National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for operating cost savings

  1. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    operations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%budgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, properalso identify potential energy and cost savings. Quick PEP

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    operations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%budgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, properalso identify potential energy and cost savings. Quick PEP

  4. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  5. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lowers Costs ArcelorMittal's Indiana Harbor plant in East Chicago, Indiana, is the largest steel mill in the Western Hemisphere. It operates five...

  6. Operating Costs Estimates Cost Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    cost projections · Chemical Engineering (CE) Plant Construction Cost Index ­ Base value = 100 in 1957.0 in 2Q 2001 · Engineering News Record (ENR) · Nelson Refinery (NR) Construction Cost Index Cost Indices available for estimation are based upon the past · These data must be updated using cost indexes . · Cost

  7. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    refineries with specific energy and cost savings data whenoperations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%the potential energy and cost-savings (Frangopoluos et al. ,

  8. Machine Learning with Operational Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudin, Cynthia

    This work proposes a way to align statistical modeling with decision making. We provide a method that propagates the uncertainty in predictive modeling to the uncertainty in operational cost, where operational cost is the ...

  9. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy savings estimates and cost...

  10. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential...

  11. California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort April 18, 2013 - 12:00am...

  12. California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort California: Energy-Efficient Glass Saves Energy Costs, Increases Personal Comfort April 18, 2013 -...

  13. Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Weimar

    1998-12-10

    This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

  14. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingsley, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Marty Kushler. 2009. “Saving Energy Cost-Effectively: Ascale up efforts, what saving energy costs among an array ofgenerally supportive of saving energy (e.g. , energy savings

  15. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  16. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations forEnergy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations forEnergy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    needed to calculate energy and cost savings from implementedis a wide range of energy and cost saving measures thatbudgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, properly

  18. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

    2003-01-01

    23 Table 8: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and SavingsHVAC Source Energy, Cost, &Savings Projections.. 258: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings Projections

  19. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting Some users have experienced difficulties saving BLCC projects. The primary issue causing the issue is that the user is not an...

  20. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential Network...

  1. IEECB'08 Paper n57 Can energy savings from operations promoting energy efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 IEECB'08 Paper n°57 Can energy savings from operations promoting energy efficient behaviors. But cost-effective energy savings can also be achieved in a complementary way by an improved energy that if awareness operations were widely disseminated, a significant amount of energy savings could be realized

  2. Costs, Savings and Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Stelly, Randall; Parker, Cecil A.

    1958-01-01

    ,s - / cwdh\\@ Costs, Savi~gs;.itd Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms . ?. I I 1 i I I ! ,:ravings in hauling - 10 cents I \\ \\ 1 \\ savings in hauling - 15 cents -----------____--- 'savings in hauling - 20 cents Annual production..., 1,000 pounds Estimated number of years required for savings from a bulk tank to equal additional costs at different levels of production and savings in hauling costs. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN'T STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION...

  3. Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Slattery, Bob S; Atkin, Erica

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the realization rate of energy and cost savings from the Department of Energy's Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program based on information reported by the energy services companies (ESCOs) that are carrying out ESPC projects at federal sites. Information was extracted from 134 Measurement and Verification (M&V) reports to determine reported, estimated, and guaranteed cost savings and reported and estimated energy savings for the previous contract year. Because the quality of the reports varied, it was not possible to determine all of these parameters for each project. For 133 of the 134 projects, there was sufficient information to compare estimated, reported, and guaranteed cost savings. For this group, the total estimated cost savings for the reporting periods addressed were $95.7 million, total reported cost savings were $96.8 million, and total guaranteed cost savings were $92.1 million. This means that on average: ESPC contractors guaranteed 96% of the estimated cost savings, projects reported achieving 101% of the estimated cost savings, and projects reported achieving 105% of the guaranteed cost savings. For 129 of the projects examined, there was sufficient information to compare estimated and reported energy savings. On the basis of site energy, estimated savings for those projects for the previous year totaled 5.371 million MMBtu, and reported savings were 5.374 million MMBtu, just over 100% of the estimated energy savings. On the basis of source energy, total estimated energy savings for the 129 projects were 10.400 million MMBtu, and reported saving were 10.405 million MMBtu, again, just over 100.0% of the estimated energy savings.

  4. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingsley, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Kushler. 2009. “Saving Energy Cost-Effectively: A Nationalscale up efforts, what saving energy costs among an array ofhigher CSE. Higher retail energy costs result in lower CSE

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    plants with specific energy and cost savings data, when suchpartners. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%budgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, proper

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    and abroad with specific energy and cost savings data arecontrol systems, energy and cost savings are typicallybudgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, proper

  7. DOE Perspective on Budget, Accounting, and Cost-Saving Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Joseph Hezir, Chief Financial Officer, DOE presented on the topic DOE Perspective on Budget, Accounting, and Cost-Saving Initiatives. The presentation focuses on FFRDCs, National Lab funding and cost accounting, ICR, and overhead costs.

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Interesting Natural gas Savings. Heads Up CIPEC Newsletter.Hydronix. 2006. Cement Savings Spreadsheet. http://Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the

  9. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    campus, which includes 750 buildings. Photo courtesy of Texas A&M University Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University Recovery Act...

  10. Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-07-01

    Summary of The Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings, an energy efficiency guidebook for College and University business and facility managers.

  11. Reported Energy and Cost Savings From the ESPC Program (2012...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    36 REPORTED ENERGY AND COST SAVINGS FROM THE DOE ESPC PROGRAM: FY 2012 December 2012 Prepared by John A. Shonder, Bob Slattery DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January...

  12. Unconventional Staging Package Selection Leads to Cost Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-06-07

    In late 2010, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Deputy Secretary of Energy, Daniel Poneman, directed that an analysis be conducted on the U-233 steel-clad, Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) fuel plates that were stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), focusing on cost savings and any potential DOE programmatic needs for the special nuclear material (SNM). The NA-162 Nuclear Criticality Safety Program requested retention of these fuel plates for use in experiments at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). A Secretarial Initiative challenged ORNL to make the first shipment to the NNSS by the end of the 2011 calendar year, and this effort became known as the U-233 Project Accelerated Shipping Campaign. To meet the Secretarial Initiative, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), the NNSS Management and Operations contractor, was asked to facilitate the receipt and staging of the U-233 fuel plates in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). Because there were insufficient staging containers available for the fuel plates, NSTec conducted an analysis of alternatives. The project required a staging method that would reduce the staging footprint while addressing nuclear criticality safety and radiation exposure concerns. To accommodate an intermediate staging method of approximately five years, the NSTec project team determined that a unique and unconventional staging package, the AT-400R, was available to meet the project requirements. By using the AT-400R containers, NSTec was able to realize a cost savings of approximately $10K per container, a total cost savings of nearly $450K.

  13. Lender-Based Revenues and Cost-Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Revenues and Cost-Savings Lender-Based Revenues and Cost-Savings Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Lender-Based Revenues and Cost-Savings, Call Slides and...

  14. Program Potential: Estimates of Federal Energy Cost Savings from Energy Efficient Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    24   Energy and Costsavings in Table 7: Annual energy and cost savings of waterwere used to derive energy and cost savings estimates:

  15. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the State Capitol Complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Abbas, M.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential cost savings by improving operations and maintenance (O&M) practices at eight buildings of the State Capitol Complex, monitored by the LoanSTAR program. This report discusses...

  16. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the Dunbar Middle and Sims Elementary Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Houcek, J. K.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential cost savings which may be achieved by improving operational and maintenance (O&M) practices at Dunbar Middle School and Sims Elementary School in the Fort Worth ...

  17. Reduce emissions and operating costs with appropriate glycol selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covington, K.; Lyddon, L. [Bryan Research and Engineering, Inc., TX (United States); Ebeling, H. [Latoka Engineering L.L.C., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) emissions from glycol dehydration units have become a major concern and some form of control is necessary in many cases. One method of reducing BTEX emissions that is often overlooked is in the selection of the proper dehydrating agent. BTEX compounds are less soluble in diethylene glycol (DEG) than triethylene glycol (TEG) and considerably less soluble in ethylene glycol (EG). If the use of DEG or EG achieves the required gas dew point in cases where BTEX emissions are a concern, a significant savings in both operating costs and the cost of treating still vent gases may be achieved. This paper compares plant operations using TEG, DEG and EG from the viewpoint of BTEX emissions, circulating rates, utilities and dehydration capabilities.

  18. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    pump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance costs,maintenance at times lowers pump system efficiency, causes pumps to wear out more quickly and increases costs.

  19. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    energy savings, technology costs, market potential, andenergy savings, technology costs, market potential, andin this study. Normally, technology cost is quantified using

  20. EECBG Success Story: Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Block Grant Program, Ormond Beach was able to make energy efficiency upgrades to 16 city-owned buildings and is now saving more than 45,000 a year on its energy costs. | Photo...

  1. Reported Energy and Cost Savings From the ESPC Program (2011...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    251&18;70&16;&21;&19;&20;&20;&18;&24;&20;&26;&3; &3; REPORTED ENERGY AND COST SAVINGS FROM THE DOE ESPC PROGRAM December 2011 Prepared by John A. Shonder, Bob Slattery and Erica Atkin DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    industry with specific energy and cost savings data whenoperations. Typically, energy and cost savings are around 5%also identify potential energy and cost savings. Quick PEP

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    the world with specific energy and cost savings data whenincreased productivity and energy and cost savings. Examplesalso identify potential energy and cost savings. Quick PEP

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    include specific energy and cost savings data as well asbudgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, properalso identify potential energy and cost savings. Quick PEP

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Reducing Drying Energy and Costs by Process Alterations atand process related energy- and cost-efficiency measuresindustry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical

  6. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-applications to save energy and costs. This potential couldof ESPCs to provide energy and cost savings in non-building

  7. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providingin mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluationof the costs and energy savings potential of emerging

  8. Operating costs and plant options analysis for the Shamokin fluidized bed boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, M.G.; Dowdy, T.E.; Litman, R.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study that examined the operating costs and options to improve the Shamokin Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Demonstration Plant located near Shamokin, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this study was to perform an operating cost analysis and compare the results with projected operating costs. An analysis was also made to identify possible cost savings options. Two base case scenarios were developed for this study: the first scenario assumed that the plant operated in a manner similar to operations during the extended test program; and the second scenario was concerned with two options. One option assumed upgrading the plant to achieve continuous full load operation, restarting, and used revised costs and revenues. The second assumed reconfiguring the plant for cogeneration.

  9. Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A project started last year at a U.S. Navy base in Meridian, Miss., that will save thousands in taxpayer dollars has been successfully completed.

  10. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  11. Factors Affecting Auction Market Operating Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wootan, Charley V.; McNeely, John G.

    1966-01-01

    share of the total. If one auction diverts volume from another, the total ;~uction volume will be unchanged, and volume- intl11ced gains in efficiency at the first market will ~eritl to be offset by losses at the second. Given the present structure... Market Operating Costs Texas Summary and Conclusions T THE TIME THE DATA for this study were collected A there were 178 livestock auctions operating in Texas; 140 were included in this analysis. They ranyed in size from just over 5,000 animal units...

  12. Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs April 16, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis Located near...

  13. Ormond Beach Triples Energy Cost Savings Projections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program, the city of Ormond Beach, Florida is saving energy and encouraging its residents to do the same through an environmental education program.

  14. Control and operation cost optimization of the HISS cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, J.; Bieser, F.; Anderson, D.

    1983-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. A previous paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration and gas management. This paper discusses a control strategy which has allowed full time unattended operation, along with significant nitrogen and power cost reductions. Reduction of liquid nitrogen consumption has been accomplished by making use of the sensible heat available in the cold exhaust gas. Measured nitrogen throughput agrees with calculations for sensible heat utilization of zero to 70%. Calculated consumption saving over this range is 40 liters per hour for conductive losses to the supports only. The measured throughput differential for the total system is higher.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    pump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance costs,maintenance at times lowers pump system efficiency, causes pumps to wear out more quickly and increases costs.pumps by the controls. In addition to energy savings, the project reduced maintenance costs

  16. Operating Costs for Trucks David Levinson*, Michael Corbett, Maryam Hashami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Operating Costs for Trucks David Levinson*, Michael Corbett, Maryam Hashami David Levinson Author Abstract This study estimates the operating costs for commercial vehicle operators in Minnesota. A survey of firms that undertake commercial truck road movements was performed. The average operating cost

  17. DOE Challenge Home Savings & Cost Estimate Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cost data sources and maintains a methodology consistent with a similar study for ENERGY STAR Homes V3. In actual projects the cost impacts for various upgrades will vary....

  18. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  19. Identifying Water Savings in Industrial Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T.

    2015-01-01

    Solutions, L.L.C. Identifying Water Savings in Industrial Operations IETC June 4, 2015 Tom Theising, C.E.M., C.D.S.M. (979) 709-6389 tom.theising@yahoo.com ESL-IE-15-06-23a Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 SES Sustainable Energy Solutions, L.L.C. Energy Optimization Services: • Energy Efficiency Evaluation • Energy Management Program Development • Energy Maintenance Best Practices Energy Reliability Services: • Identify solutions...

  20. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In addition to generating energy, water and dollar savings,in the cost of energy, water, wastewater treatment, fuelpurpose of achieving energy and water savings, in which a

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    plants with specific energy and cost savings data whenbudgeted. In addition to energy and cost savings, propera significant reduction in energy and costs. Generally, two

  2. Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

  3. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-12

    In June 2009, ArcelorMittal learned about the potential to receive a 50% cost-matching grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ArcelorMittal applied for the competitive grant and, in November, received $31.6 million as a DOE cost-sharing award. By matching the federal funding, ArcelorMittal was able to construct a new, high efficiency Energy Recovery & Reuse 504 Boiler and supporting infrastructure.

  4. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    and grid owners. Energy (and cost) savings might be found inSystem to Offset Peak Energy Cost at a Wastewater TreatmentSavings Estimation (GWh) Energy Costs Current Other Total

  5. Cost-Informed Operational Process Support M. T. Wynn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Cost-Informed Operational Process Support M. T. Wynn1 , H. A. Reijers2,3 , M. Adams1 , C. Ouyang1 operations in alignment with the true origins of costs, and to be informed about this on a real-time basis, allows businesses to increase profitability. In most organisations however, high-level cost

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    CADDET (2001). Saving Energy with Daylighting Systems.Motors Mean Energy and Dollar Savings. Copper DevelopmentEfficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the

  7. Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

  8. #tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs A feature on the Energy Department's Twitter account,...

  9. Mainstream Engineering Develops a Low-Cost Energy-Saving Device...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Mainstream Engineering Develops a Low-Cost Energy-Saving Device for AC Systems Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIRSTTR...

  10. Reported Energy and Cost Savings From the ESPC Program: FY 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42 REPORTED ENERGY AND COST SAVINGS FROM THE DOE ESPC PROGRAM: FY 2013 December 2013 Prepared by John A. Shonder, Bob Slattery DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January...

  11. Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program: FY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORNLTM-2015110 Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program: FY 2014 Bob Slattery March 2015 DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are...

  12. cost savings | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46A NAME6/%2A encore values |cost

  13. Power cost saving irrigation method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, D.H.

    1993-08-10

    An irrigation system is described for irrigating an area comprising: a pipe for delivering water to the area to be irrigated; a pump connected to the pipe for delivering a first water supply from a reservoir to the pipe; a timer operatively associated with the pump for activating said pump during a first predetermined time period; a second water supply connectable to the pipe during a second predetermined time period when the pump is deactivated; a first valve; and the second water supply being connectable to the reservoir through the first valve for maintaining water in the reservoir.

  14. Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available to respond to system contingencies and random variation in demand. Demand response and energy storage, may provide these services at lower cost to conventional generators. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system characteristics, renewable energy penetration, and several other sensitivities.

  15. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E.

    2012-07-16

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  16. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to Californiacosts and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to Californiaof cost- and energy-efficient installations. California has

  17. FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

  18. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and...

  19. Money for Research, Not Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , to meet national security, materials design, climate protection, and energy goals, among othersLBNL-4282E Money for Research, Not Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High of California. #12;1 Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High

  20. Entanglement cost of implementing controlled-unitary operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihito Soeda; Peter S. Turner; Mio Murao

    2011-10-27

    We investigate the minimum entanglement cost of the deterministic implementation of two-qubit controlled-unitary operations using local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We show that any such operation can be implemented by a three-turn LOCC protocol, which requires at least 1 ebit of entanglement when the resource is given by a bipartite entangled state with Schmidt number 2. Our result implies that there is a gap between the minimum entanglement cost and the entangling power of controlled-unitary operations. This gap arises due to the requirement of implementing the operations while oblivious to the identity of the inputs.

  1. Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Erick

    2010-01-01

    new starts projects-capital costs and ridership. Technicalridership, operating, and capital cost data for 24 transitridership, operating, and capital cost data for 24 transit

  2. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  3. Evaluation of electric vehicle production and operating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R. M.; Gaines, L. L.; Vyas, A. D.

    2000-05-23

    This report presents an analysis of the initial cost of electric vehicles (EVs). The manufacturing and retail cost structure of mature conventional vehicles produced at high volume is analyzed first, and the contributions by various cost categories to vehicle price are estimated. The costs are then allocated to such vehicle component groups as body, chassis, and powertrain. The similarities and differences among various component systems are reviewed. In electric vehicles, an electric drive replaces the conventional powertrain, and a battery pack replaces the fuel system. Three types of traction motors are reviewed, and their cost in high-volume production is analyzed. Various components of the motor and controller package are analyzed, and their representative costs are summarized. Four types of EV batteries are reviewed, and their costs are presented. Various alternatives for the low-, medium-, and high-volume production of EVs are evaluated, and some sample costs are presented. A methodology that estimates initial and operating costs on the basis of this analysis is presented. The methodology also estimates the average lifetime cost of owning and operating an electric vehicle.

  4. AEC Lowman Station - coal switching and magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing to lower operating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inkenhaus, W.; Babu, M.; Smith, K. [Dravo Lime Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Loper, L. [Alabama Electric Coopreative, Leroy, AL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    AEC`s Lowman Station is located in Leroy, Alabama. There are three coal-fired boilers at this station. Unit 1 is capable of generating 85 MW without a flue gas desulfurization, FGD, system. Units 2 and 3, with a total of 516 MW output capacity, are equipped with FGD systems. The FGD plant was designed for wet limestone FGD with natural oxidation. Lowman Station burned low sulfur, 1.3 to 1.8% sulfur, coal. In January of 1996 AEC switched Units 2 and 3 from limestone to magnesium-enhanced lime FGD operation. It was determined that the plant could take advantage of the higher SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of the magnesium-enhanced lime system. Major benefits resulting from this conversion were AEC`s ability to switch to a lower cost high sulfur coal while meeting the stringent SO{sub 2} emission requirements. Power cost savings resulted from the lower liquid to gas ratio required by the magnesium-enhanced lime process. Three recirculation pumps per module were reduced to a single operating pump per module, lowering the scrubber pressure drop. Significant cost reduction in the operating costs of the ball mill was realized due to modifications made to slake lime instead of grinding limestone. Prior to switching, personnel from AEC and Dravo Lime Company ran a four week test on magnesium-enhanced lime to obtain scrubber performance data including SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies on the modules while burning a 1.8% sulfur coal. This paper discusses the plant modifications that were needed to make the switch, cost justifications due to coal switching, and AEC`s operating experiences to date. AEC and Dravo Lime Company working together as a team conducted detailed cost studies, followed by extensive field tests and implemented the plant modifications. This plant continues to operate burning higher sulfur coal with the magnesium-enhanced lime FGD system.

  5. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Charles; Green, Andrew S.; Dahle, Douglas; Barnett, John; Butler, Pat; Kerner, David

    2013-08-01

    The findings of this study indicate that potential exists in non-building applications to save energy and costs. This potential could save billions of federal dollars, reduce reliance on fossil fuels, increase energy independence and security, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Federal Government has nearly twenty years of experience with achieving similar energy cost reductions, and letting the energy costs savings pay for themselves, by applying energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) inits buildings. Currently, the application of ESPCs is limited by statute to federal buildings. This study indicates that ESPCs can be a compatible and effective contracting tool for achieving savings in non-building applications.

  6. Evaluating the Energy Saving Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Industrial Energy Efficiency Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating the Energy Saving Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Industrial Energy Efficiency Initiatives of the Office of Energy Efficiency Prepared for the Office of Energy Efficiency Prepared ............................................................................................. 18 5 SIMULATION OF THE FIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS

  7. Energy Conservation and the Environment - Designing for Cost Savings and Minimum Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.; Nagy, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    AND THE ENVIRONMENT DESIGNING FOR COST SAVINGS AND MINIMUM EMISSIONS Daniel H. Johnnie, Jr. H. J. Klooster John F. Nagy Fluor Engineers, Inc. Advanced Tec'hnology Division Irvine, California ABSTRACT Upgrading existing facilities for is offering technical...

  8. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  9. Quantifying Energy Savings by Improving Boiler Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, K.; Kissock, J. K.

    2005-01-01

    of combustion temperature, calculation of the relationship between internal convection coefficient and gas flow rate, and calculation of overall heat transfer assuming a parallel-flow heat exchanger model. The method for estimating savings from changing... combustion air accounts for the increased combustion temperature, reduced internal convection coefficient and increased residence time of combustion gasses in the boiler. Measured boiler data are used to demonstrate the accuracy of the methods...

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The downstream savings of lighting efficiency measures cansavings of approximately 5% (Novartis There are many energy efficiency measuresefficiency measures. It gives a wide variety of information, including implementation costs and savings

  11. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This `was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE).

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    lifetime costs of the pump. Maintenance costs comprise themaintenance costs were reduced, system stability was improved, pumppump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance costs,

  13. Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M. R.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.

    2013-07-01

    Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available for responding to system contingencies variable demand. In many regions of the United States, thermal power plants provide a large fraction of the operating reserve requirement. Alternative sources of operating reserves, such as demand response and energy storage, may provide more efficient sources of these reserves. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services, including spinning contingency reserves and upward regulation reserves. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system flexibilities, renewable energy penetration, and other sensitivities. The analysis demonstrates that the price of operating reserves depend highly on many assumptions regarding the operational flexibility of the generation fleet, including ramp rates and the fraction of fleet available to provide reserves.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    is a decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. Avoidand maintenance costs rather than on initial capital costs alone. The Pumpmaintenance and energy costs represent by far the most significant fraction of a pump’

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    is a decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. Avoidand maintenance costs rather than on initial capital costs alone. The Pumpmaintenance and energy costs represent by far the most significant fraction of a pump’

  16. "We have 7 cogen systems and are very pleased with the cost savings."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District Terry Tilley Director of Maintenance/ Operations/Construction California Energy Commission Public energy-saving lights, heating and cooling systems, and more? Look at the benefits of our Energy DISTRICT COGENERATION PROJECT The school district is very satisfied with the performance and energy savings

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. To reducereduced maintenance costs and increased the pump system’scosts. The implementation of a pump system maintenance

  18. Remote implementation of partially unknown operations and its entanglement costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu-Hui Luo; An-Min Wang

    2013-01-24

    We present the generalized version of Wang's protocol[A.M.Wang, Phys.Rev.A 74,032317 (2006)] for the remote implementation(sometimes referred to as quantum remote control) of partially unknown quantum operations. The protocol only requires no more than half of the entanglements used in Bidirectional Quantum State Teleportation. We also propose a protocol for another form of quantum remote control. It can remotely implement a unitary operation which is a combination of the projective representations of a group. Moreover, we prove that the Schmidt rank of the entanglements cannot not be less than the number of controlled parameters of the operations, which for the first time gives a lower bound on entanglement costs in remote implementation of quantum operations.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of savings in outage costs by using emergency actions strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, A.; Asuhaimi, A.; Shaibon, H. [Univ. Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bharu (Malaysia); Lo, K.L. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study carried out to assess the savings in consumer outage costs that can be accrued as a result of implementing Emergency Actions Strategy. The use of Emergency Actions Strategy plays a significant role in curtailing the consumer outage costs ensuing from unreliable electric service. In order to calculate the savings in outage costs, the probabilistic framework of the frequency and duration method has been used in conjunction with emergency actions. At first, the outage costs of various consumer sectors are estimated without considering the emergency actions. Secondly, the consumer outage costs are calculated by combining the frequency and duration method, and unserved energy with the emergency actions invoked. The results of the savings in consumer outage costs that can be accrued by utilizing Emergency Actions Strategy are presented for a synthetic system. The results of the study show that substantial savings in consumer outage costs are obtained by devising and implementing emergency actions strategy in situations of capacity outages. The results are of particular relevance and utility to the underdeveloped and developing countries where capacity shortages occur quite frequently. These results also suggest the importance of emergency actions strategy for electric utilities in reducing the consumer economic losses arising from unreliable electric service.

  20. Computers & Operations Research 27 (2000) 399}408 Solving a savings allocation problem by numerical dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Ecuyer, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    Computers & Operations Research 27 (2000) 399}408 Solving a savings allocation problem by numerical of a dynamic program. First, we present a savings allocation problem between a pension account and another non distribute his or her savings, in each account, between stocks and cash funds. Formally, this complex problem

  1. Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shreekant

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  3. Better Buildings Challenge Saves $840 Million in Energy Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    maximize efficiency over the next decade. Across the country, partners have shared energy data for more than 32,000 properties and are reporting energy savings of 20 percent or...

  4. Pressure monitoring technique provides cost-savings solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, J.O.

    1994-05-01

    EnergyNorth Natural Gas, Inc. solved its concern over cost-effectively retrieving various amounts of data over an extensive geographical area with a smart pressure transmitter. Much of the company's existing technology was either old, or required a substantial degree of manual intervention. It was determined that the age along with manual requirements would have an adverse effect on future management operations. The company explored the market for alternative solutions and the search led to the Rosemount Model 1151 Smart Pressure Transmitter. The transmitter was particularly appealing because it allowed direct communication with the transmitter through a modem without additional peripheral devices. The supplier was contacted directly regarding the interest in using the devices for monitoring the ENGI system pressures. Specifications for the HART protocol was provided which was used to determine how to utilize the transmitters to obtain cost-effective pressure readings. The smart transmitters proved to be the driving force behind the entire SCADA system installation. The use of these transmitters will pay for SCADA installation over a 5-year period.

  5. Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornish, John

    2011-03-05

    Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    the world with specific energy and cost savings data whenand energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world

  7. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

    2014-03-19

    End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new construction, commercial/industrial custom rebate programs). In this report, the focus is on gross energy savings and the costs borne by the program administrator—including administration, payments to implementation contractors, marketing, incentives to program participants (end users) and both midstream and upstream trade allies, and evaluation costs. We collected data on net savings and costs incurred by program participants. However, there were insufficient data on participant cost contributions, and uncertainty and variability in the ways in which net savings were reported and defined across states (and program administrators).

  8. Estimated Maintenance Cost Savings from a Geothermal Heat Pump Energy Savings Performance Contract at Fort Polk, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick

    1997-06-01

    At Fort Polk, Louisiana, the space-conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights, low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation, were installed. These retrofits were performed by an energy services company at no up-front cost to the Army. The company has also assumed responsibility for maintenance of all equipment installed. In return, it receives a percentage of the energy and maintenance savings realized by the Army. In developing the energy savings performance contract, the Army estimated its pre-retrofit maintenance costs from bids received on a request for proposals. In this paper, a more rigorous cost estimate is developed, based on a survey of maintenance records for the pre-retrofit HVAC equipment. The reliability of the equipment is also estimated using an actuarial method to determine the number of units requiring replacement each year and the effect of these replacements on annual maintenance costs.

  9. Estimated maintenance cost savings from a geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Fort Polk, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-12-31

    At Fort Polk, Louisiana, the space-conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights, low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation, were installed. These retrofits were performed by an energy services company at no up-front cost to the Army. The company has also assumed responsibility for maintenance of all the equipment installed. In return, it receives a percentage of the energy and maintenance savings realized by the Army. In developing the energy savings performance contract, the Army estimated its pre-retrofit maintenance costs from bids received on a request for proposals. In this paper, a more rigorous cost estimate is developed, based on a survey of maintenance records for the pre-retrofit HVAC equipment. The reliability of the equipment is also estimated using an actuarial method to determine the number of units requiring replacement each year and the effect of these replacements on annual maintenance costs.

  10. Pennsylvania Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Pennsylvania homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Pennsylvania homeowners will save $8,632 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $515 for the 2012 IECC.

  11. Idaho Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Idaho homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Idaho homeowners will save $4,057 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $285 for the 2012 IECC.

  12. Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Nevada homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Nevada homeowners will save $4,736 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $360 for the 2012 IECC.

  13. Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Ohio homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Ohio homeowners will save $5,151 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $330 for the 2012 IECC.

  14. Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yan; Song, Zhen; Loftness, Vivian; Ji, Kun; Zheng, Sam; Lasternas, Bertrand; Marion, Flore; Yuebin, Yu

    2012-10-15

    We developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource; uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplace's northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance was measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building occupants and the building operator. Lifecycle cost analyses of the advanced building control were performed, and a Building Control System Guide was prepared and published to inform owners, architects, and engineers dealing with new construction or renovation of buildings.

  15. Cost-Energy Dynamics of Thermal Insulation: Potential Energy Savings and Policy Recommendations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phung, D. L.; Plaza, H.

    1980-01-01

    and manufacturing sectors are assessed. A hypothetical $10 billion insulation budget is determined to save 0.5 quad/yr of energy for the next 10 to 15 years, resulting in conservation energy costing less than $2/MMBtu. It is argued that public subsidies to energy...

  16. Operational Impacts of Operating Reserve Demand Curves on Production Cost and Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik; Gao, Wenzhong

    2015-10-27

    The electric power industry landscape is continually evolving. As emerging technologies such as wind, solar, electric vehicles, and energy storage systems become more cost-effective and present in the system, traditional power system operating strategies will need to be reevaluated. The presence of wind and solar generation (commonly referred to as variable generation) may result in an increase in the variability and uncertainty of the net load profile. One mechanism to mitigate this is to schedule and dispatch additional operating reserves. These operating reserves aim to ensure that there is enough capacity online in the system to account for the increased variability and uncertainty occurring at finer temporal resolutions. A new operating reserve strategy, referred to as flexibility reserve, has been introduced in some regions. A similar implementation is explored in this paper, and its implications on power system operations are analyzed.

  17. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    regenerative braking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissionsconditions, the expected savings in fuel costs are notis whether the fuel cost savings over the lifetime of the

  18. A multi-regression analysis of airline indirect operating costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taneja, Nawal K.

    1968-01-01

    A multiple regression analysis of domestic and local airline indirect costs was carried out to formulate cost estimating equations for airline indirect costs. Data from CAB and FAA sources covering the years 1962-66 was ...

  19. Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $408 for the 2012 IECC.

  20. Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Iowa homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Iowa homeowners will save $7,573 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $454 for the 2012 IECC.

  1. Massachusetts Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Massachusetts homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Massachusetts homeowners will save $10,848 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $621 for the 2012 IECC.

  2. Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Delaware homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Delaware homeowners will save $10,409 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $616 for the 2012 IECC.

  3. Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Texas homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Texas homeowners will save $3,456 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $259 for the 2012 IECC.

  4. Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  6. Reported Energy and Cost Savings From the ESPC Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Prepared by John A. Shonder, Tarrah Glass, and Erica Atkin ORNLTM-2010310 REPORTED ENERGY AND COST DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally...

  7. Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    is a decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. AvoidImplementing a pump system maintenance program will help youoptimally. Improved pump system maintenance can lead to pump

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. To reducesized motors Pumps Pump system maintenance Multiple pumpsare described below. Pump system maintenance. Inadequate

  10. New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    steam (near 900C), then dehydrogenates the EB over an iron oxide catalyst under vacuum at temperatures in excess of 600C. The cost of production is elevated by the...

  11. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    er iz 4. Energy Consumption The petroleum refining industry2003b. Paramount Petroleum: Plant-Wide Energy-EfficiencyFigure 8. Annual energy costs of petroleum refineries in the

  12. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  13. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  14. Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01

    -01-01 ESTIMATES OF ENERGY COST SAVINGS ACHIEVED FROM 2009 IECC CODE-COMPLIANT, SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCES IN TEXAS Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. January 2011 (Revised...) ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 2009 IECC Cost Savings Report, p.i January 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report presents estimates...

  15. Wireless Sensors: Technology and Cost-Savings for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Brambley, Michael R.; Carlon, Teresa A.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2002-08-30

    Two projects under way for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs, aim to adapt, test and demonstrate wireless sensors and data acquisition for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) in commercial buildings. One project focuses on built-up systems in medium to large buildings; the second on applications for rooftop units in small- to medium-size facilities. In this paper, the authors present the technical characteristics and costs of off-the-shelf wireless sensor and data-acquisition systems and describe how they can be adapted to commercial buildings. The first part of the paper discusses the appropriateness of the different wireless protocols and then uses a "low-cost" and "high-cost" scenario later in the paper for comparison to wired systems. The paper provides a brief overview of wireless communication standards and discusses their appropriateness to HVAC control applications. The authors describe two wireless technology demonstration projects and discuss the limitations of today's technology and how wireless technology might be improved to reduce costs. Finally, a cost comparison between wired and wireless control networks for retrofit and new construction is presented to provide insights into the key drivers that determine the cost competitive of wireless technologies for HVAC control applications.

  16. Influence of district heating water temperatures on the fuel saving and reduction of ecological cost of the heat generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portacha, J.; Smyk, A.; Zielinski, A.; Misiewicz, L.

    1998-07-01

    Results of examinations carried out on the district heating water temperature influence in the cogeneration plant with respect to both the fuel economy and the ecological cost reduction of heat generation for the purposes of heating and hot service water preparation are presented in this paper. The decrease of water return temperature effectively contributes to the increase of fuel savings in all the examined cases. The quantitative savings depend on the outlet water temperature of the cogeneration plant and on the fuel type combusted at the alternative heat generating plant. A mathematical model and a numerical method for calculations of annual cogeneration plant performance, e.g. annual heat and electrical energy produced in cogeneration mode, and the annual fuel consumption, are also discussed. In the discussed mathematical model, the variable operating conditions of cogeneration plant vs. outside temperature and method of control can be determined. The thermal system of cogeneration plant was decomposed into subsystems so as to set up the mathematical model. The determination of subsystem tasks, including a method of convenient aggregation thereof is an essential element of numerical method for calculations of a specific cogeneration plant thermal system under changing conditions. Costs of heat losses in the environment, resulting from the pollutants emission, being formed in the fuel combustion process in the heat sources, were defined. In addition, the environment quantitative and qualitative pollution characteristics were determined both for the heat generation in a cogeneration plant and for an alternative heat-generating plant. Based on the calculations, a profitable decrease of ecological costs is achieved in the cogeneration economy even if compared with the gas-fired heat generating plant. Ecological costs of coal-fired heat generating plant are almost three time higher than those of the comparable cogeneration plant.

  17. Evaluation of Irrigation Efficiency Strategies for Far West Texas: Feasibility, Water Savings And Cost Considerations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelsen, Ari; Chavez, Marissa; Lacewell, Ron; Gilley, James; Sheng, Zhuping

    2009-01-01

    -Final.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-360 2009 Evaluation of Irrigation Efficiency Strategies for Far West Texas: Feasibility, Water Savings And Cost Considerations... Prepared for: Far West Texas Water Planning Group, Rio Grande Council of Governments and Texas Water Development Board Prepared by: Ari Michelsen, Texas AgriLife Research Marissa Chavez, Texas AgriLife Research Ron Lacewell, Agricultural...

  18. Creating an Energy Strategy that Delivers Cost Savings While Optimizing Asset Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, A.

    2006-01-01

    and electricity as opposed to flaring. Waste streams containing combustible process off- gas or biogas are now routinely diverted to specially designed boilers, and are used to supplement, or in some cases completely displace, natural gas used in some..., Business Development Cinergy Solutions Cincinnati, OH Creating an Energy Strategy that Delivers Cost Savings while Optimizing Asset Utilization Abstract Fortune 1000 companies are at the top of their field because they focus...

  19. An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-21

    Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

  20. Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present...

  1. Earth-sheltered compromise home saves on heating, cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankhauser, T.

    1985-02-01

    Building a home into the side of a hill to take advantage of the earth's temperature-neutralizing qualities and facing it to the south will reduce heating and cooling costs. A home in North Dakota based on these principles has never had two unheated rooms freeze and needs no air conditioning. Mutli-zoned thermostats are located in the south-facing rooms. Other features are a five-foot overhang, lower ceilings, aluminum foil deflectors beneath carpets and above the plasterboard in the ceiling, and extra insulation. By eliminating an earth covering that would require sturdier support, construction costs were competitive with regular frame construction.

  2. Data-driven minimization of pump operating and maintenance cost Zijun Zhang a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Data-driven minimization of pump operating and maintenance cost Zijun Zhang a,n , Xiaofei He b the cost of pump operations and maintenance. A neural network algorithm is applied to model performance research seldom considered the interaction between the operation and maintenance scheduling as well

  3. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the Clinical Science Building at UTMB 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential energy savings due to optimizing the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) operation schedule in the Clinical Science Building at University of Texas Medical Brach (UTMB...

  4. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the Basic Science Building at UTMB 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the potential energy savings due to optimizing the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) operation schedule in the Basic Science Building at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB...

  5. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    turbine, a 210,000-pound-per-hour (pph) heat recovery steam generator, and an 11 MW steam turbine generator. The system can operate as a baseload system to serve 75% of Texas...

  6. Energy (Cost) Savings by Zero Discharge in Cooling Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J. V.; Gardiner, W. M.; Harris, T. G.; Puckorius, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica solubility equations for the resultant high ionic strength of a zero blowdown system. Operational aspects are highlighted in terms of deposition, corrosion, and biofouling potentials as well as currently...

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing Produces Energy- Saving Opportunities [citedD.C. Base Co. 2012. Energy Savings for a Bread Plant. BaseTeam Approach to Energy Savings. Ottawa, Ontario: Natural

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Air Compressors, New Money-Saving Option Requires CarefulN. Rivers (1997). Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps.Introducing Energy Saving Opportunities for Business.

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing Steam Systems: Saving Energy and Money in MexicanCADDET). 1997. Saving Energy with Efficient Compressed AirTechnologies (CADDET). 2001. Saving Energy with Daylighting

  10. Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. The Energy Information Administration published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

  11. How to Determine and Verify Operating and Maintenance Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recognizing and Assigning ESPC Risks and Responsibilities Using the Risk, Responsibility, and Performance Matrix Practical Guide to Savings and Payments in FEMP ESPC Task Orders...

  12. Achieving the 30% Goal: Energy and Cost Savings Analysis of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Richman, Eric E.; Wang, Weimin; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Cho, Heejin; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2011-05-24

    This Technical Support Document presents the energy and cost savings analysis that PNNL conducted to measure the potential energy savings of 90.1-2010 relative to 90.1-2004. PNNL conducted this analysis with inputs from many other contributors and source of information. In particular, guidance and direction was provided by the Simulation Working Group under the auspices of the SSPC90.1. This report documents the approach and methodologies that PNNL developed to evaluate the energy saving achieved from use of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010. Specifically, this report provides PNNL’s Progress Indicator process and methodology, EnergyPlus simulation framework, prototype model descriptions. This report covers the combined upgrades from 90.1-2004 to 90.1-2010, resulting in a total of 153 addenda. PNNL has reviewed and considered all 153 addenda for quantitative analysis in the Progress Indicator process. 53 of those are included in the quantitative analysis. This report provides information on the categorization of all of the addenda, a summary of the content, and deeper explanation of the impact and modeling of 53 identified addenda with quantitative savings.

  13. The cost of noise reduction for departure and arrival operations of commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Henry B.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and noise annoyance due to a departure and an arrival operation was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt ...

  14. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeepDecemberCornstalks Cost

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Potential for Electric Energy Savings in the ManufacturingThe energy savings associated with pulsed electric field

  16. A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen and development cost in addition to two case studies are documented. Introduction DrillEdge is a software system for how to handle the current situation. Verdande Technology has developed DrillEdge to reduce the cost

  17. Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports on the cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy applications throughout the United States. It is part of an overall effort to inform utilities of technological developments in conservation and renewable energy technologies and so aid utilities in their planning process to determine the most effective and economic combination of capital investments to meet customer needs. Department of Energy assessments of the applications, current costs and cost goals for the various technologies included in this bibliography are presented. These assessments are based on analyses performed by or for the respective DOE Program Offices. The results are sensitive to a number of variables and assumptions; however, the estimates presented are considered representative. These assessments are presented, followed by some conclusions regarding the potential role of the conservation and renewable energy alternative. The approach used to classify the bibliographic citations and abstracts is outlined.

  18. Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

  19. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    also reduced maintenance costs, increased pump bearing lifecosts of the pump. Maintenance costs compose the remainingpump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance costs,

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    maintenance lowers pump system efficiency, causes pumps to wear out more quickly and increases costs.pumps’ total energy consumption. In addition to energy savings, the project reduced maintenance costs

  1. How to save truck fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The future of fuel costs and its availability is discussed. Six areas of potential fuel savings for trucks discussed are: aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, power train efficiency and speed control, vehicle maintenance, driving practices, and operational techniques. (MCW)

  2. Web-based Tool Identifies and Quantifies Potential Cost Savings Measures at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renevitz, Marisa J.; Peschong, Jon C.; Charboneau, Briant L.; Simpson, Brett C.

    2014-01-09

    The Technical Improvement system is an approachable web-based tool that is available to Hanford DOE staff, site contractors, and general support service contractors as part of the baseline optimization effort underway at the Hanford Site. Finding and implementing technical improvements are a large part of DOE’s cost savings efforts. The Technical Improvement dashboard is a key tool for brainstorming and monitoring the progress of submitted baseline optimization and potential cost/schedule efficiencies. The dashboard is accessible to users over the Hanford Local Area Network (HLAN) and provides a highly visual and straightforward status to management on the ideas provided, alleviating the need for resource intensive weekly and monthly reviews.

  3. Beyond Energy Savings: Case Studies on Enhancing Productivity and Reducing Costs Through Energy Efficiency Investments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pye, M.

    1999-01-01

    Promoting energy efficiency to corporate CEOs and CFOs based on energy savings alone has had limited success. Experience shows that energy efficiency projects' non-energy benefits often exceed the value of energy savings, so energy savings should...

  4. Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Cost optimization of long-cycle LWR operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handwerk, C.S.; Driscoll, M.J.; McMahon, M.V.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-10-01

    The continuing emphasis on improvement of plant capacity factor, as a major means to make nuclear energy more cost competitive in the current deregulatory environment, motivates heightened interest in long intra-refueling intervals and high burnup in LWR units. This study examines the economic implications of these trends, to determine the envelope of profitable fuel management tactics. One batch management is found to be significantly more expensive than two-batch management. Parametric studies were carried out varying the most important input parameters. If ultra-high burnup can be achieved, then n = 3 or even n = 4 management may be preferable. For n = 1 or 2, economic performance declines at higher burnups, hence providing no great incentive for moving further in that direction. Values for n > 2 are also attractive because, for a given burnup target, required enrichment decreases as n increases. This study was limited to average batch burnups below 60,000 MWd/MT.

  6. Program Potential: Estimates of Federal Energy Cost Savings from Energy Efficient Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Agency Compliance with Energy- Efficient Procurement Laws.Washington, D.C. , Alliance to Save Energy. Fujita, K. S.2012). Achieved and Potential Energy Savings through Energy

  7. cost savings

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 20142/%2A2/%2A en

  8. The Texas Cattle Feeding Industry - Operations, Management, and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, R.A.; Thomas, P.J.; Farris, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    PLACED ON FEED BY SIZE OF FEEDLOT, TEXAS, 1980-81 Less than 2,000 to 2,000 3,999 head head Breed capacity capacity English Breeds and English crosses 78.4 37.3 Brahman and Brahman crosses 19.7 62.7 Holstein and Dairy crosses .2 NR Exotic European... primarily of large scale, highly efficient feeding operations located predominantly in the Panhandle-Plains area where more than 85% of Texas cattle are fed annually. Feedlots with 16,0.0.0. head or more capacity, which accounted for almost 80...

  9. Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings: Today's Trends in Project Finance, Clean Fuel Fleets, Combined Heat& Power, Emissions Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-07-01

    The Energy Smart Guide to Campus Cost Savings covers today's trends in project finance, combined heat& power, clean fuel fleets and emissions trading. The guide is directed at campus facilities and business managers and contains general guidance, contact information and case studies from colleges and universities across the country.

  10. Instill Customer Confidence Control Costs Manage Business Growth Manage Operational and Business Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Manage Operational and Business Risk Synthesize Information and Inform Campus Manage Investment Manage Risk 20. Risk Management--Cost of Risk per $1 dollar of Operating Expense (R3) $.0052 $.0059 Productivity: Finance & Facilities vs.. U.S. Department of Labor 14.4% 7.8% No gap Purchase Goods and Services

  11. Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-06-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  13. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-09-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  14. Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    "Distillation is a big consumer of energy in process plant operations. A first step to energy cost savings is the use of high efficiency structured packing in place of trays or dumped packings in conventionally operated ...

  15. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    in 2015 Fuel svgs potential in 2015 Primary energy svgs2015 Fuel savings potential in 2015 Primary energy savings2015 Fuel savings potential in 2015 Primary energy savings

  16. Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Virginia Construction Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Virginia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Virginia Construction Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Virginia homeowners will save $5,836 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $388 for the 2012 IECC.

  17. National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yield positive benefits for U.S. homeowners and significant energy savings for the nation. Moving from a baseline of the 2006 IECC to the 2009 IECC reduces average annual energy costs by 10.8%, while moving from the same baseline to the 2012 IECC reduces them by 32.1%. These reductions amount to annual energy cost savings of $168 and $497, respectively. The 2012 IECC saves $329 in energy costs compared to the 2009 IECC.

  18. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-29

    Texas A&M University is operating a high-efficiency combined heat and power (CHP) system at its district energy campus in College Station, Texas. Texas A&M received $10 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for this project. Private-sector cost share totaled $40 million.

  19. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Thornton, Jeff W.

    1997-08-01

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  20. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    that leads to greater energy and cost savings. Companiesas a significant risk. Energy costs are also identified as amonthly energy savings. Energy cost savings are calculated

  1. Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate Calculation Values ........................................12 Construction Cost per ac-ft of Water Saved ...............................12 Construction Cost per Unit of Energy Saved ...............................12 Construction Cost per Dollar.... Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 485 ac-ft of water per year and 179,486,553 BTUs {52,604 kwh} of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost...

  2. Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-04

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $119 for the 2009 IECC and $392 for the 2012 IECC.

  3. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions; Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt-recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  4. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

    2014-06-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for fifteen Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these fifteen housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades Versus Cost-Optimized Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, S.; Milby, M.; Baker, J.

    2014-06-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for 15 Chicagoland single family housing archetypes. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these 15 housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations. Additionally, a measure-level sensitivity analysis conducted for one housing group reveals which measures may be contributing the most to gas and electric savings. Overall, the study finds not only that for some housing groups, the average IHP retrofit results in more energy savings than would result from cost-optimal, BEopt recommended measure packages, but also that linking home categorization to standardized retrofit measure packages provides an opportunity to streamline the process for single family home energy retrofits and maximize both energy savings and cost effectiveness.

  6. Minimizing Market Operation Costs Using A Security-Constrained Unit Commitment Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Minimizing Market Operation Costs Using A Security-Constrained Unit Commitment Approach Qin Zhou that is currently in place. It uses a Security Constrained Unit Commitment application to commit enough units the specified time period. A post Must Offer Waiver procedure utilizing the Security Constrained Unit Commitment

  7. SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paperSPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which

  8. Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fossil fuel resources especially oil and natural gas, alternatives to electricity production basedOperational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter to the variability and unpredictability of wind power production. For large amounts of wind power production

  9. A Pragmatic Business Analysis Model for Telecom Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwete, Eric Kwete Mwana

    2010-05-14

    ................................................................................................................................... 33 Cost Analysis – Labor .............................................................................................................................. 34 Cost Analysis – CapEx... is to develop ways to reduce Operational Expenditure (OpEx). The impact of OpEx savings strategies could well benefit Capital Expenditure (CapEx) forecasts. For example, choosing to disconnect underutilized T1 circuits could save ports on a switch hence...

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. To reducereduced maintenance costs and increased the pump system’smaintenance costs and energy costs represent by far the most significant fraction of a pump’

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. To reducereduced maintenance costs and increased the pump system’smaintenance costs and energy costs represent by far the most significant fraction of a pump’

  12. Energy Efficiency and Least-Cost Planning: The Best Way to Save Money and Reduce Energy Use in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mowris, Robert J.

    1990-05-21

    If the 500 MW geothermal project on the Big Island of Hawaii is developed as planned, the Wao Kele O Puna rain forest will be severely damaged or destroyed. If this happens the State will lose one of its most precious resources. It would be tragic for this to happen, since on a least-cost basis, the geothermal project does not make economic sense. Improving energy efficiency in the commercial and residential sectors of Hawaii can save about 500 MW of power at a cost of $700 million.

  13. Service Members Aim High-- for Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide.

  14. West Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for West Virginia homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, West Virginia homeowners will save $1,996 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,301 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $135 for the 2009 IECC and $480 for the 2012 IECC.

  15. Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $143 for the 2009 IECC and $507 for the 2012 IECC.

  16. Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $155 for the 2009 IECC and $543 for the 2012 IECC.

  17. Arkansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arkansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arkansas homeowners will save $1,948 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,679 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $147 for the 2009 IECC and $466 for the 2012 IECC.

  18. Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $123 for the 2009 IECC and $415 for the 2012 IECC.

  19. Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $168 for the 2009 IECC and $462 for the 2012 IECC.

  20. Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $358 for the 2012 IECC.

  1. Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $164 for the 2009 IECC and $422 for the 2012 IECC.

  2. Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $672 for the 2012 IECC.

  3. Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $231 for the 2009 IECC and $486 for the 2012 IECC.

  4. Minnesota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Minnesota Residential Energy Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Minnesota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Minnesota Residential Energy Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Minnesota homeowners will save $1,277 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $9,873 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceed cumulative cash outlays) in 3 years for the 2009 IECC and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $122 for the 2009 IECC and $669 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines...

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Birch, E. , 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems”Engineering and Energy Savings” Energy Efficiency in theGomes, A. S. , 1990. “Energy Saving and Environmental Impact

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    identify and evaluate energy-saving opportunities, recommendAir Compressors, New Money-Saving Option Requires CarefulJ. (2000). Energy – Saving and Emission – Reduction

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs. LawrenceUnion, Energy, Emissions, Savings Potential and PolicyEnergy and Capital Savings. Saginaw, Michigan. http://

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    and 4, the efficiency measures and estimated savings for theEnergy Efficiency Measure Specific Fuel Savings (MBtu/tonEnergy Efficiency Measure Specific Fuel Savings (MBtu/ ton

  10. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2011-01-01

    Willems, D. (2008). Saving Energy with the High Efficiencyelectrical motors energy use and energy savings. Renewable &climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the

  11. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pietermen, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    feed stream and thus reduces the energy requirements of thetemperature streams can save energy. Higher temperaturesstream, recovering approximately 85%- 90% of the thermal energy.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Envirowise (1996). Family Brewery Makes Big Water Savings: AJ.W. Lees and Company (Brewery) Ltd. Oxfordshire, England.The Efficiency of A Brewery's Cooling System. Office of

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Conservation (CIPEC) (2001). Boilers and Heaters, ImprovingCADDET) (2003). Steam Boiler House Modifications Give Energymilks significant savings from boiler tune-up. The Energy

  15. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  16. Entanglement cost and entangling power of bipartite unitary and permutation operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin Chen; Li Yu

    2015-08-18

    It is known that any bipartite unitary operator of Schmidt rank three is equivalent to a controlled unitary under local unitaries. We propose a standard form of such operators. Using the form we improve the upper bound for the entanglement cost to implement such operators under local operations and classical communications (LOCC), and provide a corresponding protocol. A part of our protocol is based on a recursive-control protocol which is helpful for implementing other unitary operators. We also propose the upper bound for the entanglement cost of complex bipartite permutation unitaries of two special types. Based on this we show that any real bipartite permutation unitary of Schmidt rank three can be implemented using LOCC and two ebits. We also give a protocol for implementing bipartite permutation unitaries of any Schmidt rank $r$, which is shown to require not more than $r^2$ ebits. Based on this we obtain upper bounds of the number of nonlocal CNOT gates needed to implement bipartite classical reversible maps using classical circuits under two different conditions. We also quantify the entangling power of bipartite permutation unitaries of Schmidt rank two and three. We show that they are respectively $1$ ebit and some value between $\\log_2 9 - 16/9$ and $\\log_2 3$ ebits.

  17. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2013-01-01

    they could trim costs by saving energy and water. Journalfor annual energy savings, energy costs savings, waterReport for DOE-Sponsored Energy Savings Assessment Conducted

  18. Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2013-01-01

    they could trim costs by saving energy and water. Journalfor annual energy savings, energy costs savings, wateron quantified savings potential and energy efficiency

  19. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

  20. Estimating the Energy, Demand and Cost Savings from a Geothermal Heat Pump ESPC Project at Fort Polk, LA Through Utility Bill Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are a method of financing energy conservation projects using the energy cost savings generated by the conservation measures themselves. Ideally, reduced energy costs are visible as reduced utility bills, but in fact this is not always the case. On large military bases, for example, a single electric meter typically covers hundreds of individual buildings. Savings from an ESPC involving only a small number of these buildings will have little effect on the overall utility bill. In fact, changes in mission, occupancy, and energy prices could cause substantial increases in utility bills. For this reason, other, more practical, methods have been developed to measure and verify savings in ESPC projects. Nevertheless, increasing utility bills--when ESPCs are expected to be reducing them--are problematic and can lead some observers to question whether savings are actually being achieved. In this paper, the authors use utility bill analysis to determine energy, demand, and cost savings from an ESPC project that installed geothermal heat pumps in the family housing areas of the military base at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The savings estimates for the first year after the retrofits were found to be in substantial agreement with previous estimates that were based on submetered data. However, the utility bills also show that electrical use tended to increase as time went on. Since other data show that the energy use in family housing has remained about the same over the period, the authors conclude that the savings from the ESPC have persisted, and increases in electrical use must be due to loads unassociated with family housing. This shows that under certain circumstances, and with the proper analysis, utility bills can be used to estimate savings from ESPC projects. However, these circumstances are rare and over time the comparison may be invalidated by increases in energy use in areas unaffected by the ESPC.

  1. Statewide Electrical Energy Cost Savings and Peak Demand Reduction from the IECC Code-Compliant, Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2009) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01

    -02-01 STATEWIDE ELECTRICITY AND DEMAND CAPACITY SAVINGS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE (IECC) ADOPTION FOR SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCES IN TEXAS (2002-2009) Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P... SUMMARY Statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the different International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) versions for single-family residences in Texas and the corresponding construction cost increases over...

  2. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01

    including specific energy and cost savings data. For otherdevelops estimates of energy and cost savings for upgradesdevelop estimates of energy and cost savings for upgrades

  3. The Full Costs of Urban Transport. Part I: Economic Efficiency in Bus Operations; Preliminary Intermodal Cost Comparison and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Fisher; Philip Viton

    1974-01-01

    costs o f bus c o n s u m e r and i n a cost service. the Ino n a l planning c o n s u m e r and exploration costs be aContra Costa bus s m a l l e r and as p o l i c e , s h e r

  4. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more »90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  5. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoidedincluding: operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, capitalactual savings Operations and maintenance and other non-

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Envirowise. 1996. Family Brewery Makes Big Water Savings: AJ.W. Lees and Company (Brewery) Ltd. Oxfordshire, England.At the J.W. Lees and Company Brewery in Manchester, England,

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    water, can save both water and energy compared to higha significant source of water and energy use (Chisti 1999,101quantities of water and energy in the cleaning process.

  8. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  9. Evaluation of Production Cost Savings from Consolidation of Balancing Authorities in the US Western Interconnection under High Wind and Solar Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2014-12-24

    This paper introduces a comprehensive analysis to quantify the potential savings in production cost due to consolidation of 32 US western interconnection Balancing Authorities (BAs). Three simulation scenarios are developed: current Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) BAs structure, full copper-sheet consolidation, and full consolidation with transmission congestion considered. The study uses WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) model that was developed for the year 2020. The model assumes 8% wind and 3% solar energy penetration as percentage of total WECC demand in 2020. Sensitivity analyses are carried out to assess the impact of transmission hurdle rates between WECC BAs on potential benefits. The study shows savings that ranges from $400 Million (2.4% of total one year production cost) to $600 Million (3.2%) per year in thermal units production cost due to consolidation can be achieved. The copper sheet consolidation scenario shows an extra savings of $240 Million (1.4%) per year.

  10. Ford Cleveland: Inside-Out Analysis Identifies Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities at Metal Casting Plant; Industrial Technologies Program Metal Casting BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01

    The Ford Cleveland Casting Plant used results from its plant-wide energy efficiency assessment to identify 16 energy- and cost-saving projects. These projects addressed combustion, compressed air, water, steam, motor drive, and lighting systems. When implemented, the projects should save a total of$3.28 million per year. In addition, two long-term projects were identified that together would represent another$9.5 million in cost savings.

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    valve to open, often becomes the normal operating practice, but is extremely wasteful and costly in terms of air leakage.

  12. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingsley, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    2013. State Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS).The total resource costs of energy efficiency (includingtotal resource costs of energy efficiency for comparison

  13. Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs April 10, 2013 - 12:00am...

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

    2003-09-01

    Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  16. LEED-EB: How to Achieve Certification and Reduce Operating Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iczkowski, E.

    2005-01-01

    Is the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program (LEED) delivering actual energy savings? This study addresses that question with a post-occupancy assessment of 121 LEED buildings across the United State. Input to the study consisted...

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  18. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingsley, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    CSE DOE DSM EIA EERS HVAC LCOE MUSH WACC American Councillevelized cost of energy (LCOE), which represents the per-the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), often is applied to

  19. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

    2003-01-01

    energy performance and cost models for high performance relocatable classrooms (RCs) across CaliforniaCost Benefit Calculations for High Performance Relocatable Classrooms 6 Acknowledgements This research was sponsored by the California Energy

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    concrete Process Water Multiple low volume drum washoutsconcrete is reused, disposal costs avoided and water use for truck washout

  1. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

  2. The Optimizing Control and Energy Saving Operations of One Teaching Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.

    2006-01-01

    save the energy consumption of the air conditioning system to a large extent. In other words, the optimizing control system possesses enormous development potential. Therefore, the control method and the energy-saving strategies in this paper can...

  3. Assessing the Role of Operating, Passenger, and Infrastructure Costs in Fleet Planning under Fuel Price Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirti, Megan; Hansen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    ATA) Quarterly Cost Index: U.S. Passenger Airlines. http://fuel, termed Jet A, and the cost index in cents per gallon.The cost index, as defined by the Air Transportation

  4. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  5. Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

    2013-01-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale - Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    In this project, IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes to develop a simple and low-cost methodology by which community-scale energy savings can be evaluated based on results at the occupied test house level.Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a whole-house systems integrated measures package and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  7. Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

  8. Geothermal Heat Pumps as a Cost Saving and Capital Renewal Too!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.

    1998-11-06

    An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk, Louisiana energy savings performance contract (ESPC) has verified the financial value of geothermal heat pump (GHP)-centered ESPCS to the federal government. The Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has responded by issuing an RFP for the "National GHP-Technology-Specific Super ESPC Procurement." Federal agency sites anywhere in the nation will be able to implement GHP-centered ESPC projects as delivery orders against the awarded contracts.

  9. Practical Energy Savings and New Process Control Options for Parts Washing and Cleaning Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    2002-01-01

    Substantial potential energy savings exist for many parts washing and cleaning processes in use today. Energy usage is frequently the largest single variable cost involved in parts washing and cleaning operations. Several control parameters...

  10. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the “cost-effective potential” (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-worldenergy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world

  12. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  13. Integrating Volume Reduction and Packaging Alternatives to Achieve Cost Savings for Low Level Waste Disposal at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, A.; Gordon, J.; Montrose, J. K.

    2002-02-26

    In order to reduce costs and achieve schedules for Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the Waste Requirements Group has implemented a number of cost saving initiatives aimed at integrating waste volume reduction with the selection of compliant waste packaging methods for the disposal of RFETS low level radioactive waste (LLW). Waste Guidance Inventory and Shipping Forecasts indicate that over 200,000 m3 of low level waste will be shipped offsite between FY2002 and FY2006. Current projections indicate that the majority of this waste will be shipped offsite in an estimated 40,000 55-gallon drums, 10,000 metal and plywood boxes, and 5000 cargo containers. Currently, the projected cost for packaging, shipment, and disposal adds up to $80 million. With these waste volume and cost projections, the need for more efficient and cost effective packaging and transportation options were apparent in order to reduce costs and achieve future Site packaging a nd transportation needs. This paper presents some of the cost saving initiatives being implemented for waste packaging at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site). There are many options for either volume reduction or alternative packaging. Each building and/or project may indicate different preferences and/or combinations of options.

  14. #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Water Heating Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks Y-12 Beta-3of thePoliciesDuringWays to Save on

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    decrease in pump operating and maintenance costs. To reduceunbalances Pumps Pump system maintenance Multiple pumps forare described below. Pump system maintenance. Inadequate

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    controls Pumps Pump system maintenance Avoiding throttlingInadequate maintenance at times lowers pump systempump system. Energy costs, and sometimes operations and maintenance

  17. Instill Customer Confidence Control Costs Manage Business Growth Manage Operational and Business Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    ! " # $# ! % " & ' " ( ) ( * + ( Instill Customer Confidence Control Costs Manage Business Growth Portfolios Monitor Customer Satisfaction Manage Cost of Capital , * + * - . Advise and Consult Develop Staff to deliver outstanding service anywhere, anytime Values: Collaboration · Diversity · Excellence · Innovation

  18. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    in Exeter, New Hampshire, identified electricity savings ofNew Hampshire, opportunities were identified for saving 1.7 million kWh of electricityelectricity use at OSRAM Sylvania’s glass plant in Exeter, New Hampshire,

  20. Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1969-01-01

    storage facilities, water system, feed distri- 1 bution equipment, transportation equipment and i Imd. munted for about 55 percent of the fed cattle mar- Annual fixed costs - depreciation, interest, taxes, insurance, repairs and fixed labor... and ............................................ I Total Fixed Costs 2? ........................... Summary and Selected Implications .?i 1 Appendix A: Supplementary Tables ........................ 19 Appendix B: Procedure for Estimating Depreciation Costs and Classification ! of Feedlot...

  1. Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puckorius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    down for reuse into the cooling tower system. Several plants have been built and operated with considerable difficulty regarding effective operation of the softener due to improper chemical selection. However, other plants have utilized the proper...

  2. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  3. SAVE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SAVE the DATE The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is proud to announce the pending release of the Office of Legacy Management's Strategic Plan 2016-2025 on...

  4. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department ofBusinessCEA90:2:09California Energy

  5. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2003-05-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  6. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles

    2014-01-01

    8   Overview of Non-Building Federal Energyof Extending the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts35 Amory B. Lovins, “All Energy Experts on Deck! ” available

  7. Saving Energy at Ford 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McReynolds, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    effectively to save energy and reduce energy costs in our manufacturing operations. As a result, we are in a position to speak about successful industrial conservation practices that have worked for us over the last decade. Fuel Switching For a time... equipment. Ensure air-drying equipment is effective. Avoid continuously blowing off moisture through open valves -- it is a gross energy-waster, overloads the compressor, reducing effective oil and water removal and causes excessive pressure drop...

  8. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchgroundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;the environmental costs of motor vehicle transportation in

  9. Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

    2012-08-28

    Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

  10. Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullan, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process design is a complex task... and operatlng a process. Understanding the impact of these decisions in the context of the overall process can lead to significant savings in both capital and operating costs. Full investigation of these interactions through engineering studies is expensive...

  11. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  12. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

    2003-01-01

    impact on the advanced hybrid heating use. Initially, in thenot be operating. The advanced hybrid heating data indicatedegrees F) Avg Hybrid Heating 70.1 Hybrid Cooling 70.2 HPAC

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Air Compressors, New Money-Saving Option Requires Careful1997). Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps. Proc.Mean Energy and Dollar Savings. http://energy.copper.org/

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Edison Educational Publication: Saving Money with Motors inIntroducing Energy Saving Opportunities for Business.Potential for Electric Energy Savings in the Manufacturing

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based onenergy savings for each energy efficiency measure based onenergy savings data are provided for each efficiency measure

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Optimizing Steam Systems: Saving Energy and Money in MexicanCADDET) (1997a). Saving Energy with Efficient Compressed AirTechnologies (CADDET) (2001). Saving Energy with Daylighting

  17. Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

    2003-01-01

    Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

  18. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2004-10-01

    PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Commercial Refrigeration Rebate Program Efficiency Vermont offers financial incentives to cover the incremental costs...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Utilities Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Renewable Energy Cost Recovery Incentive Payment In May 2005, Washington enacted Senate Bill...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Commercial Refrigeration Rebate Program Efficiency Vermont offers financial incentives to cover the incremental costs of energy...

  2. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a networkmore »of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  3. Two-layer Solar Panels to Save Space, Cut Cost By Express News Service, Published: 17th March 2015 06:00 AM , Last Updated: 17th March 2015 03:50 A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    Two-layer Solar Panels to Save Space, Cut Cost By Express News Service, Published: 17th March 2015 and also cost. Acharya Nagarjuna University principal P Siddaiah said it takes `84,000 to instal one solar 06:00 AM , Last Updated: 17th March 2015 03:50 A Visitors examine solar equipment at a stall during

  4. Existing Whole-House Case Study: Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions, Chicago, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    Expanding on previous research by PARR, this study compares measure packages installed during 800 Illinois Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® (IHP) residential retrofits to those recommended as cost-optimal by Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) modeling software. In previous research, cost-optimal measure packages were identified for 15 Chicagoland single family housing archetypes, called housing groups. In the present study, 800 IHP homes are first matched to one of these 15 housing groups, and then the average measures being installed in each housing group are modeled using BEopt to estimate energy savings. For most housing groups, the differences between recommended and installed measure packages is substantial. By comparing actual IHP retrofit measures to BEopt-recommended cost-optimal measures, missed savings opportunities are identified in some housing groups; also, valuable information is obtained regarding housing groups where IHP achieves greater savings than BEopt-modeled, cost-optimal recommendations.

  5. Small Businesses Save Big: A Borrower's Guide To Increase the Bottom Line Using Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides a guide for small businesses to find the resources to increase the energy efficiency of their buildings.

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Potential for Electric Energy Savings in the ManufacturingThe energy savings associated with pulsed electric field

  7. Uncovering opportunities for cost containment and operational improvements via shared practices between device manufacturer and hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machinani, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical device manufacturers (suppliers) and hospitals (providers) face financial and operational stressors exacerbated by recent healthcare reform. Providers now face the prospect of decreased reimbursements ...

  8. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

    2013-08-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  9. Energy savings potential from energy-conserving irrigation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report systematically compares, within a consistent framework, the technical and economic characteristics of energy-conserving irrigation systems with those of conventional irrigation systems and to determine total energy savings. Levelized annual costs of owning and operating both energy-conserving and conventional irrigation systems have been developed and compared for all 17 states to account for the differences in energy costs and irrigation conditions in each state. Market penetration of energy-conserving systems is assessed for those systems having lower levelized annual costs than conventional systems performing the same function. Annual energy savings were computed by matching the energy savings per system with an assumed maximum market penetration of 100 percent in those markets where the levelized annual costs of energy-conserving systems are lower than the levelized annual costs of conventional systems.

  10. Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) problem where future thermal demand and electricity prices are predicted. The proposed method uses show that significant cost reduction can be obtained. I. INTRODUCTION Cutting peak electricity demand for the next day is defined taking account of thermal demand for the TES system and electricity prices

  11. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles

    2014-01-01

    cost of modification. With jet fuel prices hovering around $price of $2.50/gallon – significantly lower than the present commercial cost of jet fuel–

  13. Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft OperatingCapturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operatingsurges in the price of fuel as regional jets have lower fuel

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  15. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2005-03-17

    Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

  16. Using Batteries to Reduce the Power Costs of Internet-scale Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Emery

    margin) Power Savings: (Ppeak ­ Pbatt) Cost Savings: cp(Ppeak ­ Pbatt) ­ cbB/L cp= cost of power ($/KW Empirical Evaluation: Power Savings Empirical Evaluation: Cost Savings Outline Concluding Remarks #12;Power, Global Load Balancing, etc. #12;Provisioning Algorithms Empirical Evaluation: Power Savings Empirical

  17. Cost savings associated with landfilling wastes containing very low levels of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, C.J. [Argonne National Lab., Germantown, MD (United States); Shaddoan, W.T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Paducah, KY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has operated captive landfills (both residential and construction/demolition debris) in accordance with the Commonwealth of Kentucky regulations since the early 1980s. Typical waste streams allowed in these landfills include nonhazardous industrial and municipal solid waste (such as paper, plastic, cardboard, cafeteria waste, clothing, wood, asbestos, fly ash, metals, and construction debris). In July 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new requirements for the disposal of sanitary wastes in a {open_quotes}contained landfill.{close_quotes} These requirements were promulgated in the 401 Kentucky Administrative Record Chapters 47 and 48 that became effective 30 June 1995. The requirements for a new contained landfill include a synthetic liner made of high-density polyethylene in addition to the traditional 1-meter (3-foot) clay liner and a leachate collection system. A new landfill at Paducah would accept waste streams similar to those that have been accepted in the past. The permit for the previously existing landfills did not include radioactivity limits; instead, these levels were administratively controlled. Typically, if radioactivity was detected above background levels, the waste was classified as low-level waste (LLW), which would be sent off-site for disposal.

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    1997 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry.American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy,Park, NC. Birch, E. , 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    energy savings, such as roof insulation, air conditioning efficiency,Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry .17 5.1 Energy Management Systems and Programs18 5.2 Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Outlook in West Germany’s Cement Industry” Energy EfficiencyGermany) and Mitsui Mining (Japan). All report typical energyGermany. Dumas, J. , 1990. “Engineering and Energy Savings

  1. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  2. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    has become a potential energy and cost saver for refineries.Refrigeration System Reduces Energy Costs - September - GRIin material and energy costs ([DOE-OIT], U.S. Department of

  3. Small Businesses Save Big: A Guide to Help SBA Lenders Understand and Communicate the Value of Energy Efficiency Investments (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides guidelines for SBA lenders to understand the value of financing energy efficiency investments.

  4. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,Saving Water Saves Energy James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunhamavailable products. The energy savings associated with water

  5. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    energy costs of this plant as representative for the calculationsenergy (fuel) NA Cost of conserved energy (primary energy) $/MBtu Discount rate for all CCE calculations

  6. Cost-Optimal Operation of Energy Storage Units: Benefits of a Problem-Specific Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemer, Lars; Kleinhans, David

    2015-01-01

    The integration of large shares of electricity produced by non-dispatchable Renewable Energy Sources (RES) leads to an increasingly volatile energy generation side, with temporary local overproduction. The application of energy storage units has the potential to use this excess electricity from RES efficiently and to prevent curtailment. The objective of this work is to calculate cost-optimal charging strategies for energy storage units used as buffers. For this purpose, a new mathematical optimization method is presented that is applicable to general storage-related problems. Due to a tremendous gain in efficiency of this method compared with standard solvers and proven optimality, calculations of complex problems as well as a high-resolution sensitivity analysis of multiple system combinations are feasible within a very short time. As an example technology, Power-to-Heat converters used in combination with thermal storage units are investigated in detail and optimal system configurations, including storage ...

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    155,000 kWh of electric energy per year, totaling savings ofnatural gas/electric boilers and found energy savings of $varying energy savings results. The Tokyo Electric Power

  8. ESTIMATING ENERGY SAVINGS IN COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEMS Chris Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    energy savings must be calculated in order to justify the cost of implementing the savings opportunity. It is important to calculate projected energy and cost savings as accurately as possible. Unfortunately, savings is presented for modeling air compressor performance and calculating projected energy savings from easily

  9. Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Satish; Webster, Lia

    2005-01-01

    Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Working GroupESPCs), operation and maintenance (O&M) is critical to1.1 Overview of Operations and Maintenance Issues in Energy

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    The energy savings were estimated at 58% per year (Hydraulicmonths by energy savings of 36 MWh (2%) per year (Hydraulicenergy. Proper maintenance includes the following (Hydraulic

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    feed stream and thus reduces the energy requirements of thethe inlet air stream, thereby saving energy. The success ofprocess input streams, which saves energy (European

  12. Financing Energy Cost Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    *Pricing RFQ *Firm and Staff Qualifications Subsequent Discovery *Details *Process and Pricing Creating A Cleaner Energy Future For the Commonwealth Regional Aggregated Projects...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Mandatory Utility Green Power Option All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not...

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Agricultural, Low Income Residential Savings Category: Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewable Energy Cost Recovery Incentive Payment...

  16. Energy-efficient data center design and management has been a problem of increasing importance in the last decade due to its potential to save billions of dollars in energy costs. Conventional design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-efficient data center design and management has been a problem of increasing importance in the last decade due to its potential to save billions of dollars in energy costs. Conventional design and analysis methods include: 1) physical modeling to analyze the physical aspects of data centers

  17. A new A&P Food Market in Mt. Kisco, New York, is enjoying annual energy cost savings of nearly $130,000 with the installation of an integrated microturbine power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Background A new A&P Food Market in Mt. Kisco, New York, is enjoying annual energy cost savings, heating and power solutions, was installed in 2005 in the 57,000- square-foot facility. The New York supermarket was the first U.S. customer to take delivery of the new system. The PureComfort system is designed

  18. Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens Saves Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens Saves Consumers Energy and Updates the Social Cost of Carbon Energy Efficiency Standards for Microwave Ovens Saves Consumers Energy...

  19. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications Potential for the Use of Energy...

  20. Study on Energy Saving of the Interlayer Ventilation Walla Used in Clean Operation Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, J.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Recovery energy of the exhaust in air conditioning is very important to clean operating rooms. In disinfected operating rooms, we often use completely fresh air conditioning system in order to maintain cleanliness. All the return air of the air...

  1. Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program April 2006 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Yu

    for operation and maintenance. New initiatives will continue to be collected and shared with appropriate vehicle energy reduction goal. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use Energy units are converted to mmbtu to allow to current energy costs and campus square footage. Utility Goal Actual % Change Est. Savings Electricity 0

  2. Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2006 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    for operation and maintenance. New initiatives will continue to be collected and shared with appropriate vehicle energy reduction goal. A. Energy Goals 1. Campus Energy Use Energy units are converted to mmbtu to allow to current energy costs and campus square footage. Utility FY05 Actual % Change Est. Savings Electricity

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  5. Measuring Cost Variability in Provision of Transit Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Brian D.; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    include both operating costs and capital costs, though mostof semi?xed operating and capital-cost allocation generallyresearch, both operating and capital costs are combined, and

  6. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    interviews, and gathering energy and cost data. Similarly,EIS? 2. What are the energy- and cost-savings benefits of anEIS? Quantifying the energy and cost-savings benefits

  7. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost-effectiveness for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , cost and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity.............................................................................................................. 1 Measure Cost Assumptions savings that are cost-effective to the region's power system. The second section describes the methodology

  8. Kansas City Plant submits productivity savings under share-in...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    who generate the cost savings ideas. This use of share-in-savings was added to M&O contracts as a savings tool made available by the NNSA-wide Business Management Advisory...

  9. Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be available to save you money. Q: When will the new bulbs be phased in? A: Newer energy-saving lightbulb choices that save about 25% to 75% in energy costs are on the market...

  10. RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L; Martin, Michaela A; Gemmer, Bob; Scheihing, Paul; Quinn, James

    2007-09-01

    In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

  11. What does a negawatt really cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

  12. Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the John Sealy North Building at UTMB 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    schedule, the cold deck reset schedule and the hot deck reset schedule. These optimized HVAC operation schedules were determined using an analysis involving a simplified HVAC model, which was calibrated against daily data measured by the LoanSTAR program...

  13. Analyze Detect Measure ControlTM Compact, low-cost spectrophotometer offers all the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Analyze · Detect · Measure · ControlTM Compact, low-cost spectrophotometer offers all with the SPECTRONIC 20 system now run faster, with more efficiency, and yield more accurate results. And for your Benefits: · Easy operation and reliable design for fast, accurate results · Small size saves valuable lab

  14. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) allow Federal agencies to conduct energy projects with limited to no up-front capital costs, minimizing the need for Congressional appropriations.

  15. Operating plan FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  16. National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying Savings From Improved Boiler Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    estimates of savings are vital to efforts to improve energy efficiency. This paper describes methods for estimating the expected savings from these measures in natural gas fired boilers. The methods described here energy supplied. A method for calculating boiler efficiency from easily measured input variables

  17. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Programme. (1997). Good Practice Guide 149: Rotary Drying inProgramme. (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Programme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  19. Costs of Saving Water in South Texas with Irrigation District Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Using Capital Budgeting with RGIDECON© 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, E.; Lacewell, R.; Sturdivant, A.

    2013-01-01

    District Economics) to facilitate unbiased comparisons of real project costs. That is, a Capital Budgeting – Net Present Value (NPV) methodology, combined with calculation of annuity equivalent (AE) values, was developed to incorporate different initial...

  20. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Gilligan, Donald; Singer, Terry

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry?a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances-- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Nonenergy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100percent of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

  1. Energy Savings Measure Packages: Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, S.; Booten, C.

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the US. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for given source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home. The dollar value of the maximum annual savings varies significantly by location but typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  2. Packaging effects: operating frequency, power, complexity, reliability, and cost The packaging challenge is too keep up with the demands of forecasted silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Packaging effects: operating frequency, power, complexity, reliability, and cost The packaging materials, as well as process techniques. Introduction of CU/low-k materials has caused stiffness of package and silicon to become similar. The IC and package become a single physical structure requiring new knowledge

  3. Measuring the Effects of Peaking, Vehicle Capital, and Passenger Capacity on the Cost of Providing Transit Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Brian D; Garrett, Mark; Iseki, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    include both operating costs and capital costs, though mostthe Peak Period Operating Vehicle Non-vehicle Costs CapitalCosts Capital Costs Total Capital Total Costs Costs This

  4. Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of TXDOT CNG fleet conversion. Volume 2. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euritt, M.A.; Taylor, D.B.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-08-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas' program for alternate fuels includes compressed natural gas (CNG). Based on an analysis of 30-year life-cycle costs, development of a natural gas vehicle (NGV) program for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) would cost about $47 million (in 1991 dollars). These costs include savings from lower priced natural gas, infrastructure costs for a fast-fueling station, vehicle costs, and operating costs. The 30-year life-cycle costs translate into an average annual vehicle cost increase of $596, or about 4.9 cents more per vehicle mile of travel. Based on the cost-effectiveness analysis and assumptions, there are currently no TxDOT stations suitable for conversion to compressed natural gas.

  6. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    energy-efficiency measures, commissioning savings are oftenefficiency measures, it has a cost, associated savings, andSavings do not last, especially for “soft” measures that can be and often are defeated Risks to Energy-Efficiency

  7. Evaluation Prompts ENERGY STAR Program to Replace Web Tool, Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prompts ENERGY STAR Program to Replace Web Tool, Saving 90 Percent of Annual Costs Evaluation Prompts ENERGY STAR Program to Replace Web Tool, Saving 90 Percent of Annual Costs...

  8. Reducing Idle Power Consumption in Office Spaces Saves U.S. Navy in Energy Costs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    As part of a two-year project to demonstrate energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has identified advanced plug load controls as a promising technology for reducing energy use and related costs in the U.S. Navy's Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) office spaces.

  9. Utility Cost Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, S.

    1984-01-01

    One of the first steps in setting up an energy management program in a commercial building is determining operating costs per energy consuming system through a utility cost analysis. This paper illustrates utility cost analysis methods used...

  10. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  11. Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, A. W.; Rister, M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Rogers, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    : Allen W. Sturdivant; Extension Associate a, b M. Edward Rister; Professor and Associate Head a, c Ronald D. Lacewell; Professor and Assistant Vice Chancellor a, c Callie S. Rogers; Student Technician a Background The original economic analysis reporting... $ 20,071 ....................same As shown in Table 1, the original estimated initial capital construction costs totaled $3,585,300 with the revised, actual value equaling $3,278,276 (Balcombe). The installation period was projected to take one year...

  12. Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Lacewell, R.

    2007-01-01

    . Sturdivant Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas Cooperative Extension, Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Weslaco M. Edward Rister and Ronald D. Lacewell Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A... Construction Costs for the Main Pipeline, Brownsville Irrigation District by: Allen W. Sturdivant; Extension Associate 1, 2 M. Edward Rister; Professor and Associate Head 1, 3 Ronald D. Lacewell; Professor and Assistant Vice Chancellor 1, 3 Background...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Schools, State Government, Tribal Government Savings Category: Photovoltaics Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Retail Supplier, Schools, State Government Savings Category: Lighting Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  16. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    i=2 Wisconsin – Focus on Energy Description: Target Group:Format: Contact: URL: Energy advisors offer free servicesidentify and evaluate energy-saving opportunities, recommend

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    and M. Kushler. (c. 1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotiveof Demonstrated Energy Technologies ( CADDET). (1987).Rivers. (1997). Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps.

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Programme (1994). Good Practice Guide 141: Waste heatProgramme (1998). Good Practice Guide 249: Energy Savings inProgramme (1999a). Good Practice Guide 225: Industrial

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (2000c). New steam turbine saves chemical manufacturer $demand. Back-pressure steam turbines which may be used to

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Envirowise (1996). Family Brewery Makes Big Water Savings: AJ.W. Lees and Company (Brewery) Ltd. Oxfordshire, England.The Efficiency of A Brewery's Cooling System. Office of

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Envirowise (1996). Family Brewery Makes Big Water Savings: AJ.W. Lees and Company (Brewery) Ltd. Oxfordshire, England.The Efficiency of A Brewery's Cooling System. Office of

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Conservation (CIPEC) (2001). Boilers and Heaters, ImprovingCADDET) (2003). Steam Boiler House Modifications Give Energymilks significant savings from boiler tune-up. The Energy

  4. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain: Strategic biorefinery feedstock supply system design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biore? neries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock sup-ply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply depend-ency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biore? nery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based onmore »a network of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system bene? ts. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system bene? ts including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biore? nery. When translating these bene? ts into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we ? nd that total cost reductions between –$0.46 to –$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and –$0.32 to –$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level bene? ts will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  5. Savannah River Site Saves $10 Million with Innovative Commercial Procurement Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The management and operations contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) created more than $10 million in cost savings in fiscal year 2013 by adopting successful purchasing practices used by America’s top companies.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of TXDOT CNG fleet conversion. Volume 1. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euritt, M.A.; Taylor, D.B.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-08-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas' program for alternate fuels includes compressed natural gas (CNG). Based on analysis of 30-year life-cycle costs, development of a natural gas vehicle (NGV) program for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) would cost about $47 million (in 1991 dollars). These costs include savings from lower-priced natural gas, infrastructure costs for a fast-fueling station, vehicle costs, and operating costs. The 30-year life-cycle costs translate into an average annual vehicle cost increase of $596, or about 4.9

  7. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01

    factor O&M – Operations and Maintenance (fraction of capitalfuel cost, and operations and maintenance costs. Table 4and variable operations and maintenance costs (O&M). In

  8. Energy Savings Measure Packages. Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Sean; Booten, Chuck

    2011-11-01

    This document presents the most cost effective Energy Savings Measure Packages (ESMP) for existing mixed-fuel and all electric homes to achieve 15% and 30% savings for each BetterBuildings grantee location across the United States. These packages are optimized for minimum cost to homeowners for source energy savings given the local climate and prevalent building characteristics (i.e. foundation types). Maximum cost savings are typically found between 30% and 50% energy savings over the reference home; this typically amounts to $300 - $700/year.

  9. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J.L. ); Whitlow, R.R. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that pulling tubing to clean out a production liner at Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBU WOA) averages $600,000 to $800,000. Coiled tubing underreaming was developed to accomplish this objective at lower costs. Beginning in 1988, these operations have been improved through several generations of procedures and tool designs. Using current technology, the underreamer, in conjunction with coiled tubing, can reduce the cost of drilling out to a liner to about $50,000 or $100,000, depending on the amount and type of material to be removed. PBU WOA, operated by BP Exploration, produces about 600,000 bopd from 395 wells. Another 61 wells are used to inject produced water, seawater and miscible fluids. Most of the remedial well servicing operations are conducted using coiled tubing (CT). Three contract coiled tubing units (CTUs) work daily, performing wellbore cleanouts, stimulations, inflatable bridge plug installations and cement squeeze operations. About 42 underreaming jobs were performed from 1990 to 1991 at PBU WOA for an average cost of between $75,000 and $100,000, a cost savings of $500,000 power well compared to pulling tubing and cleaning out the wells conventionally.

  10. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine cost trade studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschall, R.K. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, Mail Stop IB57, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    The NASA transportation strategy for the Mars Exploration architecture includes the use of nuclear thermal propulsion as the primary propulsion system for Mars transits. It is anticipated that the outgrowth of the NERVA/ROVER programs will be a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system capable of providing the propulsion for missions to Mars. The specific impulse (Isp) for such a system is expected to be in the 870 s range. Trade studies were conducted to investigate whether or not it may be cost effective to invest in a higher performance (Isp[gt]870 s) engine for nuclear thermal propulsion for missions to Mars. The basic cost trades revolved around the amount of mass that must be transported to low-earth orbit prior to each Mars flight and the cost to launch that mass. The mass required depended on the assumptions made for Mars missions scenarios including piloted/cargo flights, number of Mars missions, and transit time to Mars. Cost parameters included launch cost, program schedule for development and operations, and net discount rate. The results were very dependent on the assumptions that were made. Under some assumptions, higher performance engines showed cost savings in the billions of dollars; under other assumptions, the additional cost to develop higher performance engines was not justified.

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy saving products at no cost to the customer. The installation include: CFLs, low-flow shower heads, low flow... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Multifamily Residential...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Savings Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rebates are limited to 50% of the project cost up to a maximum of 100,000....

  13. Energy Efficiency: Saving Money and Preserving Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy efficiency is not something flashy at first glance, but it quietly spurs innovation while cutting costs and saving jobs across the country.

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A minimum 50% cash match of total project costs is required to be from non-state derived matching funds. ... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial Savings Category: Geothermal...

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    1998b). Distributed Small-scale CHP on a Large ManufacturingCADDET). (1998). Free CHP Saves Energy for VehicleCombined heat and power (CHP) CHP combined with absorption

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    saves $200,000 per Year with Energy-Efficient Motors. CopperStrategies to Promote Energy-Efficient Motor Systems in2000). Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies.

  17. Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

  18. Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenquist, G.

    2010-01-01

    calculation include the installed consumer cost (purchase price plus installation cost), operating expenses (energy and

  19. Momentum Savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that drives any Momentum Savings analysis. While program savings often have receipts, rebate forms, or pre- and post- engineering measurements, Momentum Savings-those efficient...

  20. Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trego, A.L.

    1992-06-16

    The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.

  1. Predicting yearly energy savings using BIN weather data with heat-pipe heat exchangers with indirect evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, G.D.

    1998-07-01

    Heat-Pipe Heat-Exchangers (HPHE) are passive systems that have recently seen application in energy recovery (Mathur, 1997). A HPHE consists of individual closed end heat pipe tubes that are charged with a suitable working fluid. In these systems, the working fluid evaporates on one side of the heat exchanger and condenses over the other end of the heat exchanger. The condensed fluid returns back to the evaporator section through the capillary action of the wick. The performance of a HPHE system can be improved by the raising the condenser portion of the heat exchanger which facilitates effective return of the condensate back to the evaporator. HPHE can be used with air conditioning systems as retrofits and in new applications. For retrofit applications, the operating costs are reduced because of the reduction in the energy (kWh) and peak demand (kW) consumptions. For new installations, the heating and cooling equipment can be of smaller capacity which will result in lower equipment and operating costs. During the summer season, indirect evaporative cooling can also be used to further enhance the performance of the air conditioning system. When operated during both the heating and cooling seasons, a HPHE yields four types of savings: (i) Heating equipment savings (ii) Cooling equipment savings (iii) Heating operating savings (iv) Cooling operating savings. Savings in the energy consumption for both heating and cooling were calculated with the HPHE for 30 cities with widely different climactic conditions. The payback periods for most of the cities were less than 1 year. If indirect evaporative cooling is used during the summer season, more energy savings would be realized on an yearly basis along with further reductions in the peak demand. In this paper, the author has simulated the performance of a HPHE with indirect evaporative cooling using the BIN weather data.

  2. Saving Energy and Money with Appliance and Equipment Standards...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    savings. While the more efficient products may cost more at the time of sale, consumers save through lower energy bills year after year, and are more than compensated for any...

  3. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  4. Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

  5. Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost...

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Hydraulic Institute/Europump/ United States Department of Energy.Hydraulic Institute standards and motor performance data from the MotorMaster+ database to calculate potential energy andhydraulic to electric robots or pneumatic to electric servos in the weld shop can save energy.

  7. Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume I: Procedures, Results, and Discussion, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    STAR MAP are to: (1) verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits; (2) reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements; (3) improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program; (4) initiate a data base...

  8. Three Paths to Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, V. N.

    1985-01-01

    General Electric's program of energy management and conservation continues to provide significant savings in energy costs in a climate of increasing energy prices and reduced visibility and promotion nationally. In 1984, General Electric energy use...

  9. Low-risk and cost-effective prior savings estimates for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Thornton, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, the authors have collected energy use data which allowed them to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. They believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights. The analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper.

  10. Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg)

  11. Updating Texas Energy Cost Containment Audit Reports 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, T. E.; Heffington, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984 and 1986, 35.3 million square feet of state owned buildings were audited to identify cost saving retrofit projects. Originally intended for direct legislative funding or bond sales, funding became available in 1989 ...

  12. Energy Information Handbook: Applications for Energy-Efficient Building Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    of the efficiency measure and associated energy cost savingsthe particular efficiency measure. FY11 savings were 10.8%,efficiency measures, the CUSUM should grow increasingly negative, as energy savings

  13. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  14. Opportunities of Wireless Sensors and Controls for Building Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2004-09-30

    This paper characterizes commercially available wireless technologies that are suitable for use in commercial buildings. It describes two demonstration projects of wireless sensors and their integration into existing control networks, and discusses their cost per sensor, their ease of installation, and their reliability. The author will discuss the operational and energy benefits of the wireless sensors and report on the energy and cost savings estimates. The paper will conclude with some practical considerations for the installation of wireless sensors and provide a future outlook for wireless technologies in buildings applications.

  15. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  16. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  17. Get to the Savings NOW! 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    NOW! J. Charles Sherman Division Vice President The Benham Companies, LLC Walled Lake, Michigan ABSTRACT The majority of industrial processes are served by support systems (process heating, process cooling, etc) which have energy savings... opportunities which can be divided into two distinct categories: Shutdown savings and operating point savings. It has been repeatedly demonstrated at large industrial facilities that introducing even a short idle mode on process support systems can...

  18. Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

  19. Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, C.

    2008-01-01

    efficiency of up to 90 percent, the use of high-quality air filters and intelligent sensors are worthwhile investments, which rapidly pay off. Using thermography imaging, load measurements or plant operation analysis, Honeywell Building Solutions specialist...

  20. Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Lateral A Lining Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan)

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-worldenergy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-worldenergy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the generator began operation after January 1, 20... Eligibility: Investor-Owned Utility, Retail Supplier Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Solar Thermal...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provided the generator began operation after January 1, 20... Eligibility: Investor-Owned Utility, Retail Supplier Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Solar...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for equipment, articles and objects whose operation depend solely on solar, wind, hydro or any other type of power,... Eligibility: Agricultural Savings Category: Solar Water...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    excises for equipment, articles and objects whose operation depend solely on solar, wind, hydro or any other type of power,... Eligibility: Agricultural Savings Category: Solar...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    constructed, operated, and main... Eligibility: Local Government Savings Category: Solar - Passive, Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar...

  8. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    almost 98% of solar electricity ownership cost is attributedof CO 2 savings. The cost of solar PV falls in the middle ofoption. Solar photovoltaic needs to cut the cost by 50% or

  9. Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

    2002-01-01

    Costs Energy Costs Pump Maintenance Costs Other Maintenanceand Identify pumps with high maintenance costs. Since thePump Downtime Operating Energy Maintenance Figure 1. Example life cycle costs

  10. Optimal operational planning of cogeneration systems with thermal storage by the decomposition method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, R.; Ito, K.

    1995-12-01

    An optimal operational planning method is proposed for cogeneration systems with thermal storage. The daily operational strategy of constituent equipment is determined so as to minimize the daily operational cost subject to the energy demand requirement. This optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale mixed-integer linear programming one, and it is solved by means of the decomposition method. Effects of thermal storage on the operation of cogeneration systems are examined through a numerical study on a gas engine-driven cogeneration system installed in a hotel. This method is a useful tool for evaluating the economic and energy-saving properties of cogeneration systems with thermal storage.

  11. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    non-energy-related annual dollar savings per square foot byenergy retrofits at K-12 schools typically cost more to install per square foot

  12. Evaluation Prompts ENERGY STAR Program to Replace Web Tool, Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value of Program Evaluation Evaluation Prompts ENERGY STAR Program to Replace Web Tool, Saving 90 Percent of Annual Costs A program within the U.S. Environmental...

  13. Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new solar panel array at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

  14. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  15. Guatemala switch to crude saves over $1 million a month

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Biasi, V.

    1980-03-01

    In a two-step program designed to reduce fuel costs and improve operating efficiency, Empresa Electrica de Guatemala has modified two General Electric PG 5341 gas turbines at Laguna to run on crude oil and installed heat recovery equipment for repowering two existing steam turbines. The gas turbines, nominally rated at around 19,000 kW for base load operation at 70/sup 0/F average ambient temperature and 4000 feet altitude, were installed in 1977-78 as a base load backup to hydro power during the dry season. Original plan was to put them into immediate service as simple cycle units and then convert to combined cycle operation. Priorities were shifted to switch over from distillate to crude oil firing before going ahead with the combined cycle istallation. Their economic evaluation showed the initial investment would be paid off in a few months by the savings in fuel costs.

  16. Total Ownership Cost (TOC) Cost as an Independent Variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $ + procurement $ + operation $ + logistical support $ + disposal $ Linked - Indirect Direct Direct Cost Life with the research, development, procurement, operation, logistical support and disposal of an individual weapon, operation, logistical support and disposal of an individual weapon system including the total supporting

  17. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,shorter showers). Water- and energy- conserving activitiesstress imposed on limited water (and energy) supplies from

  18. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2010-01-01

    Results and Calculated Energy Usage and Costs Savings6 – Simulation Results and Calculated Energy Usage and Costsresults in higher energy usage and costs for cold or hot 

  19. Technical and economic assessments of electrochemical energy storage systems: Topical report on the potential for savings in load-leveling battery and balance of plant costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Binas, G.; Del Monaco, J.L.; Pandya, D.A.; Sharp, T.E.; Consiglio, J.A.

    1985-08-31

    The battery technologies considered in this study are zinc-bromide, lead-acid, zinc-chloride and sodium sulfur. Results of the study are presented in self contained sections in the following order: Balance of Plant, Zinc-Bromide, Lead-Acid, Zinc-chloride, and Sodium-Sulfur. The balance of plant cost estimates are examined first since the results of this section are utilized in the following battery sections to generate cost reductions in the battery plant costs for each of the battery technologies.

  20. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    speed drives Higher efficiency motors Variable voltage controls Switched reluctance drives 1 Pumps Operations and Maintenancespeed drives Higher efficiency motors Variable voltage controls Switched reluctance drives 1 Pumps Operations and maintenance

  1. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2001-07-31

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000 to 2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG and E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  2. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2001-10-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  3. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie E.

    2013-01-01

    based on India’s current Building Energy Efficiency labelingProducts: The Case of India. Energy Policy McNeil, M.A. ,energy-efficiency cost gigajoule gigaton Indonesia India

  4. Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume II: Detailed Savings Calculations, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed calculations for each site are shown in this Volume. For each site the ECRM description, approved loan amount, expected savings, the pre and post-retrofit energy use (electricity and gas separately), cost of energy, energy savings (in k...

  5. Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings: Washington, D.C. (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  6. Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy...

  7. Life-cycle cost analysis 200-West Weather Enclosure: Multi-function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umphrey, M.R.

    1995-01-16

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF)will provide environmentally safe and acceptable storage capacity for handling wastes resulting from the remediation of existing single-shell and double-shell tanks on the Hanford Site. The MWTF will construct two tank farm facilities at two separate locations. A four-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site; a two-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-West Area. This report documents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH) for the Weather Enclosure proposed to be constructed over the 200-West tanks. Currently, all tank farm operations on the Hanford Site are conducted in an open environment, with weather often affecting tank farm maintenance activities. The Weather Enclosure is being proposed to allow year-round tank farm operation and maintenance activities unconstrained by weather conditions. Elimination of weather-related delays at the MWTF and associated facilities will reduce operational costs. The life-cycle cost analysis contained in this report analyzes potential cost savings based on historical weather information, operational and maintenance costs, construction cost estimates, and other various assumptions.

  8. O&M Best Practices - A Guide to Achieving Operational Efficiency (Release 2.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Gregory P.; Pugh, Ray; Melendez, Aldo P.; Hunt, W. D.

    2004-07-31

    This guide, sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program, highlights operations and maintenance (O&M) programs targeting energy efficiency that are estimated to save 5% to 20% on energy bills without a significant capital investment. The purpose of this guide is to provide the federal O&M energy manager and practitioner with useful information about O&M management, technologies, energy efficiency and cost-reduction approaches.

  9. MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING Service Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING Service Cost July 2013 1/4 Thera Kalmijn Chief Operating Officer 1608 Fourth] [Division Name] Re: CSS Service Cost for Fiscal Year 2013 - 2015 Please find the service cost for [Division [Division Name] implements into CSS. The service cost for [Division Name] will remain fixed throughout

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Inadequate maintenance lowers pump system efficiency, causesPump Systems (Chapter 12) Operation and maintenancepumps, are inherently rugged and reliable low-maintenance

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    1998). Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO). PersonalCommunication CIPEC (2001). Boilers and Heaters, Improvingheat and power systems for boiler owners and operators, Oak

  12. DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project Could Lead to Lower-Cost Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    produce both power generation increases and significant cost savings at Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, according to new research from a U.S....

  13. EM's $500,000 Investment in Contaminant Remediation Leads to Hanford Site Strategy Providing $6.35 Million in Cost Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through a collaborative approach between the EM Headquarters’ Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, the Richland Operations Office and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), investments are being leveraged and integrated in applied research and site operations to provide scientifically defensible end states for environmental remediation of volatile organic contaminants in the vadose zone.

  14. Energy-Saving Opportunities for Manufacturing Enterprises (International English Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This fact sheet provides information about the Industrial Technologies Program Save Energy Now energy audit process, software tools, training, energy management standards, and energy efficient technologies to help U.S. companies identify energy cost savings.

  15. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Treasure Hunts: Simple Steps to Finding Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Treasure Hunt is a dynamic, effective process for identifying savings opportunities, and is a best practice adopted by many ENERGY STAR partners to identify no- and low-cost savings...

  16. 'People Power' Saves Plant Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, B. G., Jr.; Kanewske, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    -stream exchanger tube cleaning systems. These systems result in keeping exchanger heat transfer coefficients at a maximum, thus producing sizable energy savings. Process engineers also have a unique opportunity to improve energy savings by keeping this goal... and reboiler loads, excessive pressure drop across control valves and unnecessary cooling/heating of product streams. Also, exchanger cleaning inter vals should be considered closely. Often, the cost of taking a unit or fractionating column off stream...

  17. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

    2003-01-27

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the ninth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station -- Long term testing and equipment decommissioning has been completed, A web cast/conference call was held to review data, and Preliminary preparation and review of data and test results for the final report. Technology Transfer -- A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them was a Program Status Report presented to NETL. Also, one paper was presented at Power-Gen and one at the Annual Coal Marketing Strategies Conference.

  18. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

    2002-10-18

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the eighth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station--Sorbent injection equipment was installed at the site during the quarter; Test plans were prepared for the field-testing phase of the project; and Baseline testing was completed during the quarter. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them was a paper published in the JAWMA. Also, two papers were presented at the Air Quality III Conference and one at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference.

  19. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schlager

    2002-08-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the seventh reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) PG&E NEG Brayton Point Station--Sorbent injection equipment was installed at the site during the quarter; Test plans were prepared for the field testing phase of the project; Baseline testing was completed during the quarter and parametric testing was begun; and A paper summarizing the full-scale tests was written and submitted to A&WMA for presentation at the annual meeting in June 2002. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them are papers published in the A&WMA EM journal and Pollution Engineering. Also, information was provided to the EPA MACT Working Group and a paper was presented at the annual A&WMA meeting.

  20. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-03-31

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

  1. Sustaining Long-Term Energy Savings for a Major Texas State Agency Performance Contracting Initiative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culp, C.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

    2007-01-01

    , the utility savings will pay for the more efficient equipment cost over a fifteen-year period. The utility savings are measured over the life of the contract in order to ensure the savings stream and maintain the savings guarantee. The agency chose... and water efficiency measures that were possible to finance with a fifteen year period. The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC), formerly the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), signed an energy savings...

  2. Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SouthCarolinaSaves Green Community Loan Program Projects are eligible to receive between 500,000 and 5,000,000 of low cost financing and must have a payback period of 15 years....

  4. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

  5. A Second Opinion is Worth the Cost - 12479

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, Drew [Project Time and Cost Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper, 'A Second Opinion is Worth the Cost', shows how a second opinion for a Department of Energy (DOE) Project helped prepare and pass a DOE Order 413.3A 'Program and Project Management for the acquisition of Capital Assets' Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) required External Independent Review (EIR) in support of the approved baseline for Critical Decision (CD) 2. The DOE project personnel were informed that the project's Total Project Cost (TPC) was going to increase from $815 million to $1.1 billion due to unforeseen problems and unexplained reasons. The DOE Project Team determined that a second opinion was needed to review and validate the TPC. Project Time and Cost, Inc. (PT and C) was requested to evaluate the cost estimate, schedule, basis of estimate (BOE), and risk management plan of the Project and to give an independent assessment of the TPC that was presented to DOE. This paper will demonstrate how breaking down a project to the work breakdown structure (WBS) level allows a project to be analyzed for potential cost increases and/or decreases, thus providing a more accurate TPC. The review Team's cost analyses of Projects identified eight primary drivers resulting in cost increases. They included: - Overstatement of the effort required to develop drawings and specifications. - Cost allocation to 'Miscellaneous' without sufficient detail or documentation. - Cost for duplicated efforts. - Vendor estimates or quotations without sufficient detail. - The practice of using the highest price quoted then adding an additional 10% mark-up. - Application of Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) highest level quality requirements when not required. - Allocation of operational costs to the Project Costs instead of to the Operating Expenses (OPEX). OPEX costs come from a different funding source. - DOE had not approved the activities. By using a Team approach with professionals from cost, civil, mechanical, electrical, structural and nuclear disciplines and by performing a Line by Line, WBS element by WBS element review of the Projects' CD-2 baseline package helped the DOE Project Team experience success. The second opinion that PT and C provide by conducting a Pre-EIR review of the Project baseline package and the cost review of the TPC helped the DOE Team pass the CD-2 EIR and reduced the TPC. The Line-by-Line review of the DOE Project identified opportunities to reduce the TPC from $1.1 billion to $740.8 million, thus realizing a saving of approximately $359.2 million, or roughly 32% of the original TPC. This significant cost savings underscores the cost in obtaining the second opinion. This same Line by Line review can be applied to any DOE project in the Energy Management or Weapons complex. In the case of this DOE Project a second opinion was worth the cost. (authors)

  6. CALiPER Report 21.3. Cost Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

  7. CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

    2014-05-27

    Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

  8. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2010-01-01

    DCV costs from the HVAC energy cost  savings.    Table 6 –OA Use Gas Use Energy Energy Cost PV kWh/ft² kBtu/ft² kBtu/n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. HVAC Energy Cost Savings PV $/ft² n.a.

  9. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    cost per kWh than current energy efficiency procurement programs in California.Energy Down The Drain: The Hidden Costs of California’sCost of Procurement of Electricity Efficiency (Ratio of respective $/Annual KWh) California Energy

  10. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  11. Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Mike

    2013-08-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost-effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  12. Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.

    2013-08-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  13. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    wind energy generation costs, and generation costs cannot beand operating costs of new generation projects, whereas ourof installed generation, with costs recovered through

  14. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC): FEMP Assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-01

    An ESPC is a working relationship between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the Federal facility and identifies improvements to save energy. In consultation with the Federal agency, the ESCO designs and constructs a project that meets the agency’s needs and arranges the necessary funding. The ESCO guarantees the improvements will generate energy cost savings sufficient to pay for the project over the term of the contract. After the contract ends, all additional cost savings accrue to the agency.

  15. Planning for Variation and E-Discovery Costs By Macyl A. Burke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    in large direct savings in terms of allin cost. Good metrics help foster innovation and are a catalyst rework that is not necessary. CAN THEY DO IT FOR LESS? Quality processes should lower cost: Understand not lower cost they are not quality applications. They are cost increases. The lowered costs should

  16. Report of the Finance Cost Reduction Working Group to the Federal ESPC Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Report of the Finance Cost Reduction Working Group to the Federal ESPC Steering Committee Reducing Financing Costs for Federal ESPCs Federal Energy Management Program Energy Savings Performance Contracting 2. REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPETITIVE FINANCING ACQUISITION .................................7 2.1 Use

  17. Energy Department Announces New Investments to Drive Cost-Competitive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    over the next two decades could save the U.S. 250 billion in energy costs and reduce electricity consumption for lighting by nearly 50 percent. By 2030, LED lighting is...

  18. A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C Integration Costs" Extended Abstract A fast growth of the installation of wind turbines has been experienced in several European countries. The introduction of substantial amounts of wind power in a liberalized

  19. Cost analysis guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strait, R.S.

    1996-01-10

    The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

  20. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    17 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by Projectperformance, and operations and maintenance expenses.Capacity Factor Operations and maintenance (O&M) costs are

  1. Chrysler: Save Energy Now Assessment Enables a Vehicle Assembly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    helped identify new areas where energy savings could be captured. * By optimizing boiler operation, improving boiler ef- ficiency, and repairing failed steam traps, Chrysler...

  2. Operational Strategies for Single-Stage Crossdocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiana-Fu

    2010-01-01

    a pallet’s transfer cost (MPTC) strategy are as follows:Do-Nothing; 2. CSTL; 3. CSRL; 4. MPTC; or 5. MSTC. No Yes Isthat the CSTL, CSRL and MPTC policies can save about 16% to

  3. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    potential for CHP application in Shanghai. For renewable energyrenewable technologies combined with (by current standards) extreme efficiency measures. The cost effectiveness and energy saving potential

  4. Energy Assessment Training Reduces Energy Costs for the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam: Success Stories (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam experiences considerable energy cost and use savings after implementing training from NREL's energy assessment training.

  5. Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    include different energy efficiency resource savings levels,bidding strategy of energy efficiency resources and receiveResource Costs and Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency

  6. $3.6 Million in Savings Identified in AMCAST Assessment (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    Summary of AMCAST Industrial Corporation's plant-wide assessment to identify energy and cost saving opportunities at the corporation's facility in Wapakoneta, Ohio.

  7. Low-cost inertial measurement unit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deyle, Travis Jay

    2005-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

  8. USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25

    In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This volume focuses on the role of variable renewable generation in creating challenges to the planning and operations of power systems and the expansion of transmission to deliver electricity from remote resources to load centers. The technical and institutional changes to power systems that respond to these challenges are, in many cases, underway, driven by the economic benefits of adopting more modern communication, information, and computation technologies that offer significant operational cost savings and improved asset utilization. While this volume provides background information and numerous references, the reader is referred to the literature for more complete tutorials.

  10. Maximizing productivity & profitability through best cost shift schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, R.

    1996-12-31

    If you have the right equipment and employees at the right place, the fight time, and the right cost, you have the perfect business schedule. But, if you`re like most mines, you can probably improve your schedule, improvements that will reach all the way to the bottom line. And unlike adding employees, materials, or capital equipment, better scheduling is a cost-free way improve profitability. A good schedule can save millions. A bad schedule will cost money every year. A shift schedule is not a day off pattern or shift length. A shift schedule is a complete system deploying personnel and capital equipment. Most mining schedules are either copied from another operation, based on tradition or the result of a contract negotiation made far from the mine site. Unfortunately, most mine managers don`t give much thought to schedules until a crisis develops; at which point the tendency is to implement the first solution that comes along as quickly as possible. Costly mistakes are made.

  11. ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Ankit

    2010-07-14

    drilling operation was also conducted during the audit. The data was analyzed using MATLAB and compared to a theoretical energy audit. The study showed that it is possible to remove peaks of rig power requirement by a flywheel kinetic energy recovery...

  12. The Effect of the 802.11 Power Save Mechanism (PSM) on Energy Efficiency and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatti, Saleem N.

    The Effect of the 802.11 Power Save Mechanism (PSM) on Energy Efficiency and Performance During is the increased energy usage of ICT, for reasons of cost and environmental protection. The Power Save Mode (PSM and office environments. Power save mecha- nisms that exist in the variants of the IEEE 802.11 WLAN standards

  13. The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes Jiakang Lu, Tamim Sookoor patterns in a home, and how to use these patterns to save energy by auto- matically turning off the home demonstrate that our approach will achieve a 28% en- ergy saving on average, at a cost of approximately $25

  14. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  15. Makeup air systems energy-saving opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.K. (Anderson DeBartolo Pan, Inc., Tucson, AZ (US))

    1990-01-01

    Makeup air semiconductor clean spaces can vary from 1 cfm/ft{sup 2} (5.08 L/s {center dot} m{sup 2}) to 10 cfm/ft{sup 2} (50.81 L/s {center dot} m{sup 2}) and typically averages 5 cfm/ft{sup 2} (25.4 L/s {center dot} m {sup 2}). Accordingly, the energy requirements to cool, dehumidify, preheat, and/or humidify are significant and can represent 30% to 65% of the total thermal energy required to maintain a cleanroom environment. Because of high energy requirements, cost-effective means to reduce energy costs can influence unit production costs. The greatest opportunity for significant energy savings can be achieved by reducing or displacing mechanical cooling or fuel-generated heating requirements. The primary focus of this paper is to present and discuss various concepts of heat recovery, dual-temperature cooling, direct and indirect evaporative cooling, and heat rejection directed toward makeup air systems that can achieve these objectives. In addition, equipment-sizing considerations not necessarily applicable to systems that are less energy intensive or that operate continuously are explored.

  16. Supervisory Feed-Forward Control for Real-Time Topping Cycle CHP Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Chamra, Louay M.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents an energy dispatch algorithm for real-time topping cycle Cooling, Heating, and Power (CHP) operation for buildings with the objective of minimizing the operational cost, primary energy consumption (PEC), or carbon dioxide emission (CDE). The algorithm features a supervisory feed-forward control for real-time CHP operation using short-term weather forecasting. The advantages of the proposed control scheme for CHP operation are (a) relatively simple and efficient implementation allowing realistic real-time operation , (b) optimized CHP operation with respect to operational cost, PEC, or CDE, and (c) increased site-energy consumption (SEC) resulting in less dependence on the electric grid. In the feed-forward portion of the control scheme, short-term electric, cooling, and heating loads are predicted using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) benchmark small office building model. The results are encouraging regarding the potential saving of operational cost, PEC, and CDE from using the control system for a CHP system with electric and thermal energy storages.

  17. Controlling landfill closure costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millspaugh, M.P.; Ammerman, T.A. [Spectra Engineering, Latham, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Landfill closure projects are significant undertakings typically costing well over $100,000/acre. Innovative designs, use of alternative grading and cover materials, and strong project management will substantially reduce the financial impact of a landfill closure project. This paper examines and evaluates the various elements of landfill closure projects and presents various measures which can be employed to reduce costs. Control measures evaluated include: the beneficial utilization of alternative materials such as coal ash, cement kiln dust, paper mill by-product, construction surplus soils, construction debris, and waste water treatment sludge; the appropriate application of Mandate Relief Variances to municipal landfill closures for reduced cover system requirements and reduced long-term post closure monitoring requirements; equivalent design opportunities; procurement of consulting and contractor services to maximize project value; long-term monitoring strategies; and grant loan programs. An analysis of closure costs under differing assumed closure designs based upon recently obtained bid data in New York State, is also provided as a means for presenting the potential savings which can be realized.

  18. Dynamic On-the-Fly Minimum Cost Benchmarking for Storing Generated Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    IEEEProof Dynamic On-the-Fly Minimum Cost Benchmarking for Storing Generated Scientific Datasets some generated datasets to save the storage cost but more computation cost is incurred for regeneration with efficient algorithms for dynamic yet practical on-the-fly minimum cost benchmarking of storing generated

  19. Contracting with reading costs and renegotiation costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Reading Costs, Competition, and ContractReading Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C. EquilibriumUnconscionability A?ect Reading Costs . . . . . . . . . .

  20. Lower Cost Energy Options 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maze, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    , wh1ch means g01ng from 13.000 volts up to 39.000 volts and buy1ng the transformers, we can save nearly $180,000. The other th1ng I p01nted out before was the power factor penalty. By addIng capac1tors and ra1s1ng our power factor from 84% to 95...'s not as wIdely used, but revlta11zatlon rates are avaIlable. The last area 1s cogeneratIon. ThIs can be one of two thIngs. It can be an attractIve buy-back rate or av01ded cost rate, for cogenerated electrIcIty or 1t can be a r1der or rate where they w...

  1. Analysis of Future Prices and Markets for High Temperature Superconductors ENERGY SAVINGS IN HTS DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Category HTS tape required (km)* Energy Saved, % of total energy entering device Cryogenic capital cost) and prices, the capital cost is roughly $60 per watt removed from the cold end. Hopefully, that capital cost of each device. The incremental capital cost is the cost over and above that of cryogenics and HTS wire

  2. THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characterize the reference (no capture) plant: · Capital cost, in $/kW; · Cost of electricity due to operation capital cost, in $/kg of CO2 processed per hour; · Incremental cost of electricity due to operationTHE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  3. Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program FY 2014 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Yu

    savings are reported on the cogeneration line since they would be realized as a reduction of natural gas year Estimated (Costs) / Savings Electricity 56.96 55.17 Down 3.2% $292,044 Natural Gas 72.90 85.28 Up increased by 5 vehicles during that same time period. Table III: University Fleet Gas Consumption September

  4. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings % Average Savings (sq.ft.) Average Cost (sq.ft.) Average Payback (years) Education 8.71 0.30 0.33 2.39 Healthcare 14.87 0.38 0.42 1.45 Laboratory 30.38 1.01 0.60 0.77...

  5. P2 Tips that Save Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    1998-01-01

    Resource Conservation Commission P2 Tips that save' Energy Pollution Prevention Texas Law States Pollution Prevention = Source Reduction and Waste Minimization Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission Kathey Ferland Pollution Prevention... & Conservation Manager 512/239-3177 Email: kferland@tnrcc.state.tLus Technical Assistance: 512/239-3100 bttp:/Iwww.tnrcc.state.tLuslexecloppr/ppc_sec.btml E.1 Pollution Prevention Saves Money Reduced Costs Waste Hierarchy TNRCC - Office of Pollution...

  6. Hay Harvesting Costs $$$$$ in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, James T.; Taylor, Wayne D.

    1972-01-01

    would be approximately 34 cents. Labor cost was calculated at $1.50 per hour. Total operating cost, including labor and all equipmen! use, was 8.2 cents per bale and $5.73 per acre (a$ shown in Table 2). Assuming an average yieltl oi seventy 60.... averaged $5.73 per acre for each be 8.2 cents per bale. At a cost of 10 cents per baly cutting or $2.73 per ton. With an average of 70 for custom hauling, direct, out-of-pocket costs will be 18.2 cents per bale. I Table 3. Estimated Cost Per Ton and Per...

  7. $3.6 Million in Savings Identified in AMCAST Assessment: Plant-Wide Assessment Summary--Metal Casting (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-08-01

    Summary of AMCAST Industrial Corporation's plant-wide assessment to identify energy and cost saving opportunities at the corporation's facility in Wapakoneta, Ohio.

  8. Prospects for Reducing the Processing Cost of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood III, David L; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-01-01

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: 1) elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; 2) doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and 3) reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and a standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).

  9. Thermal benefits and cost effectiveness of earth berming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speltz, J.; Haves, P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of advantages are claimed for earth sheltered buildings; the earth provides both insulation and thermal storage and also serves to reduce infiltration and noise. This paper seeks to quantify the thermal advantages of both earth sheltering and perimeter insulation by comparing the simulated thermal performance of an earth sheltered house, a house with perimeter insulation and a house with neither. The fuel savings are then compared to the estimated construction costs to determine cost-effectiveness. The major saving from an earth sheltered building is obtained in colder climates where the effective elevation of the frost line due to the earth berms considerably reduces the cost of the foundation.

  10. CDC's Core Environmental Health Services CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health Threats. Saving Money through Prevention.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS237904 CDC's Core Environmental Health Services CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from by environmental and related factors. We also identify how people might be exposed to hazardous substances to improve health and save money by reducing health care costs. We remain committed to maximizing the impact

  11. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

    2010-12-01

    In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

  12. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to look for rebates on these appliances. Changing incandescent light bulbs to CFLs or LEDs can save as much as 80% a year on lighting costs. Replacing 15 inefficient...

  13. Energy Saving Through High Frequency Electric Resistance Welding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udall, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    compared to most other methods. This has led to lower manufacturing costs through higher productivity. In addition to the higher productivity, however, the High-Frequency processes typically provide considerable savings of energy. In these days...

  14. Self-funded Energy Savings Performance Contracting Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    contracting project cost to be financed and paid for through the guaranteed savings stream. This can be a winning strategy for the oversight agency, the client and even for...

  15. A Manager's Approach to Energy Cost Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A major responsibility of management is the control and containment of operating costs. Energy costs are a major portion of the industrial budget. GM has developed a 3 phase approach to energy conservation. Phase I -Administrative Controls...

  16. Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    demonstrates the large amount of increased saving from a critical review of plant chilled water systems with both hardware and operational improvements. After showing several reasons why cooling systems are often ignored during plant energy surveys (their...

  17. An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2006-01-01

    connections) Installation Costs: 1. Engineering and Designstation works properly) 6. Contingency Operating Costs: 1.Feedstock Costs (natural gas, electricity) 2. Equipment

  18. Shared energy savings (SES) contracting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, D.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    This paper discusses the use of a Shared Energy Savings (SES) contract as the procurement vehicle to provide, install, and maintain closed-loop ground-coupled heat pumps (CLGCHP`s) for 4,003 family-housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana. In addition to the requirement relative to heat pumps, the contract allows the energy service company (ESCO) to propose additional projects needed to take full advantage of energy cost-saving opportunities that may exist at Fort Polk. The paper traces the development of the SES contract from feasibility study through development of the request for proposal (RFP) to contract award and implementation. In tracing this development, technical aspects of the project are set forth and various benefits inherent in SES contracting are indicated. The paper concludes that, due to the positive motivation inherent in the shared-savings, as well as partnering aspects of SES contracts, SES contracting is well suited to use as a procurement vehicle.

  19. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cost modeling framework of other studies to include operational costs and life-cycle impact assessment of possible ancillary financial benefits during operation and at...

  20. Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dossary, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...