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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Fuel Production Fuel producers operate refineries and power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and if to enter the hydrogen market and how to respond to an increasing demand for electricity from PHEVs and BEVs for vehicle and fuel. Consumers have two goals: firstly, to keep their cars and secondly to own the best

California at Davis, University of

2

Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax Municipalities, counties, or school districts producing biodiesel must file a return documenting their biodiesel production activities and pay $0.03 of

5

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com...

6

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Operation and Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concepts of area specific resistance (ASR) and degradation are developed for different fuel cell operating modes. The concepts of exergetic efficiency and entropy production were applied to ASR and degradation. It is shown that exergetic efficiency is a time-dependent function useful describing the thermal efficiency of a fuel cell and the change in thermal efficiency of a degrading fuel cell. Entropy production was evaluated for the cases of constant voltage operation and constant current operation of the fuel cell for a fuel cell undergoing ohmic degradation. It was discovered that the Gaussian hypergeometric function describes the cumulative entropy and electrical work produced by fuel cells operating at constant voltage. The Gaussian hypergeometric function is found in many applications in modern physics. This paper builds from and is an extension of several papers recently published by the authors in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society (ECS), ECS Transactions, Journal of Power Sources, and the Journal of Fuel Cell Science and Technology.

Williams, Mark; Gemmen, Randall; Richards, George

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Requirements Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is composed of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids derived from plant or animal matter, meets the

8

Economics of producing fuel pellets from biomass  

SciTech Connect

An engineering economic analysis of a biomass pelleting process was performed for conditions in North America. The pelletization of biomass consists of a series of unit operations: drying, size reduction, densifying, cooling, screening, and warehousing. Capital and operating cost of the pelleting plant was estimated at several plant capacities. Pellet production cost for a base case plant capacity of 6 t/h was about $51/t of pellets. Raw material cost was the largest cost element of the total pellet production cost followed by personnel cost, drying cost, and pelleting mill cost. An increase in raw material cost substantially increased the pellet production cost. Pellet plants with a capacity of more than 10 t/h decreased the costs to roughly $40/t of pellets. Five different burner fuels - wet sawdust, dry sawdust, biomass pellets, natural gas, and coal were tested for their effect on the cost of pellet production. Wet sawdust and coal, the cheapest burner fuels, produced the lowest pellet production cost. The environmental impacts due to the potential emissions of these fuels during the combustion process require further investigation.

Mani, S.; Sokhansanj, S.; Bi, X.; Turhollow, A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Biology & Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method for producing nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel is made by contacting an aqueous solution containing an actinide salt with an aqueous solution containing ammonium hydroxide, ammonium oxalate, or oxalic acid in an amount that will react with a fraction of the actinide salt to form a precipitate consisting of the hydroxide or oxalate of the actinide. A slurry consisting of the precipitate and solution containing the unreacted actinide salt is formed into drops which are gelled, calcined, and pressed to form pellets.

Haas, P.A.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for producing nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel is made by contacting an aqueous solution containing an actinide salt with an aqueous solution containing ammonium hydroxide, ammonium oxalate, or oxalic acid in an amount that will react with a fraction of the actinide salt to form a precipitate consisting of the hydroxide or oxalate of the actinide. A slurry consisting of the precipitate and solution containing the unreacted actinide salt is formed into drops which are gelled, calcined, and pressed to form pellets.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This...

13

Process for producing fluid fuel from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for producing fluid fuel from coal. Moisture-free coal in particulate form is slurried with a hydrogen-donor solvent and the heated slurry is charged into a drum wherein the pressure is so regulated as to maintain a portion of the solvent in liquid form. During extraction of the hydrocarbons from the coal, additional solvent is added to agitate the drum mass and keep it up to temperature. Subsequently, the pressure is released to vaporize the solvent and at least a portion of the hydrocarbons extracted. The temperature of the mass in the drum is then raised under conditions required to crack the hydrocarbons in the drum and to produce, after subsequent stripping, a solid coke residue. The hydrocarbon products are removed and fractionated into several cuts, one of which is hydrotreated to form the required hydrogen-donor solvent while other fractions can be hydrotreated or hydrocracked to produce a synthetic crude product. The heaviest fraction can be used to produce ash-free coke especially adapted for hydrogen manufacture. The process can be made self-sufficient in hydrogen and furnishes as a by-product a solid carbonaceous material with a useful heating value.

Hyde, Richard W. (Winchester, MA); Reber, Stephen A. (Waltham, MA); Schutte, August H. (Lexington, MA); Nadkarni, Ravindra M. (Arlington, MA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Tax Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund A biodiesel producer may apply for a refund of Iowa state sales or use taxes paid on purchases. To qualify, the producer must be registered with

15

Maintenance and operation of the USDOE Alternative Fuel Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels Utilization Program (AFUP) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has investigated the possibilities and limitations of expanded scope of fuel alternatives and replacement means for transportation fuels from alternative sources. Under the AFUP, the Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was created to solve problems in the DOE programs that were grappling with the utilization of shale oil and coal liquids for transportation fuels. In year one of this contract, a timeline was set to coordinate uses and operations of the AFC hydrogenation pilot plant among test fuels production project work, facility maintenance, other government work, and work for industry for second-generation operations. In year two, consistent with assisting the AFUP in accomplishing its general goals, the work was done with fuel producers, regulators, and users in mind. AFC capabilities and results were disseminated through tours and outside presentations.

Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S.; Hetrick, D.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit

17

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Excise Tax Exemption Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

18

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

19

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels from biomass pyrolysis bio-oil (PNNL IPID 16665) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas Airport Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com... Sept. 5, 2009 Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels F ind out how Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport uses alternative fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan  

SciTech Connect

Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project`s current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M&O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M&O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins.

Debban, B.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Connecticut Utility Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com...

23

Performance of gasoline and diesel fuels produced from COED syncrude  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel consumption and exhaust emissions characteristics were evaluated for gasoline and diesel fuel produced from coal liquid derived syncrude. The engine types used were: (1) current technology spark-ignition, homogeneous charge, (2) stratified-charge, and (3) Stirling. There were no significant changes in fuel consumption or exhaust emissions between syncrude-derived fuels and conventional fuels in stratified-charge and Stirling engines. Because of its low (approximately equal to 70) octane number and volatility, the synthetic gasoline required a reduction in compression ratio to achieve knock-limited, MBT spark timing. This was in comparison to the reference gasoline, in a single-cylinder spark-ignited test engine, at one speed/load point. Exhaust emissions were very similar between the two fuels.

Bechtold, R.L.; Fleming, R.D.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop on...

25

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield… (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

27

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C.sub.7 -C.sub.17 paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+.

Kuester, James L. (Scottsdale, AZ)

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process is described to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C[sub 7]-C[sub 17] paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+. 1 fig.

Kuester, J.L.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Pressurised Operation of Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Presentation Title, Pressurised Operation of ...

30

GRID INDEPENDENT FUEL CELL OPERATED SMART HOME  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cell power plant, which utilizes a smart energy management and control (SEMaC) system, supplying the power need of laboratory based ''home'' has been purchased and installed. The ''home'' consists of two rooms, each approximately 250 sq. ft. Every appliance and power outlet is under the control of a host computer, running the SEMaC software package. It is possible to override the computer, in the event that an appliance or power outage is required. Detailed analysis and simulation of the fuel cell operated smart home has been performed. Two journal papers has been accepted for publication and another journal paper is under review. Three theses have been completed and three additional theses are in progress.

Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

GRID INDEPENDENT FUEL CELL OPERATED SMART HOME  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fuel cell power plant, which utilizes a smart energy management and control (SEMaC) system, supplying the power need of laboratory based ''home'' has been purchased and installed. The ''home'' consists of two rooms, each approximately 250 sq. ft. Every appliance and power outlet is under the control of a host computer, running the SEMaC software package. It is possible to override the computer, in the event that an appliance or power outage is required. Detailed analysis and simulation of the fuel cell operated smart home has been performed. Two journal papers has been accepted for publication and another journal paper is under review. Three theses have been completed and three additional theses are in progress.

Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U[sub 3]O[sub 8] over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer.

Pool, T.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Demonstrating and evaluating heavy-duty alternative fuel operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project was to understand the effects of using an alternative fuel on a truck operating fleet through actual operation of trucks. Information to be gathered was expected to be anecdotal, as opposed to statistically viable, because the Trucking Research institute (TRI) recognized that projects could not attract enough trucks to produce statistically credible volumes of data. TRI was to collect operational data, and provide them to NREL, who would enter the data into the alternative fuels database being constructed for heavy-duty trucks at the time. NREL would also perform data analysis, with the understanding that the demonstrations were generally pre-production model engines and vehicles. Other objectives included providing information to the trucking industry on the availability of alternative fuels, developing the alternative fuels marketplace, and providing information on experience with alternative fuels. In addition to providing information to the trucking industry, an objective was for TRI to inform NREL and DOE about the industry, and give feedback on the response of the industry to developments in alternative fuels in trucking. At the outset, only small numbers of vehicles participated in most of the projects. Therefore, they had to be considered demonstrations of feasibility, rather than data gathering tests from which statistically significant conclusions might be drawn. Consequently, data gathered were expected to be useful for making estimates and obtaining valuable practical lessons. Project data and lessons learned are the subjects of separate project reports. This report concerns itself with the work of TRI in meeting the overall objectives of the TRI-NREL partnership.

Peerenboom, W. [Trucking Research Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)] [Trucking Research Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Fleet Federal Fleet Operation Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Fleet Operation Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal Fleet Operation Regulations Federal fleets based in Arizona that operate primarily in counties with a

35

Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report for the Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory Dates of Activity : 10212011 Report Preparer: Tim Mengers Activity...

36

Method for producing synthetic fuels from solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organic solid wastes represented by the general chemical formula C.sub.X H.sub.Y O.sub.Z are reacted with steam at elevated temperatures to produce H.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. The overall process is represented by the reaction C.sub.X H.sub.Y O.sub.Z + 2(X-Z/2)H.sub.2 O.fwdarw..sup..delta.XCO.sub.2 + [(Y/2) + 2(X-Z/2)] H.sub.2 . (1) reaction (1) is endothermic and requires heat. This heat is supplied by a tower top solar furnace; alternatively, some of the solid wastes can be burned to supply heat for the reaction. The hydrogen produced by reaction (1) can be used as a fuel or a chemical feedstock. Alternatively, methanol can be produced by the commercial process CO.sub.2 + 3H.sub.2 .fwdarw. CH.sub.3 OH + H.sub.2 O . (2) since reaction (1) is endothermic, the system represents a method for storing heat energy from an external source in a chemical fuel produced from solid wastes.

Antal, Jr., Michael J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Investigation of Fuel Cell System Performance and Operation: A Fuel Cell as a Practical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low-grade heat from the fuel cell is utilized at the domestic hot water storage tank with a double The low-grade fuel cell heat feeds a heat exchanger to supply domestic hot water requirementsInvestigation of Fuel Cell System Performance and Operation: A Fuel Cell as a Practical Distributed

38

Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one aspect, the invention provides a method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor to a desired temperature in a fuel cell system, wherein the fuel processor generates hydrogen (H.sub.2) from a hydrocarbon for reaction within a fuel cell to generate electricity. More particularly, the invention provides a method and select system design features which cooperate to provide a start up mode of operation and a smooth transition from start-up of the combustor and fuel processor to a running mode.

Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Mowery, Kenneth D. (Noblesville, IN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Catalytic hydroprocessing of shale oil to produce distillate fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of a Chevron Research Company study sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to demonstrate the feasibility of converting whole shale oil to a synthetic crude resembling a typical petroleum distillate. The synthetic crude thus produced can then be processed, in conventional petroleum-refining facilities, to transportation fuels such as high octane gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The raw shale oil feed used is a typical Colorado shale oil produced in a surface retort in the so-called indirectly heated mode. It is shown that whole shale oil can be catalytically hydrodenitrified to reduce the nitrogen to levels as low as one part per million in a single catalytic stage. However, for economic reasons, it appears preferable to denitrify to about 0.05 wt % nitrogen. The resulting synthetic crude resembles a petroleum distillate that can be fractionated and further processed as necessary in conventional petroleum refining facilities. Shale oil contains about 0.6% sulfur. Sulfur is more easily removed by hydrofining than is nitrogen; therefore, only a few parts per million of sulfur remain at a product nitrogen of 0.05 wt %. Oxygen contained in the shale oil is also reduced to low levels during hydrodenitrification. The shale oil contains appreciable quantities of iron and arsenic which are also potential catalyst poisons. These metals are removed by a guard bed placed upstream from the hydrofining catalyst. Based on correlations, the naphthas from the shale oil hydrofiner can readily be upgraded to high octane gasolines by catalytic reforming. The middle distillate fractions may require some additional hydrofining to produce salable diesel or jet fuel. The technology is available, and pilot plant studies are scheduled to verify diesel hydrofiner performance.

Sullivan, R.F.; Stangeland, B.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Producing liquid fuels from coal: prospects and policy issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in world oil prices since 2003 has prompted renewed interest in producing and using liquid fuels from unconventional resources, such as biomass, oil shale, and coal. This book focuses on issues and options associated with establishing a commercial coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry within the United States. It describes the technical status, costs, and performance of methods that are available for producing liquids from coal; the key energy and environmental policy issues associated with CTL development; the impediments to early commercial experience; and the efficacy of alternative federal incentives in promoting early commercial experience. Because coal is not the only near-term option for meeting liquid-fuel needs, this book also briefly reviews the benefits and limitations of other approaches, including the development of oil shale resources, the further development of biomass resources, and increasing dependence on imported petroleum. A companion document provides a detailed description of incentive packages that the federal government could offer to encourage private-sector investors to pursue early CTL production experience while reducing the probability of bad outcomes and limiting the costs that might be required to motivate those investors. (See Rand Technical Report TR586, Camm, Bartis, and Bushman, 2008.) 114 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs., 3 apps.

James T. Bartis; Frank Camm; David S. Ortiz

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor in a fuel cell system, in which the fuel processor generates a hydrogen-rich stream a portion of which is consumed in a fuel cell stack and a portion of which is discharged from the fuel cell stack and supplied to the combustor, and wherein first and second streams are supplied to the combustor, the first stream being a hydrocarbon fuel stream and the second stream consisting of said hydrogen-rich stream, the method comprising the steps of monitoring the temperature of the fuel processor; regulating the quantity of the first stream to the combustor according to the temperature of the fuel processor; and comparing said quantity of said first stream to a predetermined value or range of predetermined values.

Chalfant, Robert W. (West Henrietta, NY); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system that will facilitate fueling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system into this system. All University vehicles that wish to fuel at UH M noa Transportation Services will be required the application below and submit your application to Transportation Services before attempting to fuel your

44

Fuel Composition Impacts on Combustion Turbine Operability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most new CT plants today area permitted at low emission limits for NOx and CO, leading to greater use of lean, pre-mix combustion of natural gas in dry, low-NOx (DLN) combustors. These combustors are typically fine-tuned for a narrow range of fuel properties. At the same time, the increasing variability of natural gas supplies, deregulation of the gas industry, and increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) has led to more variability in fuel properties and a need for greater flexibility in firing gas...

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

Clarke, John F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Improved Gas Turbines for LBTU Syngas Fuel Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines running on syngas can take advantage of that fuel's high mass flow per BTU. Optimizing performance while keeping all operating parameters within acceptable limits was the result of a G.E. project.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

48

Microstructural damage produced by helium in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microstructural damage is produced in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels used to power radioisotopic heat sources by the generation and release of the helium arising from alpha decay of the fuel. We obtained information about the nature and extent of this damage from metallographic examination of fuel pellets ranging in density from 87 to 94% with a grain size range of 6 to 30 ..mu..m that either were stored at ambient temperature for 18 months and then heated at 900, 1150, or 1360/sup 0/C or were stored at 900, 1150, or 1350/sup 0/C for 27 months. Microstructural damage was not observed in the fuel pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at 900/sup 0/C, but grain boundary bubble damage was observed in the pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at either 1150 or 1350/sup 0/C. More extensive damage occurred in those pellets heated at 1350/sup 0/C. Four of the higher density pellets (92 and 94% dense) stored at 900/sup 0/C shattered during storage and the rest appeared to be highly strained. The pellets stored at 1150/sup 0/C were damaged only slightly but were somewhat strained and appeared to have released their helium inventory only partially. All pellets stored at 1350/sup 0/C showed swelling and extensive void agglomeration. These data suggest that the best fuel operating temperature, as far as helium damage is concerned, would be approx. 1200/sup 0/C because below this temperature the fuel becomes highly strained and above this temperature the fuel swells ad becomes somewhat friable. Both these situations could adversely affect the impact behavior of the fuel from the standpoint of strength and fines generation.

Land, C.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Dynamically balanced fuel nozzle and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method of operation designed to reduce undesirably high pressure oscillations in lean premix combustion systems burning hydrocarbon fuels are provided. Natural combustion and nozzle acoustics are employed to generate multiple fuel pockets which, when burned in the combustor, counteract the oscillations caused by variations in heat release in the combustor. A hybrid of active and passive control techniques, the apparatus and method eliminate combustion oscillations over a wide operating range, without the use of moving parts or electronics.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Janus, Michael C. (Baltimore, MD); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Operation of an aircraft engine using liquefied methane fuel  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a reciprocating aircraft engine on methane fuel is demonstrated. Since storage of the methane fuel in the gaseous state would impractical for a flight fuel system, a liquid storage system was used. System valving was configured to deliver only liquid methane to the engine supply line. The equipment description includes photo and diagram illustrations of the liquid methane storage dewar, and photos of the methane heat exchanger, pressure regulator and air-fuel mixer. The engine test results are presented for gasoline and methane in terms of RPM, horsepower, fuel flow, specific energy consumption and standard conditions horsepower. Conclusions include the finding that conversion of an aircraft reciprocating engine to operate on liquified methane is possible with very satisfactory results.

Raymer, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

Baozhen, Li (Essex Junction, VT); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singhal, Subhash C. (Murrysville, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

53

Solar Reforming of Carbon Dioxide to Produce Diesel Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the demonstration of an innovative technology, referred to as the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer, which utilizes waste CO2 as a feedstock for the efficient and economical production of synthetic diesel fuel using solar thermal energy as the primary energy input. The Sunexus technology employs a two stage process for the conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel. A solar reforming system, including a specially designed reactor and proprietary CO2 reforming catalyst, was developed and used to convert captured CO2 rich gas streams into syngas (primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide) using concentrated solar energy at high conversion efficiencies. The second stage of the system (which has been demonstrated under other funding) involves the direct conversion of the syngas into synthetic diesel fuel using a proprietary catalyst (Terra) previously developed and validated by Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals (PRFC). The overall system energy efficiency for conversion of CO2 to diesel fuel is 74%, due to the use of solar energy. The results herein describe modeling, design, construction, and testing of the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer. Extensive parametric testing of the solar reformer and candidate catalysts was conducted and chemical kinetic models were developed. Laboratory testing of the Solar Reformer was successfully completed using various gas mixtures, temperatures, and gas flow rates/space velocities to establish performance metrics which can be employed for the design of commercial plants. A variety of laboratory tests were conducted including dry reforming (CO2 and CH{sub 4}), combination dry/steam reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4} & H{sub 2}O), and tri-reforming (CO2, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}O & O{sub 2}). CH{sub 4} and CO2 conversions averaged 95-100% and 50-90% per reformer cycle, respectively, depending upon the temperatures and gas space velocities. No formation of carbon deposits (coking) on the catalyst was observed in any of these tests. A 16 ft. diameter, concentrating solar dish was modified to accommodate the Sunexus CO2 Solar Reformer and the integrated system was installed at the Pacific Renewable Fuels and Chemicals test site at McClellan, CA. Several test runs were conducted without catalyst during which the ceramic heat exchanger in the Sunexus Solar Reformer reached temperatures between 1,050 F (566 C) and 2,200 F (1,204 C) during the test period. A dry reforming mixture of CO2/CH{sub 4} (2.0/1.0 molar ratio) was chosen for all of the tests on the integrated solar dish/catalytic reformer during December 2010. Initial tests were carried out to determine heat transfer from the collimated solar beam to the catalytic reactor. The catalyst was operated successfully at a steady-state temperature of 1,125 F (607 C), which was sufficient to convert 35% of the 2/1 CO2/CH{sub 4} mixture to syngas. This conversion efficiency confirmed the results from laboratory testing of this catalyst which provided comparable syngas production efficiencies (40% at 1,200 F [650 C]) with a resulting syngas composition of 20% CO, 16% H{sub 2}, 39% CO2 and 25% CH{sub 4}. As based upon the laboratory results, it is predicted that 90% of the CO2 will be converted to syngas in the solar reformer at 1,440 F (782 C) resulting in a syngas composition of 50% CO: 43% H{sub 2}: 7% CO2: 0% CH{sub 4}. Laboratory tests show that the higher catalyst operating temperature of 1,440 F (782 C) for efficient conversion of CO2 can certainly be achieved by optimizing solar reactor heat transfer, which would result in the projected 90% CO2-to-syngas conversion efficiencies. Further testing will be carried out during 2011, through other funding support, to further optimize the solar dish CO2 reformer. Additional studies carried out in support of this project and described in this report include: (1) An Assessment of Potential Contaminants in Captured CO2 from Various Industrial Processes and Their Possible Effect on Sunexus CO2 Reforming Catalysts; (2) Recommended Measurement Methods for Assessing Contaminant Levels in Captured CO2 Streams; (3) An Asse

Dennis Schuetzle; Robert Schuetzle

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intelligent Machine Learning Analysis for Fuel Cell Operations  

SciTech Connect

A performance computational model for a 100 kW nominal solid oxide fuel cell generator system is described. The calculational methods are based on the FORTRAN programming language. Comprehensive parameter input options are presented, and constraints are identified. Example reactant, electrical, and efficiency outputs are demonstrated over the relevant operating ranges. A sample calculated output display at nominal operating conditions is given.

Murphy, R.W.; Hoyt, W.A.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment… (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) 327993 Mineral Wool 39 12 0 * 24 * 0 3 * 331 Primary Metals 1,328 412 1 9 537 3 23 291 53 331111 Iron and...

57

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011: Fiscal Year 7: Crude Oil and Lease Condensate

58

Development of a pressurized fluidized-bed biomass gasifier to produce substitute fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting a program to convert forest and crop residues to substitute fuel in a pressurized fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The process is designed for operation at pressures up to 2.17 MPa (315 psia) and temperatures up to 1255 K (1800/sup 0/F). Various goals for synthesis or fuel gas processes are being pursued to develop an efficient process. Some of these goals are to maximize the throughput, the amount, and the quality of the gas, while minimizing both the amount of the feedstock preparation needed and the formation of condensible compounds that require by-product disposal and process wastewater treatment. The process development results obtained from fluidization, biomass devolatilization, and char gasification studies were used to design a 30.5-cm (12-inch) ID adiabatic fluidized-bed gasification process development unit (PDU), capable of handling up to 455 kg (1000 lb) of biomass per hour. The fluidized-bed gasifier performance is to be determined as a function of the standard operating parameters to develop a basis for recommending processes to produce either an industrial fuel gas for energy generation or a synthesis gas for methanol and ammonia production.

Babu, S P; Onischak, M; Kosowski, G

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for producing electricity from a fuel cell having solid-oxide ionic electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized quadrivalent cation oxide electrolytes are employed in fuel cells at elevated temperatures with a carbon and/or hydrogen containing fuel anode and an oxygen cathode. The fuel cell is operated at elevated temperatures with conductive metallic coatings as electrodes and desirably having the electrolyte surface blackened. Of particular interest as the quadrivalent oxide is zirconia.

Mason, David M. (Los Altos, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of a New Operational Technique for Producing Clear Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To produce atmospheric temperature profiles from measurements of infrared data, it is necessary to obtain infrared radiances for clear areas. Clear radiances are obtained either by identifying spots that are completely clear or by extracting ...

L. M. McMillin; C. Dean

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EDF Nuclear Power Plants Operating Experience with MOX fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EDF started Plutonium recycling in PWR in 1987 and progressively all the 20 reactors, licensed in using MOX fuel, have been loaded with MOX assemblies. At the origin of MOX introduction, these plants operated at full power in base load and the core management limited the irradiation time of MOX fuel assemblies to 3 annual cycles. Since 1995 all these reactors can operate in load follow mode. Since that time, a large amount of experience has been accumulated. This experience is very positive considering: - Receipt, handling, in core behaviour, pool storage and shipment of MOX fuel; - Operation of the various systems of the plant; - Environment impact; - Radioprotection; - Safety file requirements; - Availability for the grid. In order to reduce the fuel cost and to reach a better adequacy between UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing flow and plutonium consumption, EDF had decided to improve the core management of MOX plants. This new core management call 'MOX Parity' achieves parity for MOX and UO{sub 2} assemblies in term of discharge burn-up. Compared to the current MOX assembly the Plutonium content is increased from 7,08% to 8,65% (equivalent to natural uranium enriched to respectively 3,25% and 3,7%) and the maximum MOX assembly burn-up moves from 42 to 52 GWd/t. This amount of burn-up is obtained from loading MOX assemblies for one additional annual cycle. Some, but limited, adaptations of the plant are necessary. In addition a new MOX fuel assembly has been designed to comply with the safety criteria taking into account the core management performances. These design improvements are based on the results of an important R and D program including numerous experimental tests and post-irradiated fuel examinations. In particular, envelope conditions compared to MOX Parity neutronic solicitations has been extensively investigated in order to get a full knowledge of the in reactor fuel behavior. Moreover, the operating conditions of the plant have been evaluated in many details and finally no important impact is anticipated. The industrial maturity of plutonium recycling activities is fully demonstrated and a new progress can be done with a complete confidence. The licensing process of 'MOX Parity' core management is in progress and its implementation on the 20 PWR is now expected at mid 2007. (author)

Thibault, Xavier [EDF Generation, Tour EDF Part Dieu - 9 rue des Cuirassiers B.P.3181 - 69402 Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A full fuel-cycle analysis of energy and emissions impacts of transportation fuels produced from natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of its abundance and because it offers significant energy and evironmental advantages, natural gas has been promoted for use in motor vehicles. A number of transportation fuels are produced from natural gas; each is distinct in terms of upstream production activities and vehicle usage. In this study, the authors avaluate eight fuels produced from natural gas - compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and electricity--for use in five types of motor vehicles--spark-ignition vehicles, compression-ignition vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, battery-powered electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles. Because of great uncertainties associated with advances both in fuel production and vehicle technologies, they evaluate near-term and long-term fuels and vehicle technologies separately. Furthermore, for long-term options, they establish both an incremental technology scenario and a leap-forward technology scenario to address potential technology improvements. The study reveals that, in general, the use of natural gas-based fuels reduces energy use and emissions relative to use of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel, although different natural gas-based fuels in different vehicle technologies can have significantly different energy and emissions impacts.

Wang, M.Q.; Huang, H.S.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This paper was prepared in response to recent requests that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide updated summary information regarding fossil fuel production on federal and Indian lands in the United States. It provides EIA's current best estimates of fossil fuels sales from production on federal and Indian lands for fiscal year 2003 through 2011. eia-federallandsales.pdf More Documents & Publications Testimony Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources Before the House Natural Resources Committee Before the Energy and Power Subcommittee - House Energy and Commerce

70

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process And Apparatus For Producing A Stream Of Inert Gases From A Hydrocarbon Fuel Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental research study involving an unconventional method of producing a stream of inert gases from common hydrocarbon fuel sources has been described. Design and processing science elements from several different scientific, engineering, and ... Keywords: design, engine, fuel, hydrocarbon, inert gas, process, production, system

F. W. Giacobbe

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

OPERATION OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES WITH PRACTICAL HYDROCARBON FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was carried out to achieve a better understanding of how SOFC anodes work with real fuels. The motivation was to improve the fuel flexibility of SOFC anodes, thereby allowing simplification and cost reduction of SOFC power plants. The work was based on prior results indicating that Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs can be operated directly on methane and natural gas, while SOFCs with novel anode compositions can work with higher hydrocarbons. While these results were promising, more work was clearly needed to establish the feasibility of these direct-hydrocarbon SOFCs. Basic information on hydrocarbon-anode reactions should be broadly useful because reformate fuel gas can contain residual hydrocarbons, especially methane. In the Phase I project, we have studied the reaction mechanisms of various hydrocarbons--including methane, natural gas, and higher hydrocarbons--on two kinds of Ni-containing anodes: conventional Ni-YSZ anodes and a novel ceramic-based anode composition that avoid problems with coking. The effect of sulfur impurities was also studied. The program was aimed both at achieving an understanding of the interactions between real fuels and SOFC anodes, and providing enough information to establish the feasibility of operating SOFC stacks directly on hydrocarbon fuels. A combination of techniques was used to provide insight into the hydrocarbon reactions at these anodes during SOFC operation. Differentially-pumped mass spectrometry was be used for product-gas analysis both with and without cell operation. Impedance spectroscopy was used in order to understand electrochemical rate-limiting steps. Open-circuit voltages measurements under a range of conditions was used to help determine anode electrochemical reactions. Life tests over a wide range of conditions were used to establish the conditions for stable operation of anode-supported SOFC stacks directly on methane. Redox cycling was carried out on ceramic-based anodes. Tests on sulfur tolerance of Ni-YSZ anodes were carried out.

Scott A. Barnett; Jiang Liu; Yuanbo Lin

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL Produces Ethylene via Photosynthesis; Breakthrough Offers Cleaner Alternative for Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL scientists have demonstrated a way to produce ethylene through photosynthesis, a breakthrough that could lead to more environmentally friendly ways to produce a variety of materials, chemicals, and transportation fuels. The scientists introduced a gene into a cyanobacterium and demonstrated that the organism remains stable through at least four generations, producing ethylene gas that can be easily captured. In the laboratory, the organism, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, produced 720 milligrams of ethylene per liter each day.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of operating parameters and anode gas impurities upon polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are actively under development for transportation and other applications. Integration of a PEM fuel cell stack with a methanol reformer requires an understanding of single cell performance under a range of operating conditions using anode gas contaminated with impurities. The effect of temperature, pressure, and anode gas impurities on single cell PEM performance was investigated with platinum black electrodes. Single cell performance remained unchanged as temperature was varied between 80 and 100 at 3 atm pressure. High water partial pressures at 120C produced a mass transfer limiting current. While operation at 120C did not reverse CO{sub 2} poisoning, anode air addition proved effective. Air injection also decreased CO poisoning at injected concentrations up to 200 ppm CO. Higher single cell tolerance was observed for CH{sub 3}OH than CO. Up to 1 mole % CH{sub 3}OH in the gas phase reduced the current density by less than 10%.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Operator decision aid for breached fuel operation in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the development of an expert system that provides continuous assessment of the safety significance and technical specification conformance of Delayed Neutron (DN) signals during breached fuel operation. The completed expert system has been parallelized on an innovative distributed-memory network-computing system that enables the computationally intensive kernel of the expert system to run in parallel on a group of low-cost Unix workstations. 1 ref.

Gross, K.C.; Hawkins, R.E.; Nickless, W.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilty  

SciTech Connect

High-Level Functional & Operational Requirements for the AFCF -This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy.

Charles Park

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell System Operation ...  

Self-Regulating Water Separation System for Fuel Cells Innovators at NASA’s Johnson Space ... Solar Thermal; Startup ... The system uses the flow energy of the fuel ...

82

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases and thus reduce three temperature losses in the system associated with (1) heat transfer from the fuel to the reactor coolant, (2) temperature rise across the reactor core, and (3) heat transfer across the heat exchangers between the reactor and H2 production plant. Lowering the peak reactor temperatures and thus reducing the high-temperature materials requirements may make the AHTR the enabling technology for low-cost nuclear hydrogen production.

Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Determination of the proper operating range for the CAFCA IIB fuel cycle model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel cycle simulation tool, CAFCA II was previously modified to produce the most recent version, CAFCA IIB. The code tracks the mass distribution of transuranics in the fuel cycle in one model and also projects costs ...

Warburton, Jamie (Jamie L.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Economics of producing fuel-grade alcohol from corn in western Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of significant quantities of alcohol fuel will have important effects on the use of agricultural resources, including increased food prices. The two major objectives of this research were to determine (1) the potential effects of alcohol-fuel production on agriculture, and (2) the increase in energy prices needed for alcohol-fuel production to become economic. Western Ohio (the Corn Belt part of the state) was chosen for study. A quadratic-programming model with crop, livestock, and alcohol-fuel-production activities was used for analysis. Four alcohol-fuel-production levels were analyzed: 100, 200, 300 and 400 million gallons. The 400-million-gallon level represents western Ohio's share of alcohol-fuel production for a national gasohol program. The production of alcohol results in a high protein by-product feed that can substitute for soybean meal. Efficient use of this by-product is a crucial factor affecting resource use and food prices. At low alcohol-fuel production levels, 80% of the additional cropland required for increased corn production comes from the cropland released through by-product feeding. However, as alcohol-fuel production increases, livestock's ability to use efficiently this by-product feed decreases. This in turn, reduces greatly the cropland that can be released for increased corn production. Consequently, food prices increase substantially. The quantity of land released through by-product feeding, at high alcohol-fuel-production levels, can be increased if the corn is first wet milled. Wet milling produces high-protein feeds that can be used more efficiently by livestock. For alcohol-fuel production to become economic, crude oil prices must increase by ten cents per gallon for the wet-milling process and 22 cents per gallon for the conventional distillery process (1981 $).

Ott, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on biodiesel with a partial oxidation reformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development (NETL/ORD) has successfully demonstrated the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using reformed biodiesel. The biodiesel for the project was produced and characterized by West Virginia State University (WVSU). This project had two main aspects: 1) demonstrate a catalyst formulation on monolith for biodiesel fuel reforming; and 2) establish SOFC stack test stand capabilities. Both aspects have been completed successfully. For the first aspect, in–house patented catalyst specifications were developed, fabricated and tested. Parametric reforming studies of biofuels provided data on fuel composition, catalyst degradation, syngas composition, and operating parameters required for successful reforming and integration with the SOFC test stand. For the second aspect, a stack test fixture (STF) for standardized testing, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the Solid Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program, was engineered and constructed at NETL. To facilitate the demonstration of the STF, NETL employed H.C. Starck Ceramics GmbH & Co. (Germany) anode supported solid oxide cells. In addition, anode supported cells, SS441 end plates, and cell frames were transferred from PNNL to NETL. The stack assembly and conditioning procedures, including stack welding and sealing, contact paste application, binder burn-out, seal-setting, hot standby, and other stack assembly and conditioning methods were transferred to NETL. In the future, fuel cell stacks provided by SECA or other developers could be tested at the STF to validate SOFC performance on various fuels. The STF operated on hydrogen for over 1000 hrs before switching over to reformed biodiesel for 100 hrs of operation. Combining these first two aspects led to demonstrating the biodiesel syngas in the STF. A reformer was built and used to convert 0.5 ml/min of biodiesel into mostly hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas.) The syngas was fed to the STF and fuel cell stack. The results presented in this experimental report document one of the first times a SOFC has been operated on syngas from reformed biodiesel.

Siefert, N, Shekhawat, D.; Gemmen, R.; Berry, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fuel-producing Geobacter receives support from new research May 3rd, 2010 in Technology / Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growing the bacteria on the surface of graphite electrodes located on a rooftop. A rooftop solar panel generated from solar panels to produce fuels and other useful products. The researchers are currently efficiency than traditional photosynthesis. This efficiency is partly due to the fact that solar panels can

Lovley, Derek

88

Maintenance and operation of the US Alternative Fuel Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels Utilization Program (AFUP) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has investigated the possibilities and limitations of expanded scope of fuel alternatives and replacement means for transportation fuels from alternative sources. Under the AFUP, the Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was created to solve problems in the DOE programs that were grappling with the utilization of shale oil and coal liquids for transportation fuels. This report covers the first year at the 3-year contract. The principal objective was to assist the AFUP in accomplishing its general goals with two new fuel initiatives selected for tasks in the project year: (1) Production of low-sulfur, low-olefin catalytically cracked gasoline blendstock; and (2) production of low-reactivity/low-emission gasoline. Supporting goals included maintaining equipment in good working order, performing reformulated gasoline tests, and meeting the needs of other government agencies and industries for fuel research involving custom processing, blending, or analysis of experimental fuels.

Erwin, J.; Ferrill, J.L.; Hetrick, D.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A High Temperature Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Phosphine Contaminated Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid oxide fuel cells that operate on phosphine contaminated coal syngas are subject to performance degradation due to alterations of the anode microstructure. Theoretical investigations… (more)

De Silva, Kandaudage Channa R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report was peer reviewed by these contributors and their comments have been incorporated. Among key findings is that, for all cases examined on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol utilized as both E85 and E10 outperforms that of conventional (current) and of reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and greenhouse gas production. In many cases, the superiority of the energy and GHG result is quite pronounced (i.e., well outside the range of model "noise")

Michael Wang Christopher; Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fuel mixture stratification as a method for improving homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for slowing the heat-release rate in homogeneous charge compression ignition ("HCCI") engines that allows operation without excessive knock at higher engine loads than are possible with conventional HCCI. This method comprises injecting a fuel charge in a manner that creates a stratified fuel charge in the engine cylinder to provide a range of fuel concentrations in the in-cylinder gases (typically with enough oxygen for complete combustion) using a fuel with two-stage ignition fuel having appropriate cool-flame chemistry so that regions of different fuel concentrations autoignite sequentially.

Dec, John E. (Livermore, CA); Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G. (Livermore, CA)

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012 ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012 1

96

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. March 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 1

97

Neutron Imaging Study of the Water Transport in Operating Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durability (B) Cost (C) Performance This project is conducting fundamental studies of water transport in the fuel cell. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward...

98

Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells, 2nd International Workshop on Degradation Issues in Fuel Cells, Thessaloniki, Greece, September 21-23, 2011. 9. R. Subbaraman, Ex-situ Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic...

99

Fuel Composition Effects and Other Operational Parameters on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition Effects and Other Composition Effects and Other Operational Parameters on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Performance DOE/NETL-401/093010 September 30, 2010 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

100

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Stories of Discovery & Innovation From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Enlarge Photo Image by Eric Steen, JBEI Once E. coli have secreted oil, they sequester themselves from the droplets as shown by this optical image, thereby facilitating oil recovery. Currently, biochemical processing of cellulosic biomass requires costly enzymes for sugar liberation. By giving the E. coli the capacity to ferment both cellulose and hemicellulose without the 03.28.11 From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass A microbe that can produce an advanced biofuel directly from biomass was developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NETL: News Release - Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reaches One Year of Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2000 January 31, 2000 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reaches One Year of Operations Netherlands Test Boosts Confidence for Commercial Introduction by 2004 An experimental all solid-state fuel cell - the possible prototype for a future "combustion-less" power plant - has passed a key milestone in a joint public-private development effort. Schematic Diagram of Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell The Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell is a tubular arrangement of concentric ceramic electrodes and a solid-state electrolyte. Siemens-Westinghouse Power Corp., headquartered in Orlando, FL, announced this week that its 100-kilowatt solid oxide fuel cell power system, the world's largest, has completed one year of total operating time, the longest any fuel cell of this type and size has run. The milestone marked

103

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA); Antenucci, Annette B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nano Sensor Networks for Tailored Operation of Highly Efficient Gas-To-Liquid Fuels Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano Sensor Networks for Tailored Operation of Highly Efficient Gas-To-Liquid Fuels Catalysts Eisa Engineering at University of New South Wales. #12;1 Introduction Gas-to-liquid (GTL) compounds are clean fuels for converting natural gas to the liquid hydrocarbons [1]. However, the reaction is a complex network of many

New South Wales, University of

107

Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Scenarios for multi-unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work describes: (a) the motivation for considering fusion in general, and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) in particular, to produce hydrogen fuel powering low-emission vehicles; (b) the general requirements for any fusion electric plant to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis at costs competitive with present consumer gasoline fuel costs per passenger mile, for advanced car architectures meeting President Clinton`s 80 mpg advanced car goal, and (c) a comparative economic analysis for the potential cost of electricity (CoE) and corresponding cost of hydrogen (CoH) from a variety of multi-unit IFE plants with one to eight target chambers sharing a common driver and target fab facility. Cases with either heavy-ion or diode-pumped, solid-state laser drivers are considered, with ``conventional`` indirect drive target gains versus ``advanced, e.g. Fast Ignitor`` direct drive gain assumptions, and with conventional steam balance-of-plant (BoP) versus advanced MHD plus steam combined cycle BoP, to contrast the potential economics under ``conventional`` and ``advanced`` IFE assumptions, respectively.

Logan, B.G.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Simulated first operating campaign for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid-metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle-economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. Over the next few years, the IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated at Argonne-West in Idaho. Spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) win be processed in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) using a pyrochemical method that employs molten salts and liquid metals in an electrorefining operation. As part of the preparation for the fuel cycle demonstration, a computer code, PYRO, was developed at Argonne to model the electrorefining operation using thermodynamic and empirical data. This code has been used extensively to evaluate various operating strategies for the fuel cycle demonstration. The modeled results from the first operating campaign are presented. This campaign is capable of processing more than enough material to refuel completely the EBR-II core.

Goff, K.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Park, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ackerman, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Operator Certification Standards for Fossil Fuel Fired Plants: Survey of State and Regional Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has only started addressing the issue of certification for fossil fuel power plant operators within the last two years. This report, which includes data collected from research of state and local authorities that currently require power plant operators to be certified or licensed, is the first phase of a certification program for Fossil Fuel Fired Power Plants. The report also addresses the possible future shortage of skilled workers needed by the power plants and the ...

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fleet vehicles in the Unites States: composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As fleets become a larger proportion of the new vehicle population on the road, they have more influence on the characteristics of the total US motor vehicle population. One of the characteristics which fleets are expected to have the most influence on is the overall vehicle fuel economy. In addition, because of the relatively large market share and the high turnover rate of fleet vehicles, fleets have been considered as a useful initial market for alternative fuel vehicles. In order to analyze fleet market potential and likely market penetration of alternative fuel vehicles and to infrastructure requirements for successful operations of these vehicles in the future, information on fleet sizes and composition, fleet vehicle operating characteristics (such as daily/annual miles of travel), fuel efficiency, and refueling practices, is essential. The purpose of this report is to gather and summarize information from the latest data sources available pertaining to fleet vehicles in the US This report presents fleet vehicle data on composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices. The questions these data are intended to address include: (1) How are fleet vehicles operated? (2) Where are they located? and (3) What are their usual fueling practices? Since a limited number of alternative fuel fleet vehicles are already in use, data on these vehicles are also included in this report. 17 refs.

Miaou, S.P.; Hu, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Young, J.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fleet vehicles in the Unites States: composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As fleets become a larger proportion of the new vehicle population on the road, they have more influence on the characteristics of the total US motor vehicle population. One of the characteristics which fleets are expected to have the most influence on is the overall vehicle fuel economy. In addition, because of the relatively large market share and the high turnover rate of fleet vehicles, fleets have been considered as a useful initial market for alternative fuel vehicles. In order to analyze fleet market potential and likely market penetration of alternative fuel vehicles and to infrastructure requirements for successful operations of these vehicles in the future, information on fleet sizes and composition, fleet vehicle operating characteristics (such as daily/annual miles of travel), fuel efficiency, and refueling practices, is essential. The purpose of this report is to gather and summarize information from the latest data sources available pertaining to fleet vehicles in the US This report presents fleet vehicle data on composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices. The questions these data are intended to address include: (1) How are fleet vehicles operated (2) Where are they located and (3) What are their usual fueling practices Since a limited number of alternative fuel fleet vehicles are already in use, data on these vehicles are also included in this report. 17 refs.

Miaou, S.P.; Hu, P.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Young, J.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolytes Produced by a Combination of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising because they directly convert the oxidization of fuel into electrical energy. Plasma-spray coating  ...

117

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

122

Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings.

Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Novel Intergrated Process to Process to Produce Fuels from Coal and Other Carbonaceous Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BioConversion Technology, LLC has developed a novel gasifier design that produces a clean, medium to high BTU synthesis gas that can be utilized for a variety of applications. The staged, indirectly heated design produces high quality synthesis gas without the need for costly pure oxygen. This design also allows for extreme flexibility with respect to feedstocks (including those with high moisture contents) in addition to high throughputs in a small gasifier footprint. A pilot scale testing project was proposed to assist BCT with commercializing the process. A prototype gasifier constructed by BCT was transported to WRI for installation and testing. After troubleshooting, the gasifier was successfully operated with both coal and biomass feedstocks. Instrument upgrades are recommended for further testing.

Andrew Lucero

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

126

Preliminary Experimental Results of Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Operation Using Hardware Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly developed integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) hybrid system concept has been tested using the Hybrid Performance (Hyper) project hardware-based simulation facility at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. The cathode-loop hardware facility, previously connected to the real-time fuel cell model, was integrated with a real-time model of a gasifier of solid (biomass and fossil) fuel. The fuel cells are operated at the compressor delivery pressure, and they are fueled by an updraft atmospheric gasifier, through the syngas conditioning train for tar removal and syngas compression. The system was brought to steady state; then several perturbations in open loop (variable speed) and closed loop (constant speed) were performed in order to characterize the IGFC behavior. Coupled experiments and computations have shown the feasibility of relatively fast control of the plant as well as a possible mitigation strategy to reduce the thermal stress on the fuel cells as a consequence of load variation and change in gasifier operating conditions. Results also provided an insight into the different features of variable versus constant speed operation of the gas turbine section.

Traverso, Alberto; Tucker, David; Haynes, Comas L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Synthetic fuels. Independent has practical oil-shale operation  

SciTech Connect

Geokinetics Inc., Salt Lake City, has been developing a relatively inexpensive process to develop lean shale resources in Utah since 1975. The firm has produced almost 50,000 bbl of shale oil during the past 6 years at its test site south of Vernal, Utah. Geokinetics is projected to produce eventually 109 million bbl of shale oil from its Utah properties at a cost of ca. $30/bbl. The Low Front End Cost (Lofreco) Process, with its small scale, modular construction, and low front end capital load, can develop oil shale under conditions inhibiting firms with big, capital intensive technologies. Lofreco entails blasting a thin shale bed to create a highly permeable in situ retort. The oil shale is ignited via air injection wells, and low pressure blowers provide air to create a fire front that covers the pay section. The front moves horizontally through the fracture shale bed, with hot combustion gases heating the shale to yield shale oil which drains to the bottom of the sloped retort. The oil is recovered via small, conventional pumping units.

Williams, B.

1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Process for producing low-sulfur boiler fuel by hydrotreatment of solvent deashed SRC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this invention, a process is disclosed characterized by heating a slurry of coal in the presence of a process-derived recycle solvent and passing same to a dissolver zone, separating the resultant gases and liquid/solid products therefrom, vacuum distilling the liquid/solids products, separating the portions of the liquid/solids vacuum distillation effluent into a solid ash, unconverted coal particles and SRC material having a boiling point above 850.degree. F. and subjecting same to a critical solvent deashing step to provide an ash-free SRC product. The lighter liquid products from the vacuum distillation possess a boiling point below 850.degree. F. and are passed through a distillation tower, from which recycled solvent is recovered in addition to light distillate boiling below 400.degree. F. (overhead). The ash-free SRC product in accompanyment with at least a portion of the process derived solvent is passed in combination to a hydrotreating zone containing a hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of hydrogen is hydroprocessed to produce a desulfurized and denitrogenized low-sulfur, low-ash boiler fuel and a process derived recycle solvent which is recycled to slurry the coal in the beginning of the process before heating.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A solid oxide fuel cell power system: 1992--1993 field operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has deployed fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems in order to obtain useful customer feedback. Recently, Westinghouse has deployed 20 kW class natural gas fueled SOFC generator modules integrated into two 25 kW SOFC systems, the first with The UTILITIES, a Japanese consortium. The UTILITIES 25 kW SOFC system is the focus of this paper. The unit was shipped to the Rokko Island Test Center for Advanced Energy Systems (near Kobe, Japan) operated by Kansai Electric Power Co.; testing was initiated February 1992. Module A operated for 2601 hours at an ave output 16.6 kW dc; final shutdown was induced by current stability problems with dissipator (restart not possible because of damaged cells). Module B operated for 1579 hours at ave output 17.8 kWdc. The unit was damaged by operation at excessively high fuel utilization > 91%. It was rebuilt and returned to Rokko Island. This module B2 operated for 1843 hours on PNG; shutdown was cuased by air supply failure. After a new blower and motor were installed July 1993, the system was restarted August 5, 1993 and operated continuously until November 10, 1993, when an automatic shutdown was induced as part of a MITI licensing inspection. After restart, the unit passed 6000 hours of operation on desulfurized PNG on January 25, 1994. Westinghouse`s future plans are outlined.

Veyo, S.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Kusunoki, A.; Takeuchi, S. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kaneko, S. [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Yokoyama, H. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Effect of Operational Voltage on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Coal Syngas Containing Trace Amounts of Phosphine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrolyte-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have been proven capable of generating usable electricity when supplied with various fuels, including a synthetic fuel (syngas) generated from… (more)

Kaufman, Brian A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Efficiency Office U.S. Air Force McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas During FY 2012, the 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office (FEO) designed and implemented multiple measures, including a focus on institutional culture change, to reduce inefficiency in fuel management of the KC-135 aircraft and save the Air Force $4.3 million during a 42 percent rise in local sorties (the deployment of aircraft for missions of national defense or aircrew proficiency). These efforts included reducing KC-135 landing fuel by 5000 lb per sortie to save 1.94 million gallons per year; changing the KC-135 standard landing configuration to save 50 lb of fuel per approach; and implementing a new training configuration to reduce aircraft basic weight by 1,600 lb. The FEO also incorporated Mission Index Flying

132

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E ciency O ce E ciency O ce U.S. Air Force McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas During FY 2012, the 22nd Operations Group Fuel E ciency O ce (FEO) designed and implemented multiple measures, including a focus on institutional culture change, to reduce ine ciency in fuel management of the KC-135 aircraft and save the Air Force $4.3 million during a 42 percent rise in local sorties (the deployment of aircraft for missions of national defense or aircrew proficiency). These e orts included reducing KC-135 landing fuel by 5000 lb per sortie to save 1.94 million gallons per year; changing the KC-135 standard landing configuration to save 50 lb of fuel per approach; and implementing a new training configuration to reduce aircraft basic weight by 1,600 lb. The FEO also incorporated Mission Index Flying

133

Data Collection for Class-8 Long-Haul Operations and Fuel Economy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Haul Long-Haul Operations and Fuel Economy Analysis A s part of a long-term study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in conjunction with a number of industry partners (Michelin Americas Research Company - Michelin), have collected data and information related to Class-8 heavy truck long-haul operations in real-world

134

Cycling Operation of Fossil-Fueled Plants: Volume 6: Evaluation and Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, the sixth volume in a series (GS-7219), describes tools to help utilities define and evaluate strategies for cycling fossil-fueled power plants. To assist companies in their cycling decisions, the report describes far-reaching guidelines on cycling units, including economics, the effects on equipment life, and operations and maintenance. In developing a stepwise plant to cycling operation, EPRI investigators reviewed an extensive database of worldwide and U.S. experience with cycling. The re...

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OR-2011-10-21 OR-2011-10-21 Site: Oak Ridge Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory Dates of Activity : 10/21/2011 Report Preparer: Tim Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of the visit was for the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site lead to develop an operational awareness of the Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory. Result: The HSS site lead toured the Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Facility with two Facility Representatives from the Office of Science. During the tour he was provided an explanation of the processes currently used in each of the hot cells and how the

136

Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OR-2011-10-21 OR-2011-10-21 Site: Oak Ridge Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Operational Awareness Tour of Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory Dates of Activity : 10/21/2011 Report Preparer: Tim Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of the visit was for the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site lead to develop an operational awareness of the Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Examination Hot Cell Laboratory. Result: The HSS site lead toured the Building 3525 Irradiated Fuels Facility with two Facility Representatives from the Office of Science. During the tour he was provided an explanation of the processes currently used in each of the hot cells and how the

137

Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPIRE Program Kickoff SPIRE Program Kickoff Topic 3A. Cell Degradation Studies / Degradation Studies Durability of Low Pt Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting DOE Award: DE-EE0000469 October 1 st , 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to study and identify strategies to assure durability of fuel cells designed to meet DOE cost targets. Technical Barriers Barrier Approach Strategy A. Durability Reinforced, Stabilized Membrane MEA Partner Durability-Enhanced Electrodes Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner Optimized Operating Conditions Parametric model & experimental studies B. Cost Low Pt Loadings (0.2 mg/cm 2 ) Electrocatalyst/MEA Partner High Power Density (>1.0W/cm 2 ) Open Flowfield Stack Metallic Stack Architecture Incumbent Derivative

138

Advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) progress with respect to remote operation and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to reduce the volume of spent fuel, and the construction of the ACP facility (ACPF) for a demonstration of its technical feasibility has been completed. In 2006 two inactive demonstrations were performed with simulated fuels in the ACPF. Accompanied by process equipment performance tests, its remote operability and maintainability were also tested during that time. Procedures for remote operation tasks are well addressed in this study and evaluated thoroughly. Also, remote maintenance and repair tasks are addressed regarding some important modules with a high priority order. The above remote handling test's results provided a lot of information such as items to be revised to improve the efficiency of the remote handling tasks. This paper deals with the current status of ACP and the progress of remote handling of ACPF. (authors)

Lee, Hyo Jik; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk [NURE Lab, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ji Sup [Spent Fuel Technology Development Division, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

U.S. could become the world’s top liquid fuels producer, but how ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Significant increases in U.S. production of crude oil and other liquid fuels and the outlook for further growth have focused attention on the possibility that the ...

140

Operation strategy for solid oxide fuel cell systems for small-scale stationary applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variation during the operation. The analysis will consider an average profile for heat and power demand gross electricity generation in 2010 by doubling the generation capacity and increasing the plant load and degrades the fuel cells. To counteract the degradation, the system has not to be stressed with rapid load

Liso, Vincenzo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

Yaniv Shaposhnik; Eugene Shwageraus; Ezra Elias

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Rail versus truck fuel efficiency: The relative fuel efficiency of truck-competitive rail freight and truck operations compared in a range of corridors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes the findings of a study to evaluate the fuel efficiency of rail freight operations relative to competing truckload service. The objective of the study was to identify the circumstances in which rail freight service offers a fuel efficiency advantage over alternative truckload options, and to estimate the fuel savings associated with using rail service. The findings are based on computer simulations of rail and truck freight movements between the same origins and destinations. The simulation input assumptions and data are based on actual rail and truck operations. Input data was provided by U.S. regional and Class I railroads and by large truck fleet operators.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles  

SciTech Connect

Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technical considerations in repowering a nuclear plant for fossil fueled operation  

SciTech Connect

Repowering involves replacement of the reactor by a fossil fuel source of steam. This source can be a conventional fossil fueled boiler or the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) on a gas turbine exhaust. The existing steam turbine plant is used to the extent possible. Alternative fuels for repowering a nuclear plant are coal, natural gas and oil. In today`s world oil is not usually an alternative. Selection of coal or natural gas is largely a matter of availability of the fuel near the location of the plant. Both the fossil boiler and the HRSG produce steam at higher pressures and temperatures than the throttle conditions for a saturated steam nuclear turbine. It is necessary to match the steam conditions from the new source to the existing turbine as closely as possible. Technical approaches to achieve a match range from using a topping turbine at the front end of the cycle to attemperation of the throttle steam with feedwater. The electrical output from the repowered plant is usually greater than that of the original nuclear fueled design. This requires consideration of the ability to use the excess electricity. Interfacing of the new facility with the existing turbine plant requires consideration of facility layout and design. Site factors must also be considered, especially for a coal fired boiler, since rail and coal handling facilities must be added to a site for which these were not considered. Additional site factors that require consideration are ash handling and disposal.

Patti, F.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application, the coolant is pumped to a heat recovery system. A water-to-air heat exchange system or water-to-water heat

Victoria, University of

152

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 4, and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Includes those quantities for which royalties were paid based on the value of the natural gas plant liquids produced. Additional quantities of natural gas plant ...

155

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Effects of Operating Conditions on Internal Resistances in Enzyme Fuel Cells Studied via Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Enzyme fuel cells (EFCs) offer some advantages over traditional precious-metal-catalyzed fuel cells, such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, EFCs exhibit far less power output than PEMFCs and have relatively short life spans before materials must be replaced. In this work, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to analyze the internal resistances throughout the EFC at a variety of operating conditions. EIS analysis is focused primarily on the resistances of the anode, solution/membrane, and cathode. Increased enzyme loading results in improved power output and reductions in internal resistance. Conditions are identified for which enzyme loading does not limit the EFC performance. EIS experiments are also reported for EFCs operated continuously for 2 days; power output declines sharply over time, while all internal resistances increase. Drying of the cathode and enzyme/mediator degradation are believed to have contributed to this behavior. Finally, experiments are performed at varying air-humidification temperatures. Little effect on internal resistances or power output is observed. However, it is anticipated that increased air humidification can improve longevity by delivering more water to the cathode. Improvements to the enzymatic cathode are needed for EFC development. These improvements need to focus on improving transport rather than increasing enzyme loading.

Aaron, D [Georgia Institute of Technology; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Estimates of Tropical Analysis Differences in Daily Values Produced by Two Operational Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to asses the uncertainty of daily synoptic analyses for the atmospheric state, the intercomparison of three First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) level IIIb datasets is conducted. The original analyses and reanalyses produced by the ...

Akira Kasahara; Arthur P. Mizzi

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300.degree.-550.degree. C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400.degree.-500.degree. C. for a limited time of only about 1-5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300.degree. C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

Longanbach, James R. (Columbus, OH)

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for the K Basin Fuel Transfer System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This implementation plan has been prepared to comply with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 425.1A, Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities, and DOE-STD-3006-2000, Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR) (DOE 2002). The scope of the ORR is described in the contractor K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Plan of Action (POA), which was prepared by Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project line management and approved by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager on April 4, 2002 (FH 2002a). While the Project Hanford Management Contractor has been revised to include DOE Order 425.1B, the contractor implementing procedure, ''F-PRO-055, Startup Readiness (Revision 9) has not yet been approved by RL for contractor use. Appendix A provides a crosswalk between the requirements of DOE Order 425.1A and DOE Order 425.1B to show that all requirements of DOE 425.1B are covered by this implementation plan. DOE Order 425.1B indicates that the Secretarial Officer is the Authorization Authority when substantial modifications are made to a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility. This Authorization Authority has been delegated to the RL Manager by memorandum from Jessie Hill Roberson, dated November 20, 2001 (Roberson 2001). The scope of the ORR is described in the RL Plan of Action, K Basin Fuel Transfer System, prepared by DOE project line management and approved by the RL Manager, the designated approval authority, on September 12, 2002 (Schlender 2002). This implementation plan provides the overall approach and guidelines for performance of the DOE ORR. Appendix B contains the Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD), which define the review objectives and criteria as well as the approach for assessing each objective. ORR results will be published in a final report, as discussed in Section 9.4.

DAVIES, T.H.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass. Volume II. Fermentation chemicals from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technological and economic feasibility of producing some selected chemicals by fermentation is discussed: acetone, butanol, acetic acid, citric acid, 2,3-butanediol, and propionic acid. The demand for acetone and butanol has grown considerably. They have not been produced fermentatively for three decades, but instead by the oxo and aldol processes. Improved cost of fermentative production will hinge on improving yields and using cellulosic feedstocks. The market for acetic acid is likely to grow 5% to 7%/yr. A potential process for production is the fermentation of hydrolyzed cellulosic material to ethanol followed by chemical conversion to acetic acid. For about 50 years fermentation has been the chief process for citric acid production. The feedstock cost is 15% to 20% of the overall cost of production. The anticipated 5%/yr growth in demand for citric acid could be enhanced by using it to displace phosphates in detergent manufacture. A number of useful chemicals can be derived from 2,3-butanediol, which has not been produced commercially on a large scale. R and D are needed to establish a viable commercial process. The commercial fermentative production of propionic acid has not yet been developed. Recovery and purification of the product require considerable improvement. Other chemicals such as lactic acid, isopropanol, maleic anhydride, fumarate, and glycerol merit evaluation for commercial fermentative production in the near future.

Villet, R. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Process for producing a clean hydrocarbon fuel from high calcium coal  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for substantially reducing the amount of at least one insoluble fluoride-forming species selected from the group consisting of Group IA species and Group IIA species. The species is present in a coal feed material comprising: forming a slurry of a coal feed; a fluoride acid in an amount to produce a first molar concentration of free-fluoride-ions; at least one fluoride-complexing species, the total of all fluoride-complexing species in the slurry being present in an amount to produce a second molar concentration, the second molar concentration being at least equal to that amount such that the ratio of the first molar concentration to the second molar concentration is substantially equal to the stoichiometric ratio of fluoride in at least one tightly-bound complexion so as to from tightly-bound complexions with substantially all free-fluoride ions in the slurry to produce a leached coal product and a spent leach liquor; and separating the leached coal product from the spent leach liquor.

Kindig, J.K.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimation of iron-55 volumetric contamination via surrogates produced during Z-machine operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the radiation produced by Z-machine nuclear experiments at Sandia National Laboratory and the materials irradiated indicate that the majority of produced radionuclides can easily be detected. One significant exception is volumetric contamination of stainless steel by iron-55. Detecting iron-55 in Z-machine components presents a particular problem due to its low-abundance and the low-energy (5.9 keV) xray it emits. The nuclide is often below the minimum detectable activity (MDA) threshold and resolution criteria of many standard radiation detection devices. Liquid scintillation has proven useful in determining iron-55 presence in loose contamination at concentrations below that of regulatory guidelines, but determination of volumetric iron- 55 contamination remains a significant challenge. Due to this difficulty, an alternate method of detection is needed. The use of radioactive surrogates correlating to iron-55 production is proposed in order to establish an estimate of iron-55 abundance. The primary interaction pathways and interaction probabilities for all likely radionuclide production in the Z-machine were tabulated and radionuclides with production pathways matching those of iron-55 production were noted. For purposes of nuclide identification and adequate detection, abundant gamma emitters with half-lives on the order of days were selected for use as surrogates. Interaction probabilities were compared between that of iron-55 production and a chosen surrogate. Weighting factors were developed to account for the differences in the interaction probabilities over the range of the known energy spectra produced on the device. The selection process resulted in cobalt-55, cobalt-57 and chromium-51 as optimal surrogates for iron-55 detection in both deuterium and non-deuterium loaded interactions. A decay corrected correlation of the surrogates (chromium-51, cobalt-57 and cobalt-55) to iron-55 for deuterium and non-deuterium loaded Z-machine driven reactions was derived. The weighting factors presented here are estimates which are based on rough comparisons of cross-section graphs. Analysis considering factors such as energy spectrum criteria to provide refined weighting factors may be utilized in future work.

Flores-McLaughlin, John

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Determination of the Operating Envelope for a Direct Fired Fuel Cell Turbine Hybrid Using Hardware Based Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating range of a direct fired solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrid with bypass control of cathode airflow was determined using a hardware-based simulation facility designed and built by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Three methods of cathode airflow management using bypass valves in a hybrid power system were evaluated over the maximum range of operation. The cathode air flow was varied independently over the full range of operation of each bypass valve. Each operating point was taken at a steady state condition and was matched to the thermal, pressure and flow output of a corresponding fuel cell operation condition. Turbine electric load was also varied so that the maximum range of fuel cell operation could be studied, and a preliminary operating map could be made. Results are presented to show operating envelopes in terms of cathode air flow, fuel cell and turbine load, and compressor surge margin to be substantial.

David Tucker; Eric Liese; Randall Gemmen

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass: recommendations for R and D. Volume I. Synopsis and executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Areas of research and development judged to be crucial for establishing a biotechnology of biomass processing are identified. Two general avenues are recommended for R and D: (1) in the near term, revival of the older fermentation technology and improvement of processing efficiencies; and (2) in the longer term, the development of novel biotechnological processes, such as for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recommended R and D ranges from work in moleular genetics to biochemical engineering aspects of plant design. It is recommended that the R and D strategy be designed as an integration of three disciplines: biochemical engineering, microbial genetics, and biochemistry. Applcations of gene-transfer methodology and developments in continuous fermentation should be pursued. Currently, economic incentive for the use of biological conversion processes for producing fuels and chemical feedstocks from biomass is marginal. But as the imported fraction of US oil supply grows and hydrocarbon costs mount, the market is beginning to motivate a quest for substitutes. The commercial potential for biotechnology for establishing a renewable resources chemicals industry appears similar to the potential of the computer and microelectronics field several decades ago.

Villet, R

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Catalytic hydrotreating of biomass liquefaction products to produce hydrocarbon fuels: Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research catalytic hydrotreatment of biomass liquefaction products to a gasoline has been technically demonstrated in a bench-scale continuous processing unit. This report describes the development of the chemistry needed for hydrotreatment of both high pressure and pyrolyzate biomass liquefaction products and outlines the important processing knowledge gained by the research. Catalyst identity is important in hydrotreatment of phenolics. Hydrogenation catalysts such as palladium, copper chromite, cobalt and nickel show activity with nickel being the most active. Major products include benzene, cyclohexane, and cyclohexanone. The hydrotreating catalysts cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten exhibit some activity when added to the reactor in the oxide form and show a great specificity for hydrodeoxygenation of phenol without saturation of the benzene product. The sulfide form of these catalysts is much more active than the oxide form and, in the case of the cobalt-molybdenum, much of the specificity for hydrodeoxygenation is retained. Substitution on the phenolic ring has only marginal effects on the hydrotreating reaction. However, the methoxy (OCH/sub 3/) substituent on the phenol ring is thermally unstable relative to other phenolics tested. The pyrolysis products dominate the product distribution when cobalt-molybdenum is used as the hydrotreating catalyst for methoxyphenol. The product from catalytic hydrotreatment of high-pressure biomass liquefaction products confirms the model compounds studies. Catalytic processing at 350 to 400/sup 0/C and 2000 psig with the sulfided cobalt-molybdenum or nickel-molybdenum catalyst produced a gasoline-like product composed of cyclic and aromatic compounds. Oxygen contents in products were in the range of 0 to 0.7 wt % and hydrogen to carbon atomic ratios ranged from 1.5 to 2.0. 46 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Improved fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fuel Cell 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell 101 Fuel Cell 101 Don Hoffman Don Hoffman Ship Systems & Engineering Research Division March 2011 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Fuel Cell Operation * A Fuel Cell is an electrochemical power source * It supplies electricity by combining hydrogen and oxygen electrochemically without combustion. * It is configured like a battery with anode and cathode. * Unlike a battery, it does not run down or require recharging and will produce electricity and will produce electricity, heat and water as long as fuel is supplied. 2H + + 2e - O 2 + 2H + + 2e - 2H 2 O H 2 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 FUEL FUEL CONTROLS Fuel Cell System HEAT & WATER CLEAN CLEAN EXHAUST EXHAUST

171

Membrane-supported nonvolatile acidic electrolytes allow higher temperature operation of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nonvolatile molten and solid acidic electrolyte impregnated ion-exchange membranes in higher temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) to alleviate their water dependence is investigated. Higher temperature PEMFC operation reduces CO poisoning as well as passivation of the Pt electrocatalyst by other condensable species. Further, higher temperature operation could eventually allow direct use of low-temperature reformable fuels such as methanol in the PEMFC. The methodology proposed here involves supporting an appropriate acidic solid, melt, or solution of low volatility within the pores of Nafion{reg_sign} so as to enhance its protonic conductivity at higher temperatures and lower humidity levels. Preliminary experimental results reported here for a PEM fuel cell operating at temperatures of 110 to 120 C based on Nafion supported solutions of heteropolyacid indicate the feasibility of the technique.

Malhotra, S.; Datta, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300°C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cmČ degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cmČ degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)  

SciTech Connect

Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

Chad Smutzer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for use in fuel injectors and pump systems operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While sulfur in diesel fuels helps reduce friction and prevents wear and galling in fuel pump and injector systems, it also creates environmental pollution in the form of hazardous particulates and SO{sub 2} emissions. The environmental concern is the driving force behind industry's efforts to come up with new alternative approaches to this problem. One such approach is to replace sulfur in diesel fuels with other chemicals that would maintain the antifriction and antiwear properties provided by sulfur in diesel fuels while at the same time reducing particulate emissions. A second alternative might be to surface-treat fuel injection parts (i.e., nitriding, carburizing, or coating the surfaces) to reduce or eliminate failures associated with the use of low-sulfur diesel fuels. This research explores the potential usefulness of a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) film developed at Argonne National Laboratory in alleviating the aforementioned problems. The lubricity of various diesel fuels (i.e., high-sulfur, 500 ppm; low sulfur, 140 ppm; ultra-clean, 3 ppm; and synthetic diesel or Fischer-Tropsch, zero sulfur) were tested by using both uncoated and NFC-coated 52100 steel specimens in a ball-on-three-disks and a high-frequency reciprocating wear-test rig. The test program was expanded to include some gasoline fuels as well (i.e., regular gasoline and indolene) to further substantiate the usefulness of the NFC coatings in low-sulfur gasoline environments. The results showed that the NFC coating was extremely effective in reducing wear and providing lubricity in low-sulfur or sulfur-free diesel and gasoline fuels. Specifically, depending on the wear test rig, test pair, and test media, the NFC films were able to reduce wear rates of balls and flats by factors of 8 to 83. These remarkable reductions in wear rates raise the prospect for using the ultra slick carbon coatings to alleviate problems that will be caused by the use of low sulfur diesel and gasoline fuels. Surfaces of the wear scars and tracks were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and by Raman spectroscopy.

Erdemir, A.; Ozturk, O.; Alzoubi, M.; Woodford, J.; Ajayi, L.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Federal Alternative Fuel Program Light Duty Vehicle Operations. Second annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report to Congress details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations as required by Section 400AA(b)(1)(B) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended by the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, Public Law 100-494. In 1992, the Federal alternative fuel vehicle fleet expanded significantly, from the 65 M85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) vehicles acquired in 1991 to an anticipated total of 3,267 light duty vehicles. Operating data are being collected from slightly over 20 percent, or 666, of these vehicles. The 601 additional vehicles that were added to the data collection program in 1992 include 75 compressed natural gas Dodge full-size (8-passenger) vans, 25 E85 (85 percent denatured ethanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) Chevrolet Lumina sedans, 250 M85 Dodge Spirit sedans (planned to begin operation in fiscal year 1993), and 251 compressed natural gas Chevrolet C-20 pickup trucks. Figure ES-1 illustrates the locations where the Federal light duty alternative fuel vehicles that are participating in the data collection program are operating. The primary criteria for placement of vehicles will continue to include air quality attainment status and the availability of an alternative fuel infrastructure to support the vehicles. This report details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations, from October 1991 through September 1992.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel injection system and method of operating the same for an engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector is coupled to an engine. The fuel injector includes an injection opening configured to vary in cross-section between a open state and a fully closed state. The fuel injector is configured to provide a plurality of discrete commanded fuel injections into an engine cylinder by modulating the size of the injection opening without completely closing the opening to the fully closed state.

Topinka, Jennifer Ann (Niskayuna, NY); DeLancey, James Peter (Corinth, NY); Primus, Roy James (Niskayuna, NY); Pintgen, Florian Peter (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Basic Operating Characteristics and Cylinder-to-Cylinder Effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Operating experience with a liquid-hydrogen fueled Buick and refueling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of liquid-hydrogen storage and refueling systems for vehicular applications was made in a recently completed project. The vehicle used in the project was a 1979 Buick Century sedan with a 3.8-L displacement turbocharged V6 engine and an automatic transmission. The vehicle had a fuel economy for driving in the high altitude Los Alamos area that was equivalent to 2.4 km/L of liquid hydrogen or 8.9 km/L of gasoline on an equivalent energy basis. About 22% less energy was required using hydrogen rather than gasoline to go a given distance based on the Environmental Protection Agency estimate of 7.2 km/L of gasoline for this vehicle. At the end of the project the engine had been operated for 138 h and the car driven 3633 km during the 17 months that the vehicle was operated on hydrogen . Two types of onboard liquid-hydrogen storage tanks were tested in the vehicle: the first was an aluminum Dewar with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 110 L; the second was a Dewar with an aluminum outer vessel, two copper vapor-cooled thermal radiation shields, and a stainless steel inner vessel with a liquid-hydrogen capacity of 155 L. The Buick had an unrefueled range of about 274 km with the first liquid-hydrogen tank and about 362 km with the second. The Buick was fueled at least 65 times involving a minimum of 8.1 kL of liquid hydrogen using various liquid-hydrogen storage Dewars at Los Alamos and a semiautomatic refueling station. A refueling time of nine minutes was achieved, and liquid hydrogen losses during refueling were measured. The project has demonstrated that liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle, and its refueling, can be accomplished over an extended period without any major difficulties; nevertheless, appropriate testing is still needed to quantitatively address the question of safety for liquid-hydrogen storage onboard a vehicle.

Stewart, W.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Commercialization of waste gob gas and methane produced in conjunction with coal mining operations. Final report, August 1992--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the project were to identify and evaluate existing processes for (1) using gas as a feedstock for production of marketable, value-added commodities, and (2) enriching contaminated gas to pipeline quality. The following gas conversion technologies were evaluated: (1) transformation to liquid fuels, (2) manufacture of methanol, (3) synthesis of mixed alcohols, and (4) conversion to ammonia and urea. All of these involved synthesis gas production prior to conversion to the desired end products. Most of the conversion technologies evaluated were found to be mature processes operating at a large scale. A drawback in all of the processes was the need to have a relatively pure feedstock, thereby requiring gas clean-up prior to conversion. Despite this requirement, the conversion technologies were preliminarily found to be marginally economic. However, the prohibitively high investment for a combined gas clean-up/conversion facility required that REI refocus the project to investigation of gas enrichment alternatives. Enrichment of a gas stream with only one contaminant is a relatively straightforward process (depending on the contaminant) using available technology. However, gob gas has a unique nature, being typically composed of from constituents. These components are: methane, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor. Each of the four contaminants may be separated from the methane using existing technologies that have varying degrees of complexity and compatibility. However, the operating and cost effectiveness of the combined system is dependent on careful integration of the clean-up processes. REI is pursuing Phase 2 of this project for demonstration of a waste gas enrichment facility using the approach described above. This is expected to result in the validation of the commercial and technical viability of the facility, and the refinement of design parameters.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Investigation of the low temperature performance of trucks operating on low cetane diesel fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anticipated increase in diesel fuel demand prompted a study by Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, to assess the effect of synthetic and cracked fuel components on truck cold weather performance. Subsequently, a two-year contract was awarded to Esso Petroleum Canada Research to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on combustion using a 310 hp modern HD engine, and the effect on startup and driveability down to -30/sup 0/C in four Class 8 trucks.

Cartwright, S.J.; Gilbert, J.B

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Catalytic Tri-reforming of Biomass-Derived Syngas to Produce Desired H2:CO Ratios for Fuel Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on upgrading biomass derived syngas for the synthesis of liquid fuels using Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The process includes novel gasification of biomass… (more)

Walker, Devin Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ENTERPRISE SRS: LEVERAGING ONGOING OPERATIONS TO ADVANCE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is repurposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for ?all things nuclear? as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research (hereafter referred to as the Center). The key proposition of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear fuel cycle processing discoveries and large commercial-scaletechnology deployment by leveraging SRS assets as facilities for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. The Center will coordinate the demonstration of R&D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R&D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the research team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of the Center will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, the Center also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform research demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE?s critical nuclear material missions (e.g., processing in H-Canyon and plutonium storage in K-Area). Thus, the demonstration can be accomplished by leveraging the incremental cost of performing demonstrations without needing to cover the full operational cost of the facility. Current Center activities have been focused on integrating advanced safeguards monitoring technologies demonstrations into the SRS H-Canyon and advanced location technologies demonstrations into K-Area Materials Storage. These demonstrations are providing valuable information to researchers and customers as well as providing the Center with an improved protocol for demonstration management that can be exercised across the entire SRS (as well as to offsite venues) so that future demonstrations can be done more efficiently and provide an opportunity to utilize these unique assets for multiple purposes involving national laboratories, academia, and commercial entities. Key among the envisioned future demonstrations is the use of H-Canyon to demonstrate new nuclear materials separations technologies critical for advancing the mission needs DOE-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to advance the research for next generation fuel cycle technologies. The concept is to install processing equipment on frames. The frames are then positioned into an H-Canyon cell and testing in a relevant radiological environment involving prototypic radioactive materials can be performed.

Murray, A.; Marra, J.; Wilmarth, B.; Mcguire, P.; Wheeler, V.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A health physics program for operation with failed nuclear fuel; Dealing with fleas  

SciTech Connect

The San Onofre Unit 3 nuclear plant suffered fuel cladding failures during its first fuel cycle. As a result, primary systems and parts of the station were contaminated with fleas--tiny highly radioactive, and highly mobile fuel fragments. This article describes the special health physics practices needed to control flea contamination and to evaluate skin doses when personnel contaminations occur. Included are descriptions of a modified Eberline RO-2 ion chamber survey instrument with enhance flea detection capabilities and a laundry monitor that is used to check protective clothing for fleas.

Warnock, R.V.; Cooper, T.L.; Bray, L.G.; Goldin, E.M.; Knapp, P.J.; Lewis, M.N.; Rigby, W.F. (Southern California Edison Co., San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, CA (US))

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Final Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i n a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc. Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1597 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy October 2007 Contents Section Page Contents........................................................................................................................................iii Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1

186

Atmospheric Photochemistry Studies of Pollutant Emissions from Transportation Vehicles Operating on Alternative Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken with the goal of improving our ability to predict the changes in urban ozone resulting from the widespread use of alternative fuels in automobiles. This report presents the results in detail.

Jeffries, H.; Sexton, K.; Yu, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

On selection and operation of an international interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposal of post-irradiation fuel from nuclear reactors has been an issue for the nuclear industry for many years. Most countries currently have no long-term disposal strategy in place. Therefore, the concept of an ...

Burns, Joe, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

190

Fuel Cell Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives Develop a ceramic National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Technical Targets

191

Operating Procedures and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The principal operating variables are: Distance from inner cone of oxy-fuel gas flames or from air-fuel

192

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

More Than 410,000 Hours of Real-World Fuel Cell System Operation Have Been Analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation Team (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet discusses how researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are working to validate hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world settings. NREL strives to provide an independent third-party technology assessment that focuses on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure performance, operation, maintenance, and safety.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation and Analysis of an Integrated PEM Fuel Cell with Absorption Cooling and Water Heating System for Sustainable Building Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a parametric study of a PEM fuel cell integrated with a double effect absorption system is carried out in order to study the effect of different operating conditions on the efficiency of the PEM fuel cell, utilization factor of the over all system, COPs of the double effect cooling and heating system, and power and heat output of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that the efficiency of the cell decreases, ranging from 46.2% to 24.4% with increase in membrane thickness and current density, and at the same time the COP increases ranging from 0.65 to 1.52. The heat and power output of the fuel cell decreases from 10.54 kW to 5.12 kW, and 9.12 kW to 6.99 kW, respectively for the increase in membrane thickness. However, when the temperature of the cell is increased the heat and power output increases from 5.12 kW to 10.54 kW, and 6.9 kW to 7.02 kW, respectively. The COP is found to be decreasing ranging from 1.53 to 0.33 with the increase in temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. As for the utilization factor, it increases ranging from 17% to 87% with increase in the temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. This study reveals that an integrated PEM fuel cell with a double effect absorption cooling systems has a very high potential to be an economical and environmental solution as compared with conventional systems of high electricity and natural gas prices which emit lots of harmful gasses and are not that efficient.

Gadalla, M.; Ratlamwala, T.; Dincer, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Interventions for Plant Operators and Mechanics in Fossil-Fueled Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Committee Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the sixth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it specifically focuses on tasks performed by plant operators and mechanics working in fossil-fueled generating stations and also addresses some tasks performed by steam services technicians. Fossil-fueled generating station operational and mechanical work is physically strenuous and can expose workers...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Chrystal defects of ytria stabilized zirconia in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and their evolution upon cell operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolytes must be crystallographically and chemically stable in typical operating environments, while also possessing high ionic and low electronic conductivities. Cubic fluorite structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), in which ion conduction is provided by oxide ion vacancies, is a proven oxide ion conductor fulfilling such requirements. In the present work, the microstructural and crystallographic defects of YSZ in the anode (Ni/YSZ), cathode (LSM/YSZ), and electrolyte of commercial SOFC cells were studied using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Comparisons were made between an as-received cell and a cell operated at 800 °C for 550 h using syngas as fuel. Examination of the YSZ electron diffraction pattern of the cathode reveals a typical cubic fluorite crystal structure. However, weak diffraction spots, where diffractions should be absent according to the structure factor of the cubic fluorite phase, are present in the patterns taken from the YSZ in the anode and the electrolyte. The appearance of kinematically forbidden spots in YSZ is unchanged after cell operation. Such weak diffraction spots can be interpreted as arising from a nanoscale (2–10 nm) irregularly-shaped tetragonal YSZ (t-YSZ) domain that is randomly distributed in the cubic YSZ (c-YSZ) matrix. However, larger t-YSZ domains with thicknesses of 5–10 nm and lengths of 30 nm are observed by the Ni/YSZ interfaces in cells operated at 800 °C in coal-derived syngas for 550 h. The layered t-YSZ domains are accompanied by the c-YSZ domains, implying the migration of Y along the Ni/YSZ interface in response to cell operation.

Chen, Song; Finklea, Harry; Song, Xueyan; Hackett, Gregory; Gerdes, Kirk

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Vermont Yankee's benefits and concerns operating with Axially zoned GE9 fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vermont Yankee (VY) is a 368-assembly, D-lattice, boiling water reactor (BWR)/4. The current cycle 16 contains 252 GE9 assemblies with axial zoning of gadolinium and enrichment, 112 GE8 assemblies with axially zoned gadolinium, and 4 Siemens 9 x 9-IX lead qualification assemblies. In this paper, the performance of the GE9-dominated core is evaluated against previous cores containing less sophisticated fuel designs.

Woehlke, R.A. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

More Than 410,000 Hours of Real-World Fuel Cell System Operation Have Been Analyzed by NRELs Technology Validation Team (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0362 * February 2011 0362 * February 2011 More Than 410,000 Hours of Real-World Fuel Cell System Operation Have Been Analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation Team Team: Jennifer Kurtz, Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, and Todd Ramsden Accomplishment: NREL analyzed more than 410,000 hours of real-world fuel cell operation from more than 470 government-funded demonstrations in light-duty vehicle, bus, material handling, and backup power markets. Context: NREL's analyses validates the technology in real-world applications, reports on the technology status, and facilitates the development of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations in strategic markets-material handling equipment, backup power, and stationary power-where fuel cells can compete with conventional technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Parallel Operation of Wind Turbine, Fuel Cell, and Diesel Generation Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated a small isolated hybrid power system that used a parallel combination of dispatchable and non-dispatchable power generation sources. The non-dispatchable generation came from a nature-dependent wind turbine, and the dispatchable generations were a fuel cell and a diesel generator. On the load side, the non-dispatchable portion was the village load, and the dispatchable portion was the energy storage, which could be in many different forms (e.g., space/water heater, electrolysis, battery charger, etc.) The interaction among different generation sources and the loads was investigated. Simulation results showed the effect of the proposed system on voltage and frequency fluctuations.

Muljadi, E.; Wang, C.; Nehrir, M. H.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Comparative study of heavy-duty engine operation with diesel fuel and ignition-improved methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be made suitable for compression ignition engines by ignition-improving additives. The ignition improver demand can be minimized by increasing the compression ratio. The technical suitability of this fuel can be regarded as proven, since most of the problems connected with its use have been solved. Its economic viability, however, has still to be doubted. From an environmental point of view, ignition-improved methanol deserves great interest due to the total absence of soot in the exhaust and the considerably reduced NO/sub x/ emission.

Hardenberg, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Turbocharged engine operations using knock resistant fuel blends for engine efficiency improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine downsizing with a turbocharger has become popular these days in automotive industries. Downsizing the engine lets the engine operate in a more efficient region, and the engine boosting compensates for the power loss ...

Jo, Young Suk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modelling the Effects of Nuclear Fuel Reservoir Operation in a Competitive Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many countries, the electricity systems are quitting the vertically integrated monopoly organization for an operation framed by competitive markets. In such a competitive regime one can ask what the optimal management ...

Lykidi, Maria

205

Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

In this project, simulated gasifier-product streams were contacted with the zinc titanate desulfurization sorbent in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized-bed reactor at temperatures ranging from 538 to 750 {degree}C (1000 to 1382 {degree}F). The first set of experiments involved treating a medium-Btu fuel gas (simulating that of a ``Texaco`` oxygen-blown, entrained-bed gasifier) containing 1.4 percent H{sub 2}S and HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 1500 ppmv. The second experimental set evaluated hot-gas desulfurization of a low-Btu fuel gas (simulating the product of the ``U-Gas`` air-blown gasifier), with HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 800 ppmv. These operating conditions were typical of the gas-treatment requirements of gasifiers fueled by Illinois basin coals containing up to 0.6 percent chlorine. The results of the experiments at 538 and 650 {degree}C at all the HCl concentrations revealed no deleterious effects on the capability of the sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from the fuel gas mixtures. In most cases, the presence of the HCl significantly enhanced the desulfurization reaction rate. Some zinc loss, however, was encountered in certain situations at 750 {degree}C when low-steam operating conditions were present. Also of interest, a portion of the incoming HCl was removed from the gas stream and was retained permanently by the sorbent. This behavior was examined in more detail in a limited set of experiments aimed at identifying ways to modify the sorbents composition so that the sorbent could act as a simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination agent in the hot-gas cleanup process.

O`Brien, W.S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A coal-water slurry fueled internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, M.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Preventing CO poisoning in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance with CO contamination of the H.sub.2 fuel stream is substantially improved by injecting O.sub.2 into the fuel stream ahead of the fuel cell. It is found that a surface reaction occurs even at PEM operating temperatures below about 100.degree. C. to oxidatively remove the CO and restore electrode surface area for the H.sub.2 reaction to generate current. Using an O.sub.2 injection, a suitable fuel stream for a PEM fuel cell can be formed from a methanol source using conventional reforming processes for producing H.sub.2.

Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Maine Yankee: Making the Transition from an Operating Plant to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the challenges faced by Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company in making the transition from an operating nuclear power plant to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Maine Yankee (MY) is a 900-megawatt Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactor whose architect engineer was Stone & Webster. Maine Yankee was put into commercial operation on December 28, 1972. It is located on an 820-acre site, on the shores of the Back River in Wiscasset, Maine about 40 miles northeast of Portland, Maine. During its operating life, it generated about 1.2 billion kilowatts of power, providing 25% of Maine's electric power needs and serving additional customers in New England. Maine Yankee's lifetime capacity factor was about 67% and it employed more than 450 people. The decision was made to shutdown Maine Yankee in August of 1997, based on economic reasons. Once this decision was made planning began on how to accomplish safe and cost effective decommissioning of the plant by 2004 while being responsive to the community and employees.

Norton, W.; McGough, M. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Test Operation of Oxygen-Enriched Incinerator for Wastes From Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The oxygen-enriched combustion concept, which can minimize off-gas production, has been applied to the incineration of combustible uranium-containing wastes from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A simulation for oxygen combustion shows the off-gas production can be reduced by a factor of 6.7 theoretically, compared with conventional air combustion. The laboratory-scale oxygen enriched incineration (OEI) process with a thermal capacity of 350 MJ/h is composed of an oxygen feeding and control system, a combustion chamber, a quencher, a ceramic filter, an induced draft fan, a condenser, a stack, an off-gas recycle path, and a measurement and control system. Test burning with cleaning paper and office paper in this OEI process shows that the thermal capacity is about 320 MJ/h, 90 % of design value and the off-gas reduces by a factor of 3.5, compared with air combustion. The CO concentration for oxygen combustion is lower than that of air combustion, while the O2 concentration in off-gas is kept above 25 vol % for a simple incineration process without any grate. The NOx concentration in an off-gas stream does not reduce significantly due to air incoming by leakage, and the volume and weight reduction factors are not changed significantly, which suggests a need for an improvement in sealing.

Kim, J.-G.; Yang, H.cC.; Park, G.-I.; Kim, I.-T.; Kim, J.-K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap„Precision Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap-Precision Combustion Background Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology for auxiliary power units (APUs) offers the potential for major contributions toward Department of Energy (DOE) objectives such as clean energy deployment and improved efficiency. Reforming of conventional liquid fuels to produce synthesis gas (syngas) fuel for SOFC stacks is a practical approach for operating fuel cell APUs

218

Design and analysis of microalgal open pond systems for the purpose of producing fuels: A subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The designs and systems developed include many innovative concepts and experiments, including the design and operation of a low-cost system. Cost-effectiveness is realized by minimizing capital costs of the system and achieving efficient use of inputs. Extensive engineering analysis of carbonation, mixing, and harvesting subsystems has elucidated both the lowest cost, most efficient options and the essential parameters needed to construct, test, and evaluate these subsystems. The use of growth ponds sealed with clay and lined with crushed rock results in construction cost savings of 50% over ponds lined with synthetic membranes. In addition a low-cost but efficient design allows improvements in technology to have maximum impact on final product cost reductions. In addition to the innovations in low-cost construction, the operational efficiency of the design is both higher and more feasible than that attained by any previous system concept of comparable scale. The water analysis has led to operational specifications that minimize water use and virtually eliminate losses of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide injection system is designed for 95% efficiency, but is still low in cost. The construction of a large-scale, covered anaerobic lagoon to recycle carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus has not been attempted at the scale analyzed here. Yet efficient recycling is essential for achieving economic affordability. 23 refs., 21 figs., 53 tabs.

Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Three-dimensional microstructural changes in the Ni–YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode during operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural evolution in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes has been investigated using X-ray nanotomography along with differential absorption imaging. SOFC anode supports composed of Ni and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were subjected to extended operation and selected regions were imaged using a transmission X-ray microscope. X-ray nanotomography provides unique insight into microstructure changes of all three phases (Ni, YSZ, pore) in three spatial dimensions, and its relation to performance degradation. Statistically significant 3D microstructural changes were observed in the anode Ni phase over a range of operational times, including phase size growth and changes in connectivity, interfacial contact area and contiguous triple-phase boundary length. These observations support microstructural evolution correlated to SOFC performance. We find that Ni coarsening is driven by particle curvature as indicated by the dihedral angles between the Ni, YSZ and pore phases, and hypothesize that growth occurs primarily by means of diffusion and particle agglomeration constrained by a pinning mechanism related to the YSZ phase. The decrease in Ni phase size after extended periods of time may be the result of a second process connected to a mobility-induced decrease in the YSZ phase size or non-uniform curvature resulting in a net decrease in Ni phase size.

Nelson G. J.; Chu Y.; Grew, K.N.; Izzo Jr. J.R.; Lombardo, J.J.; Harris, W.M.; Faes, A.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; Van herle, J.; Wang, S.; Virkar, A.V.; Chiu, W.K.S.

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Climate Change Fuel Cell Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 200 kW, natural gas fired fuel cell was installed at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the financial and operational suitability of retrofit fuel cell technology at a medium sized college. Target audience was design professionals and the wider community, with emphasis on use in higher education. ''Waste'' heat from the fuel cell was utilized to supplement boiler operations and provide domestic hot water. Instrumentation was installed in order to measure the effectiveness of heat utilization. It was determined that 26% of the available heat was captured during the first year of operation. The economics of the fuel cell is highly dependent on the prices of electricity and natural gas. Considering only fuel consumed and energy produced (adjusted for boiler efficiency), the fuel cell saved $54,000 in its first year of operation. However, taking into account the price of maintenance and the cost of financing over the short five-year life span, the fuel cell operated at a loss, despite generous subsidies. As an educational tool and market stimulus, the fuel cell attracted considerable attention, both from design professionals and the general public.

Alice M. Gitchell

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal analysis of uranium zirconium hydride fuel using a lead-bismuth gap at LWR operating temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear technology calls for more advanced fuels to maximize the effectiveness of new designs. A fuel currently being studied for use in advanced light water reactors (LWRs) is uranium zirconium hydride ...

Ensor, Brendan M. (Brendan Melvin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fact sheet on production of jet fuel or multi-purpose military fuel from lipids produced by microalgae.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Maintenance and operation of the U.S. DOE Alternative Fuel Center. Final subcontract report, 5 August 1994--4 August 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Alternative Fuel Utilization Program (AFUP). The AFC is designed to provide drum quantities of finished transportation fuels from a variety of sources. DOE funded the design, construction, and installation of a hydrogenation pilot plant capable of performing a range of hydrotreating, reforming, and hydrocracking operations. Southwest Research Institute provided the building, utilities, and laboratory and safety systems needed for the pilot plant. The AFC work reported here contributes to the two primary objectives of the AFUP: data for alternative-fuel-capable vehicles to enhance energy security, and data for controlling emissions for improved air quality.

Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spent fuel treatment at ANL-West  

SciTech Connect

At Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) there are several thousand kilograms of metallic spent nuclear fuel containing bond sodium. This fuel will be treated in the Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-West to produce stable waste forms for storage and disposal. The treatment operations will employ a pyrochemical process that also has applications for treating most of the fuel types within the Department of Energy complex. The treatment equipment is in its last stage of readiness, and operations will begin in the Fall of 1994.

Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Levinskas, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Process of producing combustible gas and for carbonizing coal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process of producing combustible gas by supporting a column of fuel in a shaft furnace, intermittently blasting a combustion-supporting gas transversely through a mid portion of said column to produce a mid zone of sufficiently high temperature to decompose steam. The steam then circulated upwardly through said column between said blasting operations.

Doherty, H.L.

1922-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

NIST: NIF - PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cells are operationally equivalent to a battery. The reactants or fuel in a fuel cell can be replaced unlike a standard disposable or rechargeable ...

227

Computer Control of Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapidly rising energy costs present the opportunity for substantial cost savings through improved boiler combustion control. A process computer control system was installed at an Air Products & Chemicals facility in 1978. As a result the boiler efficiency has increased over 11%. The control system includes; air flow, fuel flow, pressure and drum level control. Air flow control is achieved through modulation of the F.D. fan inlet vanes. Demand for airflow is produced from a high signal selection of the steam pressure controller or the total fuel signal. The output of the oxygen controller is used to modify this airflow index by the desired air/fuel ratio. The air/fuel ratio is a polynomial function of the type of fuel used. In summary, the computer control system provides for; greater overall boiler stability, operation within tight air/gas limits, increased boiler efficiency, capability to burn multiple fuels, faster response to demand changes, and fewer shutdowns.

Pareja, G. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be

230

Post-test analysis of 20kW molten carbonate fuel cell stack operated on coal gas. Final report, August 1993--February 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20kW carbonate fuel cell stack was operated with coal gas for the first time in the world. The stack was tested for a total of 4,000 hours, of which 3,900 hours of testing was conducted at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Incorporated, Plaquemine, Louisiana outdoor site. The operation was on either natural gas or coal gas and switched several times without any effects, demonstrating duel fuel capabilities. This test was conducted with 9142 kJ/m{sup 3} (245 Btu/cft) coal gas provided by a slipstream from Destec`s entrained flow, slagging, slurry-fed gasifier equipped with a cold gas cleanup subsystem. The stack generated up to 21 kW with this coal gas. Following completion of this test, the stack was brought to Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and a detailed post-test analysis was conducted to identify any effects of coal gas on cell components. This investigation has shown that the direct fuel cell (DFC) can be operated with properly cleaned and humidified coal-as, providing stable performance. The basic C direct fuel cell component materials are stable and display normal stability in presence of the coal gas. No effects of the coal-borne contaminants are apparent. Further cell testing at ERC 1 17, confirmed these findings.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use All state employees operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation Services Bureau and

232

An E85 Ethanol Fuel Impact Study for Wake County, North Carolina Addressing Economical, Operational, Environmental, and Social Issues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The value of ethanol as an alternative fuel has recently been a highly debated topic. There have been many strong opinions for and against its… (more)

Roy, Bryan Erik

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF`s) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV`S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available ``practical``. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Turning Waste Into Fuel: How the INEOS Biorefinery Is Changing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuel. Once fully operational, the center will produce up to eight million gallons of bioethanol per year. It will also generate six megawatts of electricity -- enough to run the...

235

Flex-fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Stations that Sell E85 (Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center AFDC) Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV) Cost Calculator (compare costs for operating your vehicle...

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Incentives and Laws Wyoming Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Natural Gas Vehicle Acquisition Requirements Expired: 02/27/2013 The Wyoming Departments of Transportation and Administration and Information must retrofit existing vehicles or acquire new vehicles that operate on natural gas or a combination of natural gas and another fuel by July 1, 2012. $200,000 in funding is available to retrofit or procure the vehicles. (Reference House Enrolled Act 67, 2011) Ethanol Motor Fuel Production Tax Credit Expired: 06/30/2009 Ethanol fuel producers may redeem a tax credit of $0.40 per gallon with the

237

Gasifiers optimized for fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional coal gasification carbonate fuel cell systems are typically configured as shown in Figure 1, where the fuel gas is primarily hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, with waste heat recovery for process requirements and to produce additional power in a steam bottoming cycle. These systems make use of present day gasification processes to produce the low to medium Btu fuel gas which in turn is cleaned up and consumed by the fuel cell. These conventional gasification/fuel cell systems have been studied in recent years projecting system efficiencies of 45--53% (HHV). Conventional gasification systems currently available evolved as stand-alone systems producing low to medium Btu gas fuel gas. The requirements of the gasification process dictates high temperatures to carry out the steam/carbon reaction and to gasify the tars present in coal. The high gasification temperatures required are achieved by an oxidant which consumes a portion of the feed coal to provide the endothermic heat required for the gasification process. The thermal needs of this process result in fuel gas temperatures that are higher than necessary for most end use applications, as well as for gas cleanup purposes. This results in some efficiency and cost penalties. This effort is designed to study advanced means of power generation by integrating the gasification process with the unique operating characteristics of carbonate fuel cells to achieve a more efficient and cost effective coal based power generating system. This is to be done by altering the gasification process to produce fuel gas compositions which result in more efficient fuel cell operation and by integrating the gasification process with the fuel cell as shown in Figure 2. Low temperature catalytic gasification was chosen as the basis for this effort due to the inherent efficiency advantages and compatibility with fuel cell operating temperatures.

Steinfeld, G.; Fruchtman, J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Lee, A.; Meyers, S.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Gasifiers optimized for fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional coal gasification carbonate fuel cell systems are typically configured as shown in Figure 1, where the fuel gas is primarily hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, with waste heat recovery for process requirements and to produce additional power in a steam bottoming cycle. These systems make use of present day gasification processes to produce the low to medium Btu fuel gas which in turn is cleaned up and consumed by the fuel cell. These conventional gasification/fuel cell systems have been studied in recent years projecting system efficiencies of 45--53% (HHV). Conventional gasification systems currently available evolved as stand-alone systems producing low to medium Btu gas fuel gas. The requirements of the gasification process dictates high temperatures to carry out the steam/carbon reaction and to gasify the tars present in coal. The high gasification temperatures required are achieved by an oxidant which consumes a portion of the feed coal to provide the endothermic heat required for the gasification process. The thermal needs of this process result in fuel gas temperatures that are higher than necessary for most end use applications, as well as for gas cleanup purposes. This results in some efficiency and cost penalties. This effort is designed to study advanced means of power generation by integrating the gasification process with the unique operating characteristics of carbonate fuel cells to achieve a more efficient and cost effective coal based power generating system. This is to be done by altering the gasification process to produce fuel gas compositions which result in more efficient fuel cell operation and by integrating the gasification process with the fuel cell as shown in Figure 2. Low temperature catalytic gasification was chosen as the basis for this effort due to the inherent efficiency advantages and compatibility with fuel cell operating temperatures.

Steinfeld, G.; Fruchtman, J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Lee, A.; Meyers, S.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Promotion The state of Hawaii has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Energy to collaborate to produce 70% of the state's

240

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The excise tax imposed on compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) used to operate a vehicle can be paid through an annual flat rate sticker tax based on the

242

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The state road tax for vehicles that operate on propane (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) or natural gas is paid through the purchase of an annual flat fee sticker, and the amount is based on the vehicle's gross

243

Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages Natural disasters and other hazards can impact the energy industry's ability to produce and distribute petroleum products, including gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil. At the same time, the demand for fuel may spike due to evacuations, or because consumers are buying more fuel to power backup generators during electrical outages. All these factors may lead to fuel shortages, which will prompt local authorities and fuel suppliers to prioritize getting fuel to key assets such as emergency operations centers, hospitals, food supply dealers, water supply plants, and telecommunication networks. Homeowners should keep the following tips in mind:

244

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced when different ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels?

245

Real-World Research and Testing: Producing and Using Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design & operations - Hydrogen subsystem - CNG subsystem - Safety system * Fuel Dispensing * Hydrogen & HCNG Internal Combustion...

246

Process Description and Operating History for the CPP-601/-640/-627 Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Reprocessing Complex (FRC) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was used for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from the early 1950's until 1992. The reprocessing facilities are now scheduled to be deactivated. As part of the deactivation process, three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units located in the complex must be closed. This document gathers the historical information necessary to provide a rational basis for the preparation of a comprehensive closure plan. Included are descriptions of process operations and the operating history of the FRC. A set of detailed tables record the service history and present status of the process vessels and transfer lines.

E. P. Wagner

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough, component sizing, and utility needs. These data, along with process efficiency results from the model, were subsequently used to calculate the cost of electricity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to correlate the concentrations of key impurities in the fuel gas feedstock to the cost of electricity.

Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

xTL Fuels to someone xTL Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels xTL Fuels Synthetic liquid transportation fuels, collectively known as xTL fuels, are produced through specialized conversion processes. These production methods, including the Fischer-Tropsch process, produce fuels from carbon-based feedstocks, such as biomass, coal, or natural gas, and can

249

Coal markets squeeze producers  

SciTech Connect

Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

Ryan, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual-Mode Operation with Low Degradation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Eric Tang, Tony Wood, Sofiane Benhaddad, Casey Brown, Hongpeng He, Jeff Nelson, Oliver Grande, Ben Nuttall, Mark Richard, Randy Petri (Primary Contact) Versa Power Systems 10720 Bradford Road #110 Littleton, CO 80127 Phone: (303) 226-0762 Email: randy.petri@versa-power.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov

251

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of Fuel Gas Cleanup Systems for Waste Gas Fueled Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many industrial operations that have waste gas streams that are combustible. Chief among these is biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic wastes to produce a methane-rich biogas in landfills and anaerobic digesters. These gas streams are increasingly being used to fuel local power generators. The biogas streams, however, contain traces of a wide variety of contaminants. Removal of these contaminants may be required to either meet the manufacturer's requirements for fuel gas quality to...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Pub ID 38707 Title Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Status Distributed Communication Type ORNL report ORNL Review? Scientific communication that requires ORNL review Information Category Protected CRADA Information ORNL Report Classification Final Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

Szybist, J.P.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal,...

256

"Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" 1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

257

Fuel Reliability Program: BWR Fuel Crud Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of BWR reactor system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance limiting conditions in a limited number of cases. The operational impact can include unplanned, or increased frequency of fuel inspections, fuel failure and associated radiological consequences, operational restrictions including core power derate and/or forced shutdowns to remove failed fuel, premature discharge of individual bundles or entire reloads, and undesirable core design restrictions. T...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info Start Date 10/1/2007 State South Carolina Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of sales tax Provider South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Alliance South Carolina offers a sales tax exemption for "any device, equipment, or machinery operated by hydrogen or fuel cells, any device, equipment or machinery used to generate, produce, or distribute hydrogen and designated specifically for hydrogen applications or for fuel cell applications, and any device, equipment, or machinery used predominantly for the manufacturing of, or research and development involving hydrogen or fuel

259

Nano-structured solid oxide fuel cell design with superior power output at high and intermediate operation temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte was developed and tested. This novel SOFC shows a similar multilayer set-up as other current anode-supported SOFCs and is composed of a Ni/8YSZ anode, a gas-tight ...

Tim Van Gestel; Feng Han; Doris Sebold; Hans Peter Buchkremer; Detlev Stöver

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

DETERMINATION OF THE QUANTITY OF I-135 RELEASED FROM THE AGR-1 TEST FUELS AT THE END OF ATR OPERATING CYCLE 138B  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 experiment is a multiple fueled-capsule irradiation experiment being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and ended with shutdown of the reactor for a brief outage on February 10, 2007 at 0900. The AGR-1 experiment will continue cyclical irradiation for about 2.5 years. In order to allow estimation of the amount of radioiodine released during the first cycle, purge gas flow to all capsules continued for about 4 days after reactor shutdown. The FPMS data acquired during part of that shutdown flow period has been analyzed to elucidate the level of 135I released during the operating cycle.

J. K. Hartwell; D. M. Scates; J. B. Walter; M. W. Drigert

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE/EA-1647: Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S u p p l e m e n t a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t a n d N o t i c e o f W e t l a n d s I n v o l v e m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (formerly Range Fuels Inc.) Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1647 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy January 2009 Contents Section Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................... v 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action ..........................................................2

262

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

Colon-Mercado, H.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Place Hastings, Nebraska Product Ethanol producer and supplier References Chief Ethanol Fuels...

265

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Vehicles SuperShuttle CNG Van Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas,...

266

Controlling the hydrogenic fuel inventory in plasma facing components (PFCs) will be necessary for the successful operation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

defect defect existing defect Surface before ion implantation T collecting and distorting lattice incident ion W atom T in lattice T 2 T 2 + nm + + + + T ions are implanted into the tungsten (W) lattice and diffuse through it until they are trapped at a defect (typically a missing or diplaced W atom). The pressure of T atoms in the lattice can also be so high that they displace W atoms creating more traps. Such high pressures are enhanced by the slow recombination and release of T 2 . Contact: Bruce Lipschultz blip@psfc.mit.edu 617-253-8636 Fusion 'fuel economy' studied under reactor-like conditions New results from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak raise concerns about retention of tritium fuel in the metal walls of fusion reactors like ITER. Recent experiments on Alcator C-Mod, the first diverted tokamak with all metal walls, showed

267

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Biohydrogen production using green microalgae as an approach to operate a small Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the waste, until eventually the methane-makers convert the waste to biogas. Not only is AD is cheaper than conventional technologies, the biogas it produces can be readily used for electricity generation, heat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Inductive Double-Contingency Analysis of UO2 Powder Bulk Blending Operations at a Commercial Fuel Plant (U)  

SciTech Connect

An inductive double-contingency analysis (DCA) method developed by the criticality safety function at the Savannah River Site, was applied in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) of five major plant process systems at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation`s Commercial Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-Cola.). The method emphasizes a thorough evaluation of the controls intended to provide barriers against criticality for postulated initiating events, and has been demonstrated effective at identifying common mode failure potential and interdependence among multiple controls. A description of the method and an example of its application is provided.

Skiles, S. K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

273

Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell generator module.

Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen wig need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells, monolithic solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small cell size, thin ceramic components, and high operating temperature are the key features of the MSOFC. The small size of individual cells in the monolithic structure increases the active surface area. For example, an MSOFC with channels about 1 mm in diameter has a ratio of active surface area to volume of about 9.4 sq cm/cu cm. This is about seven times the ratio for conventional fuel cells. On this basis alone, an MSOFC with a channel diameter of 1 mm should produce the same power as a conventional fuel cell seven times as large. The high current density of the MSOFC results from the small cell size and ensuing low internal resistance. The current density is high at the fuel inlet end of the fuel channel where the thermodynamic driving force (Nernst potential) is highest. Similarly, the current density is low at the outlet end of the fuel channel where the Nernst potential is lowest. Because of the high operating temperature of the MSOFC (1000{degrees}C),hydrocarbon fuels can be reformed in the fuel channels. The reform reaction produces hydrogen which is consumed by the fuel cell. Catalytic reforming of methane and natural gas within a solid oxide fuel cell has been demonstrated.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Include in Column B cost of all composition produced by plant. Include in Column C cost of all operations not involving printing (Col. A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupied (whether Government-owned or rented), utilities, etc. (14.5 cents per month per square foot. Amount spent for rental of equipment Total cost (Use col.A total from this line to compute cost per 1 units produced in plant this fiscal quarter Total units produced in plant this fiscal year Cost per 1

US Army Corps of Engineers

277

A techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting ...

Pearlson, Matthew Noah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Summary report : universal fuel processor.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States produces only about 1/3 of the more than 20 million barrels of petroleum that it consumes daily. Oil imports into the country are roughly equivalent to the amount consumed in the transportation sector. Hence the nation in general, and the transportation sector in particular, is vulnerable to supply disruptions and price shocks. The situation is anticipated to worsen as the competition for limited global supplies increases and oil-rich nations become increasingly willing to manipulate the markets for this resource as a means to achieve political ends. The goal of this project was the development and improvement of technologies and the knowledge base necessary to produce and qualify a universal fuel from diverse feedstocks readily available in North America and elsewhere (e.g. petroleum, natural gas, coal, biomass) as a prudent and positive step towards mitigating this vulnerability. Three major focus areas, feedstock transformation, fuel formulation, and fuel characterization, were identified and each was addressed. The specific activities summarized herein were identified in consultation with industry to set the stage for collaboration. Two activities were undertaken in the area of feedstock transformation. The first activity focused on understanding the chemistry and operation of autothermal reforming, with an emphasis on understanding, and therefore preventing, soot formation. The second activity was focused on improving the economics of oxygen production, particularly for smaller operations, by integrating membrane separations with pressure swing adsorption. In the fuel formulation area, the chemistry of converting small molecules readily produced from syngas directly to fuels was examined. Consistent with the advice from industry, this activity avoided working on improving known approaches, giving it an exploratory flavor. Finally, the fuel characterization task focused on providing a direct and quantifiable comparison of diesel fuel and JP-8.

Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rice, Steven F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Miller, James Edward; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Pickett, Lyle M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Manage fuel gas with an expert system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Star Louisiana refinery has fuel gas header systems throughout the plant that are utilized by fuel gas producers and consumers. The refinery simultaneously exports surplus fuel gas from the export gas header, and maintains a minimum natural gas makeup rates from multiple external suppliers for fuel gas header pressure control. Successfully implementing a fuel gas expert system has facilitated communication of accurate, timely information to all unit control board operators in the refinery when any change or sub-optimal situation occurs in either of these systems. Information provided from the expert system rule knowledge base results in: proper unit operating actions taken when a flaring situation approaches, thus minimizing the negative impact of flaring on the environment and minimizing product loses to the flare; minimizing purchase of makeup natural gas used for fuel gas system pressure control; maximizing export gas capacity to prevent surplus fuel gas production from limiting refinery operation; immediately recognizing an upset in any fuel gas header system and advising the best corrective action for all affected refinery units; and minimizing voice communication required between units in an upset, since the expert system provides the communication immediately in expert advice messages.

Giacone, G.; Toben, S.; Bergeron, G. [Star Enterprise, Convent, LA (United States); Ayral, T. [Key Control Inc., Westlake Village, CA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Vehicle Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Tax Liquid alternative fuels used to operate on-road vehicles are taxed at a rate of $0.175 per gallon. These fuels are taxed at the same rate as

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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281

Sulfate removal from water produced during CO2 enhanced oil recovery, coal-bed methane recovery, and mining operations using anion exchange resins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Limited freshwater resources and expected increases in water demand are causing electric utilities to explore more non-traditional water sources, such as produced water from CO2… (more)

Duckworth, Cole M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Catalytic autothermal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels for fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell development has seen remarkable progress in the past decade because of an increasing need to improve energy efficiency as well as to address concerns about the environmental consequences of using fossil fuel for producing electricity and for propulsion of vehicles [1]. The lack of an infrastructure for producing and distributing H{sub 2} has led to a research effort to develop on-board fuel processing technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2} [2]. The primary focus is on reforming gasoline, because a production and distribution infrastructure for gasoline already exists to supply internal combustion engines [3]. Existing reforming technology for the production of H{sub 2} from hydrocarbon feedstocks used in large-scale manufacturing processes, such as ammonia synthesis, is cost prohibitive when scaled down to the size of the fuel processor required for transportation applications (50-80 kWe) nor is it designed to meet the varying power demands and frequent shutoffs and restarts that will be experienced during normal drive cycles. To meet the performance targets required of a fuel processor for transportation applications will require new reforming reactor technology developed to meet the volume, weight, cost, and operational characteristics for transportation applications and the development of new reforming catalysts that exhibit a higher activity and better thermal and mechanical stability than reforming catalysts currently used in the production of H{sub 2} for large-scale manufacturing processes.

Krumpelt, M.; Krause, T.; Kopasz, J.; Carter, D.; Ahmed, S.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Nuclear Fuel Handling Equipment Application and Maintenance Guide: Fuel Handling Equipment Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling is a critical task during a nuclear power plant refueling outage. The proper operation of fuel handling equipment (such as fuel handling machines, fuel upending machines, fuel transfer carriages, and fuel elevators) is important to a successful refueling outage and to preparing fuel for eventual disposal.BackgroundThe fuel handling system contains the components used to move fuel from the time that the new fuel is received until the spent fuel ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercialization decision in 2015 leads to beginning of mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell cars by 2020. FY2006 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Budget Request 13% 28% 12% 15% 22% 3% 6% 1%...

288

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuel Tax Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Tax Exemption An individual that produces biodiesel for personal use or use by a member of his or her immediate family is exempt from the state fuel excise tax.

289

Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Neutzler, Jay K. (Peoria, AZ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use Incentive The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) may provide financial aid to school districts that use biodiesel fuel to operate school buses to

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax Rate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Rate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Rate A distributor of any alternative fuel used to operate an internal combustion engine must pay a license tax of $0.0025 for each gallon of

292

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Exemption Propane, compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, and electricity used to operate motor vehicles are exempt from state fuel taxes. The Utah

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis A person using alternative fuel to operate a taxi used to transport

294

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport March 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production plant and vehicle fueling station at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility will use grid electricity to split water to produce pure hydrogen fuel. The fuel will be used by the airport's operations and the 130th Air Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard. NETL will begin operations at the Yeager Airport facility in August 2009 and plans to conduct two years of testing and evaluation. The facility will be designed using "open architecture," allowing the capability to add

295

Alternative fuel performance and emissions characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of what problems might be caused by the use of non-petroleum based gasolines in a standard throttle body fuel injection closed-loop spark-ignition internal combustion engine. Five fuels were tested in five separate but physically identical engines. The five fuels were, one baseline unleaded gasoline, two oil shale-derived gasolines, and two coal-derived gasolines. The basic testing of a fuel centered around a 5 hour cycle which was repeated daily until 200 hours of operation were accumulated. The 5 hour cycle was run by alternating every 15 minutes between two distinct conditions. The engines were disassembled and inspected nine times. Additionally, thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, unburnt hydrocarbon makeup, catalyst pressure drop, and cylinder pressure versus crankshaft position measurements were made. Noteworthy differences in the behavior of the fuels in terms of producing deposits that caused intake valve sticking are presented in this report. Additionally, the fuels behaved differently when operated in the presence of knock producing deposits. (R + M)/2 octane numbers proved to be a poor indicator of the fuels knocking behavior. R-M octane numbers proved to be a better indicator of knocking behavior. 16 refs., 43 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program - Central and Remote Sites 2003  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 25 Lorax 4.5 units operated under this Award from April 2003 to December 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government, commercial, and residential customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. The deployment of the 20 Lorax 4.5 units for the Remote Sites phase of the project began in October 2004. To date, 10 fuel cells have completed their demonstrations while 10 fuel cells are currently being monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. As of June 30, 2006 the 45 fuel cells operating under this Award produced a total of 1,585,093 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included increases in system efficiency and availability. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Low Cost Reversible fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes a 3-phase program performed from March 2000 through September 2003 with a particular focus on Phase III. The overall program studied TMI's reversible solid oxide stack, system concepts, and potential applications. The TMI reversible (fuel cell-electrolyzer) system employs a stack of high temperature solid-oxide electrochemical cells to produce either electricity (from a fuel and air or oxygen) or hydrogen (from water and supplied electricity). An atmospheric pressure fuel cell system operates on natural gas (or other carbon-containing fuel) and air. A high-pressure reversible electrolyzer system is used to make high-pressure hydrogen and oxygen from water and when desired, operates in reverse to generate electricity from these gases.

Technology Management Inc.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction. [partial liquefaction of coal in slurry, filtration and gasification of residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300 to 550/sup 0/C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400 to 500/sup 0/C for a limited time of only about 1 to 5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300/sup 0/C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

Longanbach, J.R.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Novel carbon-ion fuel cells. Quarterly technical report No. 10, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research to develop an entirely new, fundamentally different class of fuel cell using a solid electrolyte that transports carbon ions. This fuel cell would use solid carbon dissolved in molten metal as a fuel reservoir and anode; expensive gaseous or liquid fuel would not be required. A high temperature fuel cell based on a carbon ion membrane/electrolyte would operate in a way like yttria-doped zirconia solid oxide fuel cells; however, the fuel cell would transport the C ion from a fuel source to O{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Such fuel cells, operating above 1000 C, would produce an exhaust gas that could be fed directly into existing boilers, and could thus act as ``topping cycles`` to existing power plant steam cycles.

Cocks, F.H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Reformate fuel cell system durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to identify the factors limiting the durability of fuel cells and fuel processors. This includes identifying PEM fuel cell durability issues for operating on pure hydrogen, and those that arise from the fuel processing of liquid hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline) as a function of fuel composition and impurity content. Benchmark comparisons with the durability of fuel cells operating on pure hydrogen are used to identify limiting factors unique to fuel processing. We describe the design, operation and operational results of the durability system, including the operating conditions for the system, fuel processor sub-section operation over 1000 hours, post-mortem characterization of the catalysts in the fuel processor, and single cell operation.

Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Uribe, F. A. (Francisco A.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fuel cells: A handbook (Revision 3)  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of reaction directly into electrical energy. In a typical fuel cell, gaseous fuels are fed continuously to the anode (negative electrode) compartment and an oxidant (i.e., oxygen from air) is fed continuously to the cathode (positive electrode) compartment; the electrochemical reactions take place at the electrodes to produce an electric current. A fuel cell, although having similar components and several characteristics, differs from a typical battery in several respects. The battery is an energy storage device, that is, the maximum energy that is available is determined by the amount of chemical reactant stored within the battery itself. Thus, the battery will cease to produce electrical energy when the chemical reactants are consumed (i.e., discharged). In a secondary battery, the reactants are regenerated by recharging, which involves putting energy into the battery from an external source. The fuel cell, on the other hand, is an energy conversion device which theoretically has the capability of producing electrical energy for as long as the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the electrodes. In reality, degradation or malfunction of components limits the practical operating life of fuel cells.

Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Stauffer, D.B.; Engleman, R.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

How much biodiesel is produced, imported, exported, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How do I calculate diesel fuel surcharges? How many gallons of diesel fuel does one barrel of oil make? How much biodiesel is produced, imported, exported, ...

306

Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

Corporan, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; DeWitt, M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Klingshirn, Christopher D [ORNL; Striebich, Richard [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Non-pollutant fuel generator and fuel burner with a non-pollutant exhaust and supplementary dc generator. [for use in MHD generator, steam turbine, gas turbine, or fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating non-polluting fuel and a burner for using such fuel to produce energy in the form of heat with a non-polluting exhaust, together with means for utilizing such exhaust to produce supplementary direct current power is disclosed. An electrolyzer is operated to produce hydrogen and oxygen in gaseous form which is then stored in suitable fuel tanks. As needed, the fuel is combined with air and supplied under pressure to a combustion chamber where the mixture is burned, producing heat and a pollution free exhaust. The heat so produced may be used as a conventional heat source to generate steam, drive a turbine, or the like, while the combustion gases are directed to a magnetohydrodynamic generator to produce an electrical current which is usable in any desired manner.

Barros, M.J.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuels Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama on AddThis.com... May 1, 2012 Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama " As Alabama native Helen Keller once said, 'No one has the right to consume happiness without producing it.' The same can be said of

310

Fuel cell systems multi-year program plan, fiscal years 1995 to 2000  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell power systems are emerging power generation technologies for the efficient, economical and environmentally acceptable production of electricity. In some applications the by-product heat can also be efficiently used in cogeneration. Fuel cells produce electricity through the electrochemical oxidation of a fuel. They can be operated on a variety of fuels, including natural gas, coal gas, land fill gas and renewable fuels. First market entry units are fueled by natural gas. Fuel cells offer the opportunity for a major new manufacturing industry. System studies have shown that fuel cell power plants can be designed with overall system efficiencies in the 50 to 60 percent range (higher heating value basis) (55 to 65 percent on lower heating value basis). Fuel cell power plants are unique in that they offer high efficiency and low emissions even at part-load and in small sizes. Because of their efficiency, fuel cells will help in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Additional benefits are the environmentally desirable operating characteristics offered by fuel cells. Because electricity is produced through an electrochemical reaction rather than by combustion, fuel cells generate very little NO{sub x} and are extremely quiet. This combination of operating characteristics and high efficiency make fuel cells attractive for future electric utility applications. On-site industrial and commercial applications where the by-product heat can be utilized are also attractive. The DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are cooperatively sponsoring the development of fuel cell systems for applications in the utility, commercial and industrial sectors. Funding of development and demonstration is also provided by fuel cell developers and potential users. This document describes the fuel cell program of the DOE Office of Fossil Energy and its coordination with other fuel cell activities.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Base load fuel comsumption with radiant boiler simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating point of an oil fired radiant boiler, 580 Megawatt capacity, is critical in maximizing the availability, performance, reliability, and maintainability of a power producing system. Operating the unit above the design operating point causes outages to occur sooner than scheduled. When the boiler is operated below the design operating point, fuel is wasted because the quantity of fuel required to operate a radiant boiler is the same, whether the design setpoint is maintained or not. This paper demonstrates by means of simulation software that the boiler design setpoints is critical to fuel consumption and optimum output megawatts. A boiler with this capacity is used to provide a portion of the base load of an electric utility in order to sustain revenues and maintain reliable generation.

Shwehdi, M.H. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Wilkes-Barre, Lehman, PA (United States)); Hughes, C.M. (Naval Aviation Depot, NAS Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL (United States)); Quasem, M.A. (Howard Univ. School of Business, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive Any county that uses compressed natural gas (CNG) for the operation of any

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduced Propane Fuel Reduced Propane Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Propane Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Reduced Propane Fuel Tax The tax imposed on liquefied petroleum gas, or propane, used to operate a motor vehicle is equal to half the tax paid on the sale or use of gasoline,

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement State government agencies and universities owning or operating motor

315

Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

Woolley, Robert D.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells, monolithic solid oxide fuel cells. Quarterly report, April--June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small cell size, thin ceramic components, and high operating temperature are the key features of the MSOFC. The small size of individual cells in the monolithic structure increases the active surface area. For example, an MSOFC with channels about 1 mm in diameter has a ratio of active surface area to volume of about 9.4 sq cm/cu cm. This is about seven times the ratio for conventional fuel cells. On this basis alone, an MSOFC with a channel diameter of 1 mm should produce the same power as a conventional fuel cell seven times as large. The high current density of the MSOFC results from the small cell size and ensuing low internal resistance. The current density is high at the fuel inlet end of the fuel channel where the thermodynamic driving force (Nernst potential) is highest. Similarly, the current density is low at the outlet end of the fuel channel where the Nernst potential is lowest. Because of the high operating temperature of the MSOFC (1000{degrees}C),hydrocarbon fuels can be reformed in the fuel channels. The reform reaction produces hydrogen which is consumed by the fuel cell. Catalytic reforming of methane and natural gas within a solid oxide fuel cell has been demonstrated.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

NETL: Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Project No.: DE-FE0002402 NETL has partnered with the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) to investigate the characteristics of oxy-fuel flames and assess their impact on the operability of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The examination of fundamental flame characteristics data and related burner operability parameters are essential for designing and developing oxy-fuel combustion systems for new power plants and retrofitting existing power generation units. In an oxy-fuel system, coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled CO2 or water vapor (H2O), resulting in a flue stream consisting only of CO2 and H2O (no other co-contaminants) (Figure 1). Oxy-fuel combustion is promising for CCUS applications because water can be condensed out of the CO2/H2O flue stream to produce a relatively pure CO2 end product for capture. Oxy-fuel combustion and subsequent CO2 capture is currently being considered by the DOE's Innovations for Existing Plants Program as having the potential to meet the goal of 90 percent CO2 capture without increasing the cost of electricity more than 35 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case and analyze a range of realistic case studies for tri-generation systems. #12;National Renewable Energy Tri-Generation System Provides Hydrogen as an Additional Output Reformer 90100 43 Heat Loss (10

322

A Study of Fast Reactor Fuel Transmutation in a Candidate Dispersion Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Dispersion fuels represent a significant departure from typical ceramic fuels to address swelling and radiation damage in high burnup fuel. Such fuels use a manufacturing process in which fuel particles are encapsulated within a non-fuel matrix. Dispersion fuels have been studied since 1997 as part of an international effort to develop and test very high density fuel types for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program.[1] The Idaho National Laboratory is performing research in the development of an innovative dispersion fuel concept that will meet the challenges of transuranic (TRU) transmutation by providing an integral fission gas plenum within the fuel itself, to eliminate the swelling that accompanies the irradiation of TRU. In this process, a metal TRU vector produced in a separations process is atomized into solid microspheres. The dispersion fuel process overcoats the microspheres with a mixture of resin and hollow carbon microspheres to create a TRUC. The foam may then be heated and mixed with a metal power (e.g., Zr, Ti, or Si) and resin to form a matrix metal carbide, that may be compacted and extruded into fuel elements. In this paper, we perform reactor physics calculations for a core loaded with the conceptual fuel design. We will assume a “typical” TRU vector and a reference matrix density. We will employ a fuel and core design based on the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design.[2] Using the CSAS6 and TRITON modules of the SCALE system [3] for preliminary scoping studies, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reactor operations. This paper will describe the results of these analyses.

Mark DeHart; Hongbin Zhang; Eric Shaber; Matthew Jesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Excise Excise Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fuel Excise Tax Credit A tax credit of $0.50 per gallon is available for liquefied hydrogen that is sold for use or used as a fuel to operate a motor vehicle. For an entity

324

Oscillating combustion from a premix fuel nozzle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stringent emissions requirements for stationary gas turbines have produced new challenges in combustor design. In the past, very low NOx pollutant emissions have been achieved through various combustion modifications, such as steam or water injection, or post-combustion cleanup methods such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). An emerging approach to NOx abatement is lean premix combustion. Lean premix combustion avoids the cost and operational problems associated with other NOx control methods. By premixing fuel and air at very low equivalence ratios, the high temperatures which produce NOx are avoided. The challenges of premix combustion include avoiding flashback, and ensuring adequate fuel/air premixing. In addition, the combustion must be stable. The combustor should not operate so close to extinction that a momentary upset will extinguish the flame (static stability), and the flame should not oscillate (dynamic stability). Oscillations are undesirable because the associated pressure fluctuations can shorten component lifetime. Unfortunately, experience has shown that premix fuel nozzles burning natural gas are susceptible to oscillations. Eliminating these oscillations can be a costly and time consuming part of new engine development. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is investigating the issue of combustion oscillations produced by lean premix fuel nozzles. METC is evaluating various techniques to stabilize oscillating combustion in gas turbines. Tests results from a premix fuel nozzle using swirl stabilization and a pilot flame are reported here.

Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alternative fuels performance and emissions characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of what problems might be caused by the use of non-petroleum based gasolines in a standard throttle body fuel injection closed-loop spark-ignition internal combustion engine. Five fuels were tested in five separate but physically identical engines. The five fuels were, one baseline unleaded gasoline, two oil shale-derived gasolines, and two coal-derived gasolines. The basic testing of a fuel centered around a 5 hour cycle which was repeated daily until 200 hours of operation were accumulated. The 5 hour cycle was run by alternating every 15 minutes between two distinct conditions. During the accumulation of the 200 hours of operation, the engines were disassembled and inspected nine times. Additionally, thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, unburnt hydrocarbon makeup, catalyst pressure drop, and cylinder pressure versus crankshaft position measurements were made. Negligibly small differences were recorded in the behavior of the fuels, in terms of brake thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, effect on oxygen sensor life, and effect on catalyst life. Noteworthy differences in individual unburnt hydrocarbon concentration in the exhaust were recorded. Noteworthy differences in the behavior of the fuels in terms of producing deposits that caused intake valve sticking are presented in this report. Additionally, the fuels behaved differently when operated in the presence of knock producing deposits. (R+M)/2 octane numbers proved to be a poor indicator of the fuels knocking behavior. R-M octane numbers proved to be a better indicator of knocking behavior. 16 refs., 43 figs., 29 tabs.

Swain, M.R.; Swain, M.N.; Blanco, J.A.; Adt, R.R. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood 50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply

327

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

328

Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Opportunity Fuels Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generators are considering cofiring alternative fuels in their coal-fired boilers because such operations may offer opportunities to lower their fuel costs, enhance customer relationships, or meet possible future mandates requiring renewable sources or reduced fossil carbon emissions. In this guidebook, companies can find information drawn from research, testing, and experience with six categories of these opportunity fuels.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section...

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Alternative Fuel Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section...

334

Alternative Fuels Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Place Maryland Sector Renewable Energy Product US-based producer of renewable fuels. References Alternative Fuels Group1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

335

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not...

336

AgriFuel Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name AgriFuel Company Place Cranford, New Jersey Sector Biofuels Product AgriFuel produces and markets biofuels refined from waste vegetable oil,...

337

Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol Place Central City, Nebraska Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol1 LinkedIn...

338

Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes. [Public fleet groups--information needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF's) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV's) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV'S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available practical''. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Biofuels – Jet fuel  

This is a process for producing jet fuel from biological feed stock, including animal fats and oils, vegetable oils, and crop seed oils. The aviation and fuel-producing communities would have the option of leveraging available renewable and/or ...

340

Producer gas power plants can cut the oil bills of the developing countries  

SciTech Connect

As a power-generation fuel substitute in developing countries, producer gas from coal, biomass, or waste could reduce oil-import bills while assuring a steady fuel supply. An international working group formed at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences is assisting developing countries in setting up simple producer-gas plants consisting of a downdraft gasifier, cyclone, filter, and cooler. Sweden gained expertise in this technology during World War II and now manufactures much of the equipment needed for producer-gas facilities. Depending on oil price, a dual-fuel power plant (15% diesel oil, 85% producer gas) could compete economically with a diesel-only plant, assuming extra labor requirements of 20 min/hr of operation for the gas-fired facility.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Diesel Fuel Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Louisiana Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

344

Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol, while nonmethane organic gas and CO emissions remained relatively unchanged for all fuels and cycles. Higher fraction ethanol blends appeared to decrease NO{sub X} emissions on the FTP and HFET (after conversion). As expected, fuel economy (miles per gallon) decreased with increasing ethanol content in all cases.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: High Temperature Membrane Working...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically operate at temperatures no higher than 60C-80C due to structural limitations of the membrane. Operating PEM fuel...

346

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

347

FCT Fuel Cells: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with water and heat as byproducts. (How much water?) Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide energy for systems as large as a utility

348

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effects of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Operating Parameters on Particle Number Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-cylinder, wall-guided, spark ignition direct injection engine was used to study the impact of engine operating parameters on engine-out particle number (PN) emissions. Experiments were conducted with certification gasoline and a splash blend of 20% fuel grade ethanol in gasoline (E20), at four steady-state engine operating conditions. Independent engine control parameter sweeps were conducted including start of injection, injection pressure, spark timing, exhaust cam phasing, intake cam phasing, and air-fuel ratio. The results show that fuel injection timing is the dominant factor impacting PN emissions from this wall-guided gasoline direct injection engine. The major factor causing high PN emissions is fuel liquid impingement on the piston bowl. By avoiding fuel impingement, more than an order of magnitude reduction in PN emission was observed. Increasing fuel injection pressure reduces PN emissions because of smaller fuel droplet size and faster fuel-air mixing. PN emissions are insensitive to cam phasing and spark timing, especially at high engine load. Cold engine conditions produce higher PN emissions than hot engine conditions due to slower fuel vaporization and thus less fuel-air homogeneity during the combustion process. E20 produces lower PN emissions at low and medium loads if fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl is avoided. At high load or if there is fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl and/or cylinder wall, E20 tends to produce higher PN emissions. This is probably a function of the higher heat of vaporization of ethanol, which slows the vaporization of other fuel components from surfaces and may create local fuel-rich combustion or even pool-fires.

He, X.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Measurement of Fuel Dilution of Oil in a Diesel Engine using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique for measuring the fuel dilution of oil in a diesel engine is presented. Fuel dilution can occur when advanced in-cylinder fuel injection techniques are employed for the purpose of producing rich exhaust for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is used to monitor the oil in a Mercedes 1.7-liter engine operated on a dynamometer platform. A fluorescent dye suitable for use in diesel fuel and oil systems is added to the engine fuel. The LIF spectra are monitored to detect the growth of the dye signal relative to the background fluorescence of the oil; fuel mass concentration is quantified based on a known sample set. The technique was implemented with fiber optic probes which can be inserted at various points in the oil system of the engine. A low cost 532-nm laser diode was used for excitation of the fluorescence. Measurements of fuel dilution of oil are presented for various in-cylinder injection strategies for rich operation of the diesel engine. Rates of fuel dilution increase for all strategies relative to normal lean operation, and higher fuel dilution rates are observed when extra fuel injection occurs later in the combustion cycle when fuel penetration into the cylinder wall oil film is more likely.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

INCORPORATING THE EFFECT OF PRICE CHANGES ON CO2- EQUIVALENT EMSSIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE-FUEL LIFECYCLES: SCOPING THE ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fuels through use at refinery Energy: other industrialas a process fuel by refineries) (see discussion above); i)residual fuel produced by refineries that produce mainly

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fuels through use at refinery Energy: other industrialas a process fuel by refineries) (see discussion above); i)residual fuel produced by refineries that produce mainly

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Carbon-based Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

Steven S. C. Chuang

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Demonstrating Economic and Operational Viability of 72-Hour Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems to Support Emergency Communications on the Sprint Nextel Network - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kevin Kenny Sprint Nextel 12000 Sunrise Valley Drive MS: VARESQ0401-E4064 Reston, VA 20191 Phone: (703) 592-8272 Email: kevin.p.kenny@sprint.com DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: James Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: EE-0000486 Project Partners: * Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (Fuel Project Partner) * Altergy Systems, Folsum, CA (PEM Fuel Cell Project Partner) * Black & Veatch Corporation, Overland Park, KS (A&E

356

NP-MHTGR Fuel Development Program Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 1988, the Secretary of Energy announced a strategy to acquire New Production Reactor capacity for producing tritium. The strategy involved construction of a New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) where the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was selected as the Management and Operations contractor for the project. Immediately after the announcement in August 1988, tritium target particle development began with the INEEL selected as the lead laboratory. Fuel particle development was initially not considered to be on a critical path for the project, therefore, the fuel development program was to run concurrently with the design effort of the NP-MHTGR.

Maki, John Thomas; Petti, David Andrew; Hobbins, Richard Redfield; McCardell, Richard K.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Southworth, Finis Hio

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 2. Alternatives for waste treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the five-volume report is devoted to the description of alternatives for waste treatment. The discussion is presented under the following section titles: fuel reprocessing modifications; high-level liquid waste solidification; treatment and immobilization of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; treatment of noncombustible solid wastes; treatment of combustible wastes; treatment of non-high-level liquid wastes; recovery of transuranics from non-high-level wastes; immobilization of miscellaneous non-high-level wastes; volatile radioisotope recovery and off-gas treatment; immobilization of volatile radioisotopes; retired facilities (decontamination and decommissioning); and, modification and use of selected fuel reprocessing wastes. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitridenanocrystals as electrocatalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are energy conversion devices that produce electricity from a supply of fuel, such as hydrogen. One of the major challenges in achieving efficient energy conversion is the development of cost-effective materials that can act as electrocatalysts for PEMFCs. In this letter, we demonstrate that, instead of conventional noble metals, such as platinum, chromium nitride nanocrystals of fcc structure exhibit attractive catalytic activity for PEMFCs. Device testing indicates good stability of nitride nanocrystals in low temperature fuel cell operational environment.

Zhong, Hexiang; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Huamin; Wang, Meiri; Mao,Samuel S.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

California Initiative for Large Molecule Sustainable Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Initiative for Large Molecule Sustainable Fuels Transportation Energy Research PIER these fuels stands in the way of California's energy independence. Liquid fuels produced from biomass have California's preeminence in this field of technology, creating green jobs through these technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Producing SNG and other fuels from peat  

SciTech Connect

During 1981, PEATGAS process testing advanced into the pilot-plant stage. The modification now in progress is the installation of a pressurized lockhopper system. Along with a series of fluidized-bed gasification tests, studies of a wet-carbonization peat-beneficiation process are underway. Other work includes mapping US peat resources.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Use of Thorium as Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society endorses continued research and development of the use of thorium as a fertile a fuel material for nuclear reactors. Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant in the earth’s crust as uranium and is a widely distributed natural resource, which is readily accessible in many countries. 1 Use of thorium as a fertile fuel material leads to the following: • production of an alternative fissile uranium isotope, uranium-233 • coproduction of a highly radioactive isotope, uranium-232, which provides a high radiation barrier to discourage theft and proliferation of spent fuel. The path to sustainability of nuclear energy in several countries, notably India, profits from technology that utilizes their vast thorium resources. Waste produced during reactor operations benefits from the fact that the thorium-uranium fuel cycle does not readily produce long-lived transuranic elements. To date thorium utilization has been demonstrated in light water reactors, 2 as well as in other reactor types 3 including fast spectrum reactors, heavy water reactors, and gas-cooled reactors. In this context, the database and experience with thorium fuel and fuel cycles are very limited and must be augmented significantly before large-scale investment is committed to commercialization. Since thorium is an abundant resource that can potentially be used as a fertile nuclear fuel, it is likely to be an important contributor to the future global nuclear enterprise in several countries. It is, therefore, paramount that the evolving global thorium fuel cycle (including fuel conditioning and recycling operations) incorporate the latest in safeguards and other proliferation-resistant design features so that the thorium fuel cycle complements the uranium fuel cycle and enhances the long-term global sustainability of nuclear energy.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nuclear Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Nuclear Fuels Nuclear Fuels A reactor's ability to produce power efficiently is significantly affected by the composition and configuration of its fuel system. A nuclear fuel assembly consists of hundreds of thousands of uranium pellets, stacked and encapsulated within tubes called fuel rods or fuel pins which are then bundled together in various geometric arrangements. There are many design considerations for the material composition and geometric configuration of the various components comprising a nuclear fuel system. Future designs for the fuel and the assembly or packaging of fuel will contribute to cleaner, cheaper and safer nuclear energy. Today's process for developing and testing new fuel systems is resource and time intensive. The process to manufacture the fuel, build an assembly,

364

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at temperatures up to 160 C.

L.G. Marianowski

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

367

Planet Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Place Brighton, United Kingdom Product A UK based producer and supplier of biodiesel. References Planet Fuels1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

368

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

369

Biogas, compost and fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot project now under development in Folsom, California, incorporates an anaerobic digestion/aerobic composting process that could eventually supply enough biogas to a fuel cell. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) has two fuel cells in operation and is participating in the research project. Recently, the California Prison Industry Authority (PIA) began operating a processing facility at the Folsom prison, designed for 100 tons/day of mixed waste from the City of Folsom. The 35,000 square foot Correctional Resource Recovery Facility (CRRF) uses minimum security inmates from Folsom`s Return to Custody Facility to manually separate recyclables and compostable materials from the waste stream. The PIA will be using a new technology, high solids anaerobic digestion, to compost the organic fraction (representing approximately 60 to 70 percent of the waste stream). Construction began in June on a 40-foot wide by 120-foot long and 22-foot deep anaerobic digester. Once the vessel is operational in 1995, the composting process and the gradual breakdown of organic material will produce biogas, which SMUD hopes to use to power an adjacent two megawatt fuel cell. The electricity generated will serve SMUD customers, including the waste facility and nearby correctional institutions. 1 fig.

Wichert, B.; Wittrup, L.; Robel, R. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Design, Operation, and Performance Data for High Burnup PWR Fuel from the H. B. Robinson Plant for Use in the NRC Experimental Progr am at Argonne National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the background information -- design, irradiation history, and performance data -- for twelve high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods that are being provided to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use in experiments designed to study the response of highly irradiated fuel to transient accidents and long-term storage conditions. This information will establish the starting conditions needed to correctly interpret future experimental results.

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ethanol Blends and Engine Operating Strategy Effects on Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Engine Particle Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spark ignition (SI) engines with direct injection (DI) fueling can improve fuel economy and vehicle power beyond that of port fuel injection (PFI). Despite this distinct advantage, DI fueling often increases particle emissions such that SI exhaust may be subject to future particle emissions regulations. Challenges in controlling particle emissions arise as engines encounter varied fuel composition such as intermediate ethanol blends. Furthermore, modern engines are operated using unconventional breathing strategies with advanced cam-based variable valve actuation systems. In this study, we investigate particle emissions from a multi-cylinder DI engine operated with three different breathing strategies, fueling strategies and fuels. The breathing strategies are conventional throttled operation, early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC); the fueling strategies are single injection DI (sDI), multi-injection DI (mDI), and PFI; and the fuels are emissions certification gasoline, E20 and E85. The results indicate the dominant factor influencing particle number concentration emissions for the sDI and mDI strategies is the fuel injection timing. Overly advanced injection timing results in particle formation due to fuel spray impingement on the piston, and overly retarded injection timing results in particle formation due to poor fuel and air mixing. In addition, fuel type has a significant effect on particle emissions for the DI fueling strategies. Gasoline and E20 fuels generate comparable levels of particle emissions, but E85 produces dramatically lower particle number concentration. The particle emissions for E85 are near the detection limit for the FSN instrument, and particle number emissions are one to two orders of magnitude lower for E85 relative to gasoline and E20. We found PFI fueling produces very low levels of particle emissions under all conditions and is much less sensitive to engine breathing strategy and fuel type than the DI fueling strategies. The particle number-size distributions for PFI fueling are of the same order for all of the breathing strategies and fuel types and are one to two orders lower than for the sDI fuel injection strategy with gasoline and E20. Remarkably, the particle emissions for E85 under the sDI fueling strategy are similar to particle emissions with a PFI fueling strategy. Thus by using E85, the efficiency and power advantages of DI fueling can be gained without generating high particle emissions.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Anaerobic Digesters Design and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public awar'eness of the need to develop systems for producing energy from readilyrenewable sources, as an alternative to energy from expensive and diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, led to research at The Pennsylvania State University on systems for methane production by anaerobic digestion of animal manures. Experiences with design, construction, and operation of a two-stage heated continuous-feed digester for a herd of 100 dairy cows are reported in this Bulletin. The publication contains discussions of the microbiological processes involved in the anaerobic digestion of organic materials;

S. P. E. Persson; R. W. Regan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Production of New Biomass/Waste-Containing Solid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its industry partners--PBS Coals, Inc. (Friedens, Pennsylvania), American Fiber Resources (Fairmont, West Virginia), Allegheny Energy Supply (Williamsport, Maryland), and the Heritage Research Group (Indianapolis, Indiana)--addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that is applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provides environmental benefits compared with coal. During Phase I of this project (January 1999 to July 2000), several biomass/waste materials were evaluated for potential use in a composite fuel. As a result of that work and the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production, paper mill sludge and coal were selected for further evaluation and demonstration in Phase II. In Phase II (June 2001 to December 2004), the project team demonstrated the GranuFlow technology as part of a process to combine paper sludge and coal to produce a composite fuel with combustion and handling characteristics acceptable to existing boilers and fuel handling systems. Bench-scale studies were performed at DOE-NETL, followed by full-scale commercial demonstrations to produce the composite fuel in a 400-tph coal cleaning plant and combustion tests at a 90-MW power plant boiler to evaluate impacts on fuel handling, boiler operations and performance, and emissions. A circuit was successfully installed to re-pulp and inject paper sludge into the fine coal dewatering circuit of a commercial coal-cleaning plant to produce 5,000 tons of a ''composite'' fuel containing about 5% paper sludge. Subsequent combustion tests showed that boiler efficiency and stability were not compromised when the composite fuel was blended with the boiler's normal coal supply. Firing of the composite fuel blend did not have any significant impact on emissions as compared to the normal coal supply, and it did not cause any excursions beyond Title V regulatory limits; all emissions were well within regulatory limits. SO{sub 2} emissions decreased during the composite fuel blend tests as a result of its higher heat content and slightly lower sulfur content as compared to the normal coal supply. The composite fuel contained an extremely high proportion of fines because the parent coal (feedstock to the coal-cleaning plant) is a ''soft'' coal (HGI > 90) and contained a high proportion of fines. The composite fuel was produced and combustion-tested under record wet conditions for the local area. In spite of these conditions, full load was obtained by the boiler when firing the composite fuel blend, and testing was completed without any handling or combustion problems beyond those typically associated with wet coal. Fuel handling and pulverizer performance (mill capacity and outlet temperatures) could become greater concerns when firing composite fuels which contain higher percent

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Integration Strategy for DB-MHR TRISO Fuel production in conjunction with MOX Fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the nuclear power options for the future involves the evolution of gas cooled reactors to support the likely high temperature operations needed for commercial scale hydrogen production. One such proposed option is to use a Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor fueled with uranium based TRISO (coated particle) fuel. It has also been suggested that such a MHR could be operated in a ''Deep Burn'' manner fueled with TRISO fuel produced from recycle spent nuclear fuel. This concept known as a DBMHR must withstand significant development and fuel fabrication cost to be economically viable. The purpose of this report is to consider and propose a strategy where synergy with a parallel MOX fuel to LWR program provides economic or other advantage for either or both programs. A strategy involving three phases has been envisioned with potential for economic benefit relative to a stand-alone TRISO/DBMHR program. Such a strategy and related timing will ultimately be driven by economics, but is offered here for consideration of value to the total AFCI program. Phase I Near-term. Conventional spent fuel aqueous processing, MOX fuel fabrication, and use of present and future LWR/ALWR's with objective of a ''Continuous Recycle'' mode of fuel cycle management. Phase II Intermediate. Augmentation of LWR/ALWR industry with MHR deployment as justified by hydrogen economy and/or electrical demand. Phase III Long-term. Introduction of DBMHR's to offer alternative method for transuranic destruction and associated repository benefits, in addition to Phase II benefits. The basic philosophy of this strategy appears sound. However, the details of the technology plans and economic evaluations should receive additional detail and evaluation in the next fiscal year as funding can support.

MCGUIRE, DAVID

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

NETL: News Release - World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2003 22, 2003 World's First Coal Mine Methane Fuel Cell Powers Up in Ohio New Technology Mitigates Coal Mine Methane Emissions, Produces Electricity HOPEDALE, OH - In a novel pairing of old and new, FuelCell Energy of Danbury, Conn., has begun operating the world's first fuel cell powered by coal mine methane. Funded by the Department of Energy, the demonstration harnesses the power of a pollutant - methane emissions from coal mines - to produce electricity in a new, 21st Century fuel cell. MORE INFO Remarks by DOE's James Slutz FuelCell Energy Web Site "We believe this technology can reduce coal mine methane emissions significantly while producing clean, efficient, and reliable high-quality power," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "This has the dual

377

Synthetic fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Solid polymer MEMS-based fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO{sub 2}) mixed with urania (UO{sub 2}). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified.

Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85%...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electronic fuel control system for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for monitoring gas turbine operating temperatures and rotational velocity for producing one of a group of fuel control signals for controlling the fuel input rate to the gas turbine. The method consists of: monitoring turbine inlet temperatures through respective sensors for the gas turbine, averaging the turbine inlet temperatures to produce an average turbine inlet temperature signal, monitoring a gas generator inlet temperature sensor of the gas turbine for producing a gas generator inlet temperature signal, generating a speed signal proportional to the rotational velocity of the gas turbine, combining the gas generator inlet temperature signal with the speed signal to produce a first function signal, applying the first function signal to a stored data set to produce a second function signal, the stored data set related to performance characteristics of the gas turbine, and comparing the turbine inlet temperature signal to the second function signal to produce a difference signal therefrom, the difference signal serving as a fuel control signal for the gas turbine.

Nick, C.F.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section...

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

394

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

395

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

396

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

398

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

399

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operation fuels produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Dat