgeois, N.C.; Greer, D.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the Dunbar Middle and Sims Elementary Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M Report, p. 1 POTENTIAL OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE (O&M) SAVINGS AT DUNBAR MIDDLE AND SIMS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL INTRODUCTION O&M savings refers to energy savings due to improved operation and maintenance of building systems. It is expected that the improved... by the remote energy management system at 5 p.m. Clearly, O&M savings can be expected from: (1) turning off lights at night; (2) improving custodial operations; (3) installing motion sensors in auditoriums, gymnasiums, book rooms and activity centers; (4...

Liu, M.; Houcek, J. K.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Arizona, California, and Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westerns Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

134

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks  

SciTech Connect

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

On-orbit maintenance operations strategy for the International Space Stationconcept and implementation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Space Station (ISS) has an operational mission and profile that makes it a Logistics and Maintenance (L&M) support challenge different from previous programs. It is permanently manned assembled on orbit and multi-national. With this technical and operational challenge a unique approach is needed to support the hardware and crew. The key is the integration of on-orbit and ground analysis supply maintenance and crew training into a coherent functional process that supports ISS goals and objectives. To integrate all the necessary aspects of hardware and personnel to support on-orbit maintenance a myriad of products and processes must be created and coordinated such that the right resources are in the right place at the right time to ensure continued ISS functionality. This paper will familiarize the audience with ISS On-Orbit Maintenance (OOM) concepts and capabilities for different maintenance tasks and discuss some of the logic behind their selection. It will also identify the operational maintenance support responsibility split between the U.S. and the various International Partners (IPs).

Linda P. Patterson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 7 Commissioning Existing Buildings Chapter 7 Commissioning Existing Buildings � 7.1 Introduction Commissioning of existing buildings is quickly becoming one of the most important topics in the building management arena. In the Federal Sector, commissioning has taken on new importance with the enactment of EISA 2007, whereby Federal facilities are required to be assessed for commissioning measures. In general, commissioning is the process of ensuring that a building performs according to its design intent and the needs of its owners and occupants (Anderson 1997). While additional research is needed to further pinpoint the costs and resulting benefits of commis- sioning new and existing buildings, numerous case studies have demonstrated resulting O&M-related energy efficiency

137

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.4 11.4 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs Planning and Reporting for Operations & Maintenance in Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee M&V - 3 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 1 1.1 OVERVIEW OF O&M ISSUES IN ESPCS ................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Key Issues, Timing, and Available Guidance on O&M in Federal ESPCs .................................................................................................................. 2 2. STEPS OF MANAGING O&M RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................... 3

139

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11.4 11.4 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs Planning and Reporting for Operations & Maintenance in Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee M&V - 3 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 1 1.1 OVERVIEW OF O&M ISSUES IN ESPCS ................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Key Issues, Timing, and Available Guidance on O&M in Federal ESPCs .................................................................................................................. 2 2. STEPS OF MANAGING O&M RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................... 3

140

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

� � Glossary of Common Terms � Appendix A Glossary of Common Terms Absorption chiller - A refrigeration machine using heat as the power input to generate chilled water. Adjustable speed drive - A means of changing the speed of a motor in a step-less manner. In the case of an AC motor, this is accomplished by varying the frequency. Aerator - A device installed in a faucet or showerhead that adds air to the water flow, thereby maintaining an effective water spray while reducing overall water consumption. Air changes - Replacement of the total volume of air in a room over a period of time (e.g., 6 air changes per hour). Ambient temperature - The temperature of the air surrounding an object. Ballast - A device used to supply the proper voltage and limit the current to operate one or more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, E.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

How to Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describes guidance on operations and maintenance (O&M) savings determination and verification within the energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

143

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

144

High temperature process steam application at the Southern Union Refining Company, Hobbs, New Mexico. Solar energy in the oil patch. Final report, Phase III: operation, maintenance, and performance  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the technical reports for Phase III of this project. The third phase included the operation, maintenance, upgrade and performance reporting of a 10,080 square foot Solar Industrial Process Heat System installed at the Famariss Energy Refinery of Southern Union Refining Company near Hobbs, New Mexico. This report contains a description of the upgraded system, and a summary of the overall operation, maintenance and performance of the installed system. The results of the upgrade activities can be seen in the last two months of operational data. Steam production was significantly greater in peak flow and monthly total than at any previous time. Also monthly total cost savings was greatly improved even though natural gas costs remain much lower than originally anticipated.

Wilson, L.E.; McGuire, D.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chapter 5 Airline Operating Costs and Measures of Productivity Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

personnel) Materials Purchased (fuel & oil, parts, passenger food, other materials) Services Purchased airframe and engine maintenance cost, plus "burden" or overhead (hangars and spare parts inventory

146

Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

DODD, E.N.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Life of Montana Insurance Company solar system: operation and maintenance manual  

SciTech Connect

The solar space heating system for the three-story home office building of the Life of Montana Insurance Company in Bozeman, Montana, is described. The system utilizes 3885 net sq. ft. of Sunworks hydronic collectors and two 3000 gal. heat storage tanks. Engineering drawings of the system are included, and an operation and maintenance manual is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

INL Sitewide Operations and Maintenance Report for CERCLA Response Actions - FY 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report documents how remedies mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act for the Idaho National Laboratory Site were operated and maintained during fiscal year 2005. The activities addressed in the INEEL Sitewide Operations and Maintenance Plan are reported in this document. Waste Area Groups 7 and 8 are not reported in this document. Waste Area Group 7 is an operating facility, and the status of its operations is reported directly to the regulatory agencies. Waste Area Group 8 is excluded from this report, because it falls outside the direct control of U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. The INEEL Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan discusses the inspection, maintenance, repair, and reporting activities involving institutional controls at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Therefore, the maintenance of institutional controls is not discussed in this report. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan provides a reference to support this report by providing current and projected facility and land uses and by listing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites.

D. R. Fitch

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

How to Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determine and Verify Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts November 2007 Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Saving Determination Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 BACKGROUND.............................................................................................................................. 4 1.2 EXISTING GUIDANCE.................................................................................................................... 4 2. M&V APPROACH.............................................................................................................................

151

How to Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determine and Verify Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts November 2007 Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Saving Determination Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 BACKGROUND.............................................................................................................................. 4 1.2 EXISTING GUIDANCE.................................................................................................................... 4 2. M&V APPROACH.............................................................................................................................

152

Selected Operating Costs for Storage of Sorghum Grain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected Operating Costs for Storage Of Sorghum Grain TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY This is the third of three bulletins reporting the results of a study of sorghum grain storage and handling practices in Texas. The first dealt with marketing and on...-farm storage; the second with com- mercial storage and handling practices. This bulletin reports the results of a study of the costs of com- mercial grain handling practices. Three areas representing a cross section of physical and economic conditions...

Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Cunningham, William C.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual  

SciTech Connect

A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

DALE, R.N.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

155

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

156

Operations and maintenance report on Air Force oil/water separators. Final report, September 1985-August 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide general guidance for the routine operation and maintenance of oil/water separators. The report should help managers and operators to recognize and correct problems affecting the separation process of oil and water. The most common types of gravity separators used by the Air Force are discussed. Other topics include operation guidelines, flow measurements, maintenance service, waste disposal and regulations, sampling and testing, recordkeeping and spill-prevention measures.

Kilroy, M.D.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reducing Heavy-Haul Railcar Maintenance Costs and Improving Terminal Performance Using Technology: A Lean Production Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations. This research applies Lean Manufacturing methods to the railcar maintenance process industries to improve production and manufacturing efficiency. In the 2000s, various production management with terminal dwell [3,4]. In addition, Logan suggested that for every 15% reduction in systemwide average

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

158

Steam turbine maintenance and repair technology: Reducing planned-outage costs  

SciTech Connect

The North American Electric Reliability Council (NAERC) reported that the average loss of equivalent availability per outage for a major fossil turbine overhaul is 323,000 MW-HR. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation and Storage Division, is in the first phase of a major research project to reduce the duration and/or frequency of steam turbine maintenance outages. This project consists of an assessment of the current state-of-the-art turbine maintenance and repair techniques and technologies. It is based on a review of current turbine maintenance practices of the US, European, Japanese, and Australian utility industries. Emphasized are maintenance and repair activities that have the most significant impact on outage duration or frequency. Twenty-six key turbine maintenance activities and the current best techniques were identified for use by utility maintenance personnel. Overall outage durations could be reduced if the duration of these activities were shortened or if they were performed more effectively. Recommended projects for development of advanced steam turbine maintenance technology were identified. 29 refs., 46 figs., 9 tabs.

Grace, H.P.; McClintock, M. (General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (USA)); Lamping, G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

INL SITEWIDE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS, AND OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR CERCLA RESPONSE ACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the 'Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites', which required a Site-wide institutional controls plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. This revision identifies and consolidates the institutional controls and operations and maintenance requirements into a single document.

JOLLEY, WENDELL L

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Precursor Report of Data Needs and Recommended Practices for PV Plant Availability Operations and Maintenance Reporting.  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the factors that affect reliability of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant is an important aspect of optimal asset management. This document describes the many factors that affect operation and maintenance (O&M) of a PV plant, identifies the data necessary to quantify those factors, and describes how data might be used by O&M service providers and others in the PV industry. This document lays out data needs from perspectives of reliability, availability, and key performance indicators and is intended to be a precursor for standardizing terminology and data reporting, which will improve data sharing, analysis, and ultimately PV plant performance.

Hill, Roger R.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; John Balfour, John R Balfour, High Performance PV

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Minimum Cost Operation Mode and Minimum Loss Operation Mode of Power System Operation Mode Selection Based on Voltage Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two formulae an optimal P-Q generation formula for minimum system cost and an optimal MW allocation formula for minimum system loss are described in this paper. The author defines two kinds of power system operation

Sang-Joong Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westerns Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

165

Backup power working group best practices handbook for maintenance and operation of engine generators, Volume 1. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is divided into the four chapters. Chapter one covers the design, procurement, storage, handling and testing of diesel fuel oil to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter two discusses the selection of automatic transfer switches to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter three is about low voltage open frame air circuit breaker operation, testing, and maintenance for DOE backup power supplies. And chapter four covers installation, design, and maintenance of engine cooling water and jacket water systems.

Gross, R.; Padgett, A.B.; Burrows, K.P.; Fairchild, P.N.; Lam, T.; Janes, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost and Robert L. Bertini2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two cost functions are considered in the model including passenger access cost and in-vehicle1 Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost Huan Li1 and Robert L. Bertini2 model is generated with the aim at minimizing the operation cost without impact on transit accessibility

Bertini, Robert L.

167

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) plants: an operations and maintenance study  

SciTech Connect

The authors analyzed data from a fluidized bed boiler survey distributed during the spring of 2003 to develop appropriate AFBC (Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion) performance benchmarks. The survey was sent to members of CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners), who sponsored the survey, as well as to other firms who had an operating AFBC boiler on-site. There were three primary purposes for the collection and analysis of the data contained in this fluidized bed boiler survey: (1) To develop AFBC benchmarks on technical, cost, revenue, and environmental issues; (2) to inform AFBC owners and operators of contemporary concerns and issues in the industry; (3) to improve decision making in the industry with respect to current and future plant start-ups and ongoing operations.

Jack A. Fuller; Harvie Beavers; Robert Bessette [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). College of Business and Economics

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

13 - Maintenance and repair of gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Material selection is a key factor in gas turbine performance and lifecycle cost because it has a central influence in the maintenance of the gas turbine.1 Further, the operation of a gas turbine does result in gas path degradation2 that impacts lifecycle costs and eventually design, manufacture, material choice and maintenance.3 A component repair programme that minimizes maintenance costs and maximizes equipment availability can be instituted to meet or improve lifecycle cost. This chapter presents the key factors influencing the need for maintenance and the choices available.

T. lvarez Tejedor; R. Singh; P. Pilidis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintenance Types Maintenance Types Proper operations and maintenance (O&M) goes beyond repairing equipment after it breaks. Several maintenance strategies exist to prevent systems disrepair and degradation. A combination of the following can ensure an optimal blend of cost and life-cycle effectiveness: Reactive Maintenance: Follows a "run it until it breaks" strategy. No action or effort is taken to maintain equipment, prevent failure, or ensure life of the system - even if actions are suggested by the manufacturer. Preventive Maintenance: Refers to a series of actions performed on calendar time or machine run time schedules. Predictive Maintenance: Strives to detect the onset of equipment degradation and address the problems as they are identified. Several predictive maintenance technologies exist.

170

Modeling and Simulation of HVAC Faulty Operations and Performance Degradation due to Maintenance Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenges of modeling building maintenance issues usinguse, Building simulation, EnergyPlus, Fault modeling, HVACbuildings in various climates, and developing modeling

Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Maintenance and operations contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford management contract (PHMC)  

SciTech Connect

This plan has been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and its subcontractors ICF Kaiser Hanford (ICF KH) and BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), at the direction of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). WHC and its subcontractors are hereafter referred to as the Maintenance and Operations (M and O) Contractor. The plan identifies actions involving the M and O Contractor that are critical to (1) prepare for a smooth transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), and (2) support and assist the PHMC and RL in achieving transition as planned, with no or minimal impact to ongoing baseline activities. The plan is structured around two primary phases. The first is the pre-award phase, which started in mid-February 1996 and is currently scheduled to be completed on June 1, 1996, at which time the contract is currently planned to be awarded. The second is the follow-on four-month post-award phase from June 1, 1996, until October 1, 1996. Considering the magnitude and complexity of the scope of work being transitioned, completion in four months will require significant effort by all parties. To better ensure success, the M and O Contractor has developed a pre-award phase that is intended to maximize readiness for transition. Priority is given to preparation for facility assessments and processing of personnel, as these areas are determined to be on the critical path for transition. In addition, the M and O Contractor will put emphasis during the pre-award phase to close out open items prior to contract award, to include grievances, employee concerns, audit findings, compliance issues, etc.

Waite, J.L.

1996-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Planning and optimizing the maintenance of paper production systems in a paper plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manufacturing and production plants operate physical assets that deteriorate with usage and time, thus, maintenance actions are required to restore the assets back to their original predetermined operational conditions. But since, organizational resources ... Keywords: Availability, Life cycle cost, Maintenance planning, Petri nets, Preventive maintenance, Simulink

Anish Sachdeva; Dinesh Kumar; Pradeep Kumar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

174

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 producing wells, 11 injection wells and 1 water supply well. Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and drilling water supply wells...

177

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) describes rate-responsive building operations for cost and energy savings in California federal facilities.

179

The characterization of a vision-based navigation system for spacecraft proximity operations and on-orbit maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rendezvous and docking, proximity operations, and on-orbit maintenance. Also, I am leading a KC-135 Reduced Gravity Student Experiment on the "vomit comet". This is a NASA-owned jet that flies parabolas through the sky and subjects its passengers... to periods of simulated microgravity. Our project is titled Asteroid Anchoring: Low Velocity Solutions to Landing on an Asteroid, and we are testing a way to attach thrusters to an asteroids surface. These thrusters could be used to move Near Earth...

Effinger, Robert T

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

180

LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requests, only 58% to 95% of AHUs identified in earlier report were shut off S. F. Austin Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water Consumption Over 600 kW reduction when AHUs and lights turned off L.B. Johnson Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water...LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test Presented to the State Purchasing and General Services Commission By the Monitoring Analysis Task E Dr. W. D...

Turner, W. D.; Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of EMCS Recorded Data to Identify Potential Savings Due to Improved HVAC Operations & Maintenance (O&M)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of EMCS Recorded Data to Identify Potential Savings Due to Improved HVAC Operations & Maintenance(O&M) Mingsheng Liu, Yeqiao Zhu, and David Claridge Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University ABSTRACT In most chiller and boiler central... and cooling energy consumption using an appropriate model [Liu 1995, Liu and Claridge 19951 with the bin weather data for each building. Step 5: Calculate the campus consumption as the sum of consumption of all buildings. Step 6: Compare the simulated...

Liu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Integrated Chiller System Reduce Building Operation and Maintenance Costs in Cold Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although water-cooled chillers are more energy efficient than air-cooled chillers, a majority of chilled water systems use air-cooled chillers. In cold weather climates, air-cooled chillers are capable of functioning in low ambient temperatures...

Sheets, N.; Liu, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program; Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

There were 2 acclimation periods at the Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period, 130,748 smolts were delivered from Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on 7 March. This group contained progeny of both the captive (53%) and conventional broodstock programs. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.9 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 14 March 2005 and ended 27 March with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 3,187) of 29,402 fish leaving the raceways. This was 22.5% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left around 1900 hours. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.9 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.2 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 204 (0.16%). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the early period was 130,544. During the second acclimation period 59,100 smolts were delivered from LGH on 28 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.8 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 3 April 2005 and ended with a force out emergency release on 7 April. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 21.8. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 64 (0.11 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 59,036. There was only 1 planned acclimation period at the Upper Grande Ronde Acclimation Facility (UGRAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period 105,418 smolts were delivered from LGH on 8 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.0 fish/lb. There was no volitional release in 2005 due to freezing air and water conditions prompting an early release. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 49 (0.05 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 105,369. Maintenance and repair activities were conducted at the acclimation facilities in 2005. Facility maintenance work consisted of snow removal, installation of drainage lines, removal of gravel from intake area, installation of new gate at the CCAF, and complete overhaul of 2 travel trailers. The Catherine Creek Adult Capture Facility (CCACF) was put into operation on 11 February 2005. The first adult summer steelhead was captured on 4 March. A total of 190 adult summer steelhead were trapped and released from 4 March to 16 May 2005. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 8 April. The first adult spring Chinook salmon was captured at CCACF on 6 May 2005. A total of 226 spring Chinook salmon were trapped from 6 May to 8 July 2005. There were 56 adults and 4 jacks unmarked and 136 adult and 30 jack marked spring Chinook salmon trapped. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 10 June for the unmarked and marked fish. None of the captive broodstock returns were collected for broodstock. Broodstock was collected systematically over the entire return from 31 May to 6 July 2005. Ten of the 34 broodstock collected and transported from CCACF to LGH were unmarked fish trapped. About 18% of the naturally produced adult males and females trapped were taken to LGH for broodstock. One jack was collected for every 5 adult males that were taken to LGH. A total of 30 age 4 and 5 and 4 age 3 fish were transported to LGH for broodstock. The hatchery component of the broodstock was 66.7%. Five weekly spawning surveys were conducted below the weir on Catherine Creek beginning 30 June 2005. During these surveys no live or dead fish were observed. The trap was removed from Catherine Creek on 3 August 2005. Temperatures at the CCACF ranged from -0.1 C on 14 February to 23.7 C on 21 July. The hourly temperatures at the adult trap during the period of operation showed that the lowest water temperatures

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

Liang, Weifa

185

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 5  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 5 of Volume IV, discusses: Corrective maintenance procedures; Calibration procedures; Surveillance procedures; Equipment changeover procedures; Decontamination procedures; Recovery procedures; and Cable schedule.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair May 30, 2012 - 2:35pm Addthis Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar energy systems require periodic inspections and routine maintenance to keep them operating efficiently. Also, from time to time, components may need repair or replacement. You should also take steps to prevent scaling, corrosion, and freezing. You might be able to handle some of the inspections and maintenance tasks on your own, but others may require a qualified technician. Ask for a cost estimate in writing before having any work done. For some systems, it may

187

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.08.A1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.08.A1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures 21.01.08.A1.05 FARM EQUIPMENT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, 2012 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The safe operation and proper maintenance of farm equipment provides endurance

188

Lowering Drilling Cost, Improving Operational Safety, and Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via stress cycling. This can occur due to post cementing operations such as drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or thermal stresses. The testing method used a 3" PVC pipe to...

189

Complex Technical Systems Operation, Reliability, Availability, Safety and Cost Optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods based on the results of the joint model linking a semi-Markov modeling of the system operation processes with a multistate approach to system reliability and safety and the linear programming are prop...

Krzysztof Ko?owrocki; Joanna Soszy?ska-Budny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at Schools in the Ft. Worth Independent School District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31 State Energy Conservation Office Energy Systems Laboratory LoanSTAR O&M Program Texas A&M University FWISD O&M Potential in 104 Schools, P.I POTENTIAL OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE SAVINGS AT SCHOOLS IN THE FORT WORTH INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT... Office LoanSTAR O&M Program Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University FWISD O&M Potential in 104 Schools, P.I 1 Figure 3b: The Potential Savings vs the Annual Peak Demand for 104 Schools The total potential electricity and gas savings are shown...

Liu, M.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Work Cost of Thermal Operations in Quantum and Nano Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adopting a resource theory framework of thermodynamics for quantum and nano systems pioneered by Janzing et al. [Int. J. Th. Phys. 39, 2717 (2000)], we formulate the cost in useful work of transforming one resource state into another as a linear program of convex optimization. This approach is based on the characterization of thermal quasiorder given by Janzing et al. and later by Horodecki and Oppenheim [Nat. Comm. 4, 2059 (2013)]. Both characterizations are related to an extended version of majorization studied by Ruch, Schranner, and Seligman under the name mixing distance [J. Chem. Phys. 69, 386 (1978)].

Joseph M. Renes

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Table 1. Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" ,"Plant Characteristics",,,"Plant Costs (2012$)" ,"Nominal Capacity (MW)","Heat Rate (Btu/kWh)",,"Overnight Capital Cost ($/kW)","Fixed O&M Cost ($/kW-yr)","Variable O&M Cost ($/MWh)" ,,,,,,,"NEMS Input" " Coal" "Single Unit Advanced PC",650,8800,,3246,37.8,4.47,"N" "Dual Unit Advanced PC",1300,8800,,2934,31.18,4.47,"Y" "Single Unit Advanced PC with CCS",650,12000,,5227,80.53,9.51,"Y" "Dual Unit Advanced PC with CCS",1300,12000,,4724,66.43,9.51,"N" "Single Unit IGCC ",600,8700,,4400,62.25,7.22,"N"

194

Disclosure of Energy Operating Cost Information: A Silver Bullet for Overcoming the Energy-Efficiency Gap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumers frequently act contrary to rational economic theory by overvaluing an initially higher purchase price while heavily discounting future energy operating costs. One opportunity to help limit the scale ......

Stefanie Lena Heinzle

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Predicting the energy use and operation cost of HVAC air filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model has been developed to predict the energy efficiency and annual operation cost for filters installed in an HVAC air handling system using filter data from standard ASHRAE 52.2-2007 filter tests. Thirty filters from six manufacturers were investigated to determine the most energy efficient and cost effective filtration solutions for an airport installation in Vancouver, Canada. A comparison of the output of the proposed model with the kep and Wattage methods was performed to highlight the possible differences in filter choice that would be made using alternative approaches. The outcomes have been shown to differ due to data not incorporated in the older models such as filtration efficiency and particulate concentration. The sensitivity of filter cost to model parameters was also studied. It was found that the concentration of particles in the air stream and the cost of electricity had the largest effect on annual cost of operation. Increasing the concentration of particles in the air stream increases the cost of operating the filter and causes the installation of a prefilter upstream of the primary filter to be more economically attractive. Increasing electricity cost also increases the operation cost but has the reverse effect on attractiveness of prefilter installations.

James F. Montgomery; Sheldon I. Green; Steven N. Rogak; Karen Bartlett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Computerized Maintenance Management Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) are a type of management software that perform functions in support of operations and maintenance (O&M) programs. The software automates most of the logistical functions performed by O&M staff.

197

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Geothermal Well Costs and their Sensitivities to Changes in Drilling and Completion Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. The basis for much of the analysis is a computer-simulation-based model which calculates and accrues operational costs involved in drilling and completing a well. Geothermal well costs are discussed in general, with special emphasis on variations among different geothermal areas in the United States, effects of escalation and inflation over the past few years, and comparisons of geothermal drilling costs with those for oil and gas wells. Cost differences between wells for direct use of geothermal energy and those for electric generation, are also indicated. In addition, a breakdown of total well cost into its components is presented. This provides an understanding of the relative contributions of different operations in drilling and completions. A major portion of the cost in many geothermal wells is from encountered troubles, such as lost circulation, cementing difficulties, and fishing. These trouble costs are considered through both specific examples and statistical treatment of drilling and completions problems. The sensitivities of well costs to variations in several drilling and completion parameters are presented. The mode1 makes it possible to easily vary parameters such as rates of penetration; bit lifetimes; bit rental, or rig costs; delay times; number of cement plugs; etc. are compared.

Carson, C. C.; Lin, Y.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

7/26/02 /home/lml/frame/hardware/EWGMaintenance.fm EWG Maintenance/Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, etc.). 2. Check all fluid levels prior to each day's operation. Fluids include gasoline, engine oil, and hydraulic fluid. The engine will shut down if oil level is low. The hydraulics will not work properly). Tighten as needed. Lock tightTM will work if problems persist. #12;

Barrash, Warren

202

Improving central heating plant performance at the defense construction supply center (DCSC): Advanced operation and maintenance methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A 1987 air pollution emissions test done by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA) identified several problems with the central heating plant (CHP) at the Defense Construction Supply Center (DCSC), Columbus, OH. Though DCSC repaired the specified problems, improved coal specifications, and tried to reduce air infiltration, CHP performance remained at unacceptable levels. Consequently, DCSC contracted the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) to apply advanced operation and maintenance procedures to improve its combustion system. This study employed a system-wide approach to evaluate the CHP 5 fuel storage, combustion, heat distribution, and the control of air emissions. Many short-term improvements to the CHP were identified and tested. Subsequent combustion and air emissions tests revealed that the recommended improvements successfully increased CHP efficiency. Long-term improvements were also recommended to help maintain the short-term improvements.

Savoie, M.J.; Standerfer, J.; Schmidt, C.M.; Gostich, J.; Mignacca, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor of Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 3 MW TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics) Mark-II research reactor of the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been operating at Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dhaka, since September 1986. Since its commissioning, the reactor has been used in various fields of research and utilisation, such as Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Neutron Radiography (NRG), Neutron Scattering (NS), manpower training and education, and production of radioisotopes for medical applications. The reactor facility encountered a couple of incidents, which were successfully handled by BAEC personnel. In some cases, the help of experts from various local organisations/institutions as well as from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was obtained. The upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor facility was completed in 2005 as per the format of the IAEA Safety Guide, SG-35-G1. The cooling system of the reactor as well as some parts of the instrumentations used in the reactor systems were also upgraded/modified during this period. The paper highlights the experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the research reactor for the last 21 years. It also presents some of the modification and upgrading works carried out to enhance the operational safety of the research reactor.

M.A. Zulquarnain; M.M. Haque; M.A. Salam; M.S. Islam; P.K. Saha; M.A. Sarder; A. Haque; M.A.M. Soner; M.M. Uddin; M.M. Rahman; I. Kamal; M.N. Islam; S.M. Hossain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED PAR38 Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The lumen depreciation and color shift of 38 different lamps (32 LED, 2 CFL, 1 ceramic metal halide [CMH], 3 halogen) were monitored in a specially developed automated long-term test apparatus (ALTA2) for nearly 14,000 hours. Five samples of each lamp model were tested, with measurements recorded on a weekly basis. The lamps were operated continuously at a target ambient temperature between 44C and 45C.

Royer, Michael P.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Benchmarking of maintenance performance: a case study in two manufacturers of furniture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......production speed and operating/running times...in equipment and personnel to avoid longer...usually provided by training. Using the five...conjunction with operating cost and OPE would...maintenance performance, operating and quality costs...1991) On the selection of condition based......

Basim Al-Najjar; Mats-Ola Hansson; Patrik Sunnegrdh

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluating capital and operating cost efficiency of offshore wind farms: A DEA approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An actual growth rate greater than 30% indicates that offshore wind is a reasonable alternative to other energy sources. The industry today is faced with the challenge of becoming competitive and thus significantly reduce the cost of electricity from offshore wind. This situation implies that the evaluation of costs incurred during development, installation and operation is one of the most pressing issues in this industry at the moment. Unfortunately, actual cost analyses suffer from less resilient input data and the application of simple methodologies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elevate the discussion, providing stakeholders with a sophisticated methodology and representative benchmark figures. The use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) allowed for plants to be modelled as entities and costs to be related to the main specifics, such as distance to shore and water depth, ensuring the necessary comparability. Moreover, a particularly reliable database was established using cost data from annual reports. Offshore wind capacity of 3.6GW was benchmarked regarding capital and operating cost efficiency, best-practice cost frontiers were determined, and the effects of learning-by-doing and economies of scale were investigated, ensuring that this article is of significant interest for the offshore wind industry.

Nikolaus Ederer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Operating Experience and Teardown Analysis for Engines Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20)  

SciTech Connect

In this study, eight engines and fuel systems were removed from trucks operating on B20 or diesel. Results indicate little difference in operational and maintenance costs between the B20- and diesel.

Fraer, R.; Dinh, H.; Proc, K.; McCormick, R. L.; Chandler, K.; Buchholz, B.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Top Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Efficiency Opportunities at DoD/Army Sites - A Guide for O&M/Energy Managers and Practitioners  

SciTech Connect

This report, sponsored the Army's Energy Engineering Analysis Program, provides the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Energy manager and practitioner with useful information about the top O&M opportunities consistently found across the DoD/Army sector. The target is to help the DoD/Army sector develop a well-structured and organized O&M program.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Dean, Jesse D.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

212

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

Schrijver, Karel

213

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter Christoph Weber, Chair of Energy Management, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany Rüdiger Barth & Heike Brand, Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy, University of Stuttgart, Germany Abstract

214

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

215

DOE Backup Power Working Group Best Practices Handbook for Maintenance and Operation of Engine Generators, Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The lubricating oil system provides a means to introduce a lubricant in the form of a film to reduce friction and wear between surfaces that bear against each other as they move.1 The oil film which is established also cools the parts by carrying generated heat away from hot surfaces, cleans and carries dirt or metal wear particles to the filter media, and helps seal the piston to the cylinder during combustion. Most systems are pressure lubricated and distribute oil under pressure to bearings, gears, and power assemblies. Lubricating oil usually reaches main, connecting rod, and camshaft bearings through drilled passages in the cylinder block and crankshaft or through piping and common manifolds.Many parts rely on oil for cooling, so if the lube oil system fails to perform its function the engine will overheat. Metal to metal surfaces not separated by a thin film of oil rapidly build up frictional heat. As the metals reach their melting point, they tend to weld together in spots or streaks. Lube oil system failures can cause significant damage to an engine in a short period of time. Proper maintenance and operation of the lubricating oil system is essential if your engine is to accomplish its mission.

Gross, R.E.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Operation and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Final inspection checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Charging With Refrigerant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Calculating R410A cha

van Hemmen, J. Leo

217

Capturing the impact of fuel price on jet aircraft operating costs with Leontief technology and econometric models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of the airline response to a fuel price increase is in effect an investigation of the role of variable interactions in aircraft cost models. We examine the impact of fuel price on aircraft costs and airline operational strategies by developing two classes of operating cost models for jet aircraft and comparing the results. The translog operating cost model is a flexible functional form that provides a detailed representation of the empirical relationship between fuel cost and operating cost, allowing for substitution, scale, aircraft age, and variable interactions to be captured. The simpler Leontief model assumes that inputs of a cost model must be used in fixed proportions regardless of their prices. While it does not capture variable interactions, the Leontief model is more transparent, requires fewer inputs, and allows the contribution of a single factor, such as fuel price, to operating cost to be more easily isolated. An analysis of the translog operating cost model reveals that as fuel price increases, airlines will take steps to use fuel more efficiently by leveraging other inputs; a comparison of the translog and the Leontief technology models, however, show that the potential for this supplier input substitution for fuel is rather modest. By building the two operating cost models and comparing their predictions, we illustrate a method to determine the prediction potential of a Leontief technology model and assess the importance of input substitution at the vehicle level.

Megan Smirti Ryerson; Mark Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reliability-Centered Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability-Centered Maintenance Reliability-Centered Maintenance Reliability-Centered Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:48am Addthis Reliability-centered maintenance leverages the same practices and technologies of predictive maintenance. The difference is that reliability-centered maintenance recognizes that: Equipment design and operations differ Different equipment has different probabilities of failure All equipment is not of equal importance to facility operations Facilities have limited financial and personnel resources. While reliability-centered maintenance relies on predictive maintenance practices and technologies, it also recognizes that maintenance on inexpensive and/or unimportant equipment may be better served by a reactive or predictive maintenance approach. Each of the aforementioned factors are

219

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Costs Operations and Maintenance Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent operations and maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology operations and maintenance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintenance Types Maintenance Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types Resources Contacts

222

Preventive Maintenance Strategies for Compressed Air Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet discusses preventive maintenance strategies for compressed air systems to avoid high equipment repair and replacement costs.

223

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Subsea pipeline operational risk management  

SciTech Connect

Resources used for inspection, maintenance, and repair of a subsea pipeline must be allocated efficiently in order to operate it in the most cost effective manner. Operational risk management aids in resource allocation through the use of risk assessments and cost/benefit analyses. It identifies those areas where attention must be focused in order to reduce risk. When they are identified, a company`s resources (i.e., personnel, equipment, money, and time) can then be used for inspection, maintenance, and/or repair of the pipeline. The results are cost effective risk reduction and pipeline operation with minimum expenditure.

Bell, R.L.; Lanan, G.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money (Revision)  

SciTech Connect

Operating a typical school today is no easy task for facilities managers and business officials. You're expected to deliver increased services with constrained operating budgets. Many schools stay open for longer hours to accommodate community use of the facilities. Dilapidated buildings and systems gobble up energy, yet in many districts, maintenance needs are overshadowed by the need for expansion or new construction to serve growing student populations and changing educational needs.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

227

Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preventive Preventive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Preventive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

228

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reactive Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

230

Metabolic systems cost-benefit analysis for interpreting network structure and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......metabolic pathways The trade-off between capital investment costs and operating costs...and do not include maintenance energy expenditures. The in silico representation of the...operating costs were defined as the expenditure of substrate, either glucose or oxygen......

Ross P. Carlson

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Predictive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types Resources

232

CRAD, Maintenance Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance Assessment Plan Maintenance Assessment Plan CRAD, Maintenance Assessment Plan Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of parts, materials, and services needed to support the

233

Collector Field Maintenance: Distributed Solar Thermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on recent operation and maintenance experiences with distributed solar thermal systems. Although some information on system-...

E. C. Boes; E. C. Cameron; E. L. Harley

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Remote maintenance  

SciTech Connect

A general description is given of the study of maintenance design in reactor designs. The Fusion Experimental Reactor and INTOR-J are discussed in terms of simplicity in remote maintenance design, and a figure shows one of the designs of a torus sector configuration for the Fusion Experimental Reactor. An R-tokamak which is under design is a D-T burning device with a Q less than unity. Technical issues are listed and it is suggested that a long-range plan for fusion remote maintenance should be implemented. A multijoint inspection system and a remote maintenance simulation test model of the divertor module are shown.

Kazawa, Y.; Tachikawa, K.; Tone, T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems  

SciTech Connect

A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reliability centered maintenance (RCM) for substations project overview  

SciTech Connect

An EPRI Tailored Collaboration project establishing guidelines and tools for implementing Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) in substations is nearing completion and final results are being presented at this Substation RCM Conference. The ultimate goal of this RCM project is to help utilities slash substation operations and maintenance costs by optimizing equipment maintenance intervals. Preventive maintenance (PM) programs typically have been developed on a component-by-component basis, relying heavily on equipment vendors` maintenance recommendations. RCM is a logical alternative to traditional PM programs. It is intelligent, common sense maintenance that is function-based rather than component-based. First developed by the airline industry in the 1960s and further developed and applied to the nuclear industry by EPRI in the 1980s, RCM ranks the importance of each function of a system, calculates the impact the loss of the function would have on the overall system, and drives the design of appropriate maintenance tasks for each function. The nuclear industry reaped savings of at least 25% by adopting RCM, and one utility that tried this approach for substation maintenance reported savings of 13% in one year.

Lyons, P.F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computerized Computerized Maintenance Management Systems to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

238

A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time  

SciTech Connect

A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Toward mitigating wind-uncertainty costs in power system operation: A demand response exchange market framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The intermittent nature of the wind generation poses an obstacle to high penetration of wind energy in electric power systems. Demand response (DR) increases the flexibility of the power system by allowing very fast upward/downward changes in the demand. This potential can be interpreted as the ability to provide fast upward/downward reserves, facilitating the utilization of the wind power in the power system. Demand response exchange (DRX) market is a separate market in which DR is treated as a virtual resource to be exchanged between DR buyers and sellers. The major advantage of the DRX market in comparison to other DR proposals is that it allocates benefits and payments across all participants, fairly. However, there are still obstacles to its integration into the existing power markets. This paper proposes a short-term framework for DRX market that considers the interactions between the DRX market and energy/reserve markets. The proposed framework is aimed at reducing the operational costs incurred by the uncertainty of the wind power and providing a fair mechanism for valuation of the DR as a virtual resource. A stochastic programming model is used to clear the DRX market considering the wind power production scenarios. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed DRX market framework, it is implemented on a simple and a realistic case study.

Javad Saebi; Mohammad Hossein Javidi; Majid Oloomi Buygi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

INTOR critical issue D: maintainability. Tritium containment and personnel access vs remote maintenance, Chapter VI of the US INTOR report for Phase Two A, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to compare the benefits and costs associated with personnel access mmaintenance procedures compared to those of all-remote maintenance procedures. The INTOR Phase Two A, Part I configuration was used to make this comparison. For both approaches, capital and operating costs were considered to first order, maintenance equipment requirements were investigated, maintenance requirements common to both approaches and unique to each were identified, tritium handling requirements were outlined, and maintenance scenarios and device downtime were developed for both. In addition, estimates of person-rem exposure were made for the personnel access approach.

Spampinato, P.T.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, Y.; Yang, S.T.; Stasko, R.R.; Morrison, C.; Russell, S.; Shaw, G.; Bussell, G.T.; Watts, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Risk-based decision making method for maintenance policy selection of thermal power plant equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a decision-making method for maintenance policy selection of power plants equipment. The method is based on risk analysis concepts. The method first step consists in identifying critical equipment both for power plant operational performance and availability based on risk concepts. The second step involves the proposal of a potential maintenance policy that could be applied to critical equipment in order to increase its availability. The costs associated with each potential maintenance policy must be estimated, including the maintenance costs and the cost of failure that measures the critical equipment failure consequences for the power plant operation. Once the failure probabilities and the costs of failures are estimated, a decision-making procedure is applied to select the best maintenance policy. The decision criterion is to minimize the equipment cost of failure, considering the costs and likelihood of occurrence of failure scenarios. The method is applied to the analysis of a lubrication oil system used in gas turbines journal bearings. The turbine has more than 150MW nominal output, installed in an open cycle thermoelectric power plant. A design modification with the installation of a redundant oil pump is proposed for lubricating oil system availability improvement.

F.G. Carazas; G.F.M. Souza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

An evaluation of reduced amounts of advance traffic control for short duration and stop-and-go maintenance operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at this level of the driving task include maps, guide signs and other landmarks. 13 Positive Guidance (12, 13) is an engineering tool designed to enhance the safety and operational efficiency of hazardous locations. The concept of Positive Guidance... is that given sufficient information drivers may avoid becoming involved in an accident at a hazardous location . The Positive Guidance concept recognizes the different levels of driver performance with the guidance level taking "primacy" over...

Balke, Kevin Neil

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology  

SciTech Connect

The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

1994-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

Preventive Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preventive maintenance aims to sustain and/or extend system lifespan through a set of actions that detect, preclude, or mitigate system degradation. These actions are based on either calendar time or machine run time.

247

Predictive Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Predictive maintenance aims to detect equipment degradation and address problems as they arise. The result indicates potential issues, which are controlled or eliminated prior to any significant system deterioration.

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - airline operating costs Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2011) Evaluating Delay Cost Functions with Summary: RFSFS Median of FSFS ratios Rmin Median of minimum ratios...

249

Modernising underground compressed air DSM projects to reduce operating costs / Christiaan Johannes Roux Kriel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing demand for electricity forces suppliers to expand their generation capacity. Financing these expansion programmes results in electricity cost increases above inflation rates. By reducing (more)

Kriel, Christiaan Johannes Roux

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Laboratory services series: a programmed maintenance system  

SciTech Connect

The diverse facilities, operations and equipment at a major national research and development laboratory require a systematic, analytical approach to operating equipment maintenance. A computer-scheduled preventive maintenance program is described including program development, equipment identification, maintenance and inspection instructions, scheduling, personnel, and equipment history.

Tuxbury, D.C.; Srite, B.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

HVAC filtration for controlling infectious airborne disease transmission in indoor environments: Predicting risk reductions and operational costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes and applies a methodology for estimating the impact of recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) particle filters on the control of size-resolved infectious aerosols in indoor environments using a modified version of the Wells-Riley model for predicting risks of infectious disease transmission. Estimates of risk reductions and associated operational costs of both HVAC filtration and equivalent outdoor air ventilation are modeled and compared using a case study of airborne transmission of influenza in a hypothetical office space. Overall, recirculating HVAC filtration was predicted to achieve risk reductions at lower costs of operation than equivalent levels of outdoor air ventilation, particularly for MERV 1316 filters. Medium efficiency filtration products (MERV 711) are also inexpensive to operate but appear less effective in reducing infectious disease risks.

Parham Azimi; Brent Stephens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Energy-efficient evaporators can cut operating costs for wastewater treatment, reuse  

SciTech Connect

High-efficiency evaporators can substantially lower the costs of recycling water, separating and reducing waste, and reclaiming industrial byproducts. Although capital costs run higher than conventional, stream-driven systems, energy efficient designs can allow users to recoup those costs over time and provide significant, ongoing utility savings. This is especially true in applications in which evaporation requirements are more than 75,000 pounds per hour, and steam costs exceed $3 per 1,000 pounds. In conventional, multistage evaporators, vapor resulting from wastewater evaporation is reused as a heating agent to effect further evaporation, but fresh steam must be added continuously to the system to maintain adequate temperature and pressure--two factors critical to evaporation. In contrast, three energy-efficient designs maintain temperature and pressure by recycling otherwise wasted resources, thereby greatly reducing or eliminating steam costs and other utility expenses.

Kersey, D. [Dedert Corp., Olympia Fields, IL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

257

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

258

Reliability-Centered Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reliability-centered maintenance leverages the same practices and technologies of predictive maintenance.

259

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 1, 2004 through to April 14, 2004 and a total of 250,249 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2002 egg source and included captive brood (133,781) and conventional (116,468) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2004 began May 10, the first Chinook was captured on May 19, 2004 and the last Chinook was captured on September 16, 2004. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2004. A total of 1,091 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 299 natural origin fish and 792 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 46 natural and 69 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to Lookingglass Hatchery for holding and spawning, 537 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 447 hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 107 adults retained (eight additional hatchery females were collected and then later returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally) for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 22 natural females and 30 supplementation females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 221,889 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 94.9% which yielded a total of 210,661 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,267 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage and then transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they will be reared to the fingerling stage. They will then be transported back to LGH and reared to the smolt stage and then transported to the Lostine acclimation facility for release in the spring of 2006. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 3, 2003 through to April 14, 2003 and a total of 242,776 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2001 egg source and included captive broodstock (141,860) and conventional broodstock (100,916) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2003 began April 30th, the first Chinook was captured on May 16, 2003 and the last Chinook was captured on September 21, 2003. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2003. A total of 464 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 239 natural origin fish and 225 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 45 natural and 4 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 366 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 49 hatchery origin adult jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 49 adults retained for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 21 natural females and no hatchery origin females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 106,609 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 95.50% which yielded a total of 101,811 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 5,077 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage. At eye they were transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they were reared to the fingerling state at which time they were transported back to LGH until they were smolts in the spring of 2005. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2005.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from 3/5/07 through to 4/17/07 and a total of 230,010 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2005 egg source and included captive brood (24,604) and conventional (205,406) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2007 began May 14th. The first Chinook was captured on June 2, 2007 and the last Chinook was captured on September 25, 2007. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2007. A total of 637 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 240 natural origin fish and 397 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 41 natural and 81 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 403 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and only hatchery origin jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek in underseeded habitat. Of the 122 adult fish retained for broodstock, 20 natural females and 40 supplementation females were represented in spawning. The eggs from these females produced a total of 267,350 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 86.73% which yielded a total of 231,882 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,456 eggs per female. These eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until they are smolts in the spring of 2009. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2009. Due to the success of the 2007 egg collection, the number of fish produced exceeded program needs and facility capabilities. As a result, there are plans to outplant fry in 2008 and parr in early 2009 to underseeded habitat in the Wallowa River.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

267

Computerized Maintenance Management Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Operations & Maintenance » Computerized Program Areas » Operations & Maintenance » Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Computerized Maintenance Management Systems October 7, 2013 - 9:35am Addthis Computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) are a type of management software that perform functions in support of operations and maintenance (O&M) programs. The software automates most of the logistical functions performed by O&M staff. Capabilities Typical CMMS functions depend on the complexity of the system chosen. Examples include: Work order generation, prioritization, and tracking by equipment and/or component. Work orders often can be sorted by equipment, date, person responding, etc. Tracking scheduled and unscheduled maintenance activities Storing technical documentation and maintenance procedures by

268

Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality in the US Cleanup costs and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the costs of controlling some of the environmental impacts of motor vehicle transportation on groundwater and on surface waters. We estimate that annualized costs of cleaning-up leaking underground storage tanks range from $0.8 billion to $2.1 billion per year over 10years. Annualized costs of controlling highway runoff from principal arterials in the US are much larger: they range from $2.9 billion to $15.6 billion per year over 20years (1.68.3% of annualized highway transportation expenditures). Some causes of non-point source pollution were unintentionally created by regulations or could be addressed by simple design changes of motor vehicles. A review of applicable measures suggests that effective policies should combine economic incentives, information campaigns, and enforcement, coupled with preventive environmental measures. In general, preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be much cheaper than cleaning it up.

Hilary Nixon; Jean-Daniel Saphores

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

270

Dealing With Load and Generation Cost Uncertainties in Power System Operation Studies: A Fuzzy Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are currently facing a change of the paradigm that determined their operation and planning while being surrounded by multiple uncertainties sources. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainty is ...

Bruno Andr Gomes; Joo Tom Saraiva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft OperatingCapturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operatingare in part due to fuel price uncertainty. To address this

Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliability-Centered Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reliability-Centered Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems

274

16.2 - Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non-Management and Operating Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) 1 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non- Management and Operating Contracts [Reference: FAR 6, FAR 16, FAR 22, FAR 32, FAR 46, DEAR 915.404-4-72, DEAR 916.405-2, DEAR 970.1504-1, and Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.1] Overview The policy of the DOE is to maximize contractor performance and to align costs with performance through the use of performance-based management as a strategic contract management tool to plan for, manage, and evaluate contractor performance. An important function of contract administration is the ability, or the opportunity, to manage the environment within which the contracted effort is proceeding and, most importantly, to facilitate adjustments to that effort to meet the demand and changes as

275

An approach to measuring the quality of maintenance performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Transportation cost. NbM = Cost of salaries. Ny = Price of selling...finished product. ai = Initial cost of production associated to department i. di...maintenance performance in oil and gas production assets: theoretical architecture......

S. A. Oke; M. K. O. Ayomoh; I. O. Oyedokun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

277

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Maintenance Edge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintenance Edge Maintenance Edge Maintenance Edge logo Maintenance Edge is a suite of online Software as a Service (SaaS) facility management tools that gives control and management over buildings without a capital investment. Maintenance Edge enables you to combine work order, planned maintenance, work order wireless, and critical alarms with the option of adding inventory. Fully implemented, Maintenance Edge will cut labor time, increase energy efficiencies, save on capital expenditures, and save on budget and management time. Features include: easy/user-friendly work order requesting, unlimited users, seven different user roles (limits data users can see), no capital or hardware costs required, access to data anywhere anytime, easy-to-click reporting on all the data in your system,

278

Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends  

SciTech Connect

Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

Fedder, R. [Rexnord Industries, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Substations reliability-centered maintenance and predictive maintenance - a strategic partnership  

SciTech Connect

A maintenance optimization study for substation components can be most effective when Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Analysis is combined with a Predictive Maintenance (PDM) Assessment. If the two processes are performed concurrently, the benefit-to-cost ratios for each is increased. Also, the cost of implementing RCM recommendations for condition monitoring can be minimized, while maximizing their impact at the same time. This paper presents the essential elements of both the RCM and PDM processes, and describes how they work together in a substation environment as a comprehensive maintenance assessment tool. Descriptions of recent experiences are also included.

Colsher, R.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Eddystone, PA (United States); Abbott, P.D.; Matusheski, R.L. [EPRI & MD Center, Eddystone, PA (United States); Smith, S.B. [ERIN Engineering & Research, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Microsoft Word - maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Maintenance Checklist System Maintenance Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers and other information system developers and maintainers with guidance in identifying and planning system maintenance activities. The objectives of system maintenance are summarized as: C Resolution of errors, faults, and failures. C The requirements for system maintenance initiates lifecycle changes. The change is remapped and executed, thereby treating the maintenance process as iterations of development. Rev: 09/02 1 Maintenance Checklist SEM Reference Comments " A procedure exists for handling emergency changes that cannot be implemented as part of a scheduled release. Chapter 10 Maintenance " An identification number is assigned to the modification.

283

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

284

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services' current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

Bright, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number_sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services` current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

Bright, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Industrial heat pumps: types and costs  

SciTech Connect

Many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps are not being pursued because of confusion regarding both energy savings and economics. Part of this confusion stems from the variety of heat pumps available and the fact that the measure of merit, the coefficient of performance (COP), is commonly defined in at least three different ways. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, a simple categorization was developed based on the commonly accepted COP definitions. Using this categorization, the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps was examined. Examples were evaluated in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs. Heat pumps from the various categories were then compared on the basis of economics.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect

Many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps are not being pursued because of confusion regarding both energy savings and economics. Part of this confusion stems from the variety of heat pumps available and the fact that the measure of merit, the coefficient of performance (COP) is commonly defined in at least three different ways. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, a simple categorization was developed based on the commonly accepted COP definitions. Using this categorization, the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps was examined. Examples were evaluated in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs. Heat pumps from the various categories were then compared on the basis of economics. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Predictive Maintenance Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

290

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Test suite prioritization by cost-based combinatorial interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Quality and Operations Management (SREQOM), India and The Division of Operation and Maintenance, Lulea

Bryce, Renee

291

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

292

Silica Scale Management: Lowering Operating Costs through Improved Scale Control, and Adding Value by Extracting Marketable By-Products  

SciTech Connect

We are using laboratory and field experiments to design modeling tools and technology that will improve silica scale management practices in geothermal plants. Our work will help to lower operating costs through improved scale prediction and add new revenue streams from sale of mineral byproducts extracted from geothermal fluids. Improving the economics and effectiveness of scale control programs and/or extraction systems in geothermal operations requires a coupled kinetic-thermodynamic model of silica behavior. Silica scale precipitation is a multi-step process, involving a nucleation-related induction period, aqueous polymerization, condensation of polymers to form colloids, and deposition onto a solid surface. Many chemical and physical variables influence the rates of these steps and their impacts must be quantified and predictable in order to optimally control silica behavior. To date, in laboratory studies, we have quantified the effects on silica polymerization of the following set of chemical variables: Na at 500 and 2000 ppm, pH values from 5 to 9, temperatures of 25 and 50 C, and silica saturation values from 1.2 to 6 at initial dissolved silica concentrations of 600 ppm. Lowering pH both increases the induction time prior to polymerization and decreases the polymerization rate. We have successfully used a multiple regression model to predict polymerization rates from these variables. Geothermal fluids contain significant dissolved concentrations of potentially valuable mineral resources such as zinc, lithium, cesium and rubidium, but silica fouling interferes with traditional extraction methods. We are developing customized and new technologies to extract the silica as a commercial-grade commodity as well as the valuable metals. We are conducting field testing of some of these techniques at a Mammoth, CA geothermal plant using a reverse osmosis unit to concentrate the fluid, adding a commercial agglomerating agent to promote silica precipitation, and then removing the silica using a tangential flow ultrafilter. The particle size, surface area and trace impurities of the silica are characterized for comparison with commercial-grade silica products. We are also testing ion exchange resins and other functionalized materials to extract potentially economic concentrations of lithium, cesium, and rubidium that are enriched in the reverse osmosis concentrate.

Burton, E A; Bourcier, W L; Wallce, A; Bruton, C J; Leif, R

2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electric Motor Maintenance & Repair for Long Term Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy costs to operate electric motors can be a significant part of an operating budget. For example, a recent survey of California water departments reveals energy costs for pumping and treating water may be 25% of operating costs. Strategies...

Brithinee, W. P.

294

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

295

Performance and Costs of CO2 Capture at Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarises the results from a study that assesses the performance and costs of natural gas fired combined cycle power plants with CCS. Information is provided on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Discussion and commentary on the key findings and recommendations is also included. The paper includes information on base load plant performance and costs, but part load performance and costs of operation at low annual capacity factors are also presented because operation at lower load factors may be necessary, particularly in future electricity systems that include high amounts of other low-CO2 generation plants.

Neil Smith; Geoff Miller; Indran Aandi; Richard Gadsden; John Davison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reliability-based maintenance evaluations and standard preventive maintenance programs  

SciTech Connect

Due to recent issuance of 10CFR50.65, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission maintenance rule (Rule), and the [open quotes]Industry Guideline for Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants[close quotes] prepared by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council, many utilities are undertaking review or evaluation of current preventive maintenance (PM) programs. Although PM optimization and documentation are not specifically required by the Rule, an appropriate and effective PM program (PMP) will be the cornerstone of the successful and cost-effective implementation of the Rule. Currently, a project is being conducted at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VYNPS) in conjunction with Quadrex Energy Services to evaluate, optimize, and document the PMP. The project began in March 1993 and is scheduled for completion in mid-1995. The initial scope for the project is the evaluation of those structures, systems, and components that are within the scope of the Rule. Because of the number of systems to be evaluated ([approximately]50), the desired completion schedule, and cost considerations, a streamlined approach to PM optimization and documentation is being utilized.

Varno, M. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp., Vernon, VT (United States)); McKinley, M. (Quadrex Energy Services Corp., Campbell, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Maintenance Management Program for DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To define the program for the management of cost-effective maintenance of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Guidance for compliance with this Order is contained in DOE G 433.1-1, Nuclear Facility Maintenance Management Program Guide for use with DOE O 433.1, which references Federal regulations, DOE directives, and industry best practices using a graded approach to clarify requirements and guidance for maintaining DOE-owned Government property. (Cancels DOE 4330.4B, Chapter II, Maintenance Management Program, dated 2-10-94.) Cancels DOE 4330.4B (in part). Canceled by DOE O 433.1A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Maintenance and Veg Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Reauthorization of Transmission Line Permits, Maintenance and Vegetation Management on Forest Service Lands in Colorado,...

299

Development of an Efficient Maintenance Scheme for Peak Efficiency of Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractPresently the world has enormous advancement in science and technology the topic considered here is just a drop out of an ocean of knowledge. Higher product quality, better reliability, better availability of plants, optimization of cost and efficient working of boilers is the chief concern now a days. Generally the production can be increased by the efficient use of boilers and hence there is a lot of scope to minimize the boiler operation cost. A boiler maintenance improvement program must include two aspects: (1) action to bring the boiler to peak efficiency and (2) action to maintain the efficiency at the maximum level. Good maintenance and efficiency start with having a working knowledge of the components associated with the boiler, keeping records, etc., and end with cleaning heat transfer surfaces, adjusting the air-to-fuel ratio, etc. A well-planned maintenance program avoids unnecessary down time or costly repairs. It also promotes safety and aids boiler code and local inspectors. An inspection schedule listing the procedures should be established. Thus in this paper an attempt is made to develop an efficient maintenance scheme by which boilers can be used with peak efficiency.

Amit Kumar Jain; Anupam Singhal

300

CBE UFAD cost analysis tool: Life cycle cost model, issues and assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Maintenance and Repair Cost Reference. WhitestoneJ. Wallis and H. Lin. 2008. CBE UFAD Cost Analysis Tool:UFAD First Cost Model, Issues and Assumptions. Center for

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

American Red Cross VOLUNTEER SERVICE AGREEMENT FOR DISASTER OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Red Cross VOLUNTEER SERVICE AGREEMENT FOR DISASTER OPERATIONS I and maintenance costs will be reimbursed by the American Red Cross, pursuant to Staff Reimbursement Procedures the American Red Cross while I am performing disaster relief work. Furthermore, I understand and accept that

Wu, Shin-Tson

302

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Building 9401-2 Plating Shop Surveillance and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a plan for implementing surveillance and maintenance (S and M) activities to ensure that Building 9401-2 Plating Shop is maintained in a cost effective and environmentally secure configuration until subsequent closure during the final disposition phase of decommissioning. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G430.1A-2, Surveillance and Maintenance During Facility Disposition (1997), was used as guidance in the development of this plan. The S and M Plan incorporates DOE O 430.1A, Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM) (1998a) direction to provide for conducting surveillance and maintenance activities required to maintain the facility and remaining hazardous and radioactive materials, wastes, and contamination in a stable and known condition pending facility disposition. Recommendations in the S and M plan have been made that may not be requirement-based but would reduce the cost and frequency of surveillance and maintenance activities. During the course of S and M activities, the facility's condition may change so as to present an immediate or developing hazard or unsatisfactory condition. Corrective action should be coordinated with the appropriate support organizations using the requirements and guidance stated in procedure Y10-202, Rev. 1, Integrated Safety Management Program, (Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), 1998a) implemented at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the methodology of the Nuclear Operations Conduct of Operations Manual (LMES, 1999) for the Depleted Uranium Operations (DUO) organization. The key S and M objectives applicable to the Plating Shop are to: Ensure adequate containment of remaining residual material in exhaust stacks and outside process piping, stored chemicals awaiting offsite shipment, and items located in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA); Provide access control into the facility and physical safety to S and M personnel; Maintain the facility in a manner that will protect the public, the environment, and the S and M personnel; Provide an S and M plan which identifies and complies with applicable environmental, safety, and health safeguards and security requirements; and Provide a cost effective S and M program for the plating shop, Building 9401-2.

None

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE LEADS TO EARLY DETECTION AT WIPP SITE | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE LEADS TO EARLY DETECTION AT WIPP SITE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE LEADS TO EARLY DETECTION AT WIPP SITE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE LEADS TO EARLY DETECTION AT WIPP SITE September 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis The new wire rope before installation. The new wire rope before installation. URS Washington TRU Solutions operations and maintenance crews demonstrate exceptional performance to replace a steel rope. URS Washington TRU Solutions operations and maintenance crews demonstrate exceptional performance to replace a steel rope. The new wire rope before installation. URS Washington TRU Solutions operations and maintenance crews demonstrate exceptional performance to replace a steel rope. Carlsbard, NM - The effectiveness of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) preventive maintenance program paid huge dividends late last month

305

Productivity and cost of harvesting a stemwood biomass product from integrated cut-to-length harvest operations in Australian Pinus radiata plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Significant quantities of woody biomass from the tops of trees and larger woody waste pieces that fall outside existing sawlog and pulpwood specifications are left on site post final harvest in Australian radiata Pinus radiata (D. Don) (radiata pine) plantations. Woody biomass is a potential product for pulp making or energy generation. Commercial use of woody biomass from radiata pine plantations would add extra value to the Australian plantation estate through improved resource utilisation, and potentially reduced post-harvesting silvicultural costs. This study investigated the productivity and cost impact of the harvest and extraction to roadside of woody biomass in an integrated harvest operation in a typical Australian two machine (harvester/processor and forwarder), cut-to-length, clearfall operation in a mature, thinned radiata pine plantation. The harvest operation yielded 23GMt/ha (5% of the total yield) of woody biomass (known as fibreplus), 443GMt/ha of sawlogs and 28GMt/ha of pulpwood. The mean quantity of biomass left on site was 128GMt/ha, mainly consisting of branches and needles, sufficient to minimise nutrient loss and protect the soil from erosion. Woodchips derived from the fibreplus product were suitable for kraft pulp making, (when blended in small amounts with clean de-barked roundwood woodchips), and for energy generation. The method trialed with the fibreplus product being produced did not impact harvesting and processing productivity and costs, but extraction was 14% less productive. Through analysis of the productivities of each phase and development of a cost model the harvest and extraction of the fibreplus product was estimated to increase total unit costs by ?4.9%.

D. Walsh; M. Strandgard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Predictive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance Maintenance Predictive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:46am Addthis Predictive maintenance aims to detect equipment degradation and address problems as they arise. The result indicates potential issues, which are controlled or eliminated prior to any significant system deterioration. Predictive maintenance differs from preventive maintenance because maintenance is based on the condition of the machine instead of a preset schedule. This eliminates the unneeded maintenance concerns of preventive programs. Several predictive maintenance technologies are available. Federal agencies can leverage a combination of these technologies within their maintenance programs. Advantages A well-executed predictive maintenance program can almost eliminate catastrophic equipment failure because issues are identified and eliminated

307

MaintenanceRecords  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7BA003539 7BA003539 Maintenance Sheet for 2011 Hyundai Sonata Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity HEV Fleet Testing Date Mileage Description Cost 7/19/2011 5,720 Changed oil and filter $14.67 10/12/2011 11,152 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires $60.49 10/21/2011 12,342 Upgraded ECU (TG5), replaced NVLD pressure sensor (TG6), and replaced cooling fan resistor (TG8) warranty 11/21/2011 16,442 Changed oil and filter $43.22 12/20/2011 22,497 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires $56.85 1/24/2012 28,205 Changed oil and filter $41.85 2/6/2012 30,100 30K service $109.16 2/9/2012 30,460 Recall: replaced two high voltage connectors at the HPCU n/c 2/27/2012 33,208 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires $56.85 3/24/2012 40,809 Changed oil and filter $41.85 4/20/2012 47,580 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires

308

Risk-based Multiobjective Optimization Model for Bridge Maintenance Planning  

SciTech Connect

Determining the optimal maintenance plan is essential for successful bridge management. The optimization objectives are defined in the forms of minimizing life-cycle cost and maximizing performance indicators. Previous bridge maintenance models assumed the process of bridge deterioration and the estimate of maintenance cost are deterministic, i.e., known with certainty. This assumption, however, is invalid especially with estimates over a long time horizon of bridge life. In this study, we consider the risks associated with bridge deterioration and maintenance cost in determining the optimal maintenance plan. The decisions variables include the strategic choice of essential maintenance (such as silane treatment and cathodic protection), and the intervals between periodic maintenance. A epsilon-constrained Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm is used to approximate the tradeoff between life-cycle cost and performance indicators. During stochastic search for optimal solutions, Monte-Carlo simulation is used to evaluate the impact of risks on the objective values, at an acceptance level of reliability. The proposed model can facilitate decision makers to select the compromised maintenance plan with a group of alternative choices, each of which leads to a different level of performance and life-cycle cost. A numerical example is used to illustrate the proposed model.

Yang, I-T. [Associate Professor, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (China); Hsu, Y.-S.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

FACTORS AFFECTING THE SAFE AND EFFICIENT OPERATION OF BAGASSE/COAL FIRED WATERTUBE BOILERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper covers various aspects relating to the operation and maintenance of bagasse/coal fired watertube boilers which, if properly implemented, will ensure that the boiler operates safely at optimal performance while maintenance and operating costs are minimised. The current philosophies on instrumentation and controls are discussed. This includes combustion and drum level control loops as well as interlocks and safety devices. Operating problems due to unbalanced steam line pressure drops are covered, and recommendations are given for the design of steam lines. The importance of training courses for operating and maintenance personnel is emphasised, including the day-to-day aspects of proper boiler operation. An overview of present and proposed legal requirements for operating, maintaining and repairing boilers in South Africa is also given.

H Verbanck; K Mcintyre; Q Engelbrecht

310

Maintenance and operation of the U.S. DOE Alternative Fuel Center. Final subcontract report, 5 August 1994--4 August 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Alternative Fuel Utilization Program (AFUP). The AFC is designed to provide drum quantities of finished transportation fuels from a variety of sources. DOE funded the design, construction, and installation of a hydrogenation pilot plant capable of performing a range of hydrotreating, reforming, and hydrocracking operations. Southwest Research Institute provided the building, utilities, and laboratory and safety systems needed for the pilot plant. The AFC work reported here contributes to the two primary objectives of the AFUP: data for alternative-fuel-capable vehicles to enhance energy security, and data for controlling emissions for improved air quality.

Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Home Maintenance Manual.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. College Station , Texas l Introduction A regular program of maintenance inspections can help homeowners identify and correct problems before they become serious. Unfortunately, a maintenance problem ignored becomes a major repair. Preventive... maintenance can extend the life of materials and equipment and will be less expensive in the long run than replacement. Maintaining a home need not be difficult, but it requires a regular program of inspection to identify and correct problems before...

Anonymous,

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

HVAC Maintenance and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the HVAC maintenance and technologies, and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

313

SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE RBSM The Requirements Based Surveillance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND MAINTENANCE AND MAINTENANCE RBSM The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process Surveillance and Maintenance Overview What is RBSM and why do I need this process? Who has used this process so far? A Summary of RBSM results across the DOE complex Viewing a sample RBSM report Performing RBSM at your facility RBSM Guidance package Surveillance and Maintenance Overview Overall direction for surveillance and maintenance of excess facilities is addressed in DOE G 430.1-2, IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE FOR SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE DURING FACILITY TRANSITION AND DISPOSITION. In addition, the change in mission and operation of an excess facility should stimulate a review of surveillance and maintenance to determine what efficiencies can be gained as a result of the change.

314

Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process (RBSM) Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process (RBSM) Overall direction for surveillance and maintenance of excess facilities is addressed in DOE G 430.1-2, IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE FOR SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE DURING FACILITY TRANSITION AND DISPOSITION. In addition, the change in mission and operation of an excess facility should stimulate a review of surveillance and maintenance to determine what efficiencies can be gained as a result of the change. Such a review can be applied to facilities that undergoing stabilization, those intended for deactivation, and others destined for decommissioning. The material that follows provides

315

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money  

SciTech Connect

Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

Energy Smart Schools Team

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

Steam driven centrifugal pump for low cost boiler feed service  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a steam driven centrifugal pump for boiler feed-water and other high pressure water applications, which was awarded Top Honors in the special pumps category of the 1982 Chemical processing Vaaler competition, because the simple design with turbine, pump and controls combined in an integral unit provides high operating efficiency and reliable performance with minimal maintenance. Single source responsibility for all components when the pump may have to be serviced is another advantage. These features meet the requirements for boiler feed pumps that are critical to maintaining a consistent steam supply in a process plant where downtime can be extremely expensive. The annual cost to operate the pump for 8000 hours is about $100,000, if electricity costs 5 cents/kwh. These pumps can be run for about $30,000 on steam, if natural gas costs $4.00/mcf. Cost savings are $70,000 annually.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. leadacid, NaS, Li-ion, and NiCd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gas turbine performance prognostic for condition-based maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines experience degradations over time that cause great concern to gas turbine users on engine reliability, availability and operating costs. Gas turbine diagnostics and prognostics is one of the key technologies to enable the move from time-scheduled maintenance to condition-based maintenance in order to improve engine reliability and availability and reduce life cycle costs. This paper describes a prognostic approach to estimate the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines before their next major overhaul based on historical health information. A combined regression techniques, including both linear and quadratic models, is proposed to predict the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines. A statistic compatibility check is used to determine the transition point from a linear regression to a quadratic regression. The developed prognostic approach has been applied to a model gas turbine engine similar to Rolls-Royce industrial gas turbine AVON 1535 implemented with compressor degradation over time. The analysis shows that the developed prognostic approach has a great potential to provide an estimation of engine remaining useful life before next major overhaul for gas turbine engines experiencing a typical soft degradation.

Y.G. Li; P. Nilkitsaranont

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method and computer program product for maintenance and modernization backlogging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to one embodiment, a computer program product for determining future facility conditions includes a computer readable medium having computer readable program code stored therein. The computer readable program code includes computer readable program code for calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, for calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and for calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. In another embodiment, a computer-implemented method for calculating future facility conditions includes calculating a time period specific maintenance cost, calculating a time period specific modernization factor, and calculating a time period specific backlog factor. Future facility conditions equal the time period specific maintenance cost plus the time period specific modernization factor plus the time period specific backlog factor. Other embodiments are also presented.

Mattimore, Bernard G; Reynolds, Paul E; Farrell, Jill M

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

No maintenance -- no energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Field investigations illustrate that it is not realistic to expect new high-tech equipment to function for a full life expectancy at high efficiency without significant operations and maintenance (O&M). A simple walk through inspection of most buildings reveals extensive equipment that is being operated on manual override, is incorrectly adjusted and operating inefficiently, or is simply inoperative. This point is illustrated with two examples at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. The first describes development of a comprehensive, base-wide, steam trap maintenance program. The second describes a measured evaluation from a typical office building. The objective of both examples was to assess the importance of proper O&M. The proposed ``O&M First`` philosophy will result in more efficient building HVAC operation, provide improved services to the building occupants, and reduce energy consumption and unscheduled equipment repair/replacement. Implementation of a comprehensive O&M program will result in a 15--25% energy savings. The O&M foundation that is established will allow other energy conservation activities such is demand side management or energy management and control systems, to achieve and maintain their expected energy savings.

Szydlowski, R.F.; Schliesing, J.S.; Winiarski, D.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

322

MINLP model for optimal biocide dosing and maintenance scheduling of seawater cooled plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays many countries in arid regions around the world suffer from severe water shortages; this situation is steadily becoming a global concern as water resources are being depleted. In this regard, strategies that a few decades ago were not feasible are becoming interesting alternatives; one of them is the use of seawater as cooling fluid in chemical plants. This alternative, however, presents problems in the plant operation, including a rapid biofilm growth (biofouling) that reduces the heat transfer efficiency. To control the biofouling, the use of biocides (usually chlorine) and periodical mechanical maintenances are implemented. In this work a mathematical programming model is presented for the optimal planning of biocide dosing and mechanical maintenance scheduling. The model considers the biocide kinetics along the network, its dependence with temperature and its interaction with the biofilm thickness. The model uses disjunctive programming to select the optimal maintenance scenario, allowing for different levels of biofilm thickness that depend on the plant schedule. The model also includes environmental constraints to prevent the discharge of streams with potentially dangerous loads of chemicals. These constraints include a limit for the concentration of biocide and the end of pipe chemical treatment. The objective function is to minimize the total annual cost, including the cost for the biocide, chemicals used for end of pipe treatment and maintenance. To show the model applicability, a case study for an integrated power/desalination plant cooled with seawater is solved. Several scenarios were tested including daily, biweekly, monthly and bimonthly biocide and end of pipe treatment chemical dosing, and mechanical maintenances from one to up to six times per year. The results indicate that recurrent dosing policies, either biweekly or monthly for operational simplicity, along with a maximum of three treatments per year provide an optimal scenario.

Fabricio Npoles-Rivera; Abdullah Bin Mahfouz; Arturo Jimnez-Gutirrez; Mahmoud M. El-Halwagi; Jos Mara Ponce-Ortega

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - agreement maintenance based Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pave? Making Informed Decisions on When to Summary: A cost analysis based on spending history for low volume roads A method for estimating maintenance... in this study ...

324

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

325

LEED for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, aluminum, plastic and/or other materials in buildings waste stream Includes construction waste and durable goods (computers) Only a policy LEED EB O&M ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... and Recycling Committees AEE Life Member ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL-KT-13-12-54 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL...

Reihl, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Attachment A Operations and Maintenance Master Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of treatment residuals (e.g., backwash basin sediments, spent resinsfiltration media) that are byproducts of the Fernald Preserve's wastewater treatment processes. The...

327

Sandia National Laboratories: Test Site Operations & Maintenance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Test Facility Central Receiver Test Facility Power Towers for Utilities Solar Furnace Dish Test Facility Optics Lab Parabolic Dishes Work For Others (WFO) User...

328

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

329

Seasonal Landscape Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Landscape Maintenance Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII State University's Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture and Oklahoma Cooperative to dry between watering allows plants to develop stronger, deeper roots. However, some landscape plants

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

330

Associate Vice Chancellor Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Capital Planning & Design Carpentry Shop Electrical Shop Plumbing Shop HVAC Shop Housing Shop Equipment & Vehicle Maintenance Warehouse Vehicle Pool Shuttle Post Office Parking Services Contract Management Water Distribution Heat & Power Generation Heat Distribution Power Distribution December 2012

Hartman, Chris

331

Filter system cost comparison for integrated gasification combined cycle and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion power systems  

SciTech Connect

To assess the relative cost of components and sub-systems for a hot gas particulate cleanup system a cost comparison between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants was conducted. Assessing component and sub-system costs permits the most beneficial areas for product improvement to be identified. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filter Concept which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second Generation 453 MWe (net) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost and the effect on the cost of electricity for the two filter systems. The most beneficial areas for product improvement are identified.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; Buchanan, T.; Chen, H.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as 64% of the total installed system price, these "soft costs" include: Customer Acquisition Financing and Contracting Permitting, Interconnection, and Inspection Installation and Performance Operations and Maintenance. To meet SunShot goals, the industry must innovate new ways to automate and speed processes that make it easier for consumers, businesses, utilities, solar companies, and others to install solar projects. For example, novel software solutions now allow solar companies to design systems and provide accurate quotes using satellite images rather than conducting full site visits.

333

Financing Energy Cost Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an overview of funding energy savings, specifically Energy Saving Performance Contracting in relation to energy and water conservation measures, operation and maintenance...

334

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

335

Cost estimate of electricity produced by TPV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A crucial parameter for the market penetration of TPV is its electricity production cost. In this work a detailed cost estimate is performed for a Si photocell based TPV system, which was developed for electrically self-powered operation of a domestic heating system. The results are compared to a rough estimate of cost of electricity for a projected GaSb based system. For the calculation of the price of electricity, a lifetime of 20 years, an interest rate of 4.25% per year and maintenance costs of 1% of the investment are presumed. To determine the production cost of TPV systems with a power of 1220 kW, the costs of the TPV components and 100 EUR kW?1el,peak for assembly and miscellaneous were estimated. Alternatively, the system cost for the GaSb system was derived from the cost of the photocells and from the assumption that they account for 35% of the total system cost. The calculation was done for four different TPV scenarios which include a Si based prototype system with existing technology (?sys = 1.0%), leading to 3000 EUR kW?1el,peak, an optimized Si based system using conventional, available technology (?sys = 1.5%), leading to 900 EUR kW?1el,peak, a further improved system with future technology (?sys = 5%), leading to 340 EUR kW?1el,peak and a GaSb based system (?sys = 12.3% with recuperator), leading to 1900 EUR kW?1el,peak. Thus, prices of electricity from 6 to 25 EURcents kWh?1el (including gas of about 3.5 EURcents kWh?1) were calculated and compared with those of fuel cells (31 EURcents kWh?1) and gas engines (23 EURcents kWh?1).

Gnther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean-Claude Mayor; Detlev Grtzmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

Myrent, Noah J. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Kusnick, Joshua F. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Barrett, Natalie C. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Adams, Douglas E. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Griffith, Daniel Todd

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology to reduce Electric Motor Maintenance Costs.1998. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Marketof steam turbines or electric motors to run compressors. The

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Farm Out Maintenance Headaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TIDEWATER OIL chalked up a number of firsts with its new Delaware refinery. The size and modern design of the plant drew a lot of attention and over-shadowed what may eventually be the most significant "first"contract instrument maintenance.At the giant ...

1957-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cost Containment and Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Containment and Productivity Faculty Assembly Presentation January 22, 2013 Arthur G. Ramicone, CFO David N. DeJong, Vice Provost, Academic Planning and Resources Management #12;Cost Containment Resources to Enhance the Student Experience · Reduce the Cost and Complexity of Administrative Operations

Jiang, Huiqiang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Use of the Guidance Manual This manual was developed to provide organizations with the knowledge and tools necessary to perform a disciplined and thorough Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance (RBSM) review at any given facility or site in order to cost effectively manage S&M activities. Sections 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 of this manual provide a brief explanation of what the RBSM review process is, why such a process is needed and the steps a facility or site should take to get organized and initiate an RBSM review. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 of this manual discuss the use of the data gained from the RBSM review process like the development of cost reduction strategies and the development of

343

Apply reliability centered maintenance to sealless pumps  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on reliability centered maintenance (RCM) which is considered a crucial part of future reliability engineering. RCM determines the maintenance requirements of plants and equipment in their operating context. The RCM method has been applied to the management of critical sealless pumps in fire/toxic risk services, typical of the petrochemical industry. The method provides advantages from a detailed study of any critical engineering system. RCM is a team exercise and fosters team spirit in the plant environment. The maintenance strategy that evolves is based on team decisions and relies on maximizing the inherent reliability built into the equipment. RCM recommends design upgrades where this inherent reliability is being questioned. Sealless pumps of canned motor design are used as main reactor charge pumps in PVC plants. These pumps handle fresh vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), which is both carcinogenic and flammable.

Pradhan, S. (Exxon Chemicals Canada, Ontario (Canada))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

345

Optimum maintenance strategy under uncertainty in the lifetime distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problem of determining the optimal maintenance strategy for a machine given its lifetime distribution has been studied extensively. Solutions to this problem are outlined in the academic literature, prescribed in professional handbooks, implemented in reliability engineering software systems and widely used in practice. These solutions typically assume that the lifetime distribution and its parameter values are known with certainty, although this is usually not the case in practice. In this paper we study the effect of parameter uncertainty on the optimum age-based maintenance strategy. The effect of uncertainty is evaluated by considering both a theoretical uniform lifetime distribution and a more realistic Weibull lifetime distribution. The results show that admitting to the uncertainty does influence the optimal maintenance age and also provides a quantifiable cost benefit. The results can help maintenance managers in making maintenance decisions under uncertainty, and also in deciding when it is worthwhile to invest in advanced data improvement procedures.

Bram de Jonge; Warse Klingenberg; Ruud Teunter; Tiedo Tinga

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Presentations from 2nd Cryogenic Operations Workshop (CRYO 2006) , May 9-11, 2006, Menlo Park, California  

SciTech Connect

This workshop covered the latest practical engineering and operational management applications and techniques that have been found to enhance operational costs, reliability, and flexibility, with topics such as establishing the optimal refrigeration design cycle and operating design points; utility management; manpower scheduling; plant control philosophy and automation; short and long term maintenance scheduling; refrigerant loss detection and control; system contamination; component reliability; and equipment technical performance issues.

Weisend, J.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

349

Preventive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preventive Maintenance Preventive Maintenance Preventive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:44am Addthis Preventive maintenance aims to sustain or extend system lifespan through a set of actions that detect, preclude, or mitigate system degradation. These actions are based on either calendar time or machine run time. Advantages Federal agencies can greatly extend equipment reliability and lifespan by expending the necessary resources for regular maintenance. In most cases, the system designer or manufacturer outlines regular maintenance under a preventive strategy. In addition to increased reliability and lifespan, budget is saved over the life of the system. Preventive maintenance programs can save as much as 12% to 18% in equipment repair and replacement. Other advantages of preventitive maintenance are:

350

The Maintenance of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... this short essay is not satisfied with the current ideas as to the maintenance of solar ...solarenergy ...

1899-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

HVAC Maintenance and Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC - HVAC - Maintenance and Technologies Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Providence, Rhode Island April 15, 2010 BY Ramin Faramarzi, P.E. Technology Test Centers (TTC) Design and Engineering Services Southern California Edison (SCE) www.sce.com/rttc 2 Outline * Introduction to SCE's TTC * Overview of energy challenges in California (CA) * Role of HVAC in CA's energy and demand equations * Factors affecting HVAC performance * Focus on SCE's research on maintenance faults * Next generation of HVAC equipment * HVAC technologies on SCE's TTC radar * Black boxes - do they all work? 3 SCE's Technology Test Centers * SCE applied research facilities located in Irwindale, CA comprised of 3 test beds: * Refrigeration * HVAC * Lighting * Coming Soon! - A new ZNE lab 4 Refrigeration Testing

352

care and maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Now that your prairie parcel is up and growing, there are just a few concerns that you should consider about its care. Weeding The question of weeding is really just a matter of aesthetics. You do not have to weed your parcel. If your parcel is a large one, weeding may not even be practical. Although the "weed" species will dominate your parcel for the first few years, they will give way to the native plant species. You can liken the native plants to long distance runners; they appear to start off slowly, but end up winning the ecological race. After all, they are the plants that are genetically-suited and adapted to growing in this environment. The native prairie plants will be developing extensive root structure the

353

Online Monitoring to Enable Improved Diagnostics, Prognostics and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

For both existing and new plant designs there are increasing opportunities and needs for the application of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic and prognostic techniques. These methods can continuously monitor and assess the health of nuclear power plant systems and components. The added effectiveness of such programs has the potential to enable holistic plant management, and minimize exposure to future and unknown risks. The 'NDE & On-line Monitoring' activities within the Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems (II&CS) Pathway are developing R&D to establish advanced condition monitoring and prognostics technologies to understand and predict future phenomena, derived from plant aging in systems, structures, and components (SSC). This research includes utilization of the enhanced functionality and system condition awareness that becomes available through the application of digital technologies at existing nuclear power plants for online monitoring and prognostics. The current state-of-the-art for on-line monitoring applied to active components (eg pumps, valves, motors) and passive structure (eg core internals, primary piping, pressure vessel, concrete, cables, buried pipes) is being reviewed. This includes looking at the current deployment of systems that monitor reactor noise, acoustic signals and vibration in various forms, leak monitoring, and now increasingly condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components. The NDE and on-line monitoring projects are designed to look beyond locally monitored CBM. Current trends include centralized plant monitoring of SSC, potential fleet-based CBM and technology that will enable operation and maintenance to be performed with limited on-site staff. Attention is also moving to systems that use online monitoring to permit longer term operation (LTO), including a prognostic or predictive element that estimates a remaining useful life (RUL). Many, if not all, active components (pumps, valves, motors etc.) can be well managed, routinely diagnosed, analyzed and upgraded as needed using a combination of periodic and online CBM. The ability to successfully manage passive systems and structures is seen as the key to LTO, particularly in the USA. New approaches will be demonstrated, including prognostics for passive structures, which is critical to maintaining safety and availability and to reducing operations and maintenance costs for NPP's. To provide proactive on-line monitoring that includes estimates for RUL new projects will include advanced sensors, better understanding of stressors and challenges faced in quantification of uncertainty associated with RUL. This program area will leverage insights from past experience in other industries and seek to demonstrate the feasibility of on-line monitoring and prognostics to support NPP LTO.

Bond, Leonard J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of May 1997 Figure 4.5 Total Costs of Manufacture of Metal Options 900 800 700 Ctj 300 3 200 100 0 Metal Shielding Oxide Shielding Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride and Oxide Shielding s Decontamination & Decommissioning QI Operations & Maintenance s Regulatory Compliance u Balance of Plant u Manufacturing Facilities s Manufacturing Equipment u Engineering Development 57 ..- . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride May 1997 4.4 Long-term Storage Storage of depleted uranium is predicated on its use at some later date. In the engineering analysis, storage options are defined by the type of storage facility, and suboptions are defined by the chemical form in which the depleted uranium is stored. The types of storage facilities analyzed are (1) buildings, (2) below ground vaults,

357

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Maintenance strategies to improve sootblower availability  

SciTech Connect

Sootblowers are electromechanical devices used for removal of ash and slag deposits from boiler tube surfaces. By directing steam, air, or water cleaning medium through a nozzle to remove deposits from boiler tubes, boilers are kept on-line for longer periods of time reducing the need for outages to clean the boiler by mechanical means. Fuel must be burned efficiently to minimize stagging and fouling of the heat transfer surfaces. Tuning the boiler to maximize combustion efficiency should not be limited to optimizing fuel conditions, air-fuel ratios, firing rates, excess air, and over-fire air, but should also include the use of sootblowers. The goal is to know when to clean, and if the cleaning cycle has effectively removed the deposit and increased heat transfer. Today, boiler cleaning technology not only focuses on the impact of the sootblowing system on overall boiler performance, but it also focuses on design improvements that impact an individual sootblower`s performance. Proper sootblower maintenance is an integral part of making existing designs and new designs work. Existing computer technologies provide a viable means of documenting and trending sootblower performance data and maintenance history. The personal computer and the availability of spreadsheet and database software make the task of quantifying sootblower performance data and maintenance history easier to achieve. The difficult task is gathering the proper data to make decisions about sootblowing operations and maintenance. The balance of this paper will discuss typical maintenance practices, and improvements that can be achieved by documenting sootblowing system inspections and maintenance activity using a personal computer database.

Walther, J.M.; Whitehead, B.K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

360

Lawn Maintenance Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with lawn and garden tools, more than half involving riding lawn mowers and garden tractors. You can avoid accidents like these by making safety a regular part of lawn maintenance, particularly when using lawn mowers and other power tools. Lawn Mowers... mowers save homeowners valuable time and energy. These small tractors are much more powerful than walk-behind mowers and move two to three times as fast. To avoid accidents on riding mowers or larger tractors, it is important to use safe driving...

Smith, David

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OPERATIONS (OPS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPS) OPS) OBJECTIVE OPS.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. (CR 13) Scope: The Conduct of Operations Program was evaluated during the recent KE Basin FTS ORR and was found to be adequately implemented. Based on this result and the subsequent program enhancements, the scope of the review is to be limited to the SWS operating and maintenance evolutions. Criteria * Programmatic elements of conduct of operations are in place for SWS operations. (DOE Order 5480.19) * The SWS operations personnel adequately demonstrate the principles of conduct of operations requirements during the shift performance period. (DOE Order 5480.19)

362

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ROC curves in cost space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ROC curves and cost curves are two popular ways of visualising classifier performance, finding appropriate thresholds according to the operating condition, and deriving useful aggregated measures such as the area under the ROC curve (AUC) or ... Keywords: Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), Cost curves, Cost-sensitive evaluation, Kendall tau distance, Operating condition, ROC curves, Ranking performance

Jos Hernndez-Orallo; Peter Flach; Csar Ferri

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Logistics cost analysis of rice residues for second generation bioenergy production in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the techno-economic potential of rice residues as a bioenergy resource to meet Ghanas energy demands. Major rice growing regions of Ghana have 7090% of residues available for bioenergy production. To ensure cost-effective biomass logistics, a thorough cost analysis was made for two bioenergy routes. Logistics costs for a 5MWe straw combustion plant were 39.01, 47.52 and 47.89USD/t for Northern, Ashanti and Volta regions respectively. Logistics cost for a 0.25MWe husk gasification plant (with roundtrip distance 10km) was 2.64USD/t in all regions. Capital cost (6672%) contributes significantly to total logistics costs of straw, however for husk logistics, staff (40%) and operation and maintenance costs (46%) dominate. Baling is the major processing logistic cost for straw, contributing to 4648% of total costs. Scale of straw unit does not have a large impact on logistic costs. Transport distance of husks has considerable impact on logistic costs.

Pooja Vijay Ramamurthi; Maria Cristina Fernandes; Per Sieverts Nielsen; Clemente Pedro Nunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 5/08)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, landscape, and maintenance operations) with kits. · Where kits are provided, a person should be designated, building maintenance reporter, or another individual. · Kits are a supplement to and not a replacement

Farritor, Shane

366

Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate) Operations Directorate (OPS Directorate) Purpose A group chartered by the Associate Laboratory Director for the Advanced Photon Source that includes the responsible Division Directors and other appropriate APS operations personnel. The Operations Directorate collectively coordinates operating decisions that affect the facility as a whole and establishes both long- and short-term schedules, including scheduled maintenance and facility improvement periods. The Operations Directorate is the APS forum in which decisions regarding operations are discussed: These include, but are not limited to: Safety issues related to operations Operational Schedule Global operating parameters within the defined and approved operational and safety envelopes, such as energy, maximum circulating beam

367

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

368

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

369

Maintenance features of the Compact Ignition Tokamak fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is envisaged to be the next experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium/tritium fuel requires the implementation of remote handling technology for maintenance and disassembly operations. The reactor is surrounded by a close-proximity nuclear shield which is designed to permit personnel access within the test cell, one day after shutdown. With the shield in place, certain maintenance activities in the cell may be done hands-on. Maintenance on the reactor is accomplished remotely using a boom-mounted manipulator after disassembling the shield. Maintenance within the plasma chamber is accomplished with two articulated boom manipulators that are capable of operating in a vacuum environment. They are stored in a vacuum enclosure behind movable shield plugs.

Spampinato, P.T.; Hager, E.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The ExoClean Filter System for Stop and Go Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

whatever the driving conditions - Robustness and Durability - Vehicle integrations: cost, maintenance, volume... - Cost OEMRetrofit equipments - Operation costs , maintenance...

371

Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group Print The recent ALS power supply failure was one of the most challenging projects that Electronics Engineer Technical Superintendent Tim...

372

Sustainability of green space maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Japan, recent changes in socio-economic and political structures -- decreasing tax revenue, declining communication among community members, and privatization of public services-- have influenced existing maintenance ...

Nomura, Wataru

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Maintenance Types | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

prevent failure, or ensure life of the system even if actions are suggested by the manufacturer. Preventive Maintenance: Refers to a series of actions performed on calendar time...

374

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance to someone by E-mail Operations and Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Operations and Maintenance on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options

375

Keeping the Lights on While Cutting Costs.  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the Bonneville Power Administration spent $361 million in capital on a system to transmit electricity. By 1998, it was spending about one-third that amount: $123 million. In 1992, BPA`s expenses for managing, operating and maintaining the transmission system ran $160 million. By 1998, BPA had cut expenses to $128 million. Maintenance costs alone were cut 28%. In 1992, management of the grid was split into six organizations. Today, there is one. About 2,900 people worked for transmission in October 1992. By February 1998, the Transmission Business Line (TBL) employed 1,855. Transmission in 1992 for the most part meant new towers, lines and substations. Today it means computers, digital communications and electronic controls.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Estimating environmental costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Added demands on natural resources and proposed environmental regulations could potentially have a significant impact on the production and operational costs of information technology (IT). In this paper, we utilize an Economic Input-Output Life-Cycle ...

Kiara Corrigan; Amip Shah; Chandrakant Patel

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves awide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

SciTech Connect

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Positron emission tomography with selected mediastinoscopy compared to routine mediastinoscopy offers cost and clinical outcome benefits for pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The true cost of a whole-body FDG-PET scan in this environment is difficult to ascertain. Keith et al. [6...], in the setting of solitary pulmonary nodules, used the Australian Medicare rebate of AUD$950 plus cap...

Kelvin K. Yap; Kenneth S. K. Yap

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations...

Verma, Ankit

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Landscape Maintenance Considerations for Homeowner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape Maintenance Considerations for Homeowner Associations: Save Money, Be Safe, Look Good is getting their money's worth from the landscape maintenance company. Photo credit: Asset Landscaping! Kelly Murray Young Haley Paul #12;1. Consider landscape plants a long- term investment · Trees

Sanderson, Mike

382

OpenEI Community - Maintenance  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maintenance maintenance March 8-9, 2013 http://en.openei.org/community/blog/openei-maintenance-march-8-9-2013  We would like to inform the OpenEI community that OpenEI will be undergoing a significant software upgrade during a maintenance window this weekend.  We will be upgrading the wiki and semantic mediawiki portions of OpenEI, which means /datasets, /apps, /lod, /sparql and /community will continue to function normally.  Additionally, web services that rely on Ask queries (utility rate database API) may have some downtime as we transition.maintenance-march-8-9-2013" target="_blank">read more

383

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This...

384

Maintenance cost studies of rotary wing commercial transport aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: The vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft market has had substantial growth in the period of the last ten years when one considers the overall number of aircraft in use. The military fleet has continued ...

Ausrotas, Raymond A.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Operations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance The following laws and regulations set advanced metering and measurement requirements for Federal agencies. Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005: Requires all Federal buildings to be metered by October 1, 2012, to ensure efficient energy use and reduce the cost of electricity used in Federal facilities. Advanced meters or metering devices must provide data at least daily and measure the consumption of electricity at least hourly. These devices must be used to the maximum extent practical. Requires Federal agencies to submit to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an implementation plan identifying personnel responsible for achieving metering requirements, and any determination by the agency that advanced meters or metering systems are not practical in their specific situation.

386

A Comparison of Single- and Multi-parameter Wave Criteria for Accessing Wind Turbines in Strategic Maintenance and Logistics Models for Offshore Wind Farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different vessel types for transferring technicians for maintenance and inspection of offshore wind farms are often evaluated and compared by their limiting significant wave height for accessing the wind turbines. The limiting significant wave height is also the parameter that is often used as the access criteria in strategic decision support tools for maintenance and logistics for offshore wind farms. In practice, however, other wave parameters, such as the peak wave period and wave heading, have major influence on the accessibility to a wind turbine for a given vessel. We compare the use of single-parameter and multi-parameter wave criteria for access to wind turbines in two strategic maintenance and logistics models for offshore wind farms: one simulation model and one optimization model. Multi-parameter wave criteria in the form of limiting significant wave heights as functions of peak wave period and wave heading are obtained by numerical analysis of the vessel docking operation. Results for availability, operation and maintenance costs and the optimal vessel fleet size and mix are found using both these multi-parameter wave criteria and using a corresponding single-parameter limiting significant wave height. The comparison indicates that the use of a single limiting significant wave height can give similar results as when using more complex multi-parameter wave criteria. An important precondition is that the single limiting significant wave height is carefully chosen to represent the vessel and the wave conditions.

Iver Bakken Sperstad; Elin E. Halvorsen-Weare; Matthias Hofmann; Lars Magne Nons; Magnus Stlhane; MingKang Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be conducted, and their frequency. Part of the S&M planning is deciding which spaces must be accessed and which equipment must be operated. This should be agreed upon with the organization that will receive the facility for subsequent S&M and, where needed to meet a stakeholder, regulatory, and tribal nations commitment.

388

CRAD, Maintenance - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Maintenance - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II Feburary 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Maintenance program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II More Documents & Publications CRAD, Maintenance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility

389

Pre-conceptual Design Assessment of DEMO Remote Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EDFA, as part of the Power Plant Physics and Technology programme, has been working on the pre-conceptual design of a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO). As part of this programme, a review of the remote maintenance strategy considered maintenance solutions compatible with expected environmental conditions, whilst showing potential for meeting the plant availability targets. A key finding was that, for practical purposes, the expected radiation levels prohibit the use of complex remote handling operations to replace the first wall. In 2012/13, these remote maintenance activities were further extended, providing an insight into the requirements, constraints and challenges. In particular, the assessment of blanket and divertor maintenance, in light of the expected radiation conditions and availability, has elaborated the need for a very different approach from that of ITER. This activity has produced some very informative virtual reality simulations of the blanket segments and pipe removal that are exceptionally ...

Loving, A; Sykes, N; Iglesias, D; Coleman, M; Thomas, J; Harman, J; Fischer, U; Sanz, J; Siuko, M; Mittwollen, M; others,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chapter 18 - Pipeline Vibration and Condition Based Maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter comprises two integrated parts. The first part of the chapter devotes to a detailed discussion of the mechanism leading to pipeline vibration and the effect of internal and external fluid flow on the pipeline vibration. It summarizes the formulations used for the design of optimal free span length of pipeline segments under different boundary conditions and pipeline operating conditions. Different measures used to mitigate pipeline vibration are also briefly discussed in the section. The procedures of pipeline condition based maintenance (CBM) are discussed in the second part of the chapter using vibration and other corrective maintenance (CM) parameters as asset health indicators. The typical models including PF curve model, proportional hazard model, and proportional covariate model used to determine the optimal threshold and inspection intervals in CBM are introduced and discussed. The chapter also discusses the optimization of long-term maintenance activities using reliability based preventive maintenance decision-making approach.

Boyun Guo; Shanhong Song; Ali Ghalambor; Tian Ran Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be conducted, and their frequency. Part of the S&M planning is deciding which spaces must be accessed and which equipment must be operated. This should be agreed upon with the organization that will receive the facility for subsequent S&M and, where needed to meet a stakeholder, regulatory, and tribal nations commitment.

392

O&M Best Practices - A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency (Release 2.0)  

SciTech Connect

This guide, sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program, highlights operations and maintenance (O&M) programs targeting energy efficiency that are estimated to save 5% to 20% on energy bills without a significant capital investment. The purpose of this guide is to provide the federal O&M energy manager and practitioner with useful information about O&M management, technologies, energy efficiency and cost-reduction approaches.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Pugh, Ray; Melendez, Aldo P.; Hunt, W. D.

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) - August 26, 2009 This procedure provides guidance for the routine maintenance of DOE Technical Standards. This procedure applies to all DOE Headquarters and field organizations, management and operating contractors, and laboratories (hereafter referred to collectively as "DOE Components") working to the latest revision of DOE Order 252.1, "Technical Standards Program." DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 More Documents & Publications DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 MAINTENANCE OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS

394

DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) This procedure provides guidance for the routine maintenance of DOE Technical Standards. This procedure applies to all DOE Headquarters and field organizations, management and operating contractors, and laboratories (hereafter referred to collectively as "DOE Components") working to the latest revision of DOE Order 252.1, "Technical Standards Program." DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - August 1, 2000 More Documents & Publications DOE-TSPP-9, Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards - July 1, 2009 MAINTENANCE OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS

395

Cleaning, Maintenance, and Janitorial Needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination control facility, including all items that may come into contact with products, requires regular maintenance and cleaning. The products produced in the cleanroom facility are typically sensitive...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Maintenance Practices for LED Streetlights  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This April 14, 2014 webinar answered important questions about the maintenance and reliability of LED streetlights, and how to take these issues into account when planning and preparing for a...

397

Cost Estimator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

398

Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL STANDARDS TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM PROCEDURES DOE-TSPP-9 Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 MAINTENANCE OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-9 Maintenance Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1

399

CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps  

SciTech Connect

Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hay Harvesting Costs $$$$$ in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............. .. ................. 6 LOOSE HAY STACKING ................................... 7 Tractor-Mounted (Front-End Loader) Hay Stacking Equipment .......... .... ............. 8 Fixed Costs ............................................................ 8 Operating Costs..., there is no economic advantage to At least two tractors are usually needed for baling. Most livestock producers who use custom balers will probably have to buy another tractor. This machine may be used for other operations, but the equivalent of one full...

Long, James T.; Taylor, Wayne D.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cost Shifting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cost shifting exists when a provider raises prices for one set of buyers because it has lowered prices for some other buyer. In theory, cost shifting can take place only if providers have unexploited market power. The empirical evidence on the extent of cost shifting is mixed. Taken as a whole, the evidence does not support the claims that cost shifting is a large and pervasive feature of the US health-care markets. At most, one can argue that perhaps one-fifth of Medicare payment reductions have been passed on to private payers. The majority of the rigorous studies, however, have found no evidence of cost shifting.

M.A. Morrisey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating Costs Purifier Electricity costs (energy + demand)Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chapter 6.14 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6.14 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Sections: 6.14.010 Findings. 6.14.020 Landscape Maintenance. 6 of landscaping and/or landscape maintenance on private property, including overgrown, dead, or decayed vegetation of the residents of the City of Riverside. (Ord. 6970 § 2, 2007) Section 6.14.020 Landscape maintenance. A

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

405

Module 10: Maintenance and Fueling Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This course covers safety guidelines for hydrogen, safe maintenance facilities, safety guidelines for hydrogen fueling facilities

406

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates an award-winning grounds maintenance program that comprises a comprehensive landscape and irrigation management program. The program has helped the laboratory reduce its water use for irrigation by 30%. PNNL is located in Richland, Washington, and is managed and operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). PNNL scientists and engineers perform research on a variety of subjects, including energy and national security. PNNL has more than 4,200 staff members, sits on 600 acres, and houses 2 million square feet of facilities. The laboratory is located in an arid region of the state, receiving only eight inches of precipitation annually. It has more than 100 acres of turf and landscaped areas and

407

Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S&M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Exciting time to be at the U.S. NRC, by Dale Klein, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Extraordinary steps to ensure a minimal environmental impact, by George Vanderheyden, UniStar Nuclear Energy, LLC.; Focused on consistent reduction of outages, by Kevin Walsh, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; On the path towards operational excellence, by Ricardo Perez, Westinghouse Electric Company; Ability to be refuelled on-line, by Ian Trotman, CANDU Services, Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd.; ASCA Application for maintenance of SG secondary side, by Patrick Wagner, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, Phillip Battaglia and David Selfridge, Westinghouse Electric Company; and, An integral part of the landscape and lives, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Steam generator bowl drain repairs, by John Makar and Richard Gimple, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

reduced the amount of time involved in the annual chemical inventory for a cost savings of 18,282. Other presentations covered SRNS' award-winning employee suggestion...

412

BPA's Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BPAsCosts Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

413

The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a positive or negative effect on the design teams decision to implement a grey water reuse system: capital cost, maintenance cost, LEED credits, local plumbing codes, project schedule, local water conservation issues, complexity of the system, etc...

Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Open source software development and maintenance: an exploratory analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale development projects (Aoki et al. 2001; German 2004; Kerstetter et al. 2003; Markus et al. 2000; Scacchi 2004b; Wheeler 2003). Some have looked into issues like participation in OSS projects (Bergquist and Ljungberg 2001; Crowston and Scozzi 2002; Dempsey.... According to estimates, software maintenance consumes more than 80% of the lifecycle costs of software systems (Erlikh 2000; Moad 1990). From the point of view of organizational resources, IS departments spend 50-80% of their budgets on software...

Raja, Uzma

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ensuring Physicians' Competence Is Maintenance of Certification the Answer?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pressed by their leaders, external stakeholders, and a public troubled by lapses in the quality of care and unsustainable cost increases, physicians are facing stiffer challenges in initiatives designed to link more closely the goals of learning with the delivery of better care and measures of greater... Maintenance of certification programs sponsored by the American Board of Medical Specialties and its member boards were designed to improve and assess physicians' clinical competence. The authors discuss the history of MOC and current controversies.

Iglehart J.K.; Baron R.B.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Chemical Engineering 9/1/75. 4. Maintenance Engineering, May 1976. 5. "How Much Does Lost Steam Cost",Armstrong Machine works, Hydrocarbon Processing, p.129, Jan. 1976. 6. "Setter Steam Trapping Cuts Energy Waste", wesley Yates, Yarway Corp..., Georgia Tech Industrial Energy Extension Service, Chemical Engineering, 2/11/80. 10. ''Basic Facts & Enerqv Saving Tips" ,Lawrence R. O'Dell, Armstrong Machine Works, Heating/Piping/ Air Conditioning, May 1977. 11. Steam Trap Report - Energy Loss...

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Steam turbine path evaluation during maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The deterioration of a turbine (Steam & Gas) flow path affects the efficiency of the turbine. The most critical factors which affect the efficiency of turbines are: wearing out of the trailing edges of the blades by solid particle erosion, deposits, material loss due to corrosion (also sand blast) which increases the flow area, increases in blade surface roughness, etc. Wearing out of the seals caused by shaft vibrations or rapid start-up leads to significant leakage losses. Some of these effects can be estimated with some precision during operation of the turbine, but an exact evaluation can be carried out during a maintenance applying a special fluid flow analysis program. Such a program has been developed and then adapted to achieve this goal. During maintenance the complete geometry of the steam path is measured (blades lengths, widths, angles, clearances, etc.) in the condition encountered before any corrections. Then the similar measurement is undertaken after, for example, clearance corrections, blade replacements, cleaning of the blades, etc. Using the program first of all the design data is calculated. Then the actual data is fed into the program and compared to the design data. Thus the effect of the blade surface roughness, increased seal clearances, flow area increase, solid particle damage to the trailing edge and so on for each particular stage is calculated. The effect is expressed in [kW] as a deviation from the design points. This data can be helpful during online evaluation of the turbine performance. This evaluation helps the management of the plant in undertaking the correct decision concerning the date of the next major maintenance and replacement part procurement. Many turbines in the Mexican utility have been evaluated in such a manner. Some examples are presented.

Kubiak, J.; Angel, F. del; Carnero, A.; Campos, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixo, Morelos (Mexico)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The International Coal Statistics Data Base program maintenance guide  

SciTech Connect

The International Coal Statistics Data Base (ICSD) is a microcomputer-based system which contains information related to international coal trade. This includes coal production, consumption, imports and exports information. The ICSD is a secondary data base, meaning that information contained therein is derived entirely from other primary sources. It uses dBase III+ and Lotus 1-2-3 to locate, report and display data. The system is used for analysis in preparing the Annual Prospects for World Coal Trade (DOE/EIA-0363) publication. The ICSD system is menu driven and also permits the user who is familiar with dBase and Lotus operations to leave the menu structure to perform independent queries. Documentation for the ICSD consists of three manuals -- the User's Guide, the Operations Manual, and the Program Maintenance Manual. This Program Maintenance Manual provides the information necessary to maintain and update the ICSD system. Two major types of program maintenance documentation are presented in this manual. The first is the source code for the dBase III+ routines and related non-dBase programs used in operating the ICSD. The second is listings of the major component database field structures. A third important consideration for dBase programming, the structure of index files, is presented in the listing of source code for the index maintenance program. 1 fig.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Waste minimization and pollution prevention initiatives within Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) boiler house operations  

SciTech Connect

The mission of ANL-E Plant Facility and Services-Utilities and Systems (PFS-US) is to operate and maintain utility services in a cost-effective manner, while utilizing new and innovative methods whenever possible. PFS-US operates an on-site coal burning boiler plant that generates steam for use throughout the Laboratory as a source to heat buildings, as well as for use in research experiments. In the recent past, PFS-US has embarked upon a series of initiatives to improve operating efficiency of boiler house operations. The results of these projects have had the following impacts on boiler house performance and operations: (1) boiler house efficiency and operations have improved, (2) boiler house operating costs have been reduced, (3) specific operating and maintenance costs have been avoided or eliminated, and (4) the amount of waste and pollution generated has been reduced. Through the implementation of these initiatives, over $250,000 of revenue and cost savings have been incurred by ANL-E. In addition, the Laboratory and DOE will benefit annually from revenues, cost savings, and the reduction of environmental liability resulting from these initiatives.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Dynamic Maintenance of Service Orchestrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Rocquencourt, France Valérie Issarny INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt, France ABSTRACT Service-oriented architectures evolved/orchestration of services. One of the next challenges in this field is the maintenance of service-oriented architectures orchestrations. 1. INTRODUCTION Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is an architectural style that emerged

Boyer, Edmond

423

Building Operator Certification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programmed settings review ? Verify damper settings ? Check static pressure sensor calibration ? Review occupant complaint records and remedies ? Review established temperature set points HVAC Controls Operational Review ESL-KT-13-12-49 CATEE 2013: Clean... Operator Certification Energy Efficiency through Operator Training BOC Has Two Levels Level I: Building Systems Maintenance ? Two or more years experience (5 yrs avg) ? Outcome: Basic understanding of electrical, HVAC and lighting systems...

Lilley, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

B1.3 SWCX for Routine Maintenance Services-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance Services- Maintenance Services- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Routine Maintenance Services Introduction As defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated J\1anagement System Procedure, l'IEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021 Appendices A and B. The cognizant DOE Hanford NCO may issue specific sitewide

426

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

427

Remote maintenance for a new generation of hot cells  

SciTech Connect

For several years the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing facility concepts, designing specialized equipment, and testing prototypical hardware for reprocessing spent fuel from fast breeder reactors. The major facility conceptual design, the Hot Experimental Facility, was based on total remote maintenance to increase plant availability and to reduce radiation exposure. This thrust included designing modular equipment to facilitate maintenance and the manipulation necessary to accomplish maintenance. Included in the design repetoire was the development effort in advanced servomanipulator systems, a remote sampling system, television viewing, and a transporter for manipulator positioning. Demonstration of these developed items is currently ongoing, and the technology is available for applications where production operations in highly radioactive environments are required.

Feldman, M.J.; Grant, N.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Web-based feedback system: the life cycle management as continuous maintenance of apartment facility information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the feasibility of web technology as a means of delivering facility information for better support of facility operations and maintenance. This study proposes a web-based feedback system as a pragmatic solution...

Jeong, Jin Su

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

High power vented nickel-cadmium cells designed for ultra low maintenance  

SciTech Connect

Initially the SAFT program to develop maintenance-free battery technology was in response to a U.S. Air Force commitment to eliminate the need for battery maintenance shops at the line level. The U.S. Navy, through its Crane, Indiana Battery Test Facility, added further demands. They wanted new nickel cadmium battery designs that were lighter, had greater power, more capacity, required much less maintenance, and still met standard Military Specification size requirements. Crane personnel recognized that the major savings in the maintenance costs were achievable in 3- to 5-fold increases of the maintenance period and that non-maintainability was not necessarily a design requisite. In response, SAFT established an internally funded program whose objective was the development of a battery technology that would provide military aircraft batteries meeting these demands.

Scardaville, P.A. (SAFT America, Inc., Valdosta, GA (United States)); Newman, B.C. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, IN (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reliability centered maintenance of power transformers and circuit breakers  

SciTech Connect

At the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), we have historically maintained high voltage equipment. Including transformers and power circuit breakers, on a time driven basis. While this has served our needs in the past, newer methods are needed to effectively maintain the power system in future years. Today aging equipment, maintenance backlogs, and budget constraints are a reality. BPA has initiated a research and development project to examine reliability centered maintenance (RCM) as an alternative to time based maintenance on high voltage equipment. Under RCM, the performance of each place of equipment is to be monitored by observing many operating parameters. For example, with circuit breakers we will observe (measure) the trip time, accumulated contact wear using I{sup 2}T, timing of the mechanism, plus several other parameters. Equipment performing below a predetermined level, or equipment having accumulated a large amount of ``usage`` will receive maintenance. The maintenance will restore full performance and preserve an acceptable service life for that piece of equipment. To develop and evaluate RCM concepts, BPA is installing a prototype system at our Alvey Substation on 4 transformers and 25 breakers.

Purucker, S.L.; Goeltz, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hemmelman, K.; Price, R. [Bonneville Power Administration, Van Couver, WA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Human Factors/Ergonomics Handbook for the Design for Ease of Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 2.0 DESIGN FOR MAINTAINABILITY This section contains human factors guidance for designing systems, subsystems, equipment and facilities so that maintenance is easy and cost effective. 2.1 Unitization, modularization, and standardization Unitization refers to separating equipment into physically and functionally distinct units to allow for easy removal and replacement. This type of equipment separation will permit division of maintenance responsibility, especially troubleshooting, among various maintenance levels. Modularization refers to unitized equipment in which the functional units making up a module are integrated and are removed or inserted as a unit. 2.1.1 Goals of unitization/modularization. Unit design/modularization of equipment should

432

Maintenance and repair expenditures: determinants and tradeoffs with new capital goods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally economic analysis has focused on new capital investment, while ignoring expenditures to maintain or repair existing stock. Recent, broader theories of replacement have emphasized the important role played by both maintenance and utilization rates. However, the decision to extend the service life of capital has been given scant empirical attention, owing partly to a lack of appropriate data. This study exploits survey data that report annual maintenance/repair expenditures for Canadian manufacturing industries. A standard production framework, modified to incorporate endogenous depreciation, guides the econometric analysis. The empirical results indicate that the cost of capital, among other variables, has a statistically significant effect on maintenance/repair decisions.

J.K. Mullen; Martin Williams

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Invertible Program Restructurings for Continuing Modular Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invertible Program Restructurings for Continuing Modular Maintenance Julien Cohen ASCOLA team (EMN in main- tenance with invertible program transformations. We illustrate this on the typical Expression problems with our approach. Keywords-modular maintenance; restructuring; invertible pro- gram

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Effects of dairy intake on weight maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, randomized trial. Weight loss was baseline to 3 months, weight maintenance was 4 to 9 months. Participants were maintained randomly assigned to low dairy ( 3 servings/d) diets for the maintenance phase. Three...

Zemel, Michael B.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Smith, Bryan K.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Richards, Joanna; Morgan-Hanusa, Danielle; Mayo, Matthew S.; Sun, Xiaocun; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Bailey, Bruce W.; Van Walleghen, Emily L.; Washburn, Richard A.

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reliability centered maintenance (RCM) products - future  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes products related to RCM of power systems which will soon be available. The titles include: substation RCM handbook and software; substation RCM driven productive maintenance; transmission RCM evaluation; transmission inspection and maintenance workstation; transmission inspection and detection methods; substation RCM implementation and software support; substation maintenance management workstation; transmission RCM handbook and software; transmission inspection and maintenance workstation - TC; distribution RCM handbook and software; transmission RCM implementation and software support; and distribution RCM implementation and software support.

Lyons, P.F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of a maintenance effectiveness monitoring program for CANDU reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A procedural program to monitor the effectiveness of maintenance activities was developed for CANDU reactors and, to confirm its applicability, was tested on a CANDU power plant being operated by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. The monitoring program is based on a methodology utilizing probabilistic risk information to meet US regulation 10CFR50.65, which is known as the Maintenance Rule. There are many cases in which the Maintenance Rule is applied to Light Water Reactor systems, including \\{PWRs\\} and BWRs. However, it has not been applied to a CANDU Reactor System thus far. In this paper, a procedure to set up a maintenance effectiveness monitoring program is presented with an emphasis on its application to the CANDU system. Relevant solutions to problems that were encountered are introduced to make the program more suitable for the characteristics of CANDU systems. In the end, an application of the program to an operating CANDU power plant is discussed to evaluate the performance status of the plant.

Dong Wook Jerng; Hee Seung Chang; Tae Young Ju

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile February 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis EMs Richland Operations Office and its...

439

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT...

440

Categorical Exclusion for Maintenance Work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance Work Maintenance Work along the Electrical District 5 to Saguaro segment (41/4 to 58/5) of the Maricopa-Saguaro 115-kV Transmission Line, between Friendly Comers and Marana, Pinal County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western plans to conduct maintenance work to maintain or improve the reliability and safety of electrical transmission along 17 miles of the Test Track (formerly Maricopa)-Saguaro 115-kV Transmission Line between Electrical District 5 and Saguaro Steam Plant Substations. The work includes replacing wood poles, cross arms, and knee braces in-kind at 27 structures (41/4-8, 4214, 43/6, 4417, 45/4,46/6,47/2,49/2,49/6,50/2,50/6,50/8,51/4, 52/3, 54/3, 5517, 56/1 57/1-3, 57/8 & 58/2-3), because the wood poles failed stability tests, cross arms are beyond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation maintenance cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Strategic sustainability and operational efficiency dilemma of data centres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The core discussion is based on three large service companies that were analysed from a case study-perspective in terms of green energy options for its data centres, especially maintenance efforts to increase efficiency of their data centres while maintaining required levels of reliability and cooling. The components of operational effectiveness and strategy broke down into many parts. Following strategic initiatives and balancing the operational effectiveness of the firms studied, it was suggested that these trends should generate vastly different sources of competitive advantage like networking economies of scale, new opportunities for the purely physical business to a more green-based IT to eliminate distribution channels that only provide information, changes in brand identity, and reduced operating costs.

Alan D. Smith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Draft of new maintenance standards for LWR in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Activities of development of new maintenance standards for operating nuclear power plant in Japan are described. The work of drafting the standards has been done by the Committee of Nuclear Plant Operation and Maintenance Standards (POMS), that was organized in the Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation under the entrustment from the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The articles of ASME Section XI related to inspection, flaw evaluation and repair have been examined and modified, if necessary, so as to introduce latest Japanese database and technological knowledge. In the area of repairs, many repair techniques verified in recent years in Japan were incorporated i n addition to those specified in ASME Section XI. Finally major differences between ASME Section XI and the draft of the standards are listed.

Iida, Kunihiro [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Economic and sensitivity analyses of dynamic distributed generation dispatch to reduce building energy cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The practicality of any particular distributed generation (DG) installation depends upon its ability to reduce overall energy costs. A parametric study summarizing DG performance capabilities is developed using an economic dispatch strategy that minimizes building energy costs. Various electric rate structures are considered and applied to simulate meeting various measured building demand dynamics for heat and power. A determination of whether investment in DG makes economic sense is developed using a real-time dynamic dispatch and control strategy to meet real building demand dynamics. Under the economic dispatch strategy, capacity factor is influenced by DG electrical efficiency, operations and maintenance cost, and fuel price. Under a declining block natural gas rate structure, a large local thermal demand improves DG economics. Increasing capacity for DG that produces low cost electricity increases savings, but installing further capacity beyond the average building electrical demand reduces savings. For DG that produces high cost electricity, reducing demand charges can produce savings. Heat recovery improves capacity factor and DG economics only if thermal and electrical demand is coincident and DG heat is utilized. Potential DG economic value can be improved or impaired depending upon how the utility electricity cost is determined.

Robert J. Flores; Brendan P. Shaffer; Jacob Brouwer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Development of surface mine cost estimating equations  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

Operations and Maintenance Savings from Advanced Metering Infrastructure - Initial Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy |December 2012 Table of Contents Executive Summary ............................................................................................................... ii 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose and Scope...................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Organization of this Report......................................................................................... 2 2. Overview of Devices, Systems, and Expected Benefits..................................................... 3

447

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0.1 0.1 Chapter 10 O&M Frontiers As old a topic as O&M is, there are a number of new technologies and tools targeting the increased efficiency of O&M. As with most new technology introduction, these tools are in various stages of commercialization; for up-to-date information on each tool, contact information is provided in this chapter. As previously mentioned, we are not able to provide a detailed description of all tools and technologies available. What we do provide are some of the more common tools that are currently commercially available. To locate additional resources, the authors recommend contacting relevant trade groups, databases, and the world-wide web. 10.1 ACRx Handtool/Honeywell HVAC Service Assistant

448

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

� � Resources � Appendix C Resources for Energy and Facilities Professionals The references and resources provided below are by no means all-inclusive. The listed organiza- tions are not endorsed by the authors of this guide and are provided for your information only. To locate additional resources, the authors of this guide recommend contacting relevant trade groups, databases, and the world-wide web. Organizations American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) � Website: www.ashe.org � Description: ASHE serves as an advocate and resource for continuous improvement in healthcare engineering and facilities management and is the largest professional group affiliated with the American Hospital Association. ASHE provides its members with information and education

449

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

� � Suggestions for Additions or Revisions � Appendix D Suggestions for Additions or Revisions This guide is open to periodic updates and improvement. Readers are encouraged to submit suggestions for additions, deletions, corrections, or where to go for other resources. In addition, we are interested in what has worked at your Federal site. We want to find other case studies and documentation of your successes. Please send or fax your information to: Bill Sandusky Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) P.O. Box 999, MS K5-08 � Richland, WA 99352 � email: bill.sandusky@pnl.gov � Fax (509) 375-3614 � Additional material to include (please be specific): Additional References/Resources: Additional material to include (please be specific): O&M Best Practices Guide, Release 3.0

450

Groundwater abstractionconstruction, operation and maintenance: an international overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proliferation of materials on the market, which are used throughout...though they are now driven by diesel engines, rather than animal...centrifugal pumps driven by diesel or electric engines are in common...electric motors or by electric, diesel or petrol engines mounted at...

R. F. Stoner; W. Bakiewicz

451

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

contracts (ESPCs). planningomespcs.pdf More Documents & Publications Reviewing Measurement and Verification Plans for Federal ESPC Projects Introduction to Measurement &...

452

FEMP Offers New Training on Photovoltaic Operations and Maintenance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Seminar will feature a new training format with enhanced features that include hands-on video demos, audience polling and Q&A, and links to additional resources and downloadable...

453

Design, maintenance and operational aspects of the CNGS target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the CNGS Team 4th High Power Targetry Workshop Malmö, Sweden, 2nd ­ 6th May 2, 2011 #12;1. Introduction + reflector) water cooled, pulsed with 10ms half-sine wave of 150/180 kA, 0.3 Hz, remote polarity changex 2.1*1013 ppp) Beam power: ~500 kW (currently 448 kW) Sigma = 0.53 mm Ultimate 2x 3.5*1013 ppp

McDonald, Kirk

454

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adicional a las aguas negras antes de enviarlas al suelo. Si las aguas negras no se tratan adecuadamente antes de que lleguen al agua subterr?nea, el pozo de agua de su casa podr?a contaminarse. Existe una excepci?n a la regla de que todas las aguas negras...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Operation and Maintenance Methods in Solar Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solar chimney power plant has a high chimney (tower), with a height of up ... , the roof curves upward to join the chimney, creating a funnel. The sun heats ... is absorbed by the water within the dark solar pa...

Mustapha Hatti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Maintenance and operation of the US Alternative Fuel Center  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Fuels Utilization Program (AFUP) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has investigated the possibilities and limitations of expanded scope of fuel alternatives and replacement means for transportation fuels from alternative sources. Under the AFUP, the Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was created to solve problems in the DOE programs that were grappling with the utilization of shale oil and coal liquids for transportation fuels. This report covers the first year at the 3-year contract. The principal objective was to assist the AFUP in accomplishing its general goals with two new fuel initiatives selected for tasks in the project year: (1) Production of low-sulfur, low-olefin catalytically cracked gasoline blendstock; and (2) production of low-reactivity/low-emission gasoline. Supporting goals included maintaining equipment in good working order, performing reformulated gasoline tests, and meeting the needs of other government agencies and industries for fuel research involving custom processing, blending, or analysis of experimental fuels.

Erwin, J.; Ferrill, J.L.; Hetrick, D.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

458

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

459

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

460

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

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461

The air transportation industry birthplace of reliability-centered maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The 1980s and 1970s provided a timely opportunity for examining and radically changing the process called {open_quotes}preventive maintenance{close_quotes} as it is applied to the aircraft used for scheduled air transportation. The Federal Aviation Administration and four major airlines, United, American, Pan American and Trans World, were the {open_quotes}principals{close_quotes} in that process. While United`s work with the FAA on the Boeing 737 had opened the door a crack, the Boeing 747 presented a major opportunity to radically improve the process for maintenance program design. That program was guided by the results of United`s analyses of failure data from operations of several fleets, each larger than 100 aircraft, and the concurrent experience of American, Pan American and Trans World. That knowledge provided the insights necessary to support an entirely different approach to maintenance program design. As a result, while United`s existing maintenance program required scheduled overhaul of 339 items on each DC-8, it required overhaul of only 8 items on the B-7471 Although the initial thrust of that work focused on components of active systems, there was concurrent work focused on items whose principal function was to carry the loads associated with operations. That program focused on the classification of structurally-significant items and their classification as {open_quotes}safe life{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}damage tolerant{close_quote} to determine what periodic replacements or repeated inspections were required. That work came to the attention of the Department of Defense which supported preparation of the book-length report by F. Stanley Nowlan and Howard F. Heap at United Airlines entitled {open_quote}Reliability-Centered maintenance{close_quotes}.

Matteson, T.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Pipeline operation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the prosperity of the pipeline industry and the need to maintain high standards of the safety at all times is of paramount importance. Therefore, a primary concern of pipeline operator is adequate supervision and the control of the operation of pipelines. Clearly defined codes of practice, standards and maintenance schedules are necessary if protection is to be afforded to the pipeline system employees, the public at large, and the environment.

Tadors, M.K. [Petroleum Pipelines Co., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z