National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for operating hours number

  1. Optimizing hourly hydro operations at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Hamilton, S.; McCoy, J.

    1995-10-01

    The Salt Lake City Area (SLCA) office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) is responsible for marketing the capacity and energy generated by the Colorado River Storage, Collbran, and Rio Grande hydropower projects. These federal resources are collectively called the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). In recent years, stringent operational limitations have been placed on several of these hydropower plants including the Glen Canyon Dam, which accounts for approximately 80% of the SLCA/IP resources. Operational limitations on SLCA/IP hydropower plants continue to evolve as a result of decisions currently being made in the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Power Marketing EIS. The Hydro LP (Linear Program) model, which was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), was used to analyze a broad range of issues associated with many possible future operational restrictions at SLCA/IP power plants. With technical assistance from Western, the Hydro LP model was configured to simulate hourly power plant operations for weekly periods with the objective of maximizing Western`s net revenues. The model considers hydropower operations for the purpose of serving SLCA firm loads, loads for special projects, Inland Power Pool (IPP) operating reserve requirements, and Western`s purchasing programs. The model estimates hourly SLCA/IP generation and spot market activities. For this paper, hourly SLCA/IP hydropower plant generation was simulated under three operational scenarios and three hydropower conditions. For each scenario an estimate of Western`s net revenue was computed.

  2. Optimizing hourly hydro operations at the Salt Lake City Area integrated projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Hamilton, S.; McCoy, J.

    1995-06-01

    The Salt Lake City Area (SLCA) office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) is responsible for marketing the capacity and energy generated by the Colorado Storage, Collbran, and Rio Grande hydropower projects. These federal resources are collectively called the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). In recent years, stringent operational limitations have been placed on several of these hydropower plants including the Glen Canyon Dam, which accounts for approximately 80% of the SLCA/IP resources. Operational limitations on SLCA/IP hydropower plants continue to evolve as a result of decisions currently being made in the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Power Marketing EIS. To analyze a broad range of issues associated with many possible future operational restrictions, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), with technical assistance from Western has developed the Hydro LP (Linear Program) Model. This model simulates hourly operations at SLCA/IP hydropower plants for weekly periods with the objective of maximizing Western`s net revenues. The model considers hydropower operations for the purpose of serving SLCA firm loads, loads for special projects, Inland Power Pool (IPP) spinning reserve requirements, and Western`s purchasing programs. The model estimates hourly SLCA/IP generation and spot market activities. For this paper, hourly SLCA/IP hydropower plant generation is simulated under three operational scenarios and three hydropower conditions. For each scenario an estimate of Western`s net revenue is computed.

  3. Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1994-02-01

    The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

  4. Identifying Challenging Operating Hours for Solar Intergration in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Chadliev, Vladimir; Salgo, Richard

    2012-05-09

    Abstract-- In this paper, the ability of the Nevada (NV) Energy generation fleet to meet its system balancing requirements under different solar energy penetration scenarios is studied. System balancing requirements include capacity, ramp rate, and ramp duration requirements for load following and regulation. If, during some operating hours, system capability is insufficient to meet these requirements, there is certain probability that the balancing authority’s control and reliability performance can be compromised. These operating hours are considered as “challenging” hours. Five different solar energy integration scenarios have been studied. Simulations have shown that the NV Energy system will be potentially able to accommodate up to 942 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) generation. However, the existing generation scheduling procedure should be adjusted to make it happen. Fast-responsive peaker units need to be used more frequently to meet the increasing ramping requirements. Thus, the NV Energy system operational cost can increase. Index Terms—Solar Generation, Renewables Integration, Balancing Process, Load Following, Regulation.

  5. Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offices | Department of Energy About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Ames Site Office 111 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-9557 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne Site Office 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000 U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office Berkeley

  6. Alertness, performance and off-duty sleep on 8-hour and 12-hour night shifts in a simulated continuous operations control room setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, T.L.

    1995-04-01

    A growing number of nuclear power plants in the United States have adopted routine 12-hr shift schedules. Because of the potential impact that extended work shifts could have on safe and efficient power plant operation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded research on 8-hr and 12-hr shifts at the Human Alertness Research Center (HARC) in Boston, Massachusetts. This report describes the research undertaken: a study of simulated 8-hr and 12-hr work shifts that compares alertness, speed, and accuracy at responding to simulator alarms, and relative cognitive performance, self-rated mood and vigor, and sleep-wake patterns of 8-hr versus 12-hr shift workers.

  7. Survey of lepton number violation via effective operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal standard model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including 11. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the CERN LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ''correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  8. Operation Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation Schedule Daily Hours of Operation

  9. Supplement Number 3 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Supplement Number 3 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Docket No. EO-05-01:Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the ...

  10. Supplement Number 5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Supplement Number 5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance ...

  11. Supplement Number 2 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Supplement Number 2 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-05-03: Pursuant to...

  12. Allocation of Flight Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Allocation of Flight Hours for G-1 Pattern Number Name/Description Hours per flight Number of Flights Total # of Hours Fraction of Allotment (60hrs) Likely Start Time Weather Conditions 1 Stack Pattern 1 (Instrument testing) 3.5 1 3.5 6% 10:00-12:00 Shallow clouds, Cu Hu- Cu Me, Ci are okay 2 Stack Pattern 2 Basic OKC Cloudy Air Flight Plan (some in coordination with ER-2) 3.5 5 17.5 30% 10:00-12:00 Shallow clouds, Cu Hu- Cu Me, Ci are okay 3 Stack Pattern 3 Basic OKC Clear Air Flight Plan 3.5 5

  13. Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

  14. Supplement Number 1 to Operating Plan of Mirnat Potomac River, LLC in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 | Department of Energy 1 to Operating Plan of Mirnat Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Supplement Number 1 to Operating Plan of Mirnat Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act, 16 USC §824a(c), Section 301 (b) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 USC §7151 (b), and Order No. 202-05-3, issued by the Department of Energy

  15. Supplement Number 5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 | Department of Energy 5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Supplement Number 5 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act, 16 USC §824a(c), Section 301(b) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 USC §7151(b), and Order No. 202-05-3, issued by the Department of Energy

  16. Hopper Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hours Used Hopper Hours Used 2015 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2014 Hopper Usage ... Hopper Usage Chart 2011 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2015 Date Hours Used (in ...

  17. Ombuds Office Location & Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds Office Location & Hours Ombuds Office Location & Hours Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the...

  18. Franklin Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2010 2010 Franklin Usage in Hours 2009 2009 Franklin Usage in Hours 2007-2008 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours Date Hours Used (in thousands) Percentage of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 04/28/2012 0.00 0.00 04/27/2012 272.62 29.40 04/26/2012 692.81 74.71 04/25/2012 841.60 90.75 04/24/2012 53.86 5.81 04/23/2012 432.01 46.59 04/22/2012 823.23 88.77 04/21/2012 473.95 51.11

  19. Effects of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Operating Parameters on Particle Number Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.

    2012-04-19

    A single-cylinder, wall-guided, spark ignition direct injection engine was used to study the impact of engine operating parameters on engine-out particle number (PN) emissions. Experiments were conducted with certification gasoline and a splash blend of 20% fuel grade ethanol in gasoline (E20), at four steady-state engine operating conditions. Independent engine control parameter sweeps were conducted including start of injection, injection pressure, spark timing, exhaust cam phasing, intake cam phasing, and air-fuel ratio. The results show that fuel injection timing is the dominant factor impacting PN emissions from this wall-guided gasoline direct injection engine. The major factor causing high PN emissions is fuel liquid impingement on the piston bowl. By avoiding fuel impingement, more than an order of magnitude reduction in PN emission was observed. Increasing fuel injection pressure reduces PN emissions because of smaller fuel droplet size and faster fuel-air mixing. PN emissions are insensitive to cam phasing and spark timing, especially at high engine load. Cold engine conditions produce higher PN emissions than hot engine conditions due to slower fuel vaporization and thus less fuel-air homogeneity during the combustion process. E20 produces lower PN emissions at low and medium loads if fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl is avoided. At high load or if there is fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl and/or cylinder wall, E20 tends to produce higher PN emissions. This is probably a function of the higher heat of vaporization of ethanol, which slows the vaporization of other fuel components from surfaces and may create local fuel-rich combustion or even pool-fires.

  20. Edison Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Hours Used 2015 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2014 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2013 Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart 2015 Date Hours Used (in ...

  1. Contacts / Hours - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts Hours Hanford Meteorological Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current and Past 48 Hours HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate ...

  2. More Than 410,000 Hours of Real-World Fuel Cell System Operation Have Been Analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation Team (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-02-01

    This fact sheet discusses how researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are working to validate hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world settings. NREL strives to provide an independent third-party technology assessment that focuses on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure performance, operation, maintenance, and safety.

  3. Operability test procedure for rotary mode core sampling system {number_sign}4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, T.R.; Jarecki, T.D.

    1995-04-26

    This document gives instructions for the Operability Testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System No. 4. This document is based on the Operability Test Procedure for RMCS system No. 2 because the basic design is the same for all three systems. Modifications have been made from the original design only when exact duplication was not feasible or design improvements could be incorporated without affecting the operation of the system. Operability testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System No. 4 will verify that functional and operational requirements have been met. Testing will be completed in two phases. The first phase of testing (section 7) will involve operating the truck equipment to demonstrate its capabilities. The second phase of testing (section 8) will take repeated samples in a simulated operation environment. These tests will be conducted at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site located just south of U-Plant in the 200 West Area. Tests will be done in a simulated tank farm environment. All testing will be non-radioactive and stand-in materials shall be used to simulate waste tank conditions. Systems will be assembled and arranged in a manner similar to that expected in the field.

  4. Operability test procedure for rotary mode core sampling system {number_sign}3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, T.R.; Jarecki, T.D.

    1995-04-26

    This document gives instructions for the Operability Testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System No. 3. This document is based on the Operability Test Procedure for RMCS system No. 2 because the basic design is the same for all three systems. Modifications have been made from the original design only when exact duplication was not feasible or design improvements could be incorporated without affecting the operation of the system. Operability testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System No. 3, will verify that functional and operational requirements have been met. Testing will be completed in two phases. The first phase of testing (section 7) will involve operating the truck equipment to demonstrate its capabilities. The second phase of testing (section 8) will take repeated samples in a simulated operation environment. These tests will be conducted at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site located just south of U-Plant in the 200 West Area. Tests will be done in a simulated tank farm environment. All testing will be non-radioactive and stand-in materials shall be used to simulate waste tank conditions. Systems will be assembled and arranged in a manner similar to that expected in the field.

  5. Hopper Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hours Used Hopper Hours Used 2015 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2014 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2013 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2012 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2011 Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart 2015 Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 09/20/2015 3.247 88.2 09/19/2015 3.401 92.4 09/18/2015 3.425 93.0 09/17/2015 3.450 93.7 09/16/2015 3.413 92.7 09/15/2015 3.466 94.1 09/14/2015 3.299 89.6 09/13/2015 3.436 93.3

  6. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 1: Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

  7. Property:OperatingHours | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 8,587 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 7,883 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 8,338 + Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  8. Carver Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carver Hours Used Carver Hours Used Hopper Usage Chart Hopper Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 12/15/2014 161.25 84.75 12/14/2014 162.32 85.31 12/13/2014 165.95 87.22 12/12/2014 172.69 90.76 12/11/2014 174.45 91.69 12/10/2014 170.09 89.39 12/09/2014 166.50 87.50 12/08/2014 169.20 88.92 12/07/2014 167.44 88.00 12/06/2014 172.83 90.83 12/05/2014 176.73 92.89 12/04/2014 174.69 91.81 12/03/2014 178.77 93.96 12/02/2014 172.30 90.55 12/01/2014 176.12

  9. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - DEWALT RECIPROCATING SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-01, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-31

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The DeWalt reciprocating saw was assessed on August 13, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The DeWalt reciprocating saw is a hand-held industrial tool used for cutting numerous materials, including wood and various types of metals depending upon the chosen blade. Its design allows for cutting close to floors, corners, and other difficult areas. An adjustable shoe sets the cut at three separate depths. During the demonstration for the dismantling of the fiberglass-reinforced plywood crate, the saw was used for extended continuous cutting, over a period of approximately two hours. The dismantling operation involved vertical and horizontal cuts, saw blade changes, and material handling. During this process, operators experienced vibration to the hand and arm in addition to a temperature rise on the handgrip. The blade of the saw is partially exposed during handling and fully exposed during blade changes. Administrative controls, such as duty time of the operators and the machine, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, should be considered when using the saw in this application. Personal noise sampling indicated that both workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 88.3 and 90.6 dBA. Normally, a worker would be placed in a hearing conservation program if his TWA was greater than the Action Level. In this case, however, monitoring was conducted during a simulation, not during the actual work conducted at the worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted at the worksite to determine the actual noise levels for the workers. Until it is determined that the actual TWA's are less than the Action Level, the workers should use PPE. A training program on the proper use and wearing of the selected PPE should be provided to each worker. Nuisance dust monitoring yielded a concentration of 10.69 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}). Although this is less than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3}, it is above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Fiberglass dust monitoring yielded a fiber count of 1.7 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc). This is above the PEL and the TLV of 1.0 f/cc. Therefore, controls should be implemented (engineering or PPE) to reduce the workers' exposure to the dust. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  10. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1994-FY 95 annual report. Volume 9, Number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during CY 1994 and FY 1995. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through FY 1995. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission.

  11. Solar Hot Water Hourly Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel which provides an hourly simulation of a solar hot water heating system (including solar geometry, solar collector efficiency as a function of temperature, energy balance on storage tank and lifecycle cost analysis).

  12. Edison Phase I Hours Used

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Phase I Hours Used Edison Phase I Hours Used Edison Usage Chart Edison Usage Chart Date Hours Used (in millions) Percent of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 06/23/2013 0.226 88.6 06/22/2013 0.239 93.9 06/21/2013 0.248 97.1 06/20/2013 0.240 94.0 06/19/2013 0.233 91.3 06/18/2013 0.245 96.0 06/17/2013 0.251 98.4 06/16/2013 0.243 95.3 06/15/2013 0.245 95.9 06/14/2013 0.246 96.5 06/13/2013 0.240 94.1 06/12/2013 0.128 50.4 06/11/2013 0.215 84.5 06/10/2013 0.225 88.4 06/09/2013 0.228 89.6

  13. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - ADAMANT CIRCULAR SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-05, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting up specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactive contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Adamant circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Adamant was only used during a limited ''test'' on a regular plywood crate due to safety considerations of the tool for this application. The Adamant circular saw, a counter-rotating twin-cutter, constructed with blades that work differently than conventional cutting wheels with twin blades, each rotating in opposite directions. It is used to cut wood and metals. Each blade is approximately 8 3/4 inches in diameter with a maximum cutting depth of 2 1/2 inches. The machine has two rotation speeds: 1,900 and 2,900 rotations per minute (rpm). The saw is operated with an interlocked, guarded trigger switch located at the end of the saw opposite the cutting blades. To operate the saw, the safety interlock must be depressed prior to powering the saw with the trigger control. The saw is supported by a handle at the front of the saw near the cutting blades. The top part of the blades is guarded near the handle, with approximately three-fourths of the face of the blades exposed. The Adamant circular saw is an innovative technology used to cut metals and wood. Its safety features include: interlocking switch for powering the saw, overload indicator and shutoff, and an electronic brake that stops the engine immediately when the start button is released. The top part of the blades is guarded near the motor. With approximately three-fourths of the face of the blades open, the operator is exposed to the potential risk of serious and minor cuts and abrasions when using and handling the saw. There is also potential for damage to the blades if the saw is not stored properly. Without guarding on the lower part of the blades, these can be damaged if the saw is dropped or rested on the cutting blades. Based upon the industrial hygiene sampling conducted for the other four saws demonstrated at FIU, noise levels, nuisance dust, and airborne fiberglass may be a problem when using this technology for the cutting of fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. No industrial hygiene sampling was conducted while the Adamant saw was in use. Engineering controls should be used to eliminate these problems whenever possible. Where this is not possible, administrative controls, training, and proper personal protective equipment (PPE) should be used. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  14. Multi-cluster processor operating only select number of clusters during each phase based on program statistic monitored at predetermined intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev; Dwarkadas, Sandhya; Albonesi, David

    2009-02-10

    In a processor having multiple clusters which operate in parallel, the number of clusters in use can be varied dynamically. At the start of each program phase, the configuration option for an interval is run to determine the optimal configuration, which is used until the next phase change is detected. The optimum instruction interval is determined by starting with a minimum interval and doubling it until a low stability factor is reached.

  15. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  16. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  17. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  18. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  19. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-08-30

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  20. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-05-05

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  1. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-04-24

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  2. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-07-15

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  3. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (BSD) ...

  4. Intra-Hour Dispatch and Automatic Generator Control Demonstration with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Forecasting | Department of Energy Intra-Hour Dispatch and Automatic Generator Control Demonstration with Solar Forecasting Intra-Hour Dispatch and Automatic Generator Control Demonstration with Solar Forecasting UCSD logo2.png The University of California at San Diego (UCSD) is leading a project that will reduce power system operation cost by providing a prediction of the generation fleet's behavior in real time for realistic photovoltaic penetration scenarios. APPROACH The primary

  5. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight savings time. Home I take the hourly AC output numbers and apply them to a program I built that assigns...

  6. 100,000 hour design life of turbo compressor packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-20

    Many turbomachinery manufacturers and operators typically quote 100,000 hours as a design limit for service life of turbo compressor components. The Pipeline Research Committee initiated this study to review the life limiting criteria for certain critical components and determine if the design target of 100,000 hours can be safely and reliably met or extended with special component management practices. The first phase of the project was to select the turbomachinery components that would be included in the review. Committee members were surveyed with a detailed questionnaire designed to identify critical components based on: high hours (e.g. at or approaching 100,000 hours) the most common engine types operated by the member organizations, and the components of greatest concern from a risk and expense point of view. The selection made covers a wide range of engine types that are of interest to most of the committee companies. This selection represents some 78% of the high hour units operated by the committee and includes components from GE Frame 3 and Frame 5, Solar Saturn, Rolls Royce Avon, and Cooper RT56 engines. The report goes into detail regarding the various damage mechanism which can be the main life limiting factor of the component; creep, fatigue, environmental attack, wear and microstructure instability. For each of the component types selected, the study identifies the life limiting criteria and outlines how the components may be managed for extended life. Many of the selected components can be reliably operated beyond 100,000 hours by following the management practices set out in the report.

  7. Happy Birthday Unmet Hours! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Happy Birthday Unmet Hours! Happy Birthday Unmet Hours! September 3, 2015 - 1:43pm Addthis Unmet Hours is a question-and-answer resource for the building energy modeling community. Unmet Hours is a question-and-answer resource for the building energy modeling community. Amir Roth, Ph.D. Amir Roth, Ph.D. Building Energy Modeling Technology Manager A year ago this week, a star was born. Working with IBPSA-USA, the US chapter of the International Building Performance Simulation Association, and Big

  8. EIA-930 Hourly and Daily Balancing ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... file retrieval using business-to-business data transfer or web services technology. ... but are to be included in the posted hourly value for balancing authority net generation. ...

  9. Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis Production | Department of Energy Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production Download the presentation slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings," held on January 17, 2013. PDF icon Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings Webinar

  10. Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradbury Science Museum winter hours Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). December 21, 2010 Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Often called "a window to the Laboratory," the museum annually attracts thousands of visitors from all over the world. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 21, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory's

  11. Table B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Worker","Median Hours per Week","Median Age of Buildings (years)" "All Buildings

  12. ARM - Historical Operational Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For a complete description of hours for each site, please refer to the current ARM Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. The tables below provide the...

  13. Hour of Code | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom Resources Undergraduates Graduates Faculty Partners News & Events About Us Staff Directory About Us Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Developing the Next Generation of Scientists & Engineers Home Learning Center Undergraduates Graduates Faculty Partners News & Events Learning Center Community Outreach Hour of Code Introduce a Girl to Engineering Science Careers in Search of Women

  14. Team Surpasses 1 Million Hours Safety Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NISKAYUNA, N.Y. – Vigilance and dedication to safety led the EM program’s disposition project team at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) to achieve a milestone of one million hours — over two-and-a-half-years — without injury or illness resulting in time away from work.

  15. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - MILWAUKEE WORM DRIVE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-02, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-05

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw is a hand-held tool with a 7 1/4-inch diameter circular blade for cutting wood. The saw contains a fixed upper and a retractable lower blade guard to prevent access to the blade during use. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch; and is supported with a handgrip mounted on top of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of cut. The retractable blade guard permits blind or plunge cuts and protects from blade access during shutdown and blade coast. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible when using this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool. Personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was near the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) while the other was at the Action Level with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. Air sampling was performed while the workers dismantled the fiberglass-reinforced crates. The total nuisance dust sample for the Milwaukee circular saw was 36.07 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is much higher than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis void due to the overloading of the filter. The PEL for fiberglass is 1 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cc).

  16. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  17. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3023307 Name: Madeleine Brown Organization: nJa Address: --- -------- -------- -- Country: Phone Number: United States Fax Number: n/a E-mail: --- -------- --------_._------ --- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Please send me a copy of the emails and records relating to the decision to allow the underage son of Bill Gates to tour Hanford in June 2010. Please also send the emails and records that justify the Department of Energy to prevent other minors from visiting B Reactor. Optional

  18. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1074438 Name: Gayle Cooper Organization: nla Address: _ Country: United States Phone Number: Fax Number: nla E-mail: . ~===--------- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Information pertaining to the Department of Energy's cost estimate for reinstating pension benefit service years to the Enterprise Company (ENCO) employees who are active plan participants in the Hanford Site Pension Plan. This cost estimate was an outcome of the DOE's Worker Town Hall Meetings held on September 17-18, 2009.

  19. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  20. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  1. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  2. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  3. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  4. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  5. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  6. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  7. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  8. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  9. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  10. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  11. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-09-10

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  12. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-30

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  13. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-01-08

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  14. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-07-31

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  15. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-03-03

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  16. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-06-18

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  17. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-04-07

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  18. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-10-25

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  19. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-12-02

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  20. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-11-05

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  1. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-02

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  2. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-02-03

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  3. (Document Number)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A TA-53 TOUR FORM/RADIOLOGICAL LOG (Send completed form to MS H831) _____________ _____________________________ _________________________________ Tour Date Purpose of Tour or Tour Title Start Time and Approximate Duration ___________________________ ______________ _______________________ _________________ Tour Point of Contact/Requestor Z# (if applicable) Organization/Phone Number Signature Locations Visited: (Check all that apply, and list any others not shown. Prior approval must be obtained

  4. Energy Savings Performance Contracting 14-hour Agency Onsite...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Savings Performance Contracting 14-hour Agency Onsite Workshop Energy Savings Performance Contracting 14-hour Agency Onsite Workshop January 20, 2016 8:30AM PST to January...

  5. Current and Past 48 Hours HMS Observations - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Meteorological Station Current and Past 48 Hours HMS Observations Hanford Meteorological Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current and Past 48 Hours HMS ...

  6. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E KEY INDIVIDUALS U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 Washington State Department of Ecology U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Executive Managers Program Manager for the Hanford Project Office (509) 376-6865 Program Manager for the Nuclear Waste Program (509) 372-7950 Assistant Manager for the Central Plateau (509) 373-9971 Assistant Manager for the Office of River Protection, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (509) 372-3864 Assistant Manager for the Office of

  7. LED Solutions for the Dark Hours

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    technologies 5 LEDs for Street and Roadway Lighting Portland, OR Philadelphia, PA New York, NY Kansas City, MO 6 Boston Las Vegas Seattle Number of LED Replacements to Date (4...

  8. Property:OutagePhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutagePhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OutagePhoneNumber Property Type String Description An outage hotline or 24-hour customer service number Note: uses...

  9. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Off-Hour Equipment...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    such programs (Figure 1). About the same amount of floorspace had either heating system or cooling system off-hour reduction. Off-hour reduction was least for office...

  10. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom PDF icon...

  11. DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to 15 Teams for Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of...

  12. Table B1. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Worker","Mean Hours per Week" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,14.5,823,60 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  13. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9th-12th Grade Classroom | Department of Energy Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom PDF icon bioenergize_me_ngss_20151210.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit

  14. Hour of Code sparks interest in computer science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM skills Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Hour of Code sparks interest in computer science Taking the mystery out of programming February 1, 2016 Hour of Code participants work their way through fun computer programming tutorials. Hour of Code participants work their way through fun computer programming tutorials. Contacts Community Programs Director Kathy Keith Email Editor

  15. DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that approximately 1.6 billion supercomputing processor hours have been awarded to 69 cutting-edge research projects through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.

  16. Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

  17. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-09-30

    The order establishes policy, requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime and compensatory time, leave administration, and hours of duty.

  18. Department of Energy's Paducah Site Reaches Million-Hour Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environmental risk. The LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky Team, the Department's prime cleanup contractor, in October reached a milestone of 1 million hours without a lost...

  19. Reformulated Gasoline Use Under the 8-Hour Ozone Rule

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact on gasoline price and supply when additional ozone non-attainment areas come under the new 8-hour ozone standard.

  20. After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez road vehicle access portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    begin June 18 After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez Road Vehicle Access Portal After-hours, weekend changes through East Jemez road vehicle access portal begin June 18 All vehicles entering the portal must use center lane number 4. June 15, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  1. Gate Hours & Services | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gate Hours & Services Sand Hill Road Main Gate Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 650-926-2551 Alert URA or User Check-In Coordinator Jackie Kerlegan before traveling to SLAC. SLAC has proximity card readers at the entrances from Sand Hill Road and Alpine Road as well as at Security Gate 17 and Sector 30. If you do not have an ID badge with proximity access issued by Security after October 2014, stop first at the SLAC Security Office Building 235 during office hours which are 7 am-12 noon

  2. Labor Standards/Wage and Hour Laws | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards/Wage and Hour Laws Labor Standards/Wage and Hour Laws Labor Standards and Wage/Hour laws establish minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and minimum leave requirements: 40 U.S.C. chapter 31, subchapter IV, (Davis-Bacon Act) 41 U.S.C. chapter 67, (Service Contract Act) Fair Labor Standards Act Family and Medical Leave Act Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act DOE training on some of these laws are available below: File Labor Standards 101 PDF icon Davis-Bacon Act

  3. Delayed Start or Cancellation of Business Hours | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the hours of 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. should report to work as usual. Depending on their job duties and directives from their line management, some employees may be required to...

  4. Balancing Authority Cooperation Concepts - Intra-Hour Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, Matthew; Samaan, Nader; Milligan, Michael; Guo, Tao; Liu, Guangjuan; Toolson, Jacob

    2013-03-29

    The overall objective of this study was to understand, on an Interconnection-wide basis, the effects intra-hour scheduling compared to hourly scheduling. Moreover, the study sought to understand how the benefits of intra-hour scheduling would change by altering the input assumptions in different scenarios. This report describes results of three separate scenarios with differing key assumptions and comparing the production costs between hourly scheduling and 10-minute scheduling performance. The different scenarios were chosen to provide insight into how the estimated benefits might change by altering input assumptions. Several key assumptions were different in the three scenarios, however most assumptions were similar and/or unchanged among the scenarios.

  5. DOE ZERH Virtual Office Hours (4 of 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TitleZERH Virtual Office Hours: Get the Answers You Need Quickly & EfficientlyDescriptionWhether you’re new to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home or have been involved for a few years, our partners...

  6. DOE ZERH Virtual Office Hours (1 of 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TitleZERH Virtual Office Hours: Get the Answers You Need Quickly & EfficientlyDescriptionWhether you’re new to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home or have been involved for a few years, our partners...

  7. DOE ZERH Virtual Office Hours (3 of 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TitleZERH Virtual Office Hours: Get the Answers You Need Quickly & EfficientlyDescriptionWhether you’re new to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home or have been involved for a few years, our partners...

  8. DOE ZERH Virtual Office Hours (2 of 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TitleZERH Virtual Office Hours: Get the Answers You Need Quickly & EfficientlyDescriptionWhether you’re new to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home or have been involved for a few years, our partners...

  9. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs This report focuses on one example of the value that analysis of this data can provide: ...

  10. Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Question | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Question Home Hi, I saw that you were actively replying to the questions on that page, so thought I'd contact you to ask about the data...

  11. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1B and DOE O 535.1

  12. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14

    This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime and compensatory time, leave administration, and hours of duty. Cancels DOE O 322.1A. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  13. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  14. NREL: Education Center - Hours, Directions, and Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hours, Directions, and Contact Information An aerial photo of a tan Education Center. NREL's Education Center Credit: NREL 18591 Hours The Education Center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and closed on weekends and major holidays (New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Day after Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day). Please call in advance or check out our events listing for information on upcoming energy workshops and other

  15. INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers INCITE Program Doles Out Hours on Supercomputers November 5, 2012 - 1:30pm Addthis Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory, is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. Each year researchers apply to the INCITE program to get to use this machine's incredible computing power. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Lab. Mira, the 10-petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q system at Argonne National

  16. Fluor Paducah Deactivation Project Marks 2 Million Safe Work Hours |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fluor Paducah Deactivation Project Marks 2 Million Safe Work Hours Fluor Paducah Deactivation Project Marks 2 Million Safe Work Hours March 31, 2016 - 12:05pm Addthis Fluor maintenance mechanic Robert Fulton lifts equipment at the C-337 former uranium enrichment process building at EM’s Paducah Site. Fluor maintenance mechanic Robert Fulton lifts equipment at the C-337 former uranium enrichment process building at EM's Paducah Site. Dale Bristoe and Kelly Robinson

  17. Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Code' Campaign | Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour of Code' Campaign Dana Cochran, Jefferson Lab staff member, helps students as they participate in a coding activity. Dana Cochran, Jefferson Lab staff member, helps students as they participate in a coding activity. Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour of Code' Campaign To raise awareness of the need for digital literacy and a basic understanding of

  18. Ames Laboratory Scientists Receive Hours through DOE's INCITE Program | The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory Scientists Receive Hours through DOE's INCITE Program Scientist Mark Gordon was awarded 200 million processor hours through the INCITE program to work on a research project utilizing Argonne National Laboratory's supercomputer. Gordon and his co-investigators will study the behaviors of liquids and their solutes specifically water and ionic liquids. For more information about the team's work with INCITE visit Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  20. Pay and Leave Administration and Hours of Duty

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-19

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the management of pay, including overtime pay and compensatory time, leave administration, time and attendance reporting, and hours of duty. Admin Chg 1, dated 5-10-12, supersedes DOE O 322.1C.

  1. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  2. NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

    2013-01-02

    The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

  3. Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC`s NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency`s statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE`s environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS.

  4. Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property:NumOfPlants Property:NumProdWells Property:NumRepWells Property:Number of Color Cameras Property:Number of Devices Deployed Property:Number of Plants included in...

  5. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSR Key Number Retrieval Pease enter key in the box Submit

  6. 20K Hour GATEWAY Testing Results for I-35W Bridge Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy released a GATEWAY Demonstration report on the longer-term performance of an LED lighting system that was installed on the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in September 2008 and represents one of the country’s oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. Prior to installation, two of the LED luminaires were tested, along with a third luminaire that was not installed on the bridge but was tested for 6,000 hours in a laboratory for comparison purposes.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  8. Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March ...

  9. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Big Numbers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Numbers Big Numbers May 16, 2011 This article has some numbers in it. In principle, numbers are just language, like English or Japanese. Nevertheless, it is true that not everyone is comfortable or facile with numbers and may be turned off by too many of them. To those people, I apologize that this article pays less attention to maximizing the readership than some I do. But sometimes it's just appropriate to indulge one's self, so here goes. When we discuss the performance of some piece of

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  12. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many students haven’t thought much about biomass as an option for generating electricity, transportation fuels, and other products. The Biomass Basics Webinar provides general information about bioenergy, its creation, and its potential uses, and is designed to assist teams competing in the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This challenge, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), is a competition for high school students to learn about bioenergy, create infographics to present what they have learned, and share their infographics on social media. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by BETO in conjunction with the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge.

  13. California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers California Number of Natural ...

  14. Scalable Tuning of Building Models to Hourly Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garrett, Aaron; New, Joshua Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Manual tuning requires a skilled professional, is prohibitively expensive for small projects, imperfect, non-repeatable, non-transferable, and not scalable to the dozens of sensor channels that smart meters, smart appliances, and cheap/ubiquitous sensors are beginning to make available today. A scalable, automated methodology is needed to quickly and intelligently calibrate building energy models to all available data, increase the usefulness of those models, and facilitate speed-and-scale penetration of simulation-based capabilities into the marketplace for actualized energy savings. The ``Autotune'' project is a novel, model-agnosticmore » methodology which leverages supercomputing, large simulation ensembles, and big data mining with multiple machine learning algorithms to allow automatic calibration of simulations that match measured experimental data in a way that is deployable on commodity hardware. This paper shares several methodologies employed to reduce the combinatorial complexity to a computationally tractable search problem for hundreds of input parameters. Accuracy metrics are provided which quantify model error to measured data for either monthly or hourly electrical usage from a highly-instrumented, emulated-occupancy research home.« less

  15. Scalable Tuning of Building Models to Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Aaron; New, Joshua Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Manual tuning requires a skilled professional, is prohibitively expensive for small projects, imperfect, non-repeatable, non-transferable, and not scalable to the dozens of sensor channels that smart meters, smart appliances, and cheap/ubiquitous sensors are beginning to make available today. A scalable, automated methodology is needed to quickly and intelligently calibrate building energy models to all available data, increase the usefulness of those models, and facilitate speed-and-scale penetration of simulation-based capabilities into the marketplace for actualized energy savings. The ``Autotune'' project is a novel, model-agnostic methodology which leverages supercomputing, large simulation ensembles, and big data mining with multiple machine learning algorithms to allow automatic calibration of simulations that match measured experimental data in a way that is deployable on commodity hardware. This paper shares several methodologies employed to reduce the combinatorial complexity to a computationally tractable search problem for hundreds of input parameters. Accuracy metrics are provided which quantify model error to measured data for either monthly or hourly electrical usage from a highly-instrumented, emulated-occupancy research home.

  16. Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration ... Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar, ... Contractors News & Blog Data Phonebook Web Policies History

  17. Supplement Number 1 to Operating Plan of Mirnat Potomac River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act, 16 USC 824a(c), Section 301 (b) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 USC 7151 (b), and...

  18. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  19. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  20. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76 Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Environmental Assessment Final October 2010 DOE/EA-1776 Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Environmental Assessment Final October 2010 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office i CONTENTS GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................ iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  1. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    822 Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range Environmental Assessment Final March 2011 DOE/EA-1822 Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range Environmental Assessment Final March 2011 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office i CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................................... iii GLOSSARY

  2. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  3. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast- Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Weather Data and Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

  4. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Sharing Forward and Transfer Ownership

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. In 2014, Office Hours will be held once a month. We...

  5. Kenya Hourly DNI, GHI and Diffuse Solar Data - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kenya Hourly DNI, GHI and Diffuse Solar Data Abstract Each data file is a set of hourly values of solar radiation (DNI, GHI and diffuse) and meteorological elements for a 1-year...

  6. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Must-Know Tips for the 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Must-Know Tips for the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Must-Know Tips for the 2016 BioenergizeME ...

  7. Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Biomass Basics Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Biomass Basics PDF icon biomas_basics_webinar_20150827.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Annual Update Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the ACRF fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at PNNL for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The DOE requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  11. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Operations /newsroom/_assets/images/operations-icon.png Laboratory Operations Latest announcements from the Lab on its operations. Community, Events Laboratory Operations Environmental Stewardship Melissa Blueflower-Sanchez and Robert Sanchez, owners of R and M Construction, LLC, of Santa Clara Pueblo. Four regional businesses receive Native American Venture Acceleration Fund grants The grants are designed to help the recipients create jobs, increase their revenue base and help

  12. Facilities Operations Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announcement Number DOE-BPA-16-11659-DE Job Summary Ross Facilities Operations and Maintenance operates and maintains the office and light industrial facilities, buildings and...

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  15. Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions Results show ...

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  17. Modular redundant number systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-31

    With the increased use of public key cryptography, faster modular multiplication has become an important cryptographic issue. Almost all public key cryptography, including most elliptic curve systems, use modular multiplication. Modular multiplication, particularly for the large public key modulii, is very slow. Increasing the speed of modular multiplication is almost synonymous with increasing the speed of public key cryptography. There are two parts to modular multiplication: multiplication and modular reduction. Though there are fast methods for multiplying and fast methods for doing modular reduction, they do not mix well. Most fast techniques require integers to be in a special form. These special forms are not related and converting from one form to another is more costly than using the standard techniques. To this date it has been better to use the fast modular reduction technique coupled with standard multiplication. Standard modular reduction is much more costly than standard multiplication. Fast modular reduction (Montgomery`s method) reduces the reduction cost to approximately that of a standard multiply. Of the fast multiplication techniques, the redundant number system technique (RNS) is one of the most popular. It is simple, converting a large convolution (multiply) into many smaller independent ones. Not only do redundant number systems increase speed, but the independent parts allow for parallelization. RNS form implies working modulo another constant. Depending on the relationship between these two constants; reduction OR division may be possible, but not both. This paper describes a new technique using ideas from both Montgomery`s method and RNS. It avoids the formula problem and allows fast reduction and multiplication. Since RNS form is used throughout, it also allows the entire process to be parallelized.

  18. Request for Proposals Number RHB-5-52483

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Managed and Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Request for Proposals Number RHB-5-52483 "Subsurface Utility Engineering...

  19. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  20. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  1. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  2. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  3. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  4. Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  5. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  6. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  7. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  9. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  10. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  12. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  14. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  15. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  16. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

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    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  19. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  20. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  1. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  2. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  3. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  4. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  5. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  6. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  7. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  8. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  9. Nonprofit Organizations: Have Your Los Alamos Employees/Retirees Log Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in VolunteerMatch Nonprofit Organizations: Have Your Los Alamos Employees/Retirees Log Hours in VolunteerMatch Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Nonprofit Organizations: Have Your Los Alamos Employees/Retirees Log Hours in VolunteerMatch Lab employees and retirees should log their VolunteerMatch hours to benefit local nonprofits. March 1, 2013 Volunteers help fill sandbags

  10. DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific Research Projects | Department of Energy 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading Scientific Research Projects DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading Scientific Research Projects January 17, 2008 - 10:38am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science today announced that 265 million processor-hours were awarded to 55 scientific projects, the largest amount of supercomputing resource awards

  11. Join the Call: One Million Hours of STEM Volunteer Service | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Call: One Million Hours of STEM Volunteer Service Join the Call: One Million Hours of STEM Volunteer Service June 30, 2015 - 10:19am Addthis Join the Call: One Million Hours of STEM Volunteer Service America's ability to meet the demands of its energy future depends on having a trained, dedicated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce. To answer this call, the Energy Department has an obligation to do all that is possible to attract, engage, educate, and

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  15. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    researching their selected topics, developing their infographics, and designing effective social media campaigns. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar...

  16. Operational Excellence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operational Excellence /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Operational Excellence The Lab's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. aeiral shot of los alamos, new mexico What Los Alamos gets done as a premier national security science laboratory depends on how we do it The Laboratory's operations and business

  17. Operations Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Research Analysts The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Operations Research Analyst, whose work is associated with the development and main- tenance of energy modeling systems. Responsibilities: Operations Research Analysts perform or participate in one or

  18. SPEAR Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface 1113 N. Kurita J. Langton Vacuum TSP's 1120 J. Corbett A. Terebilo MATLAB Applications - Basics 1121 F. Rafael Booster Kicker Upgrade, Operation Manual 1121...

  19. operations center

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    servers and other critical Operations Center equipment

  20. Independent air supply system filtered to protect against biological and radiological agents (99.7%).
  21. <...

  22. Museum Hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide a listening-assistance system and translations of the script in French and Spanish. Sorry, a local shop has closed The Otowi Bookstore and Museum Shop, which had been...

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, J.M.; Weills, J.T.

    1960-03-15

    A method is given for operating a nuclear reactor having a negative coefficient of reactivity to compensate for the change in reactor reactivity due to the burn-up of the xenon peak following start-up of the reactor. When it is desired to start up the reactor within less than 72 hours after shutdown, the temperature of the reactor is lowered prior to start-up, and then gradually raised after start-up.

  2. Facility Operations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Operations Facility Operations The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy facilities operating, as well as many of the managerial support functions that are shared by many of the Program Offices. These functions are primarily provided by the Office of Administration, MA-40. Facility Operations Electrical Maintenance Furniture and Carpeting Furniture Repairs - If you are located at Germantown, Corporate 270, or Cloverleaf, the number for

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  4. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  5. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical Forks, ...

  6. Jefferson Lab Group Gets 10 Million Hours of Supercomputer Time | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Group Gets 10 Million Hours of Supercomputer Time Jefferson Lab Group Gets 10 Million Hours of Supercomputer Time January 25, 2007 XT3 The Cray XT3 at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Newport News, Va. - A project led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's Theory Center has been allotted 10 million hours of processing time by DOE's 2007 INCITE program on the Cray XT3 located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. According to Jefferson Lab

  7. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavior-Based Programs | Department of Energy The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs This report focuses on one example of the value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether BB efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings. This is important because there is increasing interest in using BB programs as a stand-alone peak

  8. EERE Success Story-Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Runs | Department of Energy Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs EERE Success Story-Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs January 22, 2016 - 11:01am Addthis ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an important step toward the commercialization of

  9. DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    15 Teams for Large-Scale Scientific Computing | Department of Energy 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to 15 Teams for Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Awards 18 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to 15 Teams for Large-Scale Scientific Computing February 1, 2006 - 11:14am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science has awarded a total of 18.2 million hours of computing time on some of the world's

  10. Hourly Wage and Fringe Benefit Rates FY16 WAGE SUPPLEMENT Issued 10-01-15

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Supplement to PLAs Hourly Wage and Fringe Benefit Rates FY16 WAGE SUPPLEMENT Issued 10-01-15 Craft Agmt. Type Classification (Alphabetical) BN Job Code Current Hourly Wage Rates (Use most recent 04/01/15 Re- Allocation (increase HW emploee portion) (letter dated 5/1/15 states for April hours) 10/01/15 (Allocation $1.00 wages) $0.00 $1.00 MEE Maintenance Engineer I (ME-I) 037502 28.26 29.26 MEE Maintenance Engineer II (ME-II) 037503 32.40 33.40 MEE Lead Maintenance Engineer (LME) $1.50 over ME-II

  11. WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident CARLSBAD, N.M., February 22, 2001 - Workers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) reached a safety milestone Feb. 19 by working two million man-hours without a lost-time accident. According to the National Safety Council, facilities with the same industry code as WIPP lose an average of 20.6 workdays (or 164.8 man-hours) a year to accidents. "Safety is at the core of all WIPP

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  13. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  14. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  15. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for 12 hours | Department of Energy Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No. EO-05-01. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours. Arial photograph showing plant and location of predicted SO2 violations, predicted in 2000. PDF icon Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for

  16. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August ... non-manual staff and escorts worked without a lost-time accident during this period. ...

  17. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  18. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St....

  19. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Workers with Paducah site infrastructure contractor Swift & Staley, Inc. recently exceeded 1.5 million hours without lost time away from work due to injury or illness, representing nine years of safe performance.

  20. Department of Energy’s Paducah Site Reaches Million-Hour Safety Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, KY – The U.S. Department of Energy’s Paducah Site has reached a million hours of safe work toward completing cleanup objectives to reduce environmental risk.

  1. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast- Portfolio Manager® Office Hours, Focus Topic: Portfolio Manager 2015 Priorities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. We will plan to spend the first 20-30 minutes of each...

  2. SunShot Announces 24-Hour Solar Data Hackathon | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SunShot will host a 24-hour solar data hackathon at the 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit. ... session at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Industry Growth Forum in ...

  3. EPA ENERGY STAR Webinar: Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Understanding Energy Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. We will plan to spend the first 20-30 minutes of each...

  4. EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Portfolio Manager Office Hours, Focus Topic: Responding to a Data Request

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portfolio Manager "Office Hours" is a live webinar that gives all users an opportunity to ask their questions directly to EPA in an open forum. We will plan to spend the first 20-30 minutes of each...

  5. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  6. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  7. Paducah Site Exceeds 2.5 Million Hours Without Lost Workdays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This month, EM’s cleanup contractor at the Paducah site celebrated surpassing 2.5 million work hours without lost workdays resulting from job-related injury or illness.

  8. Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME ...

  9. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. DOE's Transuranic Waste Processing Center Surpasses 3 Million Safe Work Hours

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Personnel from the U.S. Department of Energy and Wastren Advantage, Inc. met to celebrate the achievement of three million work hours without a lost-time accident at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center.

  12. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Nonaka

    2010-01-08

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe.

  13. Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours March 11, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing safety success and reaching new milestones.| Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge Safety inspections are a key element in a nuclear cleanup environment with large pieces of cleanup equipment. Inspections are essential to continuing

  14. Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge | Department of Energy Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Webinar: BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge PDF icon bioenergizeme_challenge_guide_20151015.pdf More Documents & Publications BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Rubric BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Toolkit Webinar:

  15. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27 26 29 2000's 28 28 29 29 29 28 26 27 27 25 2010's 24 24 22 22 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Industrial

  16. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10 11 8 1990's 8 8 10 11 11 9 202 7 7 9 2000's 9 8 9 9 10 12 11 11 6 3 2010's 3 5 3 3 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas

  17. Operating Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operating Strategies and Design Recommendations for Mitigating Local Damage Effects in Offshore Turbine Blades Phillip W. Richards phillip@gatech.edu Graduate Research Assistant Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering Atlanta, Georgia, USA D. Todd Griffith dgriffi@sandia.gov Principal Member of the Technical Staff Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Dewey H. Hodges dhodges@gatech.edu Professor Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  18. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  19. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,158 1,152 1,122 1990's 1,135 1,107 1,096 1,066 1,064 359 363 336 325 302 2000's 317 283 54 236 223 223 245 256 243 260 2010's 249 245 248 271 266 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  20. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 261 267 270 1990's 275 283 319 355 381 396 444 481 464 445 2000's 416 402 533 526 475 542 528 548 598 598 2010's 580 556 574 566 575 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016

  1. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 551 627 550 1990's 1,508 631 783 345 252 713 923 3,379 3,597 3,625 2000's 3,576 3,535 949 924 312 191 274 278 313 293 2010's 293 286 302 323 328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release

  2. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 22 21 14 1990's 15 13 18 20 24 23 27 30 36 37 2000's 38 36 38 41 43 41 35 37 35 36 2010's 38 36 38 13 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  3. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 463 208 211 1990's 182 198 159 197 191 192 182 173 217 147 2000's 207 213 184 142 137 145 155 114 109 101 2010's 102 94 97 95 92 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 358 344 354 1990's 526 532 532 526 519 530 534 480 514 555 2000's 526 504 488 450 414 425 439 395 383 390 2010's 368 371 379 383 386 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  5. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 233 235 1990's 240 243 248 249 252 253 250 265 257 264 2000's 297 316 182 184 186 179 170 185 165 112 2010's 114 129 134 138 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  6. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 575 552 460 1990's 452 377 388 433 481 515 517 561 574 573 2000's 520 518 451 421 398 432 475 467 449 607 2010's 581 630 507 528 520 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  7. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 219 132 64 1990's 62 65 66 75 144 167 183 189 203 200 2000's 217 198 194 191 196 195 192 188 199 187 2010's 184 178 179 183 189 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016

  8. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Must-Know Tips for the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Infographics are a useful visual tool for explaining complex information, numbers, or data quickly and effectively. However, you do not need to be an experienced graphic designer to make an eye-catching infographic. To assist student teams with the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge, this webinar will highlight strategies for designing engaging infographics and will provide creative approaches that can bring attention to your infographic and motivate others to share it across their social media networks. The webinar will also include lessons learned from previous challenges and tips from last year’s winning team. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge engages 9th–12th-grade high school teams to research one of four cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design an infographic to share what they have learned. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  9. Use of annual profiles of hourly data for analyzing DOE-2 building simulation program results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberl, J.; MacDonald, M.; Eden, A.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents an approach for improving potential building energy analyses using the DOE-2 computer program. The approach makes use of the ability to generate hour-by-hour data results from DOE-2 simulations, and uses a plotting package to generate 3-dimensional annual profiles of the hour-by-hour data for specific quantities of interest. The annual profiles of hourly data provide a graphical check of voluminous data in a condensed form allowing several different types of data to be plotted over a year. These profiles provide the user the opportunity to: check simulation results, check potential problems with simulations, provide graphs to customers who may want a simpler presentation, visualize interactions in simulations, and understand where weak areas may exist in simulations. Future analysis, using such profiles, may allow methods to be developed to check consistency between simulations, check for potential errors in modeling buildings, and better understand how simulations compared with data from real buildings. 14 refs., 24 figs.

  10. Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (~ii~,Richland Operations Office ~Z4TESO~Richland, Washington 99352 SEP 2 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Ms. Sarah Washburn Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 5 6 th Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Ms. Washburn: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0067) You requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOJA), the following documents relating to: 1 . "The authorization, decision to use, and actual use of any and all pesticides and herbicides anywhere within the

  11. Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

    2012-12-27

    Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for intermittent renewable resources, thereby improving the commercial viability of these types of energy resources.

  12. Sub-Hour Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.

    2012-12-01

    High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. This paper will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one-minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km.

  13. California Independent System Operator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search 200px Name: California Independent System Operator Address: California ISO P.O. Box 639014 Place: Folsom, California Zip: 95763-9014 Sector: Services Phone Number:...

  14. Workers at EM's West Valley Site Surpass 1 Million Hours without

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lost-Time Accident | Department of Energy at EM's West Valley Site Surpass 1 Million Hours without Lost-Time Accident Workers at EM's West Valley Site Surpass 1 Million Hours without Lost-Time Accident September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Employees of CH2M HILL Babcock & Wilcox and its subcontractors are shown during West Valley Demonstration Project’s Safety Week celebration. Employees of CH2M HILL Babcock & Wilcox and its subcontractors are shown during West Valley

  15. NREL Finds Up to 6-cent per Kilowatt-Hour Extra Value with Concentrated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Power - News Releases | NREL Finds Up to 6-cent per Kilowatt-Hour Extra Value with Concentrated Solar Power The greater the penetration of renewables in California, the greater the value of CSP with thermal storage capacity June 9, 2014 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) projects would add additional value of 5 or 6 cents per kilowatt hour to utility-scale solar energy in California where 33 percent renewables will be mandated in six years, a new report by the Energy Department's National

  16. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Applin, Bradford

    2013-05-29

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe. http://www.lbl.gov/cs/Archive/news091509.html

  17. Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market | Department of Energy Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar Market Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar Market May 7, 2014 - 2:45pm Addthis Douglas Hitching (left), CEO of Silicon Solar Solutions and Henry Chung, LG, talk during a one-on-one networking session at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Industry Growth Forum in 2012. The SunShot Initiative and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are

  18. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has worked one million hours, covering a 633-day period, without a lost-time injury. Some 285 people including building trade crafts, non-manual staff and escorts worked without a lost-time accident during this period. The Construction team's last lost workday was in September 2010. A

  19. Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

  20. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  1. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  2. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,128 16,096 16,924 1990's 17,765 18,430 18,607 21,178 21,208 21,472 21,664 21,862 22,136 22,254 2000's 22,592 22,815 23,364 23,270 22,994 23,082 23,150 23,007 23,010 22,988 2010's 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 180,656 185,861 190,796 1990's 195,100 196,438 197,926 198,563 200,959 202,947 204,259 212,777 208,208 211,097 2000's 214,474 216,781 219,769 221,141 223,669 224,320 225,027 223,589 224,103 224,846 2010's 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  4. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,414 37,075 38,856 1990's 39,904 39,999 40,968 42,191 45,487 47,293 48,650 50,817 52,237 53,436 2000's 54,794 55,257 55,608 55,909 56,049 56,974 57,452 57,544 56,317 55,850 2010's 55,853 55,846 55,908 55,997 56,172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  5. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,256 1,273 1,307 1990's 1,384 1,400 1,568 1,625 1,928 1,802 1,759 1,764 1,728 1,768 2000's 1,715 1,702 1,563 1,574 1,528 1,535 1,528 1,472 1,426 1,358 2010's 1,325 1,329 1,435 1,452 1,426 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 302,321 313,831 327,527 1990's 339,486 344,763 357,818 370,411 416,773 412,259 426,088 443,093 460,141 473,799 2000's 489,340 501,161 508,686 516,362 527,008 541,523 554,953 570,213 561,196 565,774 2010's 570,797 576,594 583,633 593,286 604,743 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  7. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,480 12,438 12,771 1990's 13,443 13,692 14,133 16,523 15,539 16,285 16,880 17,432 17,972 18,453 2000's 19,100 19,378 19,794 20,070 20,457 20,771 21,149 21,502 21,819 22,071 2010's 22,267 22,570 22,955 23,214 23,591 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 101,468 102,084 103,538 1990's 105,436 107,846 110,291 128,029 119,544 124,152 127,269 130,307 133,095 136,789 2000's 142,075 144,310 147,356 150,725 148,105 157,457 160,481 163,458 165,694 168,096 2010's 169,838 170,877 173,856 176,204 179,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  9. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 77,104 81,159 84,040 1990's 88,753 89,863 91,999 94,860 97,943 101,561 103,867 105,925 109,772 112,978 2000's 115,691 118,561 120,130 131,916 125,042 124,755 126,970 126,324 128,007 127,704 2010's 127,914 128,969 130,139 131,091 131,001 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,206 2,151 2,555 1990's 2,361 2,369 2,425 2,512 2,440 2,393 2,306 2,382 5,149 2,159 2000's 2,386 2,704 2,657 2,755 2,738 2,498 2,545 2,656 2,650 2,717 2010's 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  11. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 534,882 565,856 599,042 1990's 627,031 661,105 696,140 733,363 768,421 804,724 841,232 867,793 905,757 937,896 2000's 969,537 993,363 1,009,225 1,022,628 1,037,429 1,049,307 1,063,328 1,071,756 1,084,102 1,083,573 2010's 1,085,387 1,089,009 1,084,726 1,094,122 1,106,681 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  12. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 294,879 284,013 270,227 1990's 268,181 269,411 292,990 297,516 306,376 325,785 329,287 332,077 320,922 314,598 2000's 315,906 314,858 317,446 320,786 322,242 322,999 329,918 326,812 324,671 313,384 2010's 312,277 314,041 314,811 314,036 317,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,852 4,427 13,383 1990's 13,659 13,770 5,481 5,823 5,222 9,043 8,796 5,339 5,318 5,655 2000's 11,613 10,047 9,143 9,015 9,359 9,136 8,664 11,063 5,568 8,581 2010's 8,779 8,713 8,953 8,525 8,406 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  14. Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,155,948 3,166,168 3,201,316 1990's 3,232,849 3,274,482 3,285,025 3,346,809 3,350,314 3,446,120 3,501,853 3,543,027 3,600,505 3,613,864 2000's 3,704,501 3,738,260 3,809,370 3,859,647 3,939,101 3,984,481 4,067,508 4,156,991 4,205,412 4,248,613 2010's 4,288,495 4,326,156 4,370,057 4,424,103 4,469,282 -

  15. Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31,329 32,637 32,966 1990's 34,697 35,627 36,145 37,816 39,183 40,101 40,107 40,689 42,054 43,861 2000's 47,201 47,477 50,202 51,063 51,503 55,174 55,821 57,741 59,502 60,781 2010's 61,976 62,885 63,383 64,114 65,134 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  16. Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 414,020 418,569 432,377 1990's 453,023 455,649 467,664 484,438 503,583 523,622 562,343 567,786 588,364 609,603 2000's 641,111 657,728 660,677 678,833 701,255 743,761 754,554 778,644 794,880 810,442 2010's 821,525 830,219 840,687 854,389 869,052 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,447 2,698 2,768 1990's 2,949 3,154 3,198 3,314 3,512 3,649 3,790 3,928 4,034 4,219 2000's 4,316 4,416 4,516 4,602 4,684 4,781 4,861 4,925 4,980 5,085 2010's 5,137 5,256 5,535 5,441 5,589 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,553 16,616 16,920 1990's 18,300 19,879 20,468 21,553 22,546 23,523 24,383 25,539 26,664 27,931 2000's 28,532 29,463 30,108 30,856 31,971 33,015 34,081 34,937 35,929 37,242 2010's 38,047 38,839 39,917 41,152 42,231 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  19. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 54,071 54,892 61,012 1990's 63,751 67,997 69,629 70,161 72,188 74,690 77,284 78,986 77,220 80,500 2000's 84,646 84,839 86,328 87,202 87,919 90,577 91,481 93,015 94,219 95,704 2010's 95,401 96,086 96,503 97,499 98,741 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  20. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 877 895 895 1990's 929 1,156 1,101 2,706 2,740 2,812 2,822 2,391 2,469 2,984 2000's 1,749 1,261 1,526 1,517 1,217 1,402 1,256 1,271 1,205 1,126 2010's 1,059 1,103 1,132 1,132 1,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  1. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 550,318 573,731 601,906 1990's 622,883 651,203 664,500 690,061 721,495 753,003 789,985 812,866 847,938 893,887 2000's 907,855 941,582 982,521 996,564 1,029,389 1,066,302 1,085,509 1,101,863 1,113,016 1,124,717 2010's 1,133,103 1,145,049 1,155,636 1,170,161 1,183,894 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  2. Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 51,365 56,487 55,231 1990's 58,148 60,887 63,391 65,810 68,118 70,781 73,708 75,550 77,770 80,995 2000's 83,189 84,628 85,286 87,082 93,559 92,417 93,628 95,615 97,799 98,965 2010's 99,231 99,674 100,038 100,939 101,730 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  3. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,355 3,564 3,365 1990's 3,428 3,495 3,490 3,448 3,586 3,544 3,587 3,748 3,848 4,040 2000's 4,007 3,898 3,928 3,775 3,992 3,489 3,428 3,630 3,483 3,428 2010's 3,372 3,353 3,338 3,320 3,355 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  4. Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 392,469 413,008 425,624 1990's 458,013 492,189 528,913 565,475 604,315 638,603 673,357 702,701 737,208 779,104 2000's 813,319 841,617 861,943 895,800 926,510 966,199 997,728 1,025,171 1,047,319 1,059,239 2010's 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31,283 33,192 33,880 1990's 32,785 32,755 33,289 33,611 33,756 36,144 33,837 33,970 35,362 35,483 2000's 41,949 35,607 35,016 35,160 34,932 36,635 34,748 34,161 34,275 34,044 2010's 34,063 34,041 34,078 34,283 34,339 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  6. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 351,024 349,765 349,347 1990's 349,673 350,489 352,463 352,997 352,929 353,629 358,049 362,432 359,783 362,292 2000's 360,471 363,126 361,171 359,919 358,027 374,301 353,292 347,433 347,368 343,837 2010's 344,131 342,069 340,256 340,102 338,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  7. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,760 99,157 102,492 1990's 106,043 109,616 112,761 115,961 119,788 125,539 129,146 131,238 134,651 135,829 2000's 140,370 144,050 149,774 150,128 151,907 155,109 159,074 160,614 163,026 163,843 2010's 164,173 165,002 165,657 166,845 167,901 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,411 7,218 7,307 1990's 7,154 7,194 7,396 7,979 7,342 6,454 5,861 8,346 9,158 9,756 2000's 9,630 9,864 9,648 10,138 10,190 8,484 5,707 5,999 5,969 6,396 2010's 6,413 6,376 6,581 6,677 7,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,054,347 1,072,585 1,097,514 1990's 1,123,557 1,151,939 1,182,834 1,220,500 1,253,333 1,291,424 1,324,570 1,361,348 1,390,068 1,426,909 2000's 1,458,959 1,484,536 1,514,700 1,541,455 1,569,719 1,592,621 1,611,772 1,632,200 1,646,644 1,656,614 2010's 1,663,583 1,671,834 1,681,001 1,692,891

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60 60,355 61,630 61,848 1990's 61,530 61,731 62,221 62,952 63,821 65,490 67,293 68,413 69,974 71,389 2000's 72,933 71,875 71,530 71,016 70,655 69,990 69,475 69,495 69,144 69,043 2010's 67,987 67,815 68,765 68,791 69,011 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  11. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 1,410 1,151 1,412 1990's 1,396 1,367 1,319 1,364 1,417 1,366 1,488 1,336 1,300 1,393 2000's 1,414 1,122 1,407 1,269 1,223 1,120 1,120 1,055 1,104 1,025 2010's 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  12. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 475 480,839 485,112 491,110 1990's 488,850 495,148 504,722 513,466 521,176 531,182 539,952 544,460 550,017 554,121 2000's 560,055 552,716 553,192 553,211 554,844 555,861 555,905 557,966 556,746 557,355 2010's 549,970 551,795 549,959 549,764 549,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  13. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 108 109,770 110,769 112,004 1990's 112,661 113,945 114,898 115,924 115,994 118,502 121,221 123,580 125,178 129,041 2000's 131,613 134,393 136,489 138,621 138,543 137,513 139,746 141,420 144,719 145,624 2010's 145,460 145,837 145,960 150,145 150,235 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 896 923 976 1990's 1,018 1,074 1,108 1,032 1,176 1,528 2,099 2,923 3,349 4,727 2000's 4,994 4,729 4,337 4,054 4,175 4,318 4,472 4,592 4,816 5,084 2010's 6,232 6,529 6,906 7,293 7,823 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 925 942,571 955,810 970,512 1990's 983,592 1,002,154 1,022,542 1,044,699 1,073,308 1,108,899 1,147,743 1,183,978 1,223,433 1,265,032 2000's 1,315,619 1,365,413 1,412,923 1,453,974 1,496,876 1,524,813 1,558,911 1,583,945 1,606,602 1,622,434 2010's 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1,690,581 -

  16. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,709 2,818 2,908 1990's 3,061 2,921 2,923 2,952 3,754 3,705 3,435 3,459 3,441 3,465 2000's 3,683 3,881 3,716 3,625 3,470 3,437 3,393 3,317 3,196 3,138 2010's 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6 6,180 6,566 7,074 1990's 7,485 7,895 8,173 8,409 8,721 9,133 9,518 9,807 10,081 10,441 2000's 9,639 11,075 11,463 11,682 11,921 12,070 12,345 12,576 12,703 12,839 2010's 12,861 12,931 12,997 13,163 13,352 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 81 82,829 84,328 86,428 1990's 88,894 91,467 94,027 96,914 100,431 103,531 106,548 109,400 112,507 115,961 2000's 117,845 122,829 126,418 129,870 133,197 137,115 141,276 145,010 147,541 149,006 2010's 150,458 152,005 153,307 155,627 158,502 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 41 42,376 43,178 43,802 1990's 43,674 45,012 45,123 47,344 47,851 46,459 47,578 48,251 46,778 50,052 2000's 50,888 53,118 53,794 55,121 55,324 55,479 55,259 57,320 58,125 59,549 2010's 60,854 61,582 63,477 64,772 67,460 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 442 444,848 446,690 452,544 1990's 457,648 467,221 471,863 484,816 497,777 512,365 521,674 532,790 542,770 556,628 2000's 571,972 590,221 603,690 617,373 639,014 656,069 673,122 682,996 679,265 674,090 2010's 675,551 679,199 686,994 694,210 703,535 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 94 98,809 102,277 106,690 1990's 108,295 109,659 111,423 114,889 117,980 120,122 123,200 123,367 126,050 225,020 2000's 128,275 130,373 128,233 129,867 128,923 128,389 127,843 127,832 126,804 127,347 2010's 124,759 123,454 121,243 126,060 122,573 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 3,034 3,144 3,079 1990's 3,153 3,124 3,186 3,302 3,277 3,261 3,310 3,310 3,262 5,580 2000's 3,294 3,330 3,219 3,326 3,161 3,543 3,053 2,913 2,890 2,254 2010's 2,174 2,184 2,112 2,242 2,481 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  3. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,190 1,237,201 1,275,128 1,308,972 1990's 1,334,935 1,363,723 1,396,860 1,430,626 1,460,141 1,495,992 1,538,458 1,553,948 1,659,730 1,732,865 2000's 1,680,749 1,737,850 1,735,063 1,747,017 1,752,346 1,773,121 1,726,239 1,793,650 1,791,256 1,744,934 2010's 1,740,587 1,740,006 1,739,543 1,805,425

  4. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,896 2,852 2,842 1990's 2,837 2,786 2,793 3,222 2,805 2,825 2,823 2,783 2,761 2,763 2000's 2,768 2,777 2,781 2,804 2,578 2,572 2,548 2,547 2,540 2,535 2010's 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,502 28,761 28,970 1990's 29,137 29,701 29,805 29,984 30,614 30,492 31,017 30,990 30,918 30,708 2000's 30,751 30,794 30,731 30,473 26,255 26,219 25,982 25,899 25,632 25,466 2010's 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,482 18,454 18,813 1990's 19,452 20,328 21,145 21,989 22,999 24,150 25,271 26,436 27,697 28,923 2000's 30,018 30,789 31,547 32,274 33,104 33,362 33,625 33,767 37,320 38,245 2010's 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722 40,229 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 104,824 111,532 113,898 1990's 113,954 126,282 136,121 148,582 162,971 175,320 187,756 200,165 213,786 227,807 2000's 240,399 251,004 261,219 274,481 288,380 301,357 316,915 323,114 336,191 342,277 2010's 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 367,394 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241,367 278,473 252,791 1990's 257,851 261,107 263,988 268,104 262,308 264,756 265,007 268,841 271,585 274,919 2000's 279,179 278,506 279,838 281,877 273,967 276,763 300,606 296,465 298,418 294,226 2010's 291,395 293,213 297,523 282,743 294,391 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,460 20,015 25,161 1990's 25,991 26,489 27,178 27,807 25,788 25,929 29,493 28,472 28,063 27,605 2000's 27,348 27,421 27,477 26,698 29,187 29,887 26,109 24,000 23,737 23,857 2010's 25,043 23,722 23,390 23,804 23,829 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,170,364 3,180,199 3,248,117 1990's 3,287,091 3,320,285 3,354,679 3,388,983 3,418,052 3,452,975 3,494,545 3,521,707 3,556,736 3,594,071 2000's 3,631,762 3,670,693 3,688,281 3,702,308 3,754,132 3,975,961 3,812,121 3,845,441 3,869,308 3,839,438 2010's 3,842,206 3,855,942 3,878,806 3,838,120

  11. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 116,571 119,458 122,803 1990's 124,919 128,223 129,973 131,925 134,336 137,162 139,097 140,515 141,307 145,631 2000's 148,411 148,830 150,092 151,586 151,943 159,649 154,322 155,885 157,223 155,615 2010's 156,557 161,293 158,213 158,965 159,596 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,497 5,696 6,196 1990's 6,439 6,393 6,358 6,508 6,314 6,250 6,586 6,920 6,635 19,069 2000's 10,866 9,778 10,139 8,913 5,368 5,823 5,350 5,427 5,294 5,190 2010's 5,145 5,338 5,204 5,178 5,098 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,250,476 1,275,401 1,306,747 1990's 1,327,772 1,358,640 1,377,023 1,402,770 1,438,483 1,463,640 1,489,647 1,509,142 1,531,914 1,570,253 2000's 1,604,456 1,613,373 1,657,640 1,644,715 1,588,738 1,707,195 1,661,186 1,677,857 1,678,158 1,662,663 2010's 1,669,026 1,707,148 1,673,132 1,681,841 1,693,267

  14. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 80,797 81,294 82,549 1990's 83,047 84,387 85,325 86,452 86,918 88,585 89,663 90,643 91,300 92,306 2000's 93,836 95,485 96,496 96,712 97,274 97,767 97,823 97,979 98,144 98,416 2010's 98,396 98,541 99,113 99,017 99,182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,033 1,937 1,895 1990's 1,883 1,866 1,835 1,903 1,957 1,957 2,066 1,839 1,862 1,797 2000's 1,831 1,830 1,855 1,791 1,746 1,744 1,670 1,651 1,652 1,626 2010's 1,528 1,465 1,469 1,491 1,572 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  16. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 690,532 689,655 701,687 1990's 706,842 716,088 729,081 740,722 750,678 760,848 771,109 780,746 790,162 799,015 2000's 812,323 818,313 824,218 832,230 839,415 850,095 858,915 865,553 872,980 875,781 2010's 879,713 883,733 892,123 895,414 900,420 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 82,934 83,810 85,143 1990's 85,539 86,874 86,840 87,735 86,457 88,163 89,168 85,018 89,654 86,003 2000's 87,007 86,592 87,397 88,030 86,640 85,634 85,686 85,376 84,703 84,715 2010's 84,446 84,874 84,673 84,969 85,867 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,440 4,314 4,366 1990's 4,357 3,445 3,296 4,369 3,560 3,079 2,988 7,014 10,706 5,861 2000's 8,833 9,341 9,891 9,295 8,955 8,300 8,152 8,327 8,098 7,793 2010's 7,664 7,954 7,970 7,877 7,429 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 725,676 733,101 731,792 1990's 747,081 753,839 762,545 777,658 773,357 797,524 804,213 811,975 841,843 824,803 2000's 833,662 836,486 843,353 850,464 855,272 856,761 862,203 858,304 853,125 855,454 2010's 853,842 854,730 854,800 858,572 861,092 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 8,831 9,159 10,237 1990's 10,521 11,088 11,383 11,726 12,240 12,450 12,755 13,225 13,512 13,932 2000's 14,219 15,068 15,130 15,047 15,429 16,266 16,139 16,150 41,332 16,937 2010's 16,645 17,186 17,758 17,298 17,421 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  1. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60,078 61,969 64,059 1990's 65,310 67,991 69,356 70,938 72,656 74,232 75,175 77,092 78,786 80,958 2000's 82,813 84,760 87,147 88,170 88,600 94,473 94,600 94,963 67,945 96,924 2010's 95,361 97,400 99,738 98,715 99,146 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  2. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 56,191 60,663 63,562 1990's 68,088 70,207 72,647 76,386 80,739 84,041 93,504 97,629 100,251 104,294 2000's 107,566 107,656 102,505 107,506 105,163 109,205 111,127 112,092 111,868 113,630 2010's 113,900 115,609 117,155 118,257 120,111 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  3. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 435,826 472,928 492,821 1990's 520,140 539,321 575,096 607,388 652,307 678,147 699,159 740,013 777,805 815,908 2000's 858,004 891,227 905,816 953,732 948,283 992,906 1,022,430 1,063,871 1,095,362 1,102,001 2010's 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 - = No Data

  4. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11,905 12,104 12,454 1990's 12,742 12,082 12,353 12,650 12,944 13,399 13,789 14,099 14,422 15,050 2000's 15,531 15,740 16,093 16,202 16,443 16,518 16,848 17,013 17,284 17,632 2010's 17,823 18,421 19,089 19,855 20,687 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  5. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 83,517 84,059 84,643 1990's 85,646 87,880 89,522 91,237 93,398 95,818 97,761 98,326 101,930 104,051 2000's 105,660 106,758 108,716 110,048 112,206 114,152 116,615 118,100 120,056 122,065 2010's 123,585 125,392 130,044 133,975 137,972 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  6. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,601 219,257 225,347 1990's 233,075 236,519 237,861 240,684 245,190 250,223 259,663 254,991 258,076 266,102 2000's 269,561 269,327 271,160 271,203 272,445 277,767 270,552 272,555 272,899 270,596 2010's 268,346 268,647 267,793 269,081 269,758 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,648,972 2,678,838 2,714,839 1990's 2,766,912 2,801,716 2,826,713 2,867,959 2,921,536 2,967,375 2,994,891 3,041,948 3,050,960 3,111,108 2000's 3,178,840 3,195,584 3,208,466 3,225,908 3,250,068 3,272,307 3,263,062 3,273,791 3,262,716 3,253,184 2010's 3,240,619 3,236,160 3,244,274 3,271,074 3,283,869 -

  8. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 87,824 86,666 86,172 1990's 85,790 86,744 87,120 88,181 87,494 88,358 89,852 90,284 89,711 80,986 2000's 80,558 79,045 80,029 79,733 79,512 78,726 78,745 93,991 94,247 94,314 2010's 92,430 93,903 94,537 95,385 96,004 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  9. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 809,171 805,107 806,875 1990's 814,296 824,172 832,677 842,130 845,448 856,604 866,531 872,454 877,236 867,922 2000's 859,951 868,314 875,338 876,420 875,271 880,403 879,589 920,616 923,650 924,745 2010's 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 40,967 41,998 43,997 1990's 47,175 55,374 50,251 51,910 53,700 55,409 57,613 60,419 63,085 65,034 2000's 66,893 68,098 69,150 74,515 71,762 73,520 74,683 80,998 76,868 76,893 2010's 77,370 77,822 78,237 79,276 80,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  12. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 280,670 288,066 302,156 1990's 326,177 376,166 354,256 371,151 391,845 411,465 433,638 456,960 477,796 502,000 2000's 523,952 542,799 563,744 625,398 595,495 626,685 647,635 664,455 674,421 675,582 2010's 682,737 688,681 693,507 700,211 707,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 166,901 172,615 178,545 1990's 186,772 191,103 193,863 198,299 206,812 209,245 214,340 215,057 216,519 223,732 2000's 228,037 225,911 226,957 227,708 231,051 233,132 231,540 234,597 233,462 233,334 2010's 233,751 233,588 235,049 237,922 239,681 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  14. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,237,877 2,271,801 2,291,242 1990's 2,311,795 2,333,377 2,363,575 2,386,249 2,393,053 2,413,715 2,431,909 2,452,524 2,493,639 2,486,704 2000's 2,519,794 2,542,724 2,559,024 2,572,584 2,591,458 2,600,574 2,605,782 2,620,755 2,631,340 2,635,886 2010's 2,646,211 2,667,392 2,678,547

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63,024 63,971 65,041 1990's 67,086 68,461 69,466 71,998 73,562 74,521 76,079 77,693 80,147 80,283 2000's 81,588 81,795 82,757 84,110 84,493 85,243 85,236 85,210 84,985 83,862 2010's 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 596,320 606,106 614,058 1990's 624,477 633,942 644,281 654,664 668,774 685,481 696,989 713,509 726,960 735,371 2000's 744,816 749,106 756,234 763,290 767,022 770,080 770,171 771,047 753,531 754,761 2010's 758,129 759,584 757,790 761,575 760,131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 67,382 66,472 64,114 1990's 62,770 61,574 61,030 62,055 62,184 62,930 62,101 62,270 63,029 62,911 2000's 62,710 62,241 62,247 63,512 60,580 58,409 57,097 57,127 57,066 58,396 2010's 58,562 58,749 63,381 59,147 58,611 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  18. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 952,079 946,970 934,472 1990's 934,007 936,423 940,403 941,294 945,387 957,558 945,967 962,786 962,436 961,925 2000's 964,133 952,753 957,048 958,795 940,400 905,857 868,353 879,612 886,084 889,570 2010's 893,400 897,513 963,688 901,635 899,378 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,435 3,731 3,986 1990's 4,250 4,455 4,838 4,979 5,297 5,819 6,414 6,606 6,662 6,582 2000's 6,954 6,936 7,375 7,517 7,687 8,178 8,168 8,334 8,491 8,815 2010's 9,084 9,681 10,179 11,415 11,810 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  20. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 51,252 53,045 54,740 1990's 55,576 61,878 62,858 63,767 64,698 66,094 69,991 69,056 67,850 69,301 2000's 70,671 70,691 71,824 72,076 72,809 73,780 74,584 74,856 75,053 75,771 2010's 75,192 75,788 75,799 77,117 77,846 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 755,294 760,754 767,219 1990's 774,707 782,373 894,677 807,204 824,137 841,772 871,012 890,195 901,455 939,029 2000's 941,384 959,772 978,319 987,863 1,009,455 1,024,955 1,040,941 1,053,948 1,057,521 1,067,807 2010's 1,071,566 1,077,168 1,078,978 1,099,272 1,101,292 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 84,636 93,005 92,252 1990's 85,775 88,746 85,873 102,187 92,744 104,453 105,889 107,926 108,832 113,177 2000's 117,993 120,984 122,447 123,006 125,107 120,167 126,713 128,965 242,693 153,826 2010's 144,487 138,225 142,825 144,246 139,556 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  3. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,082,777 1,100,635 1,114,920 1990's 1,118,429 1,127,536 1,137,911 1,155,443 1,179,869 1,180,860 1,188,317 1,204,494 1,212,486 1,232,887 2000's 1,278,781 1,283,008 1,295,952 1,324,715 1,306,142 1,297,508 1,348,848 1,361,470 1,236,480 1,370,353 2010's 1,389,592 1,408,314 1,447,947

  4. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 178,469 185,961 191,474 1990's 195,766 198,890 201,561 204,453 207,629 211,817 214,843 222,726 224,506 227,159 2000's 230,558 225,109 247,818 246,123 246,991 253,415 254,923 253,139 252,382 252,017 2010's 249,309 249,456 249,994 250,994 253,127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,452,554 2,491,149 2,531,304 1990's 2,573,570 2,609,561 2,640,579 2,677,085 2,717,683 2,767,190 2,812,876 2,859,483 2,903,698 2,949,628 2000's 2,999,737 3,011,205 3,110,743 3,140,021 3,161,370 3,187,583 3,193,920 3,188,152 3,172,623 3,169,026 2010's 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 43,362 44,170 44,253 1990's 43,184 43,693 44,313 45,310 43,803 45,444 46,029 47,311 45,345 47,620 2000's 50,913 51,109 50,468 50,928 54,027 54,936 55,741 56,155 55,291 50,713 2010's 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 370,094 372,238 376,353 1990's 382,251 386,264 392,155 398,472 405,312 415,123 418,442 423,397 415,673 426,352 2000's 434,501 438,069 435,146 438,861 445,212 445,856 437,669 445,043 443,025 437,715 2010's 436,840 442,479 442,840 445,589 444,423 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,711 97,939 99,721 1990's 105,164 117,675 125,174 125,571 132,378 130,318 133,445 135,553 135,417 133,464 2000's 133,969 135,968 137,924 140,057 141,258 142,148 143,632 142,965 141,529 140,633 2010's 138,670 138,214 144,906 142,495 143,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,180,546 1,194,985 1,208,523 1990's 1,213,305 1,211,342 1,220,203 1,225,921 1,281,007 1,259,102 1,275,465 1,293,032 1,307,563 1,311,865 2000's 1,324,282 1,326,160 1,340,726 1,343,614 1,346,773 1,348,743 1,353,892 1,354,173 1,352,015 1,348,781 2010's 1,348,549 1,342,920 1,389,910 1,357,740

  10. Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 21,382 22,246 22,219 1990's 23,331 23,185 23,610 24,373 25,349 26,329 26,374 27,457 28,065 28,424 2000's 29,215 29,429 30,250 30,814 31,357 31,304 31,817 32,472 33,008 33,731 2010's 34,002 34,305 34,504 34,909 35,205 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  11. Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 167,883 171,785 171,156 1990's 174,384 177,726 182,641 188,879 194,357 203,435 205,199 209,806 218,851 222,114 2000's 224,784 226,171 229,015 232,839 236,511 240,554 245,883 247,035 253,122 255,472 2010's 257,322 259,046 259,957 262,122 265,849 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60,707 61,365 60,377 1990's 60,405 60,947 61,319 60,599 62,045 61,275 61,117 51,661 63,819 53,943 2000's 55,194 55,692 56,560 55,999 57,087 57,389 56,548 55,761 58,160 56,454 2010's 56,246 56,553 56,608 58,005 57,191 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 400,218 403,657 406,723 1990's 407,094 413,354 418,611 413,358 428,201 427,720 439,931 444,970 523,790 460,173 2000's 475,673 476,275 487,332 492,451 497,391 501,279 499,504 494,005 512,013 512,551 2010's 510,776 514,481 515,338 527,397 522,408 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18,294 18,921 19,924 1990's 20,694 22,124 22,799 23,207 24,521 25,593 26,613 27,629 29,030 30,521 2000's 31,789 32,782 33,877 34,590 35,792 37,093 38,546 40,128 41,098 41,303 2010's 40,801 40,944 41,192 41,710 42,338 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,422 219,981 236,237 1990's 256,119 283,307 295,714 305,099 336,353 364,112 393,783 426,221 458,737 490,029 2000's 520,233 550,850 580,319 610,756 648,551 688,058 726,772 750,570 758,315 760,391 2010's 764,435 772,880 782,759 794,150 808,970 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 54,306 55,400 56,822 1990's 56,903 57,265 58,068 57,827 60,320 60,902 62,064 65,919 76,467 64,185 2000's 66,193 65,794 65,788 65,297 65,223 65,294 66,337 65,879 65,313 67,674 2010's 68,163 67,696 67,252 67,136 67,806 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  17. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,313 2,293 2,380 1990's 2,431 2,523 2,509 2,458 2,477 2,491 2,512 2,496 2,464 2,620 2000's 2,792 2,781 2,730 2,743 2,799 2,787 2,735 2,704 2,757 3,057 2010's 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 656 662,217 668,432 683,528 1990's 686,149 700,195 711,043 730,114 744,394 751,890 766,322 781,711 788,464 775,311 2000's 805,689 807,770 806,389 809,754 806,660 809,454 808,801 796,476 792,236 785,005 2010's 778,985 772,892 767,396 765,957 769,418 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 11,484 11,649 11,806 1990's 11,921 12,071 12,204 12,359 12,475 12,584 12,732 12,945 13,176 13,409 2000's 13,711 14,002 14,342 14,502 13,999 14,120 14,384 13,408 12,764 13,215 2010's 12,998 13,027 13,133 13,246 13,399 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 66 67,648 68,612 69,540 1990's 70,808 72,565 74,268 75,842 77,670 79,474 81,348 83,596 86,243 88,924 2000's 91,297 93,896 97,077 100,404 104,360 108,401 112,269 115,500 119,039 120,124 2010's 121,166 121,736 122,983 124,411 126,416 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  1. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,342 15,093 14,012 1990's 13,767 14,931 15,064 15,315 15,348 15,580 17,036 15,907 16,171 16,317 2000's 16,366 16,027 16,170 17,164 17,490 17,904 18,016 18,062 19,286 19,843 2010's 19,977 20,146 20,387 20,617 20,894 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  2. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 113,175 112,126 113,129 1990's 113,598 113,463 114,793 116,027 117,385 119,544 131,910 125,740 127,324 127,750 2000's 129,274 129,897 133,445 135,441 137,434 140,013 142,385 143,644 152,439 153,062 2010's 153,852 155,181 157,226 158,889 160,896 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an important step toward the commercialization of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass and energy sorghum.

  4. Fuel Cell Stacks Still Going Strong After 5,000 Hours

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two fuel cell stacks developed by FuelCell Energy in partnership with Versa Power Systems achieved 5,000 hours of service in February, meeting a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance.

  5. Six- and three-hourly meteorological observations from 223 USSR stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.B.; Martuganov, R.A.; Kaiser, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    This document describes a database containing 6- and 3-hourly meteorological observations from a 223-station network of the former Soviet Union. These data have been made available through cooperation between the two principal climate data centers of the United States and Russia: the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), in Asheville, North Carolina, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information -- World Data Centre (RIHMI-WDC) in Obninsk. Station records consist of 6- and 3-hourly observations of some 24 meteorological variables including temperature, weather type, precipitation amount, cloud amount and type, sea level pressure, relative humidity, and wind direction and speed. The 6-hourly observations extend from 1936 to 1965; the 3-hourly observations extend from 1966 through the mid-1980s (1983, 1984, 1985, or 1986; depending on the station). These data have undergone extensive quality assurance checks by RIHMI-WDC, NCDC, and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The database represents a wealth of meteorological information for a large and climatologically important portion of the earth`s land area, and should prove extremely useful for a wide variety of regional climate change studies. These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and 40 data files that are available via the Internet or on 8mm tape. The total size of the database is {approximately}2.6 gigabytes.

  6. West Valley Demonstration Project Contractor Reaches 2 Million Safe Work Hours

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM’s West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) contractor CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley (CHBWV) and its subcontractors achieved this month 2 million safe work hours without a lost-time accident over the past 30 months

  7. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.90

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that the Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.90 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements as amplified by Notice 2008-40, Section 4 requirements.

  8. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: Hourly Analysis Program Version 4.91

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that the Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.91 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements as amplified by Notice 2008-40, Section 4 requirements.

  9. Calutron Operations | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Calutron Operations

  10. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  11. Document Number Q0029500 Introduction

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Introduction 1.0 Introduction This Remedial Investigation (RI) AddendumRocused Feasibility Study (FFS) report updates the 1998 final RI and presents the results of a FFS conducted for Operable Unit (OU) 111, contaminated surface water and ground water, of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). These documents are combined to promote better reference between the updated RI information and the remedy comparisons of the FFS. This document is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand

  12. Electric rate that shifts hourly may foretell spot-market kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-11-25

    Four California industrial plants have cut their electricity bills up to 16% by shifting from the traditional time-of-use rates to an experimental real-time program (RTP) that varies prices hourly. The users receive a price schedule reflecting changing generating costs one day in advance to encourage them to increase power consumption during the cheapest time periods. Savings during the pilot program range between $11,000 and $32,000 per customer. The hourly cost breakdown encourages consumption during the night and early morning. The signalling system could be expanded to cogenerators and independent small power producers. If an electricity spot market develops, forecasters think a place on the stock exchanges for future-delivery contracts could develop in the future.

  13. Job Code Description Hourly Wage TR-I Job Code TR I Wage TR-II

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17 031007 Firefighter/CIC/EMT $33.13 Engineer/CIC/EMT $19.76 Engineer/CIC/EMT $35.99 Chiefs Aide/CIC/EMT $19.76 Chiefs Aide/CIC/EMT $35.99 Lieutenant/CIC/EMT $20.99 Lieutenant/CIC/EMT $38.21 Captain/CIC/EMT $22.23 Captain/CIC/EMT $40.44 Assistant Chief/CIC/EMT $25.42 Assistant Chief/CIC/EMT $46.18 FP Tech/CIC/EMT $21.13 031019 FP Tech/CIC/EMT $38.47 031049 FP Captain/CIC/EMT $23.60 FP Captain/CIC/EMT $42.91 56-HOUR EMT & HAZ $1.11 10-HOUR EMT & HAZ $2.00 031047 Firefighter/CIC/EMT/HAZ

  14. Job Code Description Hourly Wage TR-I Job Code TR I Wage TR-II

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    71 031007 Firefighter/CIC/EMT $33.67 Engineer/CIC/EMT $20.30 Engineer/CIC/EMT $36.53 Chiefs Aide/CIC/EMT $20.30 Chiefs Aide/CIC/EMT $36.53 Lieutenant/CIC/EMT $21.53 Lieutenant/CIC/EMT $38.75 Captain/CIC/EMT $22.77 Captain/CIC/EMT $40.98 Assistant Chief/CIC/EMT $25.96 Assistant Chief/CIC/EMT $46.72 FP Tech/CIC/EMT $21.67 031019 FP Tech/CIC/EMT $39.01 031049 FP Captain/CIC/EMT $24.14 FP Captain/CIC/EMT $43.45 56-HOUR EMT & HAZ $1.11 10-HOUR EMT & HAZ $2.00 031047 Firefighter/CIC/EMT/HAZ

  15. PPPL team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer By John Greenwald January 26, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) The U.S Department of Energy (DOE)

  16. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th-12th Grade Classroom

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 10, 2015 BioenergizeME Office Hours Integrating Bioenergy into the 9 th__ 12 th Grade Classroom Alexis Martin Knauss Fellow Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy Shannon Zaret Contractor, The Hannon Group Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda 1. Overview Of Energy Literacy 2. Overview of Next Generation Science Standards 3. Bioenergy Basics 5. Incorporation of Bioenergy into the Classroom 4. 2016 BioenergizeME

  17. BioenergizeME Office Hours: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 15, 2015 BioenergizeME Office Hours Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Shannon Zaret Communications Specialist, The Hannon Group Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office | Bioenergy Technologies Office Agenda * Overview * Research Topic Areas And Prompts * Research Resources * Infographic Resources * Rubric * Social Media Campaign * Awards * Registration * Resources for Educators * Questions 3 |

  18. PPPL team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer By John Greenwald January 26, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) The U.S Department of Energy (DOE)

  19. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II )

    1991-12-01

    This article outlines the minimum safety requirements that should be considered for onshore and offshore oil well service operations with coiled tubing equipment. These guidelines comply with Minerals Management Service (MMS) regulations issued on May 31, 1988, for offshore work. Where specific MMS regulations are sited, the regulation reference, Incident of Non-Compliance (INC), number is provided. These guidelines can be used by operators and contractors, and although U.S. offshore operations are emphasized, they are applicable wherever coiled tubing services are used.

  20. Operating Experience Summary, 2015-02

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5-02 November 20, 2015 Inside This Issue * Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) ..............................1 Page 1 of 10 Operating Experience Summary Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security November 20, 2015 On February 14, 2014, at 2314 hours MST (11:14 P.M.), an incident in the underground repository at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) resulted in the release of plutonium and americium from one or more transuranic

  1. Lessons learned bulletin. Number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T`he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel.

  2. Technology applications bulletins: Number one

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koncinski, W. Jr.

    1989-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), operates five facilities for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is a large, multidisciplinary research and development (R and D) center whose primary mission is energy research; the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which engages in defense research, development, and production; and the uranium-enrichment plants at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Much of the research carried out at these facilities is of interest to industry and to state or local governments. To make information about this research available, the Energy Systems Office of Technology Applications publishes brief descriptions of selected technologies and reports. These technology applications bulletins describe the new technology and inform the reader about how to obtain further information, gain access to technical resources, and initiate direct contact with Energy Systems researchers.

  3. Sub-Hourly Impacts of High Solar Penetrations in the Western United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hummon, M.; Hodge, B. M.; Heaney, M.; King, J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents results of analysis on the sub-hourly impacts of high solar penetrations from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2. Extreme event analysis showed that most large ramps were due to sunrise and sunset events, which have a significant predictability component. Variability in general was much higher in the high-solar versus high-wind scenario. Reserve methodologies that had already been developed for wind were therefore modified to take into account the predictability component of solar variability.

  4. SeizAlert could give patients 4.5 hour warning of seizure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Lee Hively and Kara Kruse

    2010-01-08

    One percent of Americans, 3 million people, suffer from epilepsy. And their lives are about to be dramatically changed by scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For 15 years, Dr. Lee Hively has been working on "SeizAlert", a seizure-detecting device that resembles a common PDA. "It allows us to analyze scalp brain waves and give us up to 4.5 hours' forewarning of that event," he said. With the help of partner Kara Kruse, he's now able to help patients predict the previously unpredictable.

  5. ARM - AMF2 Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Contacts Management and Operations Operations Overview ARM Links BCR | ECR ECO, EWO Extraview PIF, CAR, DQR & DQPR Operations Status System i.arm.gov AMF2 Deployment...

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, that began on May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities by the end of 2011. The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado, in support of the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The first field deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility will be used to validate ARM-developed algorithms that convert the remote sensing measurements to cloud properties for liquid and mixed phase clouds. Although AMF2 is being set up this quarter, the official start date of the field campaign is not until November 1, 2010. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of scientific user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010.

  7. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  8. Performing a local barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value of the counter, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  9. An overview of 3-D graphical analysis using DOE-2 hourly simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberl, J.S.; MacDonald, M.; Eden, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a 3-D graphical approach for improving the potential of building energy analyses using the DOE-2 computer program. The approach produces 3-D annual profiles from hourly data generated by DOE-2 simulations using a statistical plotting package for specific quantities of interest. The annual profiles of hourly data provide a useful graphical check of voluminous data in a condensed form, allowing several different types of data to be plotted over a year. These profiles provide the user with the opportunity to check simulation results, check for potential problems with user input, provide graphs to customers who may want a simpler presentation, visualize interactions in simulations, and understand where inappropriate modeling conditions may exist in simulations. Future analysis, using such profiles, may allow methods to be developed to check consistency between simulations, check for potential hidden errors in modeling buildings, and better understand how simulations compare with data from real buildings. 22 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Transforming Commercial Building Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... * Manex - 40 hour program (16 classroom, 24 hands-on) to begin - Planning to add a module ... MEPs developed re-tuning curriculum learning objectives, to help convert re-tuning ...

  11. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  12. Operating Experience Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Operating Experience Committee (OEC) charter provides a description of the OEC's purpose, background, membership, functions, and operations.

  13. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – The number 1,584 may not mean much to most people, but for the workers on EM’s Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, it represents the number of days without a work-related, lost-time injury or illness, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  14. Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour 1) Year Mining Method Location Total 2 Underground Surface 2 East of the Mississippi West of the Mississippi Underground Surface 2 Total 2 Underground Surface 2 Total 2 1949 0.68 [3] 1.92 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.72 1950 .72 [3] 1.96 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .76 1951 .76 [3] 2.00 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .80 1952 .80 [3] 2.10 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .84 1953 .88 [3] 2.22 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .93 1954 1.00 [3] 2.48 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA

  15. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Guide to the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge is an engaging way for students to explore topics in bioenergy and share what they have learned with others across the nation. In this challenge, high school-aged teams (grades 9–12) will use technology to research, interpret, apply, and then design an infographic that responds to one of four cross-curricular bioenergy topics. To make the challenge easier and more effective, this webinar is designed to guide interested students, teachers, and other educators through the submission process and highlight the resources that are available on the BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge website. These resources will assist students with researching their selected topics, developing their infographics, and designing effective social media campaigns. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  16. BioenergizeME Office Hours Webinar: Integrating Bioenergy into the 9th–12th Grade Classroom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biofuel is the only viable substitute for petroleum-based liquid transportation fuel in the near term. It is, therefore, increasingly relevant to enhance conceptual knowledge of biofuels and other types of bioenergy in today’s classroom environment. Bioenergy has applications across multiple science and engineering disciplines and also provides opportunities for real-world learning. This webinar is designed to support high school educators in planning activities for their classrooms that integrate bioenergy topics with the life sciences, physical sciences, earth and space sciences, and engineering and technology. This information can also help support advisors who are interested in participating in the 2016 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This webinar is part of the BioenergizeME Office Hours webinar series developed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  17. Performance of Blackglas{trademark} composites in 4000-hour oxidation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.; Gonczy, S.; McNallan, M.; Cox, A.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of long term (4000 hour) oxidation on the mechanical properties of Blackglas{trademark}-Nitrided Nextel{trademark}312 Ceramic Matrix Composites in the temperature range of 500{degrees} - 700{degrees}C was investigated. Flexure specimens of the title composites prepared using three different pyrolysis processes were subjected to oxidation in flowing dry air at 500{degrees}, 600{degrees}C, and 700{degrees}C. Samples were removed at several different time intervals for 3-point flexure analysis. Results indicate that processing conditions had very little effect on the oxidation resistance of this system. At 600{degrees} and 700{degrees}C the mechanical properties degrade continuously to a steady value about half the original flexure strength. At 500{degrees}C, material properties initially improve then begin to slowly degrade. Optical microscopy indicates that oxidation of the matrix begins at the matrix/fiber interface and microcracks and proceeds into the bulk of the matrix.

  18. Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The http:www.regulations.gov Web Site is an ''anonymous access'' system, which means EPA ... The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566-1744. The EPA Web site for ...

  19. Office of Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operational Awareness Record Report Number: EA-WTP-HLW-2014-10-20 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Observation of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility ...

  20. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for...

  1. Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Map of the ...

  2. DOE's Office of Science Awards 95 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Research in Science, Academia and Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science announced today that 45 projects were awarded a total of 95 million hours of computing time on some of the world's most...

  3. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2014-03-25

    The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry previously was unable to answer; • Proof-of-concept analytics tools that can be adapted and used by others; and • Guidelines and protocols that summarize analytical best practices. This report focuses on one example of the kind of value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether behavior-based (BB) efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings.

  4. ARM - NSA Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlaskaNSA Operations NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site...

  5. Crane Operation Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crane Operational Training Crane Operational Safety Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY Crane Training - Information Reduces Risk Crane...

  6. ISDAC - NRC Convair-580 Flight Hours Date Flight From To Start

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - NRC Convair-580 Flight Hours Date Flight From To Start End hrs 03/21/08 F01-Test-01 Ottawa Ottawa 16:15Z 18:15Z 2.2 03/22/08 F02-Test-02 Ottawa Ottawa 12:45Z 15:50Z 3.3 03/28/08 F03-Transit-01 Ottawa, ON Kenora, ON 12:23Z 15:44Z 3.6 03/28/08 F04-Transit-02 Kenora, ON Calgary, AB 16:30Z 19:36Z 3.3 03/28/08 F05-Transit-03 Calgary, AB Comox, BC 20:24Z 22:17Z 2.1 03/29/08 F06-Transit-04 Comox, BC Whitehorse, YK 17:43Z 20:50Z 3.3 03/29/08 F07-Transit-05 Whitehorse, YK Fairbanks 21:51Z 23:42Z 2.1

  7. Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation Docket No. EO-05-01: Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation, part of Supplement Number 3 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC PDF icon Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation

  8. The case for extensible operating systems for exascale. (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect The case for extensible operating systems for exascale. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The case for extensible operating systems for exascale. Authors: Ferreira, Kurt Brian ; Riesen, Rolf Publication Date: 2012-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1064401 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5716C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Workshop on Exascale Operating Systems and Runtime Software held

  9. L & O Power Co-operative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    O Power Co-operative Jump to: navigation, search Name: L & O Power Co-operative Place: Iowa Phone Number: 712-472-2556 Website: www.landopowercoop.com Outage Hotline:...

  10. KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations Jump to: navigation, search Name: KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations Place: Missouri Phone Number: (660) 359-2208 Outage Hotline: (660) 359-2208...

  11. Operation Warfighter Internship Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attendees: Participants of Operation Warfighter Program Cost: Free Supports: Veteran and Disability Employment Programs

  12. Operating Experience Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Operating Experience Committe Charter explains the purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Operating Experience Committee (OEC), which is to support line management within DOE and the DOE community in developing and sustaining effective oeprating experience programs so that lessons from inernal and external operating experience lead to improvement in future operational and safety performance.

  13. ARM - SGP Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Operations Routine Operations SGP central facility offices. SGP central facility offices. The overwhelming majority of the measurements

  14. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400...

  15. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle number concentration The total number of cloud particles present in any given volume...

  16. Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ann Almgren Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics February 4, 2014 Ann Almgren. Berkeley Lab Downloads Almgren-nug2014.pdf | Adobe Acrobat PDF file Low Mach Number...

  17. Total number of longwall faces drops below 50

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-02-15

    For the first time since Coal Age began its annual Longwall Census the number of faces has dropped below 50. A total of five mines operate two longwall faces. CONSOL Energy remains the leader with 12 faces. Arch Coal operates five longwall mines; Robert E. Murray owns five longwall mines. West Virginia has 13 longwalls, followed by Pennsylvania (8), Utah (6) and Alabama (6). A detailed table gives for each longwall installation, the ownership, seam height, cutting height, panel width and length, overburden, number of gate entries, depth of cut, model of equipment used (shearer, haulage system, roof support, face conveyor, stage loader, crusher, electrical controls and voltage to face). 2 tabs., 1 photo.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-03-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 through December 31, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. For all fixed sites, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2007. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the current deployment in Niamey, Niger, Africa. PYE represents the AMF statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP Central Facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF in Niger. This report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days-broken down by institution type, gender, race, citizenship, visitor role, visit purpose, and facility-for actual visitors and for active user research computer accounts. During this reporting period, the ACRF Archive did not collect data on user characteristics in this way. Work is under way to collect and report these data. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2006 - December 31, 2006. For the first quarter of FY 2007, the overall number of users is up from the last reporting period. The historical data show that there is an apparent relationship between the total number of users and the 'size' of field campaigns, called Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs): larger IOPs draw more of the site facility resources, which are reflected by the number of site visits and site visit days, research accounts, and device accounts. These types of users typically collect and analyze data in near-real time for a site-specific IOP that is in progress. However, the Archive accounts represent persistent (year-to-year) ACRF data users that often mine from the entire collection of ACRF data, which mostly includes routine data from the fixed and mobile sites, as well as cumulative IOP data sets. Archive data users continue to show a steady growth, which is independent of the size of IOPs. For this quarter, the number of Archive data user accounts was 961, the highest since record-keeping began. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Although the AMF is not officially collecting data this quarter, personnel are regularly involved with teardown, packing, hipping, unpacking, setup, and maintenance activities, so they are included in the safety statistics. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2006. There were no recordable or lost workdays or incidents for the first quarter of FY 2007.

  19. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small business offices (< 50 employees each). Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay are a of California, nine (including the five small businesses) are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  20. Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Foundation for Success of Today's Hybrid and Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy discusses a study that found that U.S. Department of Energy-funded research in energy storage provides a vital foundation for the success of today's hybrid and electric vehicles. The study is from the DOE's Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon EERE Retrospective Study Brief More Documents & Publications Linkages of DOE's Energy Storage

  1. Supplement Number 4 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act, 16 USC 824a(c), Section 301(b) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 USC 7151 (b), and...

  2. Solar Reserve Methodology for Renewable Energy Integration Studies Based on Sub-Hourly Variability Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Hummon, M.; Lew, D.

    2012-08-01

    Increasing penetrations of wind a solar energy are raising concerns among electric system operators because of the variability and uncertainty associated with power sources. Previous work focused on the quantification of reserves for systems with wind power. This paper presents a new methodology that allows the determination of necessary reserves for high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) power and compares it to the wind-based methodology. The solar reserve methodology is applied to Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. A summary of the results is included.

  3. 100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragland, K.W.; Aerts, D.J.

    1992-08-01

    In this project a downdraft, packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system using woodchips is being developed. The combustor is designed to promote intense combustion in a thin reaction zone and to control particulate growth by using high excess air. The combustor contains a magnesia and alumina gravel bed on top of which woodchips are fed. The following test objectives were established for the 100 hr test: (a) demonstrate preliminary durability of the combustor; (b) demonstrate steady operation of the system; (c) investigate combustor pressure drop; (d) investigate bed ash cake buildup; (e) expose metal alloy coupons for corrosion examination; (f) obtain closure within 10% on mass and energy balances; and (g) obtain emissions data. The plan for the 100 hr test was to operate the combustor at the following conditions: day 1, 4 atm (absolute) pressure and 700--800 C outlet temperature; day 2, 4 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; day 3, 5 atm pressure and 800--900 C outlet temperature; days 4 and 5, repeat day 3. The inlet air was not preheated. The paper gives test results and discusses fuel characterization, combustor performance, mass and energy balance, emissions, composition of ash and deposits, and metal coupons representing turbine blade material.

  4. PDSF Office Hours 1/23/14 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /23/14 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 1/23/14 from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at LBNL January 22, 2014 PDSF office hours will be from 2:30 to 4:00 pm in 50B-2222 tomorrow. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2014 January 2014 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 October 2011 July 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 December 2010 Last edited: 2014-01-22 16:33:02

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures. Operational Analysis of the Western Interconnection at Very High Renewable Penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures)--an analysis of the costs and grid impacts of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system--examined renewable energy resources, technical issues regarding the integration of these resources into the grid, and the costs associated with high renewable penetration scenarios. These scenarios included up to 90% of annual generation from renewable sources, although most of the analysis was focused on 80% penetration scenarios. Hourly production cost modeling was performed to understand the operational impacts of high penetrations. One of the conclusions of RE Futures was that further work was necessary to understand whether the operation of the system was possible at sub-hourly time scales and during transient events. This study aimed to address part of this by modeling the operation of the power system at sub-hourly time scales using newer methodologies and updated data sets for transmission and generation infrastructure. The goal of this work was to perform a detailed, sub-hourly analysis of very high penetration scenarios for a single interconnection (the Western Interconnection). It focused on operational impacts, and it helps verify that the operational results from the capacity expansion models are useful. The primary conclusion of this study is that sub-hourly operation of the grid is possible with renewable generation levels between 80% and 90%.

  6. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression, ...

  7. Paducah Operations Timeline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations Timeline Paducah Operations Timeline Paducah Operations Timeline

  8. Calutron Operators | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operators Calutron Operators Young women recruited to operate the calutrons

  9. Supervisory Physical Scientist (Power Operations)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in Duty Scheduling (PGSD), Generation Scheduling (PGS), Power Services (P), Bonneville Power Administration. Duty Scheduling provides 24-hour coverage of the real-time...

  10. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  12. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: January -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2006 | Department of Energy January - March 2006 Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: January - March 2006 Docket No. EO-05-01: Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations related to Supplement Number 4 of the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC PDF icon Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations More Documents & Publications Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: Supplement 3, January and

  14. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library OPERATION DOORSTEP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation Doorstep NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Operation Doorstep Operation Doorstep and Operation Cue. This video shows Federal Civil Defense Administration film footage. In the Operation Doorstep portion, footage shows blast and thermal effects on mannequins, automobiles, and wooden frame houses. [ Full Text ] Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Click the Category, Number, or Date table header links to

  15. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  16. Fluidized-bed combustion 1000-hour test program. Volume IV. Engineering details and post-test inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, A. G.; Barker, S. N.; Phillips, R. N.; Pillai, K. K.; Raven, P.; Wood, P.

    1981-09-01

    Volume IV of the report on the 1000 hour programme consists of three appendices giving details of the enginmering/construction aspects of the plant and reports from Stal-Laval Turbin A.B. Appendix N has been entered individually. (LTN)

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-04-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime.

  18. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  19. Safety aspects of cryochamber operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorowski, M.; Piotrowska, A.; Sieron, A.; Stanek, A.

    2014-01-29

    Local and whole body cryotherapy is well recognized, developed and appreciated both from medical and technical point of view. Poland is a country with a highest number of medical cryochambers in operation (above 200) and more than 3 millions of whole body cryotherapeutic sessions have been performed since 1989. Cryogenic temperatures applied for whole-body apart from medical effects have also significant influence on patient's psyche. A number of cryochambers is constantly increasing in hospitals, sport centers and spas. A temperature inside a cryochamber should be below 150 K. To achieve and stabilize such low temperature, either cascade compressor unit or liquid cryogens evaporation (N{sub 2} or synthetic air) are used. This paper presents safety oriented review of cryochamber design and constructions.

  20. METHOD OF OPERATING NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Untermyer, S.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for obtaining enhanced utilization of natural uranium in heavy water moderated nuclear reactors by charging the reactor with an equal number of fuel elements formed of natural uranium and of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction. The reactor is operated until the rate of burnup of plutonium equals its rate of production, the fuel elements are processed to recover plutonium, the depleted uranium is discarded, and the remaining uranium is formed into fuel elements. These fuel elements are charged into a reactor along with an equal number of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction, and reuse of the uranium is continued as aforesaid until it wlll no longer support a chain reaction when combined with an equal quantity of natural uranium.

  1. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  2. Fact #851 December 15, 2014 The Average Number of Gears used in Transmissions Continues to Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The number of gears in a transmission affects a vehicle's fuel economy and performance. The more gears a vehicle has, the more time the engine spends within an optimal operating range while the...

  3. Integrating Solar PV in Utility System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, A.; Botterud, A.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Hodge, B-M.; Heany, M.

    2013-10-31

    This study develops a systematic framework for estimating the increase in operating costs due to uncertainty and variability in renewable resources, uses the framework to quantify the integration costs associated with sub-hourly solar power variability and uncertainty, and shows how changes in system operations may affect these costs. Toward this end, we present a statistical method for estimating the required balancing reserves to maintain system reliability along with a model for commitment and dispatch of the portfolio of thermal and renewable resources at different stages of system operations. We estimate the costs of sub-hourly solar variability, short-term forecast errors, and day-ahead (DA) forecast errors as the difference in production costs between a case with “realistic” PV (i.e., subhourly solar variability and uncertainty are fully included in the modeling) and a case with “well behaved” PV (i.e., PV is assumed to have no sub-hourly variability and can be perfectly forecasted). In addition, we highlight current practices that allow utilities to compensate for the issues encountered at the sub-hourly time frame with increased levels of PV penetration. In this analysis we use the analytical framework to simulate utility operations with increasing deployment of PV in a case study of Arizona Public Service Company (APS), a utility in the southwestern United States. In our analysis, we focus on three processes that are important in understanding the management of PV variability and uncertainty in power system operations. First, we represent the decisions made the day before the operating day through a DA commitment model that relies on imperfect DA forecasts of load and wind as well as PV generation. Second, we represent the decisions made by schedulers in the operating day through hour-ahead (HA) scheduling. Peaking units can be committed or decommitted in the HA schedules and online units can be redispatched using forecasts that are improved relative to DA forecasts, but still imperfect. Finally, we represent decisions within the operating hour by schedulers and transmission system operators as real-time (RT) balancing. We simulate the DA and HA scheduling processes with a detailed unit-commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) optimization model. This model creates a least-cost dispatch and commitment plan for the conventional generating units using forecasts and reserve requirements as inputs. We consider only the generation units and load of the utility in this analysis; we do not consider opportunities to trade power with neighboring utilities. We also do not consider provision of reserves from renewables or from demand-side options. We estimate dynamic reserve requirements in order to meet reliability requirements in the RT operations, considering the uncertainty and variability in load, solar PV, and wind resources. Balancing reserve requirements are based on the 2.5th and 97.5th percentile of 1-min deviations from the HA schedule in a previous year. We then simulate RT deployment of balancing reserves using a separate minute-by-minute simulation of deviations from the HA schedules in the operating year. In the simulations we assume that balancing reserves can be fully deployed in 10 min. The minute-by-minute deviations account for HA forecasting errors and the actual variability of the load, wind, and solar generation. Using these minute-by-minute deviations and deployment of balancing reserves, we evaluate the impact of PV on system reliability through the calculation of the standard reliability metric called Control Performance Standard 2 (CPS2). Broadly speaking, the CPS2 score measures the percentage of 10-min periods in which a balancing area is able to balance supply and demand within a specific threshold. Compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) reliability standards requires that the CPS2 score must exceed 90% (i.e., the balancing area must maintain adequate balance for 90% of the 10-min periods). The combination of representing DA forecast errors in the DA commitments, using 1-min PV data to simulate RT balancing, and estimates of reliability performance through the CPS2 metric, all factors that are important to operating systems with increasing amounts of PV, makes this study unique in its scope.

  4. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  5. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  6. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  7. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  8. EFRC: Administration and Operation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark Pederson PhD Computation and Theoretical Chemistry Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences An ASCR / BES / NERSC Workshop February 9-10, 2010 9AM OFFICE OF SCIENCE OFFICE OF SCIENCE Primary: Near Future Needs of Capacity Computing? BES has approximately 150 users requesting 50K to 4M processor hours (PU) per year. BES users use approximately 80-100M PU per year through the NERSC allocation

  9. STATEMENT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENT OMB Control Number: 9000-0014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act - Overtime Compensation (If included in prime contract see Block 6) Payrolls and Basic Records Withholding of Funds Disputes...

  10. Operating Experience Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information between DOE facilities.

  11. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    & RESIDUE 0 AECMED INVOLVEME?JT AT SITE ...----------- Control a Health Physics Protection 0 AECfMED managed operations G Little or None 0 AEUMED respansible far C ...

  12. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . .' .,Ec-itkED I' NVULVEFY l- AT SITE '---------... .Control c Health Physics Protection 0 AECMED managed operations G Little or None :kf AECMED responsible for ...

  13. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    operations G AECtlED responsible for acrountability . G I i I : I I 1 Health Physics; Protection ; c Little or, None, .c AECMED responsibility c Contractoi ...

  14. ARM - AAF Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director AAF Operations...

  15. APS User Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedules APS Schedule Useful Links Beamline Design Library (former Design Exchange) Machine Status Link Bunch Clock Information APS Systems Status Storage Ring Operating Status...

  16. APS Operational Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Downtime Log Yearly Operation Statistics 2016 Statistics 2015 Statistics 2014 Statistics 2013 Statistics 2012 Statistics 2011 Statistics 2010 Statistics 2009 Statistics 2008...

  17. Operator interface for vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  18. Operations Committee Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presented to the Commission to Review Effectiveness of National Energy Laboratories Jeff Smith Deputy for Operations Oak Ridge National Laboratory February 24, 2015 The Importance ...

  19. ARM - AMF Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF Operations Members of the AMF1 installation team prepare the...

  20. A solid oxide fuel cell power system: 1992--1993 field operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veyo, S.E.; Kusunoki, A.; Takeuchi, S.; Kaneko, S.; Yokoyama, H.

    1994-05-01

    Westinghouse has deployed fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems in order to obtain useful customer feedback. Recently, Westinghouse has deployed 20 kW class natural gas fueled SOFC generator modules integrated into two 25 kW SOFC systems, the first with The UTILITIES, a Japanese consortium. The UTILITIES 25 kW SOFC system is the focus of this paper. The unit was shipped to the Rokko Island Test Center for Advanced Energy Systems (near Kobe, Japan) operated by Kansai Electric Power Co.; testing was initiated February 1992. Module A operated for 2601 hours at an ave output 16.6 kW dc; final shutdown was induced by current stability problems with dissipator (restart not possible because of damaged cells). Module B operated for 1579 hours at ave output 17.8 kWdc. The unit was damaged by operation at excessively high fuel utilization > 91%. It was rebuilt and returned to Rokko Island. This module B2 operated for 1843 hours on PNG; shutdown was cuased by air supply failure. After a new blower and motor were installed July 1993, the system was restarted August 5, 1993 and operated continuously until November 10, 1993, when an automatic shutdown was induced as part of a MITI licensing inspection. After restart, the unit passed 6000 hours of operation on desulfurized PNG on January 25, 1994. Westinghouse`s future plans are outlined.

  1. Long-term inverter operation demonstration at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Long-term inverter operation demonstration at Sandia National Laboratories. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-term inverter operation demonstration at Sandia National Laboratories. No abstract prepared. Authors: Ellis, Abraham ; Kuszmaul, Scott S. ; Gonzalez, Sigifredo Publication Date: 2009-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 966623 Report Number(s): SAND2009-3488C TRN: US200921%%513 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  2. Probing surface & transport phenomena in energy materials under operating

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Probing surface & transport phenomena in energy materials under operating conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing surface & transport phenomena in energy materials under operating conditions. Authors: Chueh, William ; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid ; McCarty, Kevin F. ; McDaniel, Anthony H. Publication Date: 2012-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1055632 Report Number(s): SAND2012-8027 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  3. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves: An Analysis Tool for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detection Performance (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves: An Analysis Tool for Detection Performance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves: An Analysis Tool for Detection Performance Authors: Candy, J V ; Breitfeller, E F Publication Date: 2013-08-08 OSTI Identifier: 1093414 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-642693 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical Report

  4. PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL PDSF Office Hours 10/17/13 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm at LBNL October 7, 2013 I have biweekly office hours on Thursdays at LBNL. The next one is Thursday 10/17/13 from 2:00 - 4:00 pm in the NERSC drop in office at 050A-0143A (in the basement by the bus offices). Please feel free to stop by if you have any questions or want some hands on help with PDSF issues. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2014 January 2014 November 2013 October 2013 September

  5. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http:www.eia.govsurveyformeia14instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https:...

  6. LANL Site By The Numbers August 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By the Numbers The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was established in 1943 as Site Y of the Manhattan Project for a single purpose: to design and build an atomic bomb. ...

  7. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for the products (equipment, components and/or materials) and if applicable the nonproprietary associated installation/maintenance documentation that will be shipped from the United States to the ITER International Organization in Cadarache, France or to ITER Members worldwide on behalf of the Company. In rare

  8. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication

  9. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  10. Design and operation of the high energy physics information server

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingbaum, J.J.; Martin, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    HEPIC an information {open_quotes}center of centers{close_quotes} for the HEP community, is a 24 hour online location where a HEP researcher can start her/his search for information. Operated by the HEP Network Research Center, HEPIC is accessible via WWW, gopher, anonymous FTP, DECnet, and AFS. This paper describes HEPIC`s design and future plans, and the HEPNRC`s efforts to collect information and link high energy physics researchers world-wide.

  11. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) California Natural ...

  12. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  13. Operational Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operational Management Operational Management Operational Management Leadership Contact Information Office of Resource Management and Planning U.S. Department of Energy, MA-1.1 ...

  14. NERSC Operational Assessment Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Operational Assessment Review Agenda and Logistics Home » Events » HPC Workshops » NERSC Operational Assessment Review NERSC Operational Assessment Review By invitation only. Agenda TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16 8am - Coffee and Pastries 8:15am: Welcome and logistics - Katie Antypas 8:20am: Welcome and DOE charge - Dave Goodwin 8:30am - 9:15am:Year in Review - Sudip Dosanjh 9:30am - 10:30am: User Results - Katie Antypas 10:45 - 11:am: Break 11:00-11:45: Science and Strategic Results - Richard

  15. Operations & Administration - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat & Cool » Heat Pump Systems » Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos Proper operation of your heat pump will save energy. Do not set back the heat pump's thermostat if it causes the

  16. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  17. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, 6-25-13

  18. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-14

    This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

  19. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASTE G RESIDUE a i-CtlED INVOLVE"ENT-AT SITE -'---... Control ci Health Physics Protection 0 AECtlED managed operations c Little or None G AECMED rea' poneible for ...

  20. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    181 WASTE & RESIDUE q ,r . ,, A&MED I NVOLVEMENI-AT SITE I - . : Control 1 Health Physics Protection ' I, 0 AEWHED managed operations 0 Little or None 13 AEWHED responsible for ...

  1. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b RESIDUE q GOUT LECISED CONTReCTOR CONTRCICTOR -EEL ---LEeSED Control Health Physics 0 AEWMED managed operations q Little or No 0 AECMED responsible for AEWMED resp ...

  2. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, supersedes Admin Chg 1.

  3. Operations Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-30

    To establish policies, responsibilities and authorities for implementing and sustaining the Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Security (OPSEC) Program. Cancels DOE O 5632.3B. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  4. Operating plan FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  5. Continuity of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14

    The notice defines requirements and responsibilities for continuity of operations planning within the DOE to ensure the capability to continue essential Departmental functions across a wide range of all hazard emergencies. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 July 10, 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Mr. Ryan Jarvis Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 56h" Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr....

  7. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  8. Deputy Chief Operating Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position will be filled at either Morgantown, WV or Pittsburgh, PA. A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Deputy Chief Operating Officer assigned to the Laboratory...

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that 22% (a slight decrease from last quarter) of the Archive users are ARM Science funded principal investigators and 35% (the same as last quarter) of all other facility users are either ARM Science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. If any lost work time is incurred by any employee, it is counted as a workday loss. Table 3 reports the consecutive days since the last recordable or reportable injury or incident causing damage to property, equipment, or vehicle for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007. There were no incidents this reporting period.

  11. Operations | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Welcome to the Ames Laboratory and the operations pages of our website. Our website has recently been revised starting with the front page, the science division pages and a few pages needed for public interface. If you find that the pages you need are not available please contact the Manager in charge (i.e., Purchasing, Sponsored Programs, etc.) and we will get you the information you need.

  12. Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /: -. !~t. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Nav 0 4 ?nn~ 05-AMCP-OO46 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin, Suite 135 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE #166 -FUND U PLANT AREA REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES In response to your letter dated September 10, 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), appreciates your recommendations contained in HAB Consensus

  13. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    560,479 559,852 570,637 561,713 572,224 614,313 1987-2014 Sales 559,825 570,592 561,652 572,146 614,231 1997-2014 Transported 27 45 61 78 82 1997-2014 Commercial Number of...

  14. Minnesota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    423,703 1,429,681 1,436,063 1,445,824 1,459,134 1,472,663 1987-2014 Sales 1,429,681 1,436,063 1,445,824 1,459,134 1,472,663 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 131,801 132,163 ...

  15. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  16. Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 522,658 1986-2014 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 521,460 1997-2014 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1,198 1997-2014 Commercial Number of...

  17. Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C...

  18. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  19. North Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,102,001 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 1987-2014 Sales 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 113,630...

  20. Washington Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    059,239 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1987-2014 Sales 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 98,965 99,231...