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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

2

California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) describes rate-responsive building operations for cost and energy savings in California federal facilities.

3

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Financing Energy Cost Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an overview of funding energy savings, specifically Energy Saving Performance Contracting in relation to energy and water conservation measures, operation and maintenance...

5

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013 Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study, 2013...

7

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas...

8

Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

M Weimar

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money (Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating a typical school today is no easy task for facilities managers and business officials. You're expected to deliver increased services with constrained operating budgets. Many schools stay open for longer hours to accommodate community use of the facilities. Dilapidated buildings and systems gobble up energy, yet in many districts, maintenance needs are overshadowed by the need for expansion or new construction to serve growing student populations and changing educational needs.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Costs, Savings and Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\ BULLETIN 904 MAY 1958 .t(. :a ,s - / cwdh\\@ Costs, Savi~gs;.itd Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms . ?. I I 1 i I I ! ,:ravings in hauling - 10 cents I \\ \\ 1 \\ savings in hauling - 15 cents -----------____--- 'savings... in hauling - 20 cents Annual production, 1,000 pounds Estimated number of years required for savings from a bulk tank to equal additional costs at different levels of production and savings in hauling costs. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN'T STATION R. D...

Moore, Donald S.; Stelly, Randall; Parker, Cecil A.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to determine the realization rate of energy and cost savings from the Department of Energy's Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program based on information reported by the energy services companies (ESCOs) that are carrying out ESPC projects at federal sites. Information was extracted from 134 Measurement and Verification (M&V) reports to determine reported, estimated, and guaranteed cost savings and reported and estimated energy savings for the previous contract year. Because the quality of the reports varied, it was not possible to determine all of these parameters for each project. For 133 of the 134 projects, there was sufficient information to compare estimated, reported, and guaranteed cost savings. For this group, the total estimated cost savings for the reporting periods addressed were $95.7 million, total reported cost savings were $96.8 million, and total guaranteed cost savings were $92.1 million. This means that on average: ESPC contractors guaranteed 96% of the estimated cost savings, projects reported achieving 101% of the estimated cost savings, and projects reported achieving 105% of the guaranteed cost savings. For 129 of the projects examined, there was sufficient information to compare estimated and reported energy savings. On the basis of site energy, estimated savings for those projects for the previous year totaled 5.371 million MMBtu, and reported savings were 5.374 million MMBtu, just over 100% of the estimated energy savings. On the basis of source energy, total estimated energy savings for the 129 projects were 10.400 million MMBtu, and reported saving were 10.405 million MMBtu, again, just over 100.0% of the estimated energy savings.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Slattery, Bob S [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Energy and Demand Savings from Implementation Costs in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ENERGY AND DEMAND SAVINGS FROM IMPLEMENTATION COSTS IN INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES 1 Razinha, J.A. and Heffington, W.M. Industrial Assessment Center and Mechanical Engineering Department Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843.... noted that a direct calculation of cost savings from the implementation cost could eliminate as much as 30% of the preparation time (and associated cost) for the LoanSTAR reports. The savings result from not having to calculate energy or demand...

Razinha, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

13

Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to update costs of specific equipment, raw material or labor or CAPEX and OPEX of entire plants Cost Indices

Boisvert, Jeff

14

Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 26,...

15

Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings: Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary of The Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings, an energy efficiency guidebook for College and University business and facility managers.

Not Available

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Unconventional Staging Package Selection Leads to Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 2010, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Secretary of Energy, Daniel Poneman, directed that an analysis be conducted on the U-233 steel-clad, Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) fuel plates that were stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), focusing on cost savings and any potential DOE programmatic needs for the special nuclear material (SNM). The NA-162 Nuclear Criticality Safety Program requested retention of these fuel plates for use in experiments at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). A Secretarial Initiative challenged ORNL to make the first shipment to the NNSS by the end of the 2011 calendar year, and this effort became known as the U-233 Project Accelerated Shipping Campaign. To meet the Secretarial Initiative, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), the NNSS Management and Operations contractor, was asked to facilitate the receipt and staging of the U-233 fuel plates in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). Because there were insufficient staging containers available for the fuel plates, NSTec conducted an analysis of alternatives. The project required a staging method that would reduce the staging footprint while addressing nuclear criticality safety and radiation exposure concerns. To accommodate an intermediate staging method of approximately five years, the NSTec project team determined that a unique and unconventional staging package, the AT-400R, was available to meet the project requirements. By using the AT-400R containers, NSTec was able to realize a cost savings of approximately $10K per container, a total cost savings of nearly $450K.

,

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microsoft Word - CR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost Savings Amount Custom Fields  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EMAZ AUTOMOTIVECR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings

18

Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings Projections  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program, the city of Ormond Beach, Florida is saving energy and encouraging its residents to do the same through an environmental education program.

19

Quantifying Energy Savings by Improving Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dayton, OH ABSTRACT On/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas fired boilers... the accuracy of the methods. INTRODUCTION In our experience, common opportunities for improving boiler efficiency include switching from on/off to modulation control and reducing excess air. The decision about whether to pursue these opportunities...

Carpenter, K.; Kissock, J. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

EECBG Success Story: Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Program, Ormond Beach was able to make energy efficiency upgrades to 16 city-owned buildings and is now saving more than 45,000 a year on its energy costs. | Photo courtesy of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings? | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings? Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings? This presentation was given by Jan Aceti of Concord Light at the...

23

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access1 TechnicalOilOnlineandOperations

24

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type.

25

EMC Phenomena in HEP Detectors: Prevention and Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) studies applied to high-energy physics (HEP) detectors. They are focused on the quantification of the front-end electronic (FEE) sensitivity to conductive noise coupled through the input/output cables. Immunity tests performed on FEE prototypes of both the CMS hadron calorimeter and the CMS silicon tracker are presented. These tests characterize the sensitivity of the FEE to common and differential mode noise coupled through the power cables and the slow control network. Immunity tests allow evaluating the weakest areas of the system to take corrective actions before the integration of the overall detector, saving time and important costs.

Arteche, F.; /Imperial Coll., London /CERN; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessment of cost savings of DOE's return-on-investment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Pollution Prevention (EM-77) created is successful internally competed program to fund innovative projects based on projected returns. This is called the Return-on-Investment (ROI) program. EM-77 conducted a successful ROI pilot, developed and implemented sound management practices, and successfully transferred the program to several Operations Offices. Over the past 4 years sites have completed 262 ROI projects (costing $18.8 million) with claimed first-year savings of $88 million and claimed life cycle savings exceeding $300 million. EM-77 requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory perform an independent evaluation of the site-led, DOE-HQ-funded pollution prevention (P2) ROI program to assist the Department in determining whether claimed savings are real.

Yuracko, K.L.; Tonn, B.; Morris, M.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Empowering Operators to Drive Sustainable Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEPSA operates a complex steam, fuel gas and hot oil network at its chemical complex that produces Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) at San Roque (Spain). The site also contracts with neighboring industrial facilities for the exchange of steam, water...

Reitmeier, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve cost savings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Incentive Summary: ... 26 Table C- 2. Save-a-Watt mechanism: Example avoided costs of energy and capacity... 27... ... 36...

30

Program Potential: Estimates of Federal Energy Cost Savings from Energy Efficient Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Heaters ..Table 7: Annual energy and cost savings of water heaters (Boilers Commercial Water Heater See Appendix F for

Taylor, Margaret

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The findings of this study indicate that potential exists in non-building applications to save energy and costs. This potential could save billions of federal dollars, reduce reliance on fossil fuels, increase energy independence and security, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Federal Government has nearly twenty years of experience with achieving similar energy cost reductions, and letting the energy costs savings pay for themselves, by applying energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) inits buildings. Currently, the application of ESPCs is limited by statute to federal buildings. This study indicates that ESPCs can be a compatible and effective contracting tool for achieving savings in non-building applications.

Williams, Charles; Green, Andrew S.; Dahle, Douglas; Barnett, John; Butler, Pat; Kerner, David

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied...

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

SAVING MONEY & TIME (EFFICIENCY) UTILITY COST AVOIDANCE: From FY 2001 through FY2012, the UW Seattle campus has avoided  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAVING MONEY & TIME (EFFICIENCY) UTILITY COST AVOIDANCE: From FY 2001 through FY2012, the UW Seattle campus has avoided a cumulative $95.1 million in utility costs through its conservation efforts in disposal costs. These savings are calculated by subtracting the average cost per ton to recycle material

Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

35

Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings?  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Costs 10 Years into Future is Hard Determining Actual Demand Reduction due to Solar at MonthlyAnnual Peaks Requires Long Term Data Collection Wholesale Net...

36

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev nextInvestigationof Energy File Saving

37

Water-saving Measures: Energy and Cost Savings Calculator | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside,Warren County Rural EHeatersCBS

38

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Accelerating Commercialization of Cost-Saving Health Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency, and lower the costs of care. Booz Allen Hamilton has been at the forefront of strategy-for-profit organizations. booz Allen offers clients deep functional knowledge spanning strategy and organization on booz Allen to help them be ready for what's next. the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) focuses

Hasty, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% by the available NPSH. The system should provide the highest NPSHA that is cost effective. Losses in the pump suction line are therefore even more wasteful of energy than those on the discharge ? Suction pipes should avoid restrictions which can cause gas...

Bower, J. R.

42

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new construction, commercial/industrial custom rebate programs). In this report, the focus is on gross energy savings and the costs borne by the program administrator—including administration, payments to implementation contractors, marketing, incentives to program participants (end users) and both midstream and upstream trade allies, and evaluation costs. We collected data on net savings and costs incurred by program participants. However, there were insufficient data on participant cost contributions, and uncertainty and variability in the ways in which net savings were reported and defined across states (and program administrators).

Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the Dunbar Middle and Sims Elementary Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M Report, p. 1 POTENTIAL OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE (O&M) SAVINGS AT DUNBAR MIDDLE AND SIMS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL INTRODUCTION O&M savings refers to energy savings due to improved operation and maintenance of building systems. It is expected that the improved... by the remote energy management system at 5 p.m. Clearly, O&M savings can be expected from: (1) turning off lights at night; (2) improving custodial operations; (3) installing motion sensors in auditoriums, gymnasiums, book rooms and activity centers; (4...

Liu, M.; Houcek, J. K.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy and Demand Savings from Implementation Costs in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improve Lubrication Practices 0.91 4 na 3 na 0 24 16 487 Use Waste Heat from Hot Flue Gases to Preheat Combustion Air 0.29 483 na 2 0.31 449 25 11 464 Use Synthetic Lubricant 0.03 198 0.03 198 na 0 5 Table 3. National IAC... 2 25 11 Use Synthetic Lubricant 0.00 159 0.00 24 6 Table 4. Texas A&M University IAC Energy Conservation - Implementation Cost Correlations Rank No. TAMU Assessment Recommendation (AR) Total Energy Electrical Consumption Natural...

Razinha, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

45

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Costs & Savings For Houses Built With  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems. The Integrated Energy Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting;#12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The products and outcomes presented in this report are part of the Integrated Design

46

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

we developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource Uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplaceâ??s northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance were measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building occupants and the building operator. Lifecycle cost analyses of the advanced building control were performed, and a Building Control System Guide was prepared and published to inform owners, architects, and engineers dealing with new construction or renovation of buildings.

Dr. Zhen Song, Prof. Vivian Loftness, Dr. Kun Ji, Dr. Sam Zheng, Mr. Bertrand Lasternas, Ms. Flore Marion, Mr. Yuebin Yu

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Macintosh HD:from FWB:IMVP Save Stuff:Engine paper stuff:Engine Paper final COST AND EFFICIENCY PERFORMANCE OF AUTOMOBILE ENGINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND EFFICIENCY PERFORMANCE OF AUTOMOBILE ENGINE PLANTS Daniel E Whitney* Guillermo Peschard# Denis Artzner:IMVP Save Stuff:Engine paper stuff:Engine Paper final COST AND EFFICIENCY PERFORMANCE OF AUTOMOBILE ENGINE PLANTS Abstract This paper analyzes the basic performance of 27 automobile engine lines operated by 18

Whitney, Daniel

49

Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Ohio homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Ohio homeowners will save $5,151 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $330 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Nevada homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Nevada homeowners will save $4,736 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $360 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Pennsylvania Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Pennsylvania homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Pennsylvania homeowners will save $8,632 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $515 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

52

Idaho Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Idaho homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Idaho homeowners will save $4,057 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $285 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Vehicle operating costs: evidence from developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document presents information concerning the relationships between vehicle operating costs and highway conditions derived from four studies performed in Kenya, the Caribbean, Brazil, and India in the 1970s and early 1980s. The levels of transport costs and the amounts by which they are altered when highway conditions change depend on two main factors. The first is the production technology facing firms, in particular, the types and designs of vehicles to which firms have access. The second is the economic environment that firms face, in particular, relative prices of inputs to the production of transportation, such as fuel, tires, labor, and vehicles, and the nature of the transport markets that firms serve. The first part of the book sets out an economic model of firms managing vehicle fleets within which these influences can be examined. The second part of the book reports and interprets the results of the four major research projects which were designed to study the influences on vehicle operating costs. The third part of the book examines total vehicle operating costs.

Chesher, A.; Harrison, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Operating Costs for Trucks David Levinson*, Michael Corbett, Maryam Hashami  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author Abstract This study estimates the operating costs for commercial vehicle operators in Minnesota, but variable costs change with the level of output. Daniels (1974) divided vehicle operating cost into two different categories, running costs (includes fuel consumption, engine oil consumption, tire costs

Levinson, David M.

56

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVILAMENDMENT OF0/%2A1/%2A2/%2A en

57

Monitoring and Targeting (M&T): A Low Investment, Low Risk Approach to Energy Cost Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring and Targeting (M&T): A Low Investment, Low Risk Approach to Energy Cost Savings Andrew McMullan Mike Rutkowski Alan Karp Vice President President Manager Bus. Development VERITECH, INC. Sterling, VA ABSTRACT Monitoring... and Targeting (M&T) is a disciplined approach to energy management that ensures that energy resources are used to their maximmn economic advantage. M&T serves two principal functions: ? Ongoing, day-to-day control of energy use ? Planned improvements...

McMullan, A.; Rutkowski, M.; Karp, A.

58

Chiller Plant Design Goals Low operating cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3/9/09 1 2 Chiller Plant Design Goals · Low operating cost ­Energy Efficiency ­No full time staffing · Reliability ­24/7 ­ 365 ­Maintainability · Future expansion capability #12;3/9/09 2 3 Chiller T 4 Chiller Plant Electrical · Electrical ­N+1 transformer capacity ­4160 volt Compressor Motors

59

Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Delaware homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Delaware homeowners will save $10,409 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $616 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $408 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Massachusetts Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Massachusetts homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Massachusetts homeowners will save $10,848 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $621 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Iowa homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Iowa homeowners will save $7,573 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $454 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Texas homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Texas homeowners will save $3,456 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $259 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

66

Achieving the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Support Document presents the energy and cost savings analysis that PNNL conducted to measure the potential energy savings of 90.1-2010 relative to 90.1-2004. PNNL conducted this analysis with inputs from many other contributors and source of information. In particular, guidance and direction was provided by the Simulation Working Group under the auspices of the SSPC90.1. This report documents the approach and methodologies that PNNL developed to evaluate the energy saving achieved from use of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010. Specifically, this report provides PNNL’s Progress Indicator process and methodology, EnergyPlus simulation framework, prototype model descriptions. This report covers the combined upgrades from 90.1-2004 to 90.1-2010, resulting in a total of 153 addenda. PNNL has reviewed and considered all 153 addenda for quantitative analysis in the Progress Indicator process. 53 of those are included in the quantitative analysis. This report provides information on the categorization of all of the addenda, a summary of the content, and deeper explanation of the impact and modeling of 53 identified addenda with quantitative savings.

Thornton, Brian A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Richman, Eric E.; Wang, Weimin; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Cho, Heejin; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography is a compilation of reports on the cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy applications throughout the United States. It is part of an overall effort to inform utilities of technological developments in conservation and renewable energy technologies and so aid utilities in their planning process to determine the most effective and economic combination of capital investments to meet customer needs. Department of Energy assessments of the applications, current costs and cost goals for the various technologies included in this bibliography are presented. These assessments are based on analyses performed by or for the respective DOE Program Offices. The results are sensitive to a number of variables and assumptions; however, the estimates presented are considered representative. These assessments are presented, followed by some conclusions regarding the potential role of the conservation and renewable energy alternative. The approach used to classify the bibliographic citations and abstracts is outlined.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annual energy cost savings were estimated with $0.11/kWh for electricity and $0.84/therm (Climate Zone 2) and $0.64/therm (Climate Zone 3 and 4) for natural gas. 2009 IECC Cost Savings Report, p.ii January 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...). 3.2 Annual Total Energy Cost Similar trends were observed in the annual energy costs estimated with $0.11/kWh for electricity and $0.84/therm (Climate Zone 2) and $0.64/therm (Climate Zone 3 and 4) for natural gas. Across the counties, the 2001...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

70

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

71

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Web-based Tool Identifies and Quantifies Potential Cost Savings Measures at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Improvement system is an approachable web-based tool that is available to Hanford DOE staff, site contractors, and general support service contractors as part of the baseline optimization effort underway at the Hanford Site. Finding and implementing technical improvements are a large part of DOE’s cost savings efforts. The Technical Improvement dashboard is a key tool for brainstorming and monitoring the progress of submitted baseline optimization and potential cost/schedule efficiencies. The dashboard is accessible to users over the Hanford Local Area Network (HLAN) and provides a highly visual and straightforward status to management on the ideas provided, alleviating the need for resource intensive weekly and monthly reviews.

Renevitz, Marisa J. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States); Peschong, Jon C. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Charboneau, Briant L. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Simpson, Brett C. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States)

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Inspection of the cost reduction incentive program at the Department of Energy`s Idaho Operations Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this inspection was to review the economy and efficiency of Idaho`s Fiscal Year 1992 Cost Reduction Incentive Program, as well as to provide information to Departmental officials regarding any difficulties in administering these types of programs. The report is of the findings and recommendations. According to Idaho officials, their Cost Reduction Incentive Program was designed to motivate and provide incentives to management and operating contractors which would result in cost savings to the Department while increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the contractors` operations. Idaho officials reported that over $22.5 million in costs were saved as a result of the Fiscal Year 1992 Cost Reduction Incentive Program. It was found that: (1) Idaho officials acknowledged that they did not attempt a full accounting records validation of the contractor`s submitted cost savings; (2) cost reduction incentive programs may result in conflicts of interest--contractors may defer work in order to receive an incentive fee; (3) the Department lacks written Department-wide policies and procedures--senior Procurement officials stated that the 1985 memorandum from the then-Assistant Secretary for Management and Administration was not the current policy of the Department; and (4) the Department already has the management and operating contract award fee provisions and value engineering program that can be used to provide financial rewards for contractors that operate cost effectively and efficiently.

Not Available

1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Operations and Maintenance Savings from Advanced Metering Infrastructure - Initial Results  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines |OpenEnergy 8Operations U.S.

75

Optimal operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionation · The Petlyuk distillation column, see Figure 1(a), with a pre-fractionator (C1) and a main column (C21 and C22) N-7465 Trondheim, Norway Abstract This work shows the unexpected result that over-fractionating one

Skogestad, Sigurd

76

Optimal Operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Operation of a Petlyuk Distillation Column: Energy Savings by Over-fractionating Vidar the unexpected result that over-fractionating one of the product streams in a Petlyuk distillation column may is optimal in some cases. 1. Introduction The Petlyuk distillation column, see Figure 1(a), with a pre-fractionator

Skogestad, Sigurd

77

IEECB'08 Paper n57 Can energy savings from operations promoting energy efficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IEECB'08 Paper n°57 Can energy savings from operations promoting energy efficient behaviors in office buildings be accounted for ? Abstract When looking for solutions to mitigate the growth of energy consumption in the commercial buildings sector, research works often focus on the energy performance

Boyer, Edmond

78

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. 1998). Centrifugal compressors are cost effective2 psi) on a centrifugal air compressor results in savings ofto centrifugal and rotary screw compressors. Changing the

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Data Warehouse Model to Support Optimized Operation and Energy Savings in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University College Cork (Ireland) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Data Warehouse Model to support Optimized Operation and Energy Savings in Buildings Paul Stack, Brian Cahill, Farhan Manzoor, Prof. Karsten Menzel 20... October 2011 page 1ICEBO 2011 Session 10 - Brian Cahill University College Cork (Ireland) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering ICT for Optimised Building Operation (ITOBO) 20 October 2011 ICEBO 2011 Session 10 - Brian Cahill page 2...

Stack, P.; Cahill, B.; Manzoor, F.; Menzel, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

Dessouky, Maged

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AIM Energy savings can be communicated in terms of kilowatt hours (energy), carbon (climate change) or pounds (cost). We want to know if these different communication units prime different motivations more broadly. This implies that considering carbon may result in wider changes in sustainable behaviour

McAuley, Derek

82

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Optimizing Control and Energy Saving Operations of One Teaching Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: cold source; energy-saving operation; number control; water temperature control 1. FOREWORD With the fast development of economy and technology, it becomes more and more popular for the public buildings to adopt the central air conditioning... systems. This phenomenon causes the sharp increase of the energy consumption on air conditioning systems, which accounts for 50% of the total energy consumption of buildings[1]. In addition, the energy consumption of the cold source system...

Lu, J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs, and benefits of EIS, many of these descriptions are idealized and often insufficient for potential users to evaluate cost, benefit and operational usefulness. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS and related technology installations. This study explored the following questions: (1) How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? (2) What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? (3) Where do the energy savings come from? This paper reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of energy data trended by EIS and utility bills was also conducted to measure the benefit. This paper explores common uses and findings to identify energy savings attributable to EIS, and discusses non-energy benefits as well. This paper also addresses technologies related to EIS that have been demonstrated and evaluated by LBNL.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The importance of annual personal saving to the capital finance and real wealth position of farm operator families  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE IMPORTANCE OF ANNUAL PERSONAL SAVING TO THE CAPITAL FINANCE AND REAL WEALTH POSITION OF FARM OPERATOR FAMILIES A Thesis by Deroe Elizabeth Asenath Davis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the reqirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1977 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE IMPORTANCE OF ANNUAL PERSONAL SAVING TO THE CAPITAL FINANCE AND REAL WEALTH POSITION OF FARM OPERATOR FAMILIES A Thesis by Deroe Elizabeth Asenath...

Davis, Deroe Elizabeth Asenath

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Virginia Construction Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Virginia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Virginia Construction Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Virginia homeowners will save $5,836 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $388 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yield positive benefits for U.S. homeowners and significant energy savings for the nation. Moving from a baseline of the 2006 IECC to the 2009 IECC reduces average annual energy costs by 10.8%, while moving from the same baseline to the 2012 IECC reduces them by 32.1%. These reductions amount to annual energy cost savings of $168 and $497, respectively. The 2012 IECC saves $329 in energy costs compared to the 2009 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Third-party/shared savings initiatives at DOE's government-owned/contractor-operated sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To promote energy conservation at its government owned/contractor operated (GOCO) facilities, DOE implemented the In-house Energy Management (IHEM) Program. In early FY 1984, the IHEM program became interested in the concept of third-party financing as a potential supplement for its appropriated budget. The basic approach to this activity is discussed, including some of the initial concerns of third-party/shared savings financing at DOE facilities. The legal and procurement issues involved are discussed in detail. Planned initiatives are also discussed.

Petrolati, V.P.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $119 for the 2009 IECC and $392 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at Schools in the Ft. Worth Independent School District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 State Energy Conservation Office Energy Systems Laboratory LoanSTAR O&M Program Texas A&M University FWISD O&M Potential in 104 Schools, P.I POTENTIAL OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE SAVINGS AT SCHOOLS IN THE FORT WORTH INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT... Office LoanSTAR O&M Program Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University FWISD O&M Potential in 104 Schools, P.I 1 Figure 3b: The Potential Savings vs the Annual Peak Demand for 104 Schools The total potential electricity and gas savings are shown...

Liu, M.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of a mobile laboratory for analyses at uranium cleanup sites resulting in significant time and cost savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile laboratory was developed for the analysis of {sup 230}Th in soil at Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites to speed sample turnaround time and reduce the cost of using commercial laboratories. The laboratory utilizes recent developments in microwave acid dissolution, nuclide-specific extraction with extractive scintillators, and liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry to give results with an estimated minimum detectable concentration of 52 Bq kg{sup -1} (1.4 pCi g{sup -1}) for a 300-s count using a 1-g sample. The analysis time for {sup 230}Th is 16 h for eight samples, excluding quality control samples, at a cost of approximately $30 per sample. No significant additional time or costs are incurred by performing uranium analysis. As a result savings of up to $40,000 per week can be realized on the UMTRA project.

Bianconi, J. [RUST Federal Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions; Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt-recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

Not Available

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Selected Operating Costs for Storage of Sorghum Grain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected Operating Costs for Storage Of Sorghum Grain TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY This is the third of three bulletins reporting the results of a study of sorghum grain storage and handling practices in Texas. The first dealt with marketing and on...-farm storage; the second with com- mercial storage and handling practices. This bulletin reports the results of a study of the costs of com- mercial grain handling practices. Three areas representing a cross section of physical and economic conditions...

Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Cunningham, William C.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

"We have 7 cogen systems and are very pleased with the cost savings."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRICT COGENERATION PROJECT The school district is very satisfied with the performance and energy savings associated with the new swimming pool cogeneration system at Sanger High School. In particular, the district of the electric output from the cogeneration unit is used on-site and the engine waste heat is used to preheat

99

Service Members Aim High-- for Energy Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide.

100

Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available for responding to system contingencies variable demand. In many regions of the United States, thermal power plants provide a large fraction of the operating reserve requirement. Alternative sources of operating reserves, such as demand response and energy storage, may provide more efficient sources of these reserves. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services, including spinning contingency reserves and upward regulation reserves. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system flexibilities, renewable energy penetration, and other sensitivities. The analysis demonstrates that the price of operating reserves depend highly on many assumptions regarding the operational flexibility of the generation fleet, including ramp rates and the fraction of fleet available to provide reserves.

Hummon, M. R.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $672 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $358 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $164 for the 2009 IECC and $422 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $168 for the 2009 IECC and $462 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Minnesota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Minnesota Residential Energy Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Minnesota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Minnesota Residential Energy Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Minnesota homeowners will save $1,277 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $9,873 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceed cumulative cash outlays) in 3 years for the 2009 IECC and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $122 for the 2009 IECC and $669 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $155 for the 2009 IECC and $543 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $143 for the 2009 IECC and $507 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $231 for the 2009 IECC and $486 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $123 for the 2009 IECC and $415 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Arkansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arkansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arkansas homeowners will save $1,948 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,679 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $147 for the 2009 IECC and $466 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

West Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for West Virginia homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, West Virginia homeowners will save $1,996 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,301 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $135 for the 2009 IECC and $480 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Demonstration in salad2015 Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Type of cost Change2015 Cost Effectiveness Investment cost Type of cost Change

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Costs of Owning and Operating Farm Machinery in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs of Owning and Operating Farm Machinery in the Pacific Northwest: 2011 by Kathleen Painter Sociology, University of Idaho, Moscow Pacific Northwest Extension publications are jointly produced than 400 titles. Joint writing, editing, and production have prevented duplication of effort, broadened

O'Laughlin, Jay

114

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be avoided. Centrifugal compressors are cost effective whento centrifugal and rotary screw compressors. Changing theof compressor used: reciprocating, centrifugal, and screw (

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Improving the thermal integrity of new single-family detached residential buildings: Documentation for a regional database of capital costs and space conditioning load savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the costs and space-conditioning load savings from improving new single-family building shells. It relies on survey data from the National Association of Home-builders (NAHB) to assess current insulation practices for these new buildings, and NAHB cost data (aggregated to the Federal region level) to estimate the costs of improving new single-family buildings beyond current practice. Space-conditioning load savings are estimated using a database of loads for prototype buildings developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, adjusted to reflect population-weighted average weather in each of the ten federal regions and for the nation as a whole.

Koomey, J.G.; McMahon, J.E.; Wodley, C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Jefferson Lab Innovation Saves $1,000/Day in Cooling Costs | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJefferson Lab Click on theJamesBQuestionsInnovation Saves

117

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying Savings From Improved Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas firedNational Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify

Kissock, Kelly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ambulatory transradial percutaneous coronary intervention: a safe, effective and cost-saving strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ambulatory transradial percutaneous coronary intervention: a safe, effective and cost words: percutaneous coronary intervention; radial approach; ambulatory procedure; safety; economic transradial percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) under the conditions of everyday practice. Background

Boyer, Edmond

123

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Honeywell Proprietary honeywell.de/hbs#0;? 2 Improving energy efficiency: Where to start with? ? A study (1) identified energy saving potentials within non- residential office buildings high as: ? 30...-residential buildings. ESL-IC-08-10-67a Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Honeywell Proprietary honeywell.de/hbs#0;? 3 Low capital investment actions (1) ? 50% of the electrical...

Muller, C.

125

Evaluation of Production Cost Savings from Consolidation of Balancing Authorities in the US Western Interconnection under High Wind and Solar Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces a comprehensive analysis to quantify the potential savings in production cost due to consolidation of 32 US western interconnection Balancing Authorities (BAs). Three simulation scenarios are developed: current Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) BAs structure, full copper-sheet consolidation, and full consolidation with transmission congestion considered. The study uses WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) model that was developed for the year 2020. The model assumes 8% wind and 3% solar energy penetration as percentage of total WECC demand in 2020. Sensitivity analyses are carried out to assess the impact of transmission hurdle rates between WECC BAs on potential benefits. The study shows savings that ranges from $400 Million (2.4% of total one year production cost) to $600 Million (3.2%) per year in thermal units production cost due to consolidation can be achieved. The copper sheet consolidation scenario shows an extra savings of $240 Million (1.4%) per year.

Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for High Performance Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................... 2 3.2 DESCRIPTION OF HVAC SYSTEMS .................................................................................................................. 8 4.1 HVAC CONTROLS ISSUES: HVAC System Operating Characteristics ..........................................................7 Table

127

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Armor. 2010. Sustainable Concrete Plant Guidelines, Pilot-B. Ivery, J. Flaherty. 2004. Concrete Batch Plant Operator.National Ready Mixed Concrete Association Fleet Benchmarking

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fuel Cost Savings Through Computer Control of a Boiler Complex - - Two Case Histories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large pulp and paper mill complex in which multiple power boilers and turbine generators are controlled so as to meet the total energy demand of the mill at minimum cost. Also discussed are results from a second installation involving control of a...

Worthley, C. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Beyond Energy Savings: Case Studies on Enhancing Productivity and Reducing Costs Through Energy Efficiency Investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

productivity. Anheuser-Busch Companies. Inc. Bio-Energy Recoverv In response to rising fuel prices in the hite 1970s, Anheuser-Busch looked for ways to gain control over energy and other utility costs. The company began exploring anaerobic treatment... of organic nutrients in wastewater, in which bacteria consume organic compounds under water, releasing biogas that bubbles to the top of the tank. The biogas (mostly methane) is collected and used for fuel (bio-energy recovery), and solid waste...

Pye, M.

134

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Engineering and Econometric Models Megan Smirti RyersonCosts with Engineering and Econometric Models Megan Smirtiforces. To this end, an econometric operating cost model (

Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cost-Energy Dynamics of Thermal Insulation: Potential Energy Savings and Policy Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at that point, we shall designate p as price for simplicity. If Po is the price at "pres~nt," y is the escalation rate, x is the effective cost of money used for discounting, and N is the life cycle, KE(E) is N i p (l + y) E (3a)0 ~(E) (l + x)l i=1... VALUESII' OF ZI' price factor is defined as ZE =*~ (i :~) i Discount Rate 1 x (yr-1) where and Planning Horizon N (years) CRF (x,N) _rate N = y = annual fuel escalation rate x...

Phung, D. L.; Plaza, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best Practices, Case Study. Office of Energy Efficiency andBest Practices, A guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency, release 3.0. Office of Energy EfficiencyEnergy efficiency opportunities identified. BUILDING CAPACITY Tracking Monitoring and Systems established for tracking energy performance and best practices

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Impact of Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques on Energy Savings in the U.S. Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conserving energy in the process and to reduce pumping power, thereby reducing operating costs. This paper attempts to quantify the impact of enhancement on energy savings and capital costs. The overall heat exchanger market was divided into four sectors...

Rebello, W. J.; Peterson, G. R.; Sohal, M.

140

Use of EMCS Recorded Data to Identify Potential Savings Due to Improved HVAC Operations & Maintenance (O&M)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of EMCS Recorded Data to Identify Potential Savings Due to Improved HVAC Operations & Maintenance(O&M) Mingsheng Liu, Yeqiao Zhu, and David Claridge Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University ABSTRACT In most chiller and boiler central... and cooling energy consumption using an appropriate model [Liu 1995, Liu and Claridge 19951 with the bin weather data for each building. Step 5: Calculate the campus consumption as the sum of consumption of all buildings. Step 6: Compare the simulated...

Liu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost and Robert L. Bertini2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Two cost functions are considered in the model including passenger access cost and in-vehicle1 Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost Huan Li1 and Robert L. Bertini2 model is generated with the aim at minimizing the operation cost without impact on transit accessibility

Bertini, Robert L.

143

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the State Capitol Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thermal savings expected from turning off air handlers. Details are given in Appendix C. Texas Governor's Energy Office Energy Systems Laboratory LoanSTAR O&M Program Texas A&M University State Capitol Complex O&M Report, p. 8 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The O.... Texas Governor's Energy Office LoanSTAR O&M Program Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University State Capitol Complex O&M Report, p.9 Figure 3: Potential Annual O&M Savings for Eight Buildings in the State Capitol Complex Figure 4 shows the impact...

Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Abbas, M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Waste Minimization Improvements Achieved Through Six Sigma Analysis Result In Significant Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved waste minimization practices at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are leading to a 15% reduction in the generation of hazardous and radioactive waste. Bechtel, BWXT Idaho, LLC (BBWI), the prime management and operations contractor at the INEEL, applied the Six Sigma improvement process to the INEEL Waste Minimization Program to review existing processes and define opportunities for improvement. Our Six Sigma analysis team: composed of an executive champion, process owner, a black belt and yellow belt, and technical and business team members used this statistical based process approach to analyze work processes and produced ten recommendations for improvement. Recommendations ranged from waste generator financial accountability for newly generated waste to enhanced employee recognition programs for waste minimization efforts. These improvements have now been implemented to reduce waste generation rates and are producing positive results.

Mousseau, Jeffrey, D.; Jansen, John, R.; Janke, David, H.; Plowman, Catherine, M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Study on Energy Saving of the Interlayer Ventilation Walla Used in Clean Operation Rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Air Conditioning, 2003(3):61-62 (in Chinese) [3] H.L.Wang, K.Li, Y.L.Dai, Progress status and existing problems of energy-saving sunlight greenhouse, Journal of Northwest Sci-tech University of Agriculture and Forestry, 2000,28(4), 108-112 (in...

Feng, J.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cost savings associated with landfilling wastes containing very low levels of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has operated captive landfills (both residential and construction/demolition debris) in accordance with the Commonwealth of Kentucky regulations since the early 1980s. Typical waste streams allowed in these landfills include nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste (such as paper, plastic, cardboard, cafeteria waste, clothing, wood, asbestos, fly ash, metals, and construction debris). In July 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new requirements for the disposal of sanitary wastes in a {open_quotes}contained landfill.{close_quotes} These requirements were promulgated in the 401 Kentucky Administrative Record Chapters 47 and 48 that became effective 30 June 1995. The requirements for a new contained landfill include a synthetic liner made of high-density polyethylene in addition to the traditional 1-meter (3-foot) clay liner and a leachate collection system. A new landfill at Paducah would accept waste streams similar to those that have been accepted in the past. The permit for the previously existing landfills did not include radioactivity limits; instead, these levels were administratively controlled. Typically, if radioactivity was detected above background levels, the waste was classified as low-level waste (LLW), which would be sent off-site for disposal.

Boggs, C.J. [Argonne National Lab., Germantown, MD (United States); Shaddoan, W.T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The French nuclear power plant reactor building containment contributions of prestressing and concrete performances in reliability improvements and cost savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electricite de France`s N4 CHOOZ B nuclear power plant, two units of the world`s largest PWR model (1450 Mwe each), has earned the Electric Power International`s 1997 Powerplant Award. This lead NPP for EDF`s N4 series has been improved notably in terms of civil works. The presentation will focus on the Reactor Building`s inner containment wall which is one of the main civil structures on a technical and safety point of view. In order to take into account the necessary evolution of the concrete technical specification such as compressive strength low creep and shrinkage, the HSC/HPC has been used on the last N4 Civaux 2 NPP. As a result of the use of this type of professional concrete, the containment withstands an higher internal pressure related to severe accident and ensures higher level of leak-tightness, thus improving the overall safety of the NPP. On that occasion, a new type of prestressing has been tested locally through 55 C 15 S tendons using a new C 1500 FE Jack. These updated civil works techniques shall allow EDF to ensure a Reactor Containment lifespan for more than 50 years. The gains in terms of reliability and cost saving of these improved techniques will be developed hereafter.

Rouelle, P.; Roy, F. [Electricite de France, Paris (France). Engineering and Construction Div.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a predictive and preventive maintenance program. The Motorand could save considerable energy. Preventive maintenance.A general preventive maintenance (PM) program

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Aeronautical System Center's environmental compliance assessment and management program's cost-saving initiatives support the Air Force's acquisition reform initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management directorate of ASC (ASC/EM) has the responsibility of providing government oversight for the Government Owned Contractor Operated Aircraft and Missile plants (GOCOs). This oversight is manifested as a landlord role where Air Force provides the funding required to maintain the plant facilities including buildings and utilities as well as environmental systems. By agreement the companies operating the plants are required to operate them in accordance with environmental law. Presently the GOCOs include Air Force Plant (AFP) 6 in Marietta Ga., AFP 4 in Fort Worth, Tx., AFP 44 in Tucson, Az., AFP 42 in Palmdale, Ca., and AFP PJKS in Denver, Co. Lockheed Martin corporation operates AFPs 4,6, PJKS and a portion of AFP 42 while AFP 44 is operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. Other GOCOs at AFP 42 are Northrup-Grumman, Boeing, and Cabaco, the facilities engineer. Since 1992 the Environmental Management division has conducted its Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program assessments (ECAMP) annually at each of the plants. Using DOD's ECAMP Team Guide and teams comprised of both Air Force and consultant engineering personnel, each plant is assessed for its environmental compliance well being. In the face of rising operational costs and diminishing budgets ASC/EM performed a comprehensive review of its ECAMP. As a result, the basic ECAMP program was improved to reduce costs without compromising on quality of the effort. The program retained its emphasis in providing a snap-shot evaluation of each Air Force plant's environmental compliance health supported by complete but tailored protocol assessments.

Meanor, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Accelerating Computation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investment costs and long­term operational costs & savings. Production cost models are the choice tool for evaluating the majority of operational costs & savings, however they do not estimate make investment to minimize the costs associated with reliably operating electricity grids. We use UC/ED modeling in renewable

152

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

316,871 ....................same $?s $ 20,071 ....................same As shown in Table 1, the original estimated initial capital construction costs totaled $3,585,300 with the revised, actual value equaling $3,278,276 (Balcombe). The installation...,715,000 with the revised, actual value being $7,273,360 (Balcombe). The installation period was projected to take two years, with an ensuing expected useful life of 48 years. No losses of operations or other adverse impacts were anticipated (nor did they occur...

Sturdivant, A. W.; Rister, M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Rogers, C. S.

153

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2020

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 producing wells, 11 injection wells and 1 water supply well. Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and drilling water supply wells...

157

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Advanced Energy Tax Credit (Corporate) As of July 2007, the development and construction costs of...

158

The cost of noise reduction for departure and arrival operations of commercial tilt rotor aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and noise annoyance due to a departure and an arrival operation was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt ...

Faulkner, Henry B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and CAC 2003). Centrifugal compressors are cost effectiveapplied to centrifugal and rotary screw compressors. Single

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chapter 10, Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

value when hourly savings and costs are considered, because usage is higher when avoided costs are higher. Outdoor lighting, however, has lower values when hourly savings and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pilot Study for Quantifying LEED Energy & Atmosphere Operational Savings in Healthcare Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of sustainable practices can be implemented to maximize value, minimize operational overhead, and more closely align real estate products with the consumer market. The practical employment of sustainable technologies and practices 13 can...

Daniels, Patrick Rudolph

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

Liang, Weifa

164

The Texas Cattle Feeding Industry - Operations, Management, and Costs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per pound of gain. The largest decrease in annual fixed costs per pound of gain occurred as feedlot size increased from less than 1,0.0.0. head capacity to 4,0.0.0. head capacity. Results revealed generally more variability in costs among smaller... almost 1,0.50. lb while heifers averaged about 865 lb. Almost 70.% of the fed steers marketed from Texas feedlots graded U.S. Choice or higher compared to 50% for fed heifers. Fed cattle marketed from Panhandle Plains feedlots were predominantly U...

Dietrich, R.A.; Thomas, P.J.; Farris, D.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Path Cost Optimization Using Genetic Algorithm with Supervised Crossover Operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are widely applied in maneu- vering robots, such as autonomous underwater vehicles [1] and unmanned aerial effective way. The term cost can be inter- preted as fuel consumption, path visibility, probability of being and solution quality of genetic algorithms. 1. Introduction Thanks to highly advanced autonomous technologies

Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

166

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Statewide Electrical Energy Cost Savings and Peak Demand Reduction from the IECC Code-Compliant, Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed in Texas was determined using the annual surveys, National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) (NAHB 2001?2005 and 2009-2010)4. Figure 6 shows the ratio of the single family residences in Texas by type of heating system for Climate Zone 2 (CZ 2... for New Homes (Paquette et al. 2010), the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings (Amann et al. 2007), and the similar incremental cost analysis studies in Texas (Malhotra et al. 2008; Kim et al...

Kim, H; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

168

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Routine based OS-aware Microprocessor Resource Adaptation for Run-time Operating System Power Saving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workloads (see section 2 for detail), making it a major power consumer. The proportion of the OS power, such as thermal sensor reading, energy accounting and power control for memory and I/O devices [2]. ClearlyRoutine based OS-aware Microprocessor Resource Adaptation for Run-time Operating System Power

John, Lizy Kurian

170

Measuring Energy-Saving Retrofits: Experiences from the LoanSTAR Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

school, and local government buildings. As part of this program, a first-of-its-kind, statewide Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) was established to verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, reduce energy costs by identifying operational...

Claridge, D. E.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Reddy, T. A.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Practical Energy Savings and New Process Control Options for Parts Washing and Cleaning Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Substantial potential energy savings exist for many parts washing and cleaning processes in use today. Energy usage is frequently the largest single variable cost involved in parts washing and cleaning operations. Several control parameters...

McGinness, M.

172

Work Cost of Thermal Operations in Quantum and Nano Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adopting a resource theory framework of thermodynamics for quantum and nano systems pioneered by Janzing et al. [Int. J. Th. Phys. 39, 2717 (2000)], we formulate the cost in useful work of transforming one resource state into another as a linear program of convex optimization. This approach is based on the characterization of thermal quasiorder given by Janzing et al. and later by Horodecki and Oppenheim [Nat. Comm. 4, 2059 (2013)]. Both characterizations are related to an extended version of majorization studied by Ruch, Schranner, and Seligman under the name mixing distance [J. Chem. Phys. 69, 386 (1978)].

Joseph M. Renes

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs, and increased energy awareness among employees (Wyethimprove the awareness of personnel with regard to energy useawareness Build capacity Not addressed No promotion of energy

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of low refrigerant charge. The cost of automatedby applying this measure. Monitoring of refrigerant charge.A low refrigerant charge can exist in many small direct

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Schools Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

176

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the...

177

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Final.” Subsequent to that report's release, the project was installed and implemented within the District’s water-delivery infrastructure system, with actual construction costs...

Sturdivant, A. W.; Rister, M.; Lacewell, R. D.

180

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Incorporating Operational Characteristics and Startup Costs in Option-Based Valuation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Operational Characteristics and Startup Costs in Option-Based Valuation of Power characteristics on valuation of generation assets under different modeling assumptions about the energy commodity prices. We find that the impacts of operational constraints on real asset valuation are dependent upon

Oren, Shmuel S.

183

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil-well drilling operations in order to reduce non-productive time (NPT). DrillEdge utilizes case-based reasoning

Aamodt, Agnar

184

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

185

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reducing Idle Power Consumption in Office Spaces Saves U.S. Navy in Energy Costs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a two-year project to demonstrate energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has identified advanced plug load controls as a promising technology for reducing energy use and related costs in the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) office spaces.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As shown in Table 1, the original estimated initial capital construction costs totaled $2,356,000, with the revised, actual value being $2,504,435 (Balcombe). The installation period was projected to take (and remained at) one year, with an ensuing... uncertainty and multiple analyses are an underlying theme and related inference that consistent and attentive methods of analysis, such as those documented in Rister et al. 2002, are warranted. References Balcombe, Collins. Director, Special Projects, U...

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Lacewell, R.

190

THESIS: Operating Costs for Commercial Vehicle Operators in Minnesota By Maryam Hashami  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 2.5 Drivers Compensation 7 Table 2.6 Length of Hauls by Industry 8 Table 2.7 Cost per KM 9 Table 3 the weight of heavy trucks during the spring thaw. During the spring thaw, the soil under the pavement becomes weak; thus, heavy trucks may cause more pavement damage and reduce pavement life. SLR by reducing

Levinson, David M.

191

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

means of saving energy at its Morris, Illinois plant (U.S.Morris, Illinois site as a potential energy saving project,Wide Energy Efficiency Plan (EEP) at its Morris, Illinois

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113: Project cost estimate. Preliminary design report. Volume IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Volume IV of the Preliminary Design Report for the Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113 which is the Project Cost Estimate and construction schedule. The estimate was developed based upon Title 1 material take-offs, budgetary equipment quotes and Raytheon historical in-house data. The W-113 project cost estimate and project construction schedule were integrated together to provide a resource loaded project network.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

White House Honors Federal Agencies for Saving Taxpayers $133...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

White House Honors Federal Agencies for Saving Taxpayers 133 Million in Energy Costs by Increasing Efficiency Measures White House Honors Federal Agencies for Saving Taxpayers...

194

Energy Department's Texas Pantex Plant to Save Over $2 Million...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). These energy conservation measures will cost approximately 19.5 million over 19 years, saving the Pantex Plant approximately 38...

195

Empirical Assessment of Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms Designs under Aggressive Savings Goals: Case Study of a Kansas "Super-Utility"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Represents forecasted avoided cost resource savings from EEof the stream of total avoided cost savings realized overprojections of future avoided costs. There is substantial

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cyclic Operation of Power Plant: Technical, Operational and Cost Issues -- An International Seminar: Proceedings: ''Two Shifting'' Seminar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of changes in demand and competition within the power industry, fossil fuel plants in many countries are now subject to two-shift operation, that is, generating power for 10-15 hours during the day only, usually in combination with a complete shutdown on weekends. Other fossil-fueled units, although running around the clock, need to follow changes in electricity demand. This mode of functioning, in which temperatures and pressures are never stable for more than a few hours, is referred to as ''cyclic operation of plant.'' The aim of the seminar at which these papers were presented was to identify the basic causes of component and equipment problems in two-shift operation, and to begin to identify procedures that could minimize operating and maintenance costs. The papers cover the following topics: Session 1: Plant Operation Experience and Design Issues; Session 2: Materials Issues; Session 3: Cost, Manpower and Management Issues; Session 4: Plant Automation Issues; Session 5: Hot Section Gas Turbine Issues; and Session 6: HRSG [heat recovery steam generator] Issues.

None

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Small Businesses Save Big: A Borrower's Guide To Increase the Bottom Line Using Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides a guide for small businesses to find the resources to increase the energy efficiency of their buildings.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

http://tti.tamu.edu Saving Lives, Time and Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and organization > Project management > Education and training > Costs > Capital investments > Road pricinghttp://tti.tamu.edu Saving Lives, Time and Resources A Member of The Texas A&M University System estimation > Traffic forecasting > Commuting > Carpools > Highway operations > Highway capacity > Freeway

199

Energy saving ideas for open pit mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing cost of diesel fuel is making truck haulage in open pit mines less economic. Belt conveyor systems have much lower operating costs but are not as flexible in their application and require more detailed pit planning. The possibility of combining the flexibility of trucks with the low cost of conveyors is offered by the application of semi-mobile crushing plants followed by belt conveyors for the main haul out of the pit. In the first part of this article. Dr.-Ing W. Rixen describes some of the semi-mobile plants already in operation, while in the second section. Dr.-Ing K.J. Benecke discusses a theoretical case study involving trucks, crushers, and conveyors. Since a belt conveyor cannot transport rocks of a size often produced when blasting hard strata, a crusher must be installed before the belt conveyor to reduce the material to a transportable size. This also serves as a primary crusher. The crushing plant is positioned centrally in the mine and trucks haul overburden and ore from the individual faces to the crusher without having to climb long gradients. Therefore, truck haul distances and operating costs are significantly reduced. The resulting savings in operating costs greatly exceeds the additional capital costs for the crushing plant. The use of fully mobile crushers directly fed by the face shovel is well established. Whereas the partial elimination of truck haulage by semi-mobile in-pit crushers is a more recent development. This latter method restricts truck haulage to in-pit operation only, saving costly haulage of material up-grade out of the pit to the crusher or overburden dump. It is particularly applicable to operations where blending is required. In such cases, the flexibility and adaptability of trucks to frequently changing faces is essential, while the semi-mobile crusher reduces haul distances to a minimum.

Rixen, W. (Krupp Industrie-Und Stahlbau, Duisberg, Germany); Benecke, K.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

Schrijver, Karel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices Toru Kashima, Member of the result [4]. The same can be said for time varying real-time prices. Real-time energy pricing is not yet such as chillers. Energy resources such as electricity or natural gas are bought from suppliers at certain prices

202

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter Christoph Weber, Chair of Energy Management, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany RĂĽdiger Barth & Heike Brand, Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy, University of Stuttgart, Germany Abstract

203

FRONTAGE ROADS: AN ASSESSMENT OF LEGAL ISSUES, DESIGN DECISIONS, COSTS, OPERATIONS, AND LAND-DEVELOPMENT DIFFERENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRONTAGE ROADS: AN ASSESSMENT OF LEGAL ISSUES, DESIGN DECISIONS, COSTS, OPERATIONS, AND LAND with lower household incomes, lower population densities, lower percentages of bike trips to work, lower in constructing a solid, formal policy for all states and regions to follow in providing access along new

Kockelman, Kara M.

204

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplier, Schools, State Government Savings Category: Lighting Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)...

205

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Government, Tribal Government Savings Category: Photovoltaics Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)...

206

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

207

Possible Savings Through Changes in Local Government.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KO. 540, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION salaries" to various county officers, and these amounts supplement the income from fees. Thus, the actual salary received by a particular county officer is computed by totaling his fee income from all... that consolidation would save $2.91 per capita in the counties having fewer than 5,000 people. This amount is equal to 21 per cent oi the total cost of county govern- ment, 25 per cent of tlie operating costs, and 63 per cent of tlie casts affected...

Bradshaw, H. C.; Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raising Awareness Awareness of energy efficiency createdExternal Recognition Awareness of energy efficiency created1996). Energy Saved by Raising Employees’ Awareness. Case

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost and the marginal fuel savings (assuming a base case of ten cents per kWhper kWh, which would bring it in line with the break-even costcost per mile: electricity vs. gasoline PRICE OF ELECTRICITY ($/kWh)

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Three Paths to Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Electric's program of energy management and conservation continues to provide significant savings in energy costs in a climate of increasing energy prices and reduced visibility and promotion nationally. In 1984, General Electric energy use...

Weiss, V. N.

217

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inclusion of the social cost of carbon impact the evaluationinclusion of the social cost of carbon impact the evaluation

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Cost Reduction Measures Identified for Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation opportunities and capital intensive energy cost reduction measures. Though more square feet was audited in 1984, more utility cost savings per square foot were identified in 1986. Changes in the screening process, the audit report format... square foot for the audited facilities by building type. Maintenance and operation savings are included in this table. A sufficient number of academic buildings, medical research facilities, libraries, hospitals, and office buildings were audited...

Grigg, T. J.; Verdict, M. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Small Businesses Save Big: A Guide to Help SBA Lenders Understand and Communicate the Value of Energy Efficiency Investments (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides guidelines for SBA lenders to understand the value of financing energy efficiency investments.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saves $200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. Copper2000). Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies.Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC,

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998b). Distributed Small-scale CHP on a Large ManufacturingCADDET). (1998). Free CHP Saves Energy for VehicleCombined heat and power (CHP) CHP combined with absorption

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Regional Super ESPC Saves Energy and Dollars at NASA Johnson Space Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NASA will save approximately $43 million in facility operations costs over the next 23 years at the Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, thanks to the largest delivery order signed to date under a Regional Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC). The U. S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) instituted these special Regional Super ESPCs to streamline the financing process for Federal agencies.

224

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

225

Office of Employee Development Operational Efficiency Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office of Employee Development Operational Efficiency Project Survey Summary from Supervisory Staff the University titled "Operational Efficiency Project." Its mandate was to gather information, evaluate current operations, review benchmarks and best practices, and develop organizational and/or cost saving alternatives

Huang, Jianyu

226

Saving Fuel Energy in the Kitchen.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulletin] Saving Fuel Energy in the Kitchen Marilyn A. Haggard* Rising fuel costs encourage consumers to take steps to reduce energy use, especially in the home. In home food preparation accounts for 16 percent of the energy used in the food system.... Food preparation, storage and cleanup provide opportunities to save fuel energy. Energy saving measures must be practiced daily to have a positive effect on utility costs. Small Appliances Use the smallest appliances possible for preparing small...

Haggard, Marilyn A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of energy and monetary savings. Many of these savings can come from simple maintenance or by changing the way the tower is operated. The more dramatic savings can come from changing to advanced fill concepts. Over our 40 years of working...

Phelps Jr., P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years gives an annual capital cost estimate of $321 million,further adjust the capital cost estimates for these systemscosts. In order to estimate capital costs for five systems

Guerra, Erick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg)...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

231

Benefits of ceramic fiber for saving energy in reheat furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractory ceramic fiber products offer thermal insulation investment in reheat furnaces by helping to keep operating cost low and product quality high. These products are used in a range of applications that include: furnace linings; charge and discharge door insulation; skidpipe insulation; and furnace repair and maintenance. The many product forms (blankets, modules, boards, textiles, and coatings) provide several key benefits: faster cycling, energy savings and personnel protection.

Norris, A. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Power Saving Design for Servers under Response Time Constraint Shengquan Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the server utilization is high. Instead we use PowerIdle power-saving scheme, which uses only DVS utility bill. For example, for a high-performance server with 330 Watt power consumption, the annual that the electricity cost remains significant even if the server does not always operate with the maximum power

Wang, Shengquan

234

Savannah River Site Saves $10 Million with Innovative Commercial Procurement Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – The management and operations contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) created more than $10 million in cost savings in fiscal year 2013 by adopting successful purchasing practices used by America’s top companies.

235

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications Potential for the Use of...

236

Resolve to Save Energy This Year | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

STAR bulbs, you could save 75 a year in energy costs. Compared to traditional incandescent bulbs, compact fluorescent bulbs can yield as much as 75 percent energy savings and...

237

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Momentum Savings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecular StructureMomentum Savings

239

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems for which heat pump water heaters are found to beachieved by 2030. Heat-pump water heaters, which represent aU.S. and the EU. Heat-pump water heaters have a high cost

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs Annualized Investment Cost, 1000$/yr Total AnnualizedH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/yr) OperatingH2 Fueling Stations Investment Cost Cost ($/kg) Operating

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimated Annual Amount For Amount Source STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 2012-2013 Fixed Capital Outlay ProjectsProject Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description that will respond to the latest trends in small-group learning, technology resources, and collaboration spaces

Slatton, Clint

243

Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

1994-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification...

245

State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and...

246

Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... Depreciation Costs and Classification ! of Feedlot Labor ................................................... 31 . Appendix C: Derivation of Cost Curves .................... )I I Highlights Southern Plains (Texas and Oklahoma) feedlot One of the major...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chapter 5 Airline Operating Costs and Measures of Productivity Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel) Materials Purchased (fuel & oil, parts, passenger food, other materials) Services Purchased airframe and engine maintenance cost, plus "burden" or overhead (hangars and spare parts inventory

248

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Save MoneySave Money...... & save the planet.& save the planet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Save MoneySave Money...... & save the planet.& save the planet. Global WarmingGlobal Warming can to save over $2000 a year while reducing your emissions to the atmosphere that are warming the planet. Dr scenario: abrupt change IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change)IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel

Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

250

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eines Energiemanagementsystems bei BMW Motoren. Europeanits business operations. BMW adopted an energy management2.6 years (CADDET, 1995c). BMW applied powder coats at their

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EM's $500,000 Investment in Contaminant Remediation Leads to Hanford Site Strategy Providing $6.35 Million in Cost Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through a collaborative approach between the EM Headquarters’ Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, the Richland Operations Office and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), investments are being leveraged and integrated in applied research and site operations to provide scientifically defensible end states for environmental remediation of volatile organic contaminants in the vadose zone.

252

Save Energy Now  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program brochure informs industrial audiences about Save Energy Now, part of ''Easy Ways to Save Energy'', a national campaign to save energy and ensure energy security.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Save Energy Now  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program brochure informs industry about Phase 2 of Save Energy Now, part of "Easy Ways to Save Energy," a national campaign to save energy and ensure energy security.

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing Success Stories...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens Saves Consumers Energy and Updates the Social Cost of Carbon Read more homes success stories Manufacturing February 4, 2015 Just Plain...

255

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A new solar panel array at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

256

Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing Success Stories...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

solutions for our nation's buildings and manufacturing supply lines mean large-scale energy and cost savings. Learn how EERE's investments in energy solutions for homes,...

257

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

258

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elec Del Cali: Del Investment Cost Delivery Cost OperatingCost Feedstock Cost Investment Cost Delivery Cost Operatingcosts Annualized investment cost, 1000$/yr Total annualized

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Proper Design Saves Energy for Molecular Sieve Dehydration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The molecular sieve system is a significant energy user in the cryogenic gas plant. Designing and operating the system properly can save thousands of dollars in fuel each year. A poorly designed energy saving system can result in poor plant...

Barrow, J. A.; Veldman, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Conservation Cost-Effectiveness Determination Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the levelized cost of the aggregate supply curves, the portfolio model does not evaluate each measure's specific of programming constraints, the levelized costs of conservation used in the portfolio model are not adjusted of its costs. May 2005 E-1 #12;include energy and capacity cost savings, local distribution cost savings

262

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A computer solution for estimating owning and operating costs for over-the-road hauling units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT S iv LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES vii ix CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION II OVER-THE-ROAD HAULING UNITS Characteristics Preliminary Purchase Investigation Vehicle Specifications Fuel Type Weight Restrictions... SIMULATION RUN III OUTPUT, SECOND SIMULATION RUN 88 101 113 VITA 125 yii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE Major On-Highway Truck Manufacturers Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) Components 10 12 3. (a) Fuel Costs Per Gallon 3. (b) Fuel Consumed Per Brake HP...

Wenners, Edward Bernard

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Estimated groundwater restoration costs associated with commercial underground coal gasification operations. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete a preliminary cost estimate for groundwater restoration for the Hoe Creek commercial underground coal gasification (UCG) facility under a set of ground rules based on field data measurements and specific compound removal requirements. Of the three approaches evaluated for disposal of the contaminated groundwater, deep well injection is the least expensive, followed by the alternate treatment approach.

Fischer, D.D.

1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

265

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program November 2008 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs and campus square footage. For the fourth quarter of FY08 the campus consumed 42.36 kbtu/sq ft Program for four energy projects. 1) AHU VFD Project ­ Estimated cost of $600,000 with a payback of 2Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program November 2008 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings

Gelfond, Michael

266

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For the first Program for four energy projects. 1) AHU VFD Project ­ Final cost of $558,904 with a payback of 5.2 yearsTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update

Zhuang, Yu

267

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2011 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. Through the Third energy demand upon the university buildings. Cogeneration steam, provided at no cost to the universityTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update

Zhuang, Yu

268

SPECIAL REPORT Incurred Cost Audit Coverage of Non- Management and Operating Contractors  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1 ThisApril 2, 2015Incurred Cost

269

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design and modelling of an airship station holding controller for low cost satellite operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been directed in the use of autonomous airships as less expensive alternatives to satellites. A key Expressed in wind axes I. Introduction The airship is one of the oldest vehicles for aerial operations loads over long periods of time with very low fuel consumption has renewed the interest

Johnson, Eric N.

271

Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This paper presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, operated jointly appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved

272

Saving Energy Saves You Money | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Saving Energy Saves You Money Saving Energy Saves You Money July 19, 2011 - 3:06pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs...

273

Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings: Washington, D.C. (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Estimating Marginal Cost of Quality Improvements: The Case of the UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of operational and capital expenditures (Totex) as the dependent variable. Improving quality of services involves operating cost (Opex) and capital cost (Capex) for the utilities. Due to the presence of possible trade-offs between Opex and Capex (Giannakis et... saving Opex than by an equal amount of Capex reduction (Ofgem, 2003a). Hence, in order to examine existence of different strategies in the UK utilities to improve quality, and to ascertain whether the current regulation has distorted the allocation...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Orea, Luis; Pollitt, Michael G.

275

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of EnergyLANDSCAPEDepartment ofDepartment of

276

Financing Energy Cost Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal Registry Comments MayDepartmentFinancial

277

cost savings | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration goSecuritycdns | Nationalcontracting

278

ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Treasure Hunts: Simple Steps to Finding Energy Savings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Treasure Hunt is a dynamic, effective process for identifying savings opportunities, and is a best practice adopted by many ENERGY STAR partners to identify no- and low-cost savings...

279

Energy-Saving Opportunities for Manufacturing Enterprises (International English Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about the Industrial Technologies Program Save Energy Now energy audit process, software tools, training, energy management standards, and energy efficient technologies to help U.S. companies identify energy cost savings.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Industrial heat pumps: types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps are not being pursued because of confusion regarding both energy savings and economics. Part of this confusion stems from the variety of heat pumps available and the fact that the measure of merit, the coefficient of performance (COP), is commonly defined in at least three different ways. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, a simple categorization was developed based on the commonly accepted COP definitions. Using this categorization, the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps was examined. Examples were evaluated in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs. Heat pumps from the various categories were then compared on the basis of economics.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps are not being pursued because of confusion regarding both energy savings and economics. Part of this confusion stems from the variety of heat pumps available and the fact that the measure of merit, the coefficient of performance (COP) is commonly defined in at least three different ways. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, a simple categorization was developed based on the commonly accepted COP definitions. Using this categorization, the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps was examined. Examples were evaluated in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs. Heat pumps from the various categories were then compared on the basis of economics. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Estimating Energy Savings in Compressed Air Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are frequently overestimated because the methods used to estimate savings neglect to consider important factors such as compressor control and type, storage, and multiple compressor operation. In this paper, a methodology is presented for modeling air... compressor performance and calculating projected energy savings from easily obtainable performance data such as full-load power, no-load power, rated capacity, average fraction full-load power or average fraction rated capacity. The methodology...

Schmidt, C.; Kissock, J. K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2010 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footageTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2010 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings by State Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use (E&G) Energy units are converted to thousands

Zhuang, Yu

285

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program May 2008 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs and campus square footage. Through the second quarter of FY08 the campus consumed 97.48 kbtu/sq ftTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program May 2008 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Agencies. Energy numbers come from the Energy Report filed with SECO semi-annually. Energy consumption

Gelfond, Michael

286

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footageTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2009 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings by State Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use (E&G) Energy units are converted to thousands

Gelfond, Michael

287

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program April 2011 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. Through the SecondTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program April 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. University Energy Use Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs per

Gelfond, Michael

288

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program April 2010 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For first twoTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program April 2010 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use (E&G) Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs per

Zhuang, Yu

289

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For the firstTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use (E&G) Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs per

Gelfond, Michael

290

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program February 2008 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campusTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program February 2008 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings by State Agencies. Energy numbers come from the Energy Report filed with SECO semi-annually. Texas Tech

Gelfond, Michael

291

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2011 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For the firstTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings by State Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. University Energy Use Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs

Gelfond, Michael

292

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2011 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. Through fiscalTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings by State Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. University Energy Use Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs

Zhuang, Yu

293

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2010 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For first threeTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2010 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Agencies. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use (E&G) Energy units are converted to thousands of BTUs per

Zhuang, Yu

294

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program August 2008 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus.7% $(217,100) Total 144.13 142.25 Down 1.3% $163,200 Page 1 of 5 July 2008 Energy Report #12;Since RP 49Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program August 2008 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings

Gelfond, Michael

295

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2010 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage Total 15.1357 14.7573 15.5852 3.0% Page 2 of 6 October 2010 Energy Report #12;3. Fleet Fuel ManagementTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2010 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings

Zhuang, Yu

296

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2012 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs,727 Cogeneration Steam 20.06 20.83 Up 3.8% NA Total 165.84 161.01 Down 2.9% $ 194,851 Texas Tech University EnergyTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2012 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings

Zhuang, Yu

297

Expanding the role of the cost engineer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been many questions about the costs of providing medical services. These questions have resulted in the development of Resource-Based Relative Values Scale (RBRVS) at the national level. Policymakers view RBRVS as a potential tool to pay physicians. The questions, about the cost of operations of HSE-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revolve around doing routine occupation health physicals for the Laboratory. Generally, these questions are concerned about why the costs appear to be high relative to what private physician suggests the costs should be. There is also an interest in trying to find methods to reduce these costs if possible. Many of the tools developed to help in construction estimating can be applied to estimating medical costs. With the need to perform many thousands of physicals each year the saving of even a few dollars for each exam can quickly add up to a large saving. There are a number of different types of physicals and different levels; based on age, sex, type of work, and years since last physical. The LANL Health Services are housed in a 12,600 square foot building close to the population center of the Laboratory Health Services, produced by a staff of seven physicians and approximately 25 support personnel, include acute medical care, routine surveillance exams, and preventive medicine programs. This paper will consider the routine surveillance exams, which constitute the major activity of the medical staff, in terms of time and dollars expended.

Stutz, R.A.; Shaw, R.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

On the Energy Cost of Robustness and Resiliency in IP Networks , A. Caponea,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches in saving energy. We propose novel optimization models to minimize the energy consumption of IP protocols (like MPLS) allow us to quantitatively analyze the trade-off between energy cost and level Both network operators and device manufacturers agree that the energy consumption of communications

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2012 Update Page 1 of 4 Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage.06 20.83 Up 3.8% NA Total 165.84 161.01 Down 2.9% $ 194,851 #12;Texas Tech University Energy SavingsTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program ­ October 2012 Update Page 1 of 4 Texas Tech

Gelfond, Michael

300

Fan Energy Savings Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Axial fans are used for thousands of industrial applications consuming millions of kilowatts daily. The decision that saves dollars is to either automatically change fan speed or change blade pitch to save up to 50 percent of consumed power over a...

Monroe, R. C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Removable fibrous glass insulation fitted to complex equipment shapes results in $178,000/yr savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1980, PPG Industries embarked on a general plant energy conservation effort at its Lake Charles, LA plant where chlor-alkalis, various chlorinated hydrocarbons, and vinyl chloride monomer are manufactured. Company engineers sought a means of insulating process steam components that, because of their complex shapes, were not (and normally are not) insulated. These components included flanges on heat exchanger heads and reboilers, steam valves in process areas, manways and other equipment. PPG plant engineers specified removable, reusable blanket insulation. The blankets are constructed of a fibrous glass mat form insulation encased in a silicone-impregnated glass cloth or similar weather barrier. Each insulation blanket was custom-made for its particular equipment shape and service application to ensure a close fit and optimal energy efficiency. Insulation thickness, type of weather barrier, and mesh were specified according to intended use. For protection from abrasion or puncture, some of the blankets also were covered with stainless steel, Monel, or Inconel wire mesh. Overall, the blankets provide high strength, durability, low thermal conductivity ratings, and an operating range of up to 1200/sup 0/F. Reduced maintenance costs and improved worker productivity have been evidenced since installing the blanket insulation. Further, PPG has increased energy efficiency. Project savings were tracked for 30 months (insulation and installation costs vs. fuel and maintenance savings) and revealed annual plant savings of $178,000-$130,000 in energy savings and $48,000 in maintenance savings. With the cost of the insulation blankets being about $125,000, PPG recovered its investment in under a year.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Success Story: Ingersoll Rand Discovers Hidden Savings with a...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rand's three-tier energy audit system with a focus on improving compressed air and HVAC systems saved the company more than 4 million in energy costs between 2005 and 2010....

303

Lighting the Way to Serious Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lighting, you can take a big bite out of that cost. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home could save you about 50 per year. Plus, most of the...

304

Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

achieved annual energy savings of approximately 45,000 MMBtu and improved the furnace's energy intensity by 11.1% between 2006 and 2007. With project costs of approximately...

305

Nationwide: EERE Program Leads to U.S. Manufacturers Saving ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

close to 8% of the total U.S. manufacturing energy footprint. These partners are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and improve their...

306

Energy Saving Through High Frequency Electric Resistance Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared to most other methods. This has led to lower manufacturing costs through higher productivity. In addition to the higher productivity, however, the High-Frequency processes typically provide considerable savings of energy. In these days...

Udall, H. N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Operating plan FY 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

Moore, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Comparison of management, overhead, and direct costs of six projects managed by the Department of Energy and Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report covers management, overhead, and direct cost data on six DOE projects - three managed directly by DOE, and three managed for DOE by government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) laboratories. These data provide comparison for decisions on contracting out for project management services. (GHT)

Not Available

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

312

Energy Savings Achievable in Connection Preserving Energy Saving Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power, energy savings I. INTRODUCTION Wireless sensor networks have been widely used for mon- itoringEnergy Savings Achievable in Connection Preserving Energy Saving Algorithms Seh Chun Ng School ICT Australia Limited Canberra, Australia Email: brian.anderson@nicta.com.au Abstract--Energy saving

Mao, Guoqiang

313

Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) is a partnership between a system owner and an Energy Services Company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the facility under...

314

Save with Hybrid Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAVE WITH HYBRID REFRIGERATION Cheng-Wen (Wayne) Chung, P.E. Fluor Engineers, Inc. Irvine, California ABSTRACT Two level demand makes it possible to use two systems for refrigeration and save energy and money. An example of this type... of refrigeration, consisting of an ammonia absorption refrigeration (AAR) unit and a mechanical compression refrigera tion (MCR) unit, is presented in this article. This paper will briefly describe process configur ation, advantages and utility consumption...

Chung, C. W.

315

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

TRU Waste Management Program cost/schedule optimization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost/schedule optimization task is a necessary function to insure that program goals and plans are optimized from a cost and schedule aspect. Results of this study will offer DOE information with which it can establish, within institutional constraints, the most efficient program for the long-term management and disposal of contact handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). To this end, a comprehensive review of program cost/schedule tradeoffs has been made, to identify any major cost saving opportunities that may be realized by modification of current program plans. It was decided that all promising scenarios would be explored, and institutional limitations to implementation would be described. Since a virtually limitless number of possible scenarios can be envisioned, it was necessary to distill these possibilities into a manageable number of alternatives. The resultant scenarios were described in the cost/schedule strategy and work plan document. Each scenario was compared with the base case: waste processing at the originating site; transport of CH-TRU wastes in TRUPACT; shipment of drums in 6-Packs; 25 year stored waste workoff; WIPP operational 10/88, with all sites shipping to WIPP beginning 10/88; and no processing at WIPP. Major savings were identified in two alternate scenarios: centralize waste processing at INEL and eliminate rail shipment of TRUPACT. No attempt was made to calculate savings due to combination of scenarios. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Detamore, J.A. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office); Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States))

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel savings, etc. ) but are including avoided cost ofenergy, avoided cost generationcapacity, avoided cost of T&D capacity, and the Demand

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Shared Signals: Using Existing Facility Meters for Energy Savings Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conservation projects. (2) These guidelines provide monitoring and verification options that have different levels of accuracy and cost. They are specifically designed for energy savings performance contracts and are designed to provide... with a fair degree of accuracy. The costs of using existing meters are often not as clear. Obviously, if an existing meter is used, the costs of purchasing new metering equipment is avoided. However, using an existing meter is not free of costs...

McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Price, S. D.; Carlson, K.; Lopez, J.

319

Blower upkeep, energy savings estimated at $20,000/yr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vinyl chloride gas must be removed from operating vessels in a polymerization process at Occidental Chemical, Addis, LA. If left intact, the gases can polymerize and form deposits. Considered for this function were reciprocating and liquid ring type compressors. They were rejected, however, because of anticipated high valve maintenance and energy consumption. Since high reliability and leak-free performance are essential, two double-mechanical-sealed, positive displacement blowers were installed with water injection in 1980. The blowers are designed for those special applications where gas leak tightness is required or where continuous, high-pressure or vacuum, single-stage or two-stage is needed. The lobe-type blowers were selected by Occidental because they were considered to be best suited for the low-pressure differential operation. All internal surfaces are specially cleaned to reduce contamination and may be operated with non-hydrocarbon lubricants. A back-up seal on the drive shaft provides protection against leakage of process gas to the atmosphere. Maintenance and energy savings are estimated at $20,000/yr. The blowers were used with the water injection technique because previous experience vinyl chloride monomer indicated that there were major deposits inside the compressors and ring units. The blowers have provided contaminant-free (oil-free) monomer, and the water injection has prevented the polymerization material from sticking to the surfaces of the blowers. This has ensured practically trouble-free operation, and has greatly reduced maintenance and operation downtime, significantly reducing cost.

Diehl, R.; Powers, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost of ownership and environmental savings analyses: solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cellscost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cellsanalysis results favor wind over solar and fuel cells in terms of both ownership cost and

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Squillace, P. J. (2005). MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbonsP. J. (2004). The risk of MTBE relative to other VOCs inEPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs, Press release

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Steam driven centrifugal pump for low cost boiler feed service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a steam driven centrifugal pump for boiler feed-water and other high pressure water applications, which was awarded Top Honors in the special pumps category of the 1982 Chemical processing Vaaler competition, because the simple design with turbine, pump and controls combined in an integral unit provides high operating efficiency and reliable performance with minimal maintenance. Single source responsibility for all components when the pump may have to be serviced is another advantage. These features meet the requirements for boiler feed pumps that are critical to maintaining a consistent steam supply in a process plant where downtime can be extremely expensive. The annual cost to operate the pump for 8000 hours is about $100,000, if electricity costs 5 cents/kwh. These pumps can be run for about $30,000 on steam, if natural gas costs $4.00/mcf. Cost savings are $70,000 annually.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak Load Shifting & Spinning Reserves: Cost Benefit Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we present the results of an analytical cost-benefit study of residential smart appliances in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the EPA and DOE to provide a 5% credit to meet ENERGY STAR eligibility criteria for products that meet the definition of a smart appliance. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the challenges associated with increased electricity demand, and increased penetration of renewable sources of power. Our analytical model utilizes current annual appliance electricity consumption data, and estimates what the wholesale grid operating cost savings would be if some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads serve power system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. Historical wholesale market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States are used to estimate savings. The savings are then compared with the five percent credit, to determine if the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as the credit (cost) if not higher.

Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Power Saving Design for Servers under Response Time Constraint Shengquan Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilization is high, where instead we use PowerIdle power-saving scheme with DVS only. By modeling the system the cost of the power delivery subsystems and the cooling facility, the electricity cost is significantPower Saving Design for Servers under Response Time Constraint Shengquan Wang Department

Wang, Shengquan

325

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option. Solar photovoltaic needs to cut the cost by 50% orcost of ownership and environmental savings analyses: solar photovoltaic,

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of Persistence of Savings from SMUD Retrocommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial building retrocommissioning activity has increased in recent years. Retrocommissioning is a process of identifying and implementing system improvements in existing buildings, with an emphasis on using low cost operation & maintenance tuneups and diagnostic testing instead of capital intensive retrofits. This report discusses a recent study of retrocommissioning persistence, conducted by LBNL for the Sacramento Municipal utility District (SMUD). The objective of this study was to examine a selection of the 17 buildings (prior to 2003) that participated in SMUD's program and estimate the persistence of energy savings and measure implementation. The SMUD retrocommissioning program's two primary goals are to reduce overall building energy consumption and guide the customer toward more far reaching improvements and energy efficiency awareness. The complete report contains the following documents: Executive Summary & Final Report; Appendix A: Data Analysis Methodology Details; Appendix B: Site-by-Site Energy Analysis Results; Appendix C: Interview Notes--Raw Data; and Appendix D: Data Analysis Spreadsheet. The Report is organized in five sections. The Introduction describes retrocommissioning background, persistence of savings issues and previous related work. The Methodology section provides an overview of the data analysis procedures. The Results and Discussion sections highlight and interpret key findings. The Summary section provides conclusions and recommendations.

Bourassa, Norman J.; Piette, Mary A.; Motegi, Naoya

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biopulping: A new energy-saving technology for papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biopulping is defined as the treatment of wood chips with lignin-degrading fungi prior to pulping. Fungal pretreatment prior to mechanical pulping reduces electrical energy requirements during refining or increases mill throughput, improves paper strength, reduces the pitch content, reduces cooking time for sulfite pulping, and reduces the environmental impact of pulping. The recent work involved scaling up the biopulping process towards the industrial level, investigating both the engineering and economic feasibility of the technology. The authors envision the process to be done in either a chip-pile or silo-based system for which several factors need to be considered. These factors include the degree of decontamination, a hospitable environment for the fungus, and the overall process economics. Currently, treatment of the chips with low pressure steam is sufficient for decontamination. Furthermore, a simple, forced ventilation system can be used to maintain the proper temperature, humidity, and moisture content throughout the chip bed, thus promoting uniform growth of the fungus. The pilot-scale trial resulted in the successful treatment of 4 tons, of wood chips (dry weight basis) with results comparable to those on a laboratory scale. For mechanical pulping, a 2-week treatment results in approximately 30% energy savings that, considering the additional equipment and operating costs, results in an overall savings of $9 to $20/ton of pulp in a chip-pile system. The other benefits that biopulping confers improve the economics considerably A larger, 40-ton trial was also successful, with energy savings and paper properties comparable with the laboratory scale.

Scott, G.M.; Akhtar, M.; Lentz, M.J.; Kirk, T.K.; Swaney, R.; Shipley, D.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Improved Boiler System Operation with Real-time Chemical Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,910. The return on investment for these changes is shown in Table 3. The savings amounts do not include labor savings associated with reduced operator testing loads, nor possible chemical savings from reduced chemical usage, due to higher cycles. CASE...

Bloom, D.; Jenkins, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Saving Energy and Saving Money in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Philadelphia is using a portion of its EECBG grant, to change out over 50,000 traffic bulbs with energy-efficient LED bulbs and save $1 million per year in energy savings.

Nutter, Michael; Oliver, LeAnn; Gajewski, Katherine; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy Saving in Ammonia Plant by Using Gas Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An ammonia plant, in which the IHI-SULZER Type 57 Gas Turbine is integrated in order to achieve energy saving, has started successful operation. Tile exhaust gas of the gas turbine has thermal energy of relatively high temperature, therefore...

Uji, S.; Ikeda, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy Savings Potential of Process Control Valve Replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

candidates for savings. A feasibility study of retrofitting a pipeline flow control system, currently operating with a constant speed pump and differential producing, modulating control valve, with a variable speed drive is presented. This case study...

Holzenthal, L. Jr.

333

Retrofit of the Local 150 of International Union of Operating...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

financing that leverages verifiable system cost savings to provide compelling return on investment to investors while reducing first cost barriers. - Result: 1,000,000 in...

334

save energy, environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was especially emphasized dur- ing the 1970s to combat the energy crisis caused by Arab oil embargoes. The recentsave energy, money, and the environment Windbreaks and shade trees #12;PrePared by Bryan R trees is based on their potential to save money from subsequent energy re- ductions. Winter heating

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

335

Energy Savings for Centrifugal Compressors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is driven by an electric motor, steam turbine or gas turbine, costs for operating these drivers is ever increasing and how much it may go up in the future is uncertain. With a greater worldwide focus on protecting the environment by reducing greenhouse gases...

Fisher, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy Savings Performance Contracting | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Savings Performance Contracting Energy Savings Performance Contracting Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) is a budget-neutral approach to make building improvements that...

337

Energy Savings Performance Contracting Webinars  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides a listing of past Energy Savings Performance Contracting webinars and associated files. Author: U. S Department of Energy

338

Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc

339

State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) Webinar.

340

Cool energy savings opportunities in commercial refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consumes over 13 quads of primary energy annually. Most of this consumption (two-thirds) meets the energy needs of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. The largest consuming group of the remaining one-third is commercial refrigeration at about one quad annually (990 trillion Btu), valued at over $7 billion per year to the commercial sector consumer. Potential energy savings are estimated to be about 266 trillion Btu, with consumer savings valued at about $2 billion. This study provides the first known estimates of these values using a bottom-up approach. The authors evaluated numerous self-contained and engineered commercial refrigeration systems in this study, such as: supermarket central systems, beverage merchandisers, ice machines, and vending machines. Typical physical characteristics of each equipment type were identified at the component level for energy consumption. This information was used to form a detailed database from which they arrived at the estimate of 990 trillion Btu energy consumption for the major equipment types used in commercial refrigeration. Based on the implementation of the most cost-effective technology improvements for the seven major equipment types, they estimated an annual potential energy savings of 266 trillion Btu. Much of the savings can be realized with the implementation of high-efficiency fan motors and compressors. In many cases, payback can be realized within three years.

Westphalen, D.; Brodrick, J.; Zogg, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

OOTW COST TOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Raytheon: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy and Improves Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, Raytheon Company upgraded the efficiency of the compressed air system at its Integrated Air Defense Center in Andover, Massachusetts, to save energy and reduce costs. Worn compressors and dryers were replaced, a more sophisticated control strategy was installed, and an aggressive leak detection and repair effort was carried out. The total cost of these improvements was $342,000; however, National Grid, a utility service provider, contributed a $174,000 incentive payment. Total annual energy and maintenance cost savings are estimated at $141,500, and energy savings are nearly 1.6 million kWh. This case study was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Learning about saving energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet for use in primary and junior high school classes describes what energy is, how people use energy, and how energy can be conserved. This last section lists ways to save energy in heating and cooling, electric appliances, automobiles, and in manufacturing. A list of activities are suggested and resources for further information, both groups and books, are listed. A glossary is also included.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs Provides...

346

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Application Filling Requirements for Transmission Line and Substation Construction Projects...

347

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky) The waste management...

348

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings California Enterprise Development Authority (Figtree PACE)- Statewide PACE Program (California)...

349

Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume II: Detailed Savings Calculations, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed calculations for each site are shown in this Volume. For each site the ECRM description, approved loan amount, expected savings, the pre and post-retrofit energy use (electricity and gas separately), cost of energy, energy savings (in kWh...

Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Steam generation in line-focus solar collectors: a comparative assessment of thermal performance, operating stability, and cost issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and system benefits of using direct steam (in situ) generation in line-focus collectors are assessed. The major emphasis of the analysis is a detailed thermal performance comparison of in situ systems (which utilize unfired boilers). The analysis model developed for this study is discussed in detail. An analysis of potential flow stability problems is also provided along with a cursory cost analysis and an assessment of freeze protection, safety, and control issues. Results indicated a significant thermal performance advantage over the more conventional oil and flash systems and the flow stability does not appear to be a significant problem. In particular, at steam temperatures of 220/sup 0/C (430/sup 0/F) under the chosen set of assumptions, annual delivered energy predictions indicate that the in situ system can deliver 15% more energy than an oil system and 12% more energy than a flash system, with all of the systems using the same collector field. Further, the in situ system may result in a 10% capital cost reduction. Other advantages include improvement in simpler control when compared with flash systems, and fluid handling and safety enhancement when compared with oil systems.

Murphy, L.M.; May, E.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeled and metered energy savings from exterior wall insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of single-family masonry (block) houses with slab foundations exist in the southern United States. In fact, approximately 50% of Florida`s six million residences are of concrete block construction. The block walls in these homes are usually uninsulated, and the technology for retrofitting wall insulation is not well developed. Two field tests were performed--one near Phoenix, Arizona and one in Cocoa, Florida--to measure the air-conditioning energy savings and demand reduction impact of applying an exterior insulation and finish system (EEFS) to the exterior of the block wall, and gain practical experience with retrofit application techniques and costs. One field test used a {open_quotes}site-fabricated{close_quotes} insulation system, while the other field test used a commercially available system. The field tests measured a savings of 9% in Arizona and less savings in Florida, and emphasized the impact indoor temperature settings have on cooling energy savings: exterior wall insulation on block homes will produce energy savings in Florida houses only if a low cooling thermostat setting is desirable. The field tests also highlighted an improved comfort benefit from the retrofit - namely, elimination of overheating in rooms with south and west exposures. The DOE-2. ID program was used to analyze the energy savings (air-conditioning and heating) and electric demand impact of applying an EIFS. Air-conditioning energy savings were estimated to be in the range of 8% to 10% in many southern U.S. regions. A 12% savings was predicted for Phoenix, Arizona and a savings of 1% to 4% was predicted for seacoast regions, particularly in Florida. These predictions were in good agreement with the measured values. Peak hour cooling energy savings were predicted to be more uniform throughout the country, generally in the range of %8 to %12.

Ternes, M.; Parker, D.; McLain, H.; Barkaszi, S. Jr.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Savings in Steam Systems (A Case Study)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Savings in Steam Systems (A Case Study) Rich DeBat Steam Systems Engineer Armstrong Service, Inc. Three Rivers, MI ABSTRACT Armstrong Service Inc. (ASI) conducted an engineered evaluation at an Ammonium Nitrate Manufacturing facility during... existing burner system after refractory repair and continue with normal operation of the existing boiler. Annstrong Service cannot guarantee any aspect of this option. Option 2. Armstrong Service, Inc. proposes to evaluate, select and install a...

DeBat, R.

353

Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.

Trego, A.L.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Save Energy Now  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum Round-UpSTATEof Energy Save (More) Energy Now with

355

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

356

Does Extending Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from an Australian Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tellier, F. (2005): Daylight Saving Time and EnergyCEC, 2001: Effects of Daylight Saving Time on California2004): The effects of daylight and daylight saving time on

KELLOGG, RYAN M; Wolff, Hendrik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Energy Impact of Daylight Saving Time Implementation insleep at the market: The daylight saving anomaly. Americansleep at the market: The daylight saving anomaly: Reply.

Kotchen, Matthew J; Grant, Laura E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Earth Day Save the Date  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Save the Date April 22, 2014 Forrestal & Germantown Working together to reduce our environmental footprint... * USPS, USDA, EPA, and GSA will join DOE this year * DOE Program...

359

Utility Energy Savings Contract Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Utility Energy Savings Contract Project and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

360

Kentucky Save Energy Now Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet contains details regarding a Save Energy Now industrial energy efficiency project that the U.S. Department of Energy funded in Kentucky.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Support for Florida Saves Provided Establish the habit of saving moneyEstablish the habit of saving money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Support for Florida Saves Provided by #12; Establish the habit of saving moneyEstablish the habit of saving money Give yourself a raise every 3 monthsGive yourself a raise every 3 months Increase how much the money directly deposited into yourthe money directly deposited into your savings account.savings account

Jawitz, James W.

362

The Effect of the 802.11 Power Save Mechanism (PSM) on Energy Efficiency and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the increased energy usage of ICT, for reasons of cost and environmental protection. The Power Save Mode (PSM application-specific effective energy- usage. We have found that in our scenarios, no significant benefit canThe Effect of the 802.11 Power Save Mechanism (PSM) on Energy Efficiency and Performance During

Bhatti, Saleem N.

363

Page 1 of 5 July 2011 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campusPage 1 of 5 July 2011 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update is being submitted in accordance with Governor's Executive Order RP 49

Gelfond, Michael

364

Page 1 of 6 January 2010 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costsPage 1 of 6 January 2010 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2010 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update is being submitted in accordance with Governor's Executive

Gelfond, Michael

365

Page 1 of 5 October 2011 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy consumption for the same time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costsPage 1 of 5 October 2011 Energy Report Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2011 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update is being submitted in accordance with Governor's Executive

Gelfond, Michael

366

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost of documenting the NISC project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project team selected a computer-based approach for the NISC project record management system. The team is convinced that this approach did cut direct costs . The major advantage, that the team believes did help the project, comes in the area of having just one central point for all design and construction information related to the project . The other benefit to the project will come over the thirty-year design life of the project through reduced costs to design changes to the facility . The team estimates that a reasonable saving for the project (including future modifications) will be about $2,OOOK or about 3% of the project construction costs . The cost increase of scanning non-electric documents will decrease for other projects in the future as more project related information is computer generated . Many the subcontractors on the NISC project had not completely converted to computer based systems for there own internal operation during the life of the NISC project. However, as more project related documents are generated in electronic form this type of cost will reduce .

Stutz, R. A. (Roger Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difference across the column. VRC uses hot compressed overhead vapors, instead of steam, to heat the reboiler. Cost savings are highest when the pressure ratio for the compressor is low. The pressure ratio depends on the boiling point difference of top...

Hill, J.H.

369

Case Study Impact Evaluations of the Industrial Energy Savings Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures installed and the processes affected are described in this paper. The report presents energy (kWh) and peak demand (kW) savings indexed to changes in production volume, an assessment of non-energy benefits to the participating customer, and cost...

Lilly, P.; Pearson, D.

370

September 20 Save Money on Home Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 20 Save Money on Home Energy Efficiency Evaluate home energy use and learn practical cost the most for your money when shopping on-line. http://bit.ly/digimar August 9 The 4 Don'ts of Talking About Money Learn how to better communicate when discussing finances to help maintain a happy relationship

Watson, Craig A.

371

Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the “Energy Crisis” Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retro-fit installations show direct energy savings...

Abernethy, D.

372

Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings...

Abernethy, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Updating Texas Energy Cost Containment Audit Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1984 and 1986, 35.3 million square feet of state owned buildings were audited to identify cost saving retrofit projects. Originally intended for direct legislative funding or bond sales, funding became available in 1989 through oil overcharge...

Burke, T. E.; Heffington, W. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 Introduction This report documents the analysis conducted for a project anticipated to be proposed to the Border Environmental Cooperative Commission...). Installation Periods: It is anticipated that it will take one year after purchase and project initiation for each of the three new pipeline segments to be installed and fully implemented (Table 4). No loss of operations or otherwise adverse impacts...

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

375

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Retrofit Savings for Brazos County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents the energy and dollar savings for the period May 2000 - April 2001 for 10 of the Brazos County facilities that have been retrofit. The electricity use saved was 555,170 kWh and the demand was 1062 kW, which is equivalent to a...

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Shao, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2013 Update Page 1 of 4 Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time period from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. During Gallons Consumed Percent Change 1st Quarter 68,022 64,621 60,885 Down 10.5% 2nd Quarter 51,763 49,175 50Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program ­ October 2013 Update Page 1 of 4 Texas Tech

Gelfond, Michael

378

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of New Commercial Energy Codes for the Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report on an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficiently commercial building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Halverson, Mark A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Richman, Eric E.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Savings in Buildings Using Air Movement and Allowing Floating Temperature in Rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on and off at the proper times, the intelligent controller calculated temperature limits using a mathematical procedure that determined the percentage of people who would be comfortable in rooms of the building. Simulations showed the annual cost savings...

Spain, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel...

Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

With a total implementation cost of 16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years. Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump...

382

The RNLI and the University of Southampton working in partnership to enhance the operating efficiency of lifeboats through innovative engineering modelling techniques,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs of a product over a lifetime, and were pivotal in recommending areas for potential savings, and advanced data manipulation and management science. CaseStudy|KnowledgeTransferPartnership #12;The Company - Increase your competitive advantage and profitability - Improve your performance/business operations

Anderson, Jim

383

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Waste minimization and pollution prevention initiatives within Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) boiler house operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of ANL-E Plant Facility and Services-Utilities and Systems (PFS-US) is to operate and maintain utility services in a cost-effective manner, while utilizing new and innovative methods whenever possible. PFS-US operates an on-site coal burning boiler plant that generates steam for use throughout the Laboratory as a source to heat buildings, as well as for use in research experiments. In the recent past, PFS-US has embarked upon a series of initiatives to improve operating efficiency of boiler house operations. The results of these projects have had the following impacts on boiler house performance and operations: (1) boiler house efficiency and operations have improved, (2) boiler house operating costs have been reduced, (3) specific operating and maintenance costs have been avoided or eliminated, and (4) the amount of waste and pollution generated has been reduced. Through the implementation of these initiatives, over $250,000 of revenue and cost savings have been incurred by ANL-E. In addition, the Laboratory and DOE will benefit annually from revenues, cost savings, and the reduction of environmental liability resulting from these initiatives.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy Savings from Commissioning the New Sofitel Hotel in New York City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Savings from Commissioning the New Sofitel Hotel in New York City Michael C. English, PE, CCP, LEED, Senior Partner Horizon Engineering Associates, LLP New York, NY Rising thirty stories above the heart of midtown Manhattan... cost savings related to energy and maintenance deficiencies. Most importantly, our client’s return on investment was just under two years to recoup the cost of commissioning the facility. Commissioning has ensured the energy-efficiency, reliability...

English, M. C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be divided into two broad areas: ownership or sunk costs and operating or avoidable costs. These costs (sunk) costs Operating (avoidable) costs Interest on bonds Return to stockholders Property taxes

McCalley, James D.

388

Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings AEP Ohio- Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) AEP Ohio offers incentives to commercial customers...

391

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Climate Action Plan (Massachusetts) In August 2008, Governor Deval Patrick signed into law the...

392

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Climate Action Plan (Vermont) There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of...

393

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Canadian River Compact (Texas) The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact...

394

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) No construction shall commence...

395

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) This section describes regulations and permit...

396

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Angel Investment Credit (New Mexico) A taxpayer who files a New Mexico income tax return and who is...

397

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Accelerate Oklahoma (Oklahoma) Three new funds that each offer equity and growth investment capital...

398

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings...

399

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rural Electric Cooperative Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) No construction...

400

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Municipal Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings DEMEC- Green Energy Fund '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under...

402

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut)...

403

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cells Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

404

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MunicipalPublic Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) The Department of Health is the designated agency to...

405

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season...

406

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Government Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

407

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Distributor Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) An application for a pollution control...

408

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industrial Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

409

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cooperative Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season...

410

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

411

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Govt Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Nitrogen Oxides (Nox) Ozone Season...

412

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Investor-Owned Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5- Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) These regulations aim...

413

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nonprofit Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

414

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MunicipalPublic Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 and 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program and Allowance...

415

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cooperative Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

416

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

417

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

StateProvincial Govt Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) This rule states standards for emission inventory...

418

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Investor-Owned Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air...

419

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

420

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Integrator Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) This rule states standards for emission inventory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 1- Visible Emissions (Rhode Island) The regulations state...

422

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings City of Bloomington- Sustainable Development Incentives The City of Bloomington offers fee waivers and other...

423

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) No construction shall commence on a fifth nuclear...

424

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) No construction shall commence on a fifth nuclear power facility until...

425

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings CPS Energy- Solar Hot Water Rebate Program As part of a larger program designed to reduce electricity demand...

426

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings California Solar Initiative- Solar Thermal Program '''''Note: This program was modified by AB 2249, signed in September...

427

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MunicipalPublic Utility Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Under this statute, the Director of...

428

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings CPS Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CPS Energy offers a variety of rebates for...

429

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Moratorium on Construction of Nuclear Power Facilities (Connecticut) No construction shall commence on...

430

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota...

431

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Accelerate Oklahoma (Oklahoma) Three new funds that each offer equity and growth investment capital...

432

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings APS- Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program In order to meet Arizona's 22% energy reduction by 2020...

433

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Alameda Municipal Power- Commercial New Construction Rebate Program Alameda Municipal Power (AMP)...

434

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Construction Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings CPS Energy- New Commercial Construction Incentives CPS Energy offers incentives for new commercial...

435

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings AEP Texas Central Company- SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program American Electric Power Texas Central Company...

436

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

also projects... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial Savings Category: Lighting, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program The Alabama Department of...

437

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Savings Category: Fuel Cells, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program The Alabama Department of...

438

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S....

439

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Air-Quality Improvement Tax Incentives The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) provides...

440

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Established by The Energy Policy Act of 2005, the federal tax...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

442

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings AEP Ohio- Renewable Energy Credit (REC) Purchase Program '''''Note: This program is currently closed....

443

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Austin Energy- Residential Solar PV Rebate Program Austin Energy's Solar Rebate Program offers a...

444

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program The Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program (AERLP)...

445

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Accelerate Oklahoma (Oklahoma) Three new funds that each offer equity and growth investment capital...

446

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Advanced Energy Fund Ohio's Advanced Energy Fund was originally authorized by the state's 1999...

447

Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

about 1.50 to light the same space with a compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) or light emitting diode (LED). That's 4.50 in savings each year per bulb. Over their lifetime,...

448

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy Savings by Veneering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were 10%. Face Brick Manufacturer - The burning zone of a tunnel kiln was veneered with the wallpaper method using 1" of 8/1 density Ceramic Fiber blanket. The customer experienced 5% fuel cost reduction versus a calculated 4%. Due to better... Shock 4. High Reflectivity From 1964, the use of Ceramic Fiber as a total furnace lining material has gained widespread Industry acceptance in heat treating, heating, re heating furnaces, and ceramic kilns. In the 1974-1976 period, it became...

Cook, T. H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

Christensen, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Michigan Saves- Business Energy Financing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan Saves is a non-profit that offers financing options for energy efficiency improvements throughout Michigan. The Business Energy Financing Program was started with seed funding from the...

454

Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

Robinson, A. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Foundation futures: Energy saving opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant energy savings will result from compliance to the foundation insulation recommendations in ASHRAE Standard 90.2P, /open quotes/Energy Efficient Design of New, Low-Rise Residential Buildings/close quotes/ (ASHRAE 1987). This paper summarizes an assessment of current US energy savings from foundation insulation and estimates future savings resulting from broad-scale adoption of ASHRAE 90.2P. The assessment is based on the premise that the detailed analysis behind ASHRAE 90.2P and its systematic method of determining insulation levels in a balanced manner will allow it to become the accepted base energy performance standard for all residential construction. The total energy currently being saved by foundation insulation (30% of 1.7 million new units) in one year's worth of new housing starts in the United States is estimated at 9.6 /times/ 10/sup 12/ Btu/yr (10.1 PJ/yr (petajoule = 10/sup 15/ joule)). The full compliance with ASHRAE 90.2P leads to more than a doubling of current foundation insulation energy savings. The extrapolation of existing practice and the addition of other contributions resulting from compliance with ASHRAE 90.2 lead to an estimated energy savings by the year 2010 between 0.38 and 0.45 quad/yr (400 and 475 PJ/yr (quad = 10/sup 15/ Btu)). 11 refs., 14 tabs., 7 figs.

Christian, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Resources on Implementing Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Many resources are available to help Federal agencies implement energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

457

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation, Tribal Government, Utility Savings Category: Fuel Cells, Photovoltaics Brownfield Redevelopment Program (Missouri) Brownfield Redevelopment Program...

458

Saving Money When Eating Out SESSION GOALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saving Money When Eating Out SESSION GOALS: Participants will understand the impact that eating out has on their personal food budget. In addition, participants will learn ways that they can save money. Apply techniques that will enable participants to save money when eating out. #12;2 Saving Money When

459

Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The ICLS system results in superior energy savings. The chart (right)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy load is less than the design goal. Energy ICLS ICLS Title 24 Ashrae 90.1 Savings Avg. Usage Design · 200 days/school yr · 8 hrs of operation/day · $0.11/kwh ** Savings per Classroom per year vs. Ashrae 90.1 CONTROL STRATEGIES Finelite, Inc. 30300 Whipple Road Union City, CA 94587-1525 510 / 441

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Monroe County Extension Saves $2,000 Annually on Utility Bills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

antiquated tube boilers with new, high-efficiency, condensing boilers. Projected Savings Over $2,000 per year% efficiency, were replaced with 95%-efficiency condensing boilers. The new boilers use 70% less water, operateMonroe County Extension Saves $2,000 Annually on Utility Bills Heating Efficiency Upgrades Lower

Keinan, Alon

462

The Cost Reduction Incentive Program at the Savannah River Site. Audit report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (Department) established a Cost-Reduction Incentive Program (CRIP) at Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) in October 1992. In 1997, the Department performed a comprehensive review of Westinghouse`s performance-based incentives and cost-reduction incentives, and concluded that most of the savings identified through the CRIP occurred through greater management focus on reducing costs, working smart, or the results of budget constraints, as opposed to innovative changes in work methods and processes. The Assessment Team recommended that the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) re-evaluate the effectiveness of the CRIP and consider either modifying the program to provide for payment only for innovative ideas, or cancel the program and utilize performance-based incentives to reward cost savings over some pre-established threshold. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Operations Office took appropriate action in response to the Department`s internal assessment of the CRIP. The Operations Office did not take appropriate action in response to the internal assessment. The Operations Office stated that Westinghouse did not agree to the modification or cancellation of the CRIP, and the Department could not unilaterally modify or cancel the program because it was incorporated into the contract. However, the Operations Office could have substantially reduced its CRIP payments to Westinghouse without amending the contract by (1) enforcing the contract terms that required Westinghouse to use best commercial practices and industry standards in contract performance, and (2) requiring Westinghouse to comply with its internal procedures which required that cost-reduction proposals be innovative.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Savings Through Power Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibration, leading to bearing failures. In addition, noise and vibration will be particularly severe on high rpm motors. Unbalanced voltage produces a corresponding negative-sequence flux causing unbalanced currents in excess of those under balanced.... In addition, noise and vibration will be particularly severe on high rpm motors. Voltage unbalance can be extremely detrimental to the proper operation and life of a three-phase motor. When line voltages supplying an induction motor are not equal...

Mehrdad, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Jean Bustard

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG and E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that was tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology injects a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. PG&E National Energy Group provided two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company provided a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company hosted a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the fifteenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) Test Sites--Final Reports for the two remaining plants are being written (Salem Harbor and Brayton Point). (2) Technology Transfer--Technical information about the project was presented to a number of organizations during the quarter including members of congress, coal companies, architect/engineering firms, National Mining Association, the North Carolina Department of Air Quality, the National Coal Council and EPA.

Jean Bustard; Richard Schlager

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

469

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the eleventh reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) All Test Sites--Final reports for Gaston and Pleasant Prairie are complete and have been issued; and Ongoing data and sample analysis is nearly complete as well as work on the final reports. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Several papers were presented at the MEGA Symposium in Washington DC.

Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000 to 2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG and E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that was tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology injects a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. PG&E National Energy Group provided two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company provided a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company hosted a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the seventeenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: Test Sites--The Topical Report for the Salem Harbor Station was issued during the quarter. The Topical Report for the Brayton Point Station testing is in preparation; and Technology Transfer--Technical information about the project was presented at PowerGen and at an A&WMA Rocky Mountain States Section meeting.

Jean Bustard; Richard Schlager

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

472

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the twelfth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: All Test Sites--Ongoing data and sample analysis for the two remaining plants is nearly complete as well as work on the final reports. Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Several papers were presented at Air Quality IV in Washington D.C.

Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Richard Schlager

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

474

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that was tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology injects a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. PG&E National Energy Group provided two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company provided a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company hosted a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the sixteenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) Test Sites--The Topical Report for the Salem Harbor Station testing was completed during the quarter and will be issued early next quarter. The Topical Report for the Brayton Point Station testing is in preparation. (2) Technology Transfer--Technical information about the project was presented to a chemistry workshop during the quarter.

Jean Bustard; Richard Schlager

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

476

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the thirteenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: All Test Sites--Ongoing data and sample analysis for the two remaining plants is nearly complete as well as work on the final reports. Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter.

Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

2003-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

477

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the tenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) All Test Sites--Ongoing data and sample analysis as well as work on the final reports. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. One paper was presented at the American Coal Council Workshop and one at the EUCE Conference.

Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

O&M Best Practices - A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency (Release 2.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide, sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program, highlights operations and maintenance (O&M) programs targeting energy efficiency that are estimated to save 5% to 20% on energy bills without a significant capital investment. The purpose of this guide is to provide the federal O&M energy manager and practitioner with useful information about O&M management, technologies, energy efficiency and cost-reduction approaches.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Pugh, Ray; Melendez, Aldo P.; Hunt, W. D.

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Business Travel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once business travel reduction strategies have been identified, a Federal agency may evaluate the cost of implementing those measures and any potential savings from avoided travel.

480

Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable fluid type? Water Steam What fuel is used? Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operating cost savings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

LONG-RUN SAVINGS AND COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF HOME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Energy Efficiency database lists many utility HER programs; it is available for download at: http are a cornerstone of many utility energy-efficiency portfolios. These programs involve sending electronic or paper: · A summary of the home's recent and historical energy use · Energy-efficiency tips (including utility energy

482

Vehicle Cost Calculator Helps You Add Up the Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When most people go to the car dealership, they take a hard look at the vehicle’s window sticker. But that initial price doesn’t tell the whole story.

483

Simple Maintenance Saves Costly Furnace Repair/Replacement |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

furnace maintenance, which includes: Checking the condition of the vent connection pipe and chimney Checking the physical integrity of the heat exchanger Adjusting the...

484

Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

see what they are doing a lot better." Other improvements at the hangar include motion sensors for lights in offices and restrooms, heating, ventilation and air conditioning...

485

California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

by decreasing glares and helping to control internal temperatures. View is also creating green jobs-employing 100 people at its headquarters in Milpitas, California, and another...

486

How Do You Save on Lighting Costs? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LED lights are six to seven times more energy efficient than conventional incandescent lights, cut energy use by more than 80 percent and can last more than 25 times...

487

Energy (Cost) Savings by Zero Discharge in Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Relatively clean water may be added directly to the cooling tower basin (see Figure n. Reuse streams containing high suspended solids but of otherwise acceptable quality may be input just before the filters ~n the J The remainingireuse The flowrate..., silica, phos phates, and suspended solids. Other potential foulants and scale-forming species must be controlled by inhibitors or removed by an additional process in the sidestream treatment. Waste streams with scaling and corrosion potential before...

Matson, J. V.; Gardiner, W. M.; Harris, T. G.; Puckorius, P. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 79 pp.47-50 (September 2000). Technip, 2000. ProgressiveDistillation. Leaflet, Technip, Paris, France. Terrible,Stone & Webster, Technip/Elf, and UOP. An overview of

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrocracking Hydrotreating Alkylation Polymerization/Dim.i.e. , crude distillation, hydrotreating, reforming, vacuumin an increase of hydrotreating capacity at the petroleum

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

EECBG Success Story: Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings Projections |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 ClosingA Tradition ofOregonPower |

491

DOE Perspective on Budget, Accounting, and Cost-Saving Initiatives |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:Department of Energy

492

Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings Projections | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on Our National-Projects inDepartmentOrmond Beach

493

Tennessee: U.S. Automaker Improves Plant's Performance, Saves Costs |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1Telework Telework The Department's

494

Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department of Energy benchmarking.DepartmentDepartment of

495

Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department of Energy benchmarking.DepartmentDepartment ofHeating

496

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClick on the graphic to learn more

497

Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 activitiesof Energy As a basis for

498

Technology Partnerships Are Yielding Reliable, Cost-Saving Appliances |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergy Secretary ChuAsWhat typesOfficeDepartment

499

California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2 Categorical ExclusionOrderEconomy HigherComfort |

500

Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2 CategoricalApproach for Energy 07-21-2014