Sample records for operate heating equipment

  1. Heating and Cooling Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment for heating and cooling to reduce initial costs, increase homeowner comfort, increase operating efficiency, and greatly reduce utility costs.

  2. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  3. BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNA,C.R.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

  4. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

  5. Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc.

  7. Right-Size Heating and Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment size for heating and cooling to improve comfort and reduce costs, maintenance, and energy use.

  8. Training program requirements for remote equipment operators in nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palau, G.L.; Auclair, K.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most neglected areas in the engineering development of remotely operated equipment applications in nuclear environments is the planning of adequate training programs for the equipment operators. Remote equipment accidents cannot be prevented solely by engineered safety features on the equipment. As a result of the experiences in using remote equipment in the recovery effort at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), guidelines for the development of remote equipment operator training programs have been generated. The result is that a successful education and training program can create an environment favorable to the safe and effective implementation of a remote equipment program in a nuclear facility.

  9. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the Market for Home Heating and Cooling EquipmentFuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling," LBLTHE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT* David

  10. Heat exchanger for power generation equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nirmalan, Nirm Velumylm; Bowman, Michael John

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger for a turbine is provided wherein the heat exchanger comprises a heat transfer cell comprising a sheet of material having two opposed ends and two opposed sides. In addition, a plurality of concavities are disposed on a surface portion of the sheet of material so as to cause hydrodynamic interactions and affect a heat transfer rate of the turbine between a fluid and the concavities when the fluid is disposed over the concavities.

  11. Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ç. Aksak; S. Turgut

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

  12. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES://ehs.unl.edu/) Introduction This SOP is intended to work in tandem with other EHS SOPs related to Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO): · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Program Overview · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment

  13. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: TRAINING AND INSPECTIONS during maintenance and repair operations. In these situations, a Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) program must "Control of Hazardous Energy: Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) for Machines and Equipment." This course is available

  14. Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

  15. Workshop on Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations |Join the ChallengeWorkshop on Condensing Heating and

  16. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  17. Operating Experience Level 3, Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information on a safety concern related to heavy industrial equipment that contacts and damages structures and electrical, gas, and water lines. Although these contacts did not cause injuries, the events did impact mission and schedule, divert resources, and change momentum.

  18. Predicting the Operational Effectiveness of Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Sanguk

    , and experiment with their autonomous decision-making against threats in various electronic warfare settings. We: Autonomous Decision-Making, Electronic Warfare Settings, Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite, Operational Effectiveness 1. Introduction In order to counter threats in electronic warfare environments, a command

  19. Southern Illinois University Watercraft & Equipment Operating Boat Operation Eligibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that a stream of water is flowing from the motor for engine cooling. 8. Click in gear hard, don't grind. D the Illinois Boaters Safety Exam. General Boating Safety Guidelines All boat operations must comply with state is in distress, a fire extinguisher and engine cut-off safety lanyard for all boats with internal combustion

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic equipment operation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pennsylvania Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Chemistry 57 Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUTTAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT Summary: Safe Operating Procedure (511) LOCKOUT...

  1. Electric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12.5% of the nation's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Electric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12 are the heart of air conditioners, heat pumps, chillers, supermarket refrigeration systems, and more. Global use of vapor compression system configurations including multi-functional integrated heat pumps, multi

  2. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, Robert C [ORNL; Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

  3. Experimental analysis of variable capacity heat pump system equipped with vapour injection and permanent magnet motor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awan, Umer Khalid

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This study analyzes the performance of variable capacity heat pump scroll compressor which is equipped with vapour injection and permanent magnet motor. Refrigerant used… (more)

  4. Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Permit Board will issue two types of air pollution control permits, a permit to construct air emissions equipment and a State Permit to Operate such equipment. A State Permit to Operate is...

  5. Optimization of Advanced Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems A heat pump is a technology in which heating and cooling are provided by a single piece of equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Optimization of Advanced Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems A heat pump is a technology in which heating and cooling are provided by a single piece of equipment. In a Ground Coupled Heat Pump (GCHP) system a length of pipe is buried in the ground and the ground acts as a reservoir to store the heat

  6. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

  7. EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the adoption of amended energy conservation standards as required by The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended) for direct heating equipment,...

  8. 2014-02-21 Issuance: Test Procedure for Commercial Water Heating Equipment; Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding test procedures for commercial water heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency (February 21, 2014).

  9. The Department of Energy Program for Development of Industrial Heat Recovery Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustis, J. N.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment development is carried out primarily in the areas of recuperators and heat pumps, with some work in organic Rankine cycle power units and novel waste heat boilers. The Department is sponsoring basic work in heat exchanger design which includes... better under standing of heat transfer mechanism, fouling mechanisms and flow induced vibrations, development of corrosion resistant materials, and de-scaling techniques. A successful demonstration of a metallic cross and counter-flow recuperator...

  10. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air enthalpy method where relevant air-side parameters were controlled while collecting output performance data at discreet points of steady-state operation. The primary metrics include system power consumption and zonal heating and cooling capacity. Using this test method, the measured total cooling capacity was somewhat lower than reported by the manufacturer. The measured power was found to be equal to or greater than the manufacturers indicated power. Heating capacity measurements produced similar results. The air-side performance metric was total cooling and heating energy since the computer model uses those same metrics as input to the model. Although the sensible and latent components of total cooling were measured, they are not described in this report. The test methodology set the thermostat set point temperature very low for cooling and very high for heating to measure full-load performance and was originally thought to provide the maximum available capacity. Manufacturers stated that this test method would not accurately measure performance of VRF systems which is now believed to be a true statement. Near the end of the project, an alternate test method was developed to better represent VRF system performance as if field installed. This method of test is preliminarily called the Load Based Method of Test where the load is fixed and the indoor conditions and unit operation are allowed to fluctuate. This test method was only briefly attempted in a laboratory setting but does show promise for future lab testing. Since variable-speed air-conditioners and heat pumps include an on-board control algorithm to modulate capacity, these systems are difficult to test. Manufacturers do have the ability to override internal components to accommodate certification procedures, however, it is unknown if the resulting operation is replicated in the field, or if so, how often. Other studies have shown that variable-speed air-conditioners and heat pumps do out perform their single-speed counterparts though these field studies leave as many questions as they do provide answers. The measure

  11. Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

  12. Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

  13. Recovering the Heat Dissipated by the Digital Switching Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasseferian, V. V.; Desjardins, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The disadvantage is a slight loss of thermo dynamic efficiency. 3. OI'HER TYPES OF SYSI'EMS The following systems can also be considered. a) Air to air recovery system b) Air to air recovery using heat exchanger c) Run around system using glycol loop Each... of the study: 10 years Beginning year of the study: 1982 Effective annual cost of capital: 17% Effective cost of debt: 17% Proportion of capital debt: 45% Income tax rate: 50% Scenarios ALTERNATIVE: The alternative is to install a heat recuperation...

  14. Models, Calculation and Optimization of Gas Networks, Equipment and Contracts for Design, Operation, Booking and Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromuhov, Leonid A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are proposed models of contracts, technological equipment and gas networks and methods of their optimization. The flow in network undergoes restrictions of contracts and equipment to be operated. The values of sources and sinks are provided by contracts. The contract models represent (sub-) networks. The simplest contracts represent either nodes or edges. Equipment is modeled by edges. More sophisticated equipment is represented by sub-networks. Examples of such equipment are multi-poles and compressor stations with many entries and exits. The edges can be of different types corresponding to equipment and contracts. On such edges, there are given systems of equation and inequalities simulating the contracts and equipment. On this base, the methods proposed that allow: calculation and control of contract values for booking on future days and for accounting of sales and purchases; simulation and optimization of design and of operation of gas networks. These models and methods are realized in software syst...

  15. Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

  16. Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cellHeat Transfer in GE JetSHOPPHeatingSpace

  17. TEMPERED OPERATORS AND THE HEAT KERNEL AND COMPLEX POWERS OF ELLIPTIC PSEUDODIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loya, Paul

    TEMPERED OPERATORS AND THE HEAT KERNEL AND COMPLEX POWERS OF ELLIPTIC PSEUDODIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS operator and complex powers of b-pseudodi#27;erential operators, as the heat operator and complex powers are the Laplace and Mellin transforms, respectively, of the resolvent. The heat operator and complex powers

  18. An Analysis of Price Determination and Markups in the Air-Conditioning and Heating Equipment Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Larry; Millstein, Dev; Coughlin, Katie; Van Buskirk, Robert; Rosenquist, Gregory; Lekov, Alex; Bhuyan, Sanjib

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we calculate the change in final consumer prices due to minimum efficiency standards, focusing on a standard economic model of the air-conditioning and heating equipment (ACHE) wholesale industry. The model examines the relationship between the marginal cost to distribute and sell equipment and the final consumer price in this industry. The model predicts that the impact of a standard on the final consumer price is conditioned by its impact on marginal distribution costs. For example, if a standard raises the marginal cost to distribute and sell equipment a small amount, the model predicts that the standard will raise the final consumer price a small amount as well. Statistical analysis suggest that standards do not increase the amount of labor needed to distribute equipment the same employees needed to sell lower efficiency equipment can sell high efficiency equipment. Labor is a large component of the total marginal cost to distribute and sell air-conditioning and heating equipment. We infer from this that standards have a relatively small impact on ACHE marginal distribution and sale costs. Thus, our model predicts that a standard will have a relatively small impact on final ACHE consumer prices. Our statistical analysis of U.S. Census Bureau wholesale revenue tends to confirm this model prediction. Generalizing, we find that the ratio of manufacturer price to final consumer price prior to a standard tends to exceed the ratio of the change in manufacturer price to the change in final consumer price resulting from a standard. The appendix expands our analysis through a typical distribution chain for commercial and residential air-conditioning and heating equipment.

  19. Large mobile mining equipment operating on soft ground T.G. Joseph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    1 Large mobile mining equipment operating on soft ground T.G. Joseph School of Mining & Petroleum. The toll on large mobile mining equipment such as > 327 tonne capacity haulers and > 46 m3 electric for large mobile units, a discussion on the extension of the process to shovel undercarriage and carbody

  20. Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department1 Prepared by:DTE Energy VideoDark Matter andTemperature

  1. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines |OpenEnergy 8Operations U.S.for Major

  2. Control and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles Jørgen Bauck Jensen and Sigurd Skogestad in the opposite direction, the "heat pump", has recently become pop- ular. These two applications have also merged. The coefficients of performance for a heating cycle (heat pump) and a cooling cycle (refrigerator, A/C) are defined

  3. The new Kaiserstuhl coking plant: The heating system -- Design, construction and initial operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strunk, J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of 1992 the new coke plant Kaiserstuhl in Dortmund/Germany with presently the largest coke ovens world-wide started its production operation in close linkage to the Krupp-Hoesch Metallurgical Works after about 35 months construction time. This plant incorporating comprehensive equipment geared to improve environmental protection is also considered as the most modern coke plant of the world. The heating-system and first results of operation will be presented.

  4. Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Hot Water Heating System Operation and Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Z.; Chen, H.; Wei, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an example of the reconstruction of a hot water heating system, this paper provides an analysis and comparison of the operations of hot water heating systems, including supply water temperature adjustment, flow adjustment during each...

  6. Optimization of the Heating System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, W.; Mao, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the basis of the variation of outdoor temperature, and in this way, the heating system can be optimized....

  7. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  8. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat losses associated with process heating equipment.

  9. ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Final Rule

  10. Air Quality: Monthly Hazardous Material Use, Fuel Consumption, and Equipment Operation Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Monthly Hazardous Material Use, Fuel Consumption, and Equipment Operation Forms Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The conditions of SLAC's air quality permits specify that all subject hazardous

  11. Optimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    into another form of energy (kinetic energy or compressed air for example) and vice versa. This method has been is that the using cost of the storage device is not always a linear function of the energy stored or deliveredOptimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit Paul Charton June 14, 2013 Keywords

  12. 2014-10-10 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Water Heating Equipment; Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial water heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on October 10, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  13. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

  14. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

  15. Monitoring equipment environment during nuclear plant operation at Salem and Hope Creek generating stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, A.; Smith, R.J. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring of environmental parameters has become a significant issue for operating nuclear power plants. While the long-term benefits of plant life extension programs are being pursued with comprehensive environmental monitoring programs, the potential effect of local hot spots at various plant locations needs to be evaluated for its effect on equipment degradation and shortening of equipment qualified life. A significant benefit can be experienced from temperature monitoring when a margin exists between the design versus actual operating temperature. This margin can be translated into longer equipment qualified life and significant reduction in maintenance activities. At PSE and G, the immediate need for monitoring environmental parameters is being accomplished via the use of a Logic Beach Bitlogger. The Bitlogger is a portable data loggings system consisting of a system base, input modules and a communication software package. Thermocouples are installed on selected electrical equipment and cables are run from the thermocouples to the input module of the Bitlogger. Temperature readings are taken at selected intervals, stored in memory, and downloaded periodically to a PC software program, i.e., Lotus. The data is formatted into tabular or graphical documents. Because of their versatility, Bitloggers are being used differently at the authors Nuclear facility. At the Salem Station (2 Units-4 loop Westinghouse PWR), a battery powered, fully portable, calibrated Bitlogger is located in an accessible area inside Containment where it monitors the temperature of various electrical equipment within the Pressurizer Enclosure. It is planned that close monitoring of the local hot spot temperatures in this area will allow them to adjust and reconcile the environmental qualification of the equipment.

  16. 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning, water-heating, and refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 7, 2014.

  17. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air choice elec forced air choice heat pump choice elecwith ac elecforced air, with ac heat pump elec baseboard,central air conditioning (including heat pumps), and eight

  18. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  19. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  20. NGNP/HTE full-power operation at reduced high-temperature heat exchanger temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VIlim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with reduced reactor outlet temperature at full power was investigated for the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen-production application. The foremost challenge for operation at design temperature is achieving an acceptably long service life for heat exchangers. In both the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and the Process Heat Exchanger (PHX) (referred to collectively as high temperature heat exchangers) a pressure differential of several MPa exists with temperatures at or above 850 C. Thermal creep of the heat exchanger channel wall may severely limit heat exchanger life depending on the alloy selected. This report investigates plant performance with IHX temperatures reduced by lowering reactor outlet temperature. The objective is to lower the temperature in heat transfer channels to the point where existing materials can meet the 40 year lifetime needed for this component. A conservative estimate for this temperature is believed to be about 700 C. The reactor outlet temperature was reduced from 850 C to 700 C while maintaining reactor power at 600 MWt and high pressure compressor outlet at 7 MPa. We included a previously reported design option for reducing temperature at the PHX. Heat exchanger lengths were adjusted to reflect the change in performance resulting from coolant property changes and from resizing related to operating-point change. Turbomachine parameters were also optimized for the new operating condition. An integrated optimization of the complete system including heat transfer equipment was not performed. It is estimated, however, that by performing a pinch analysis the combined plant efficiency can be increased from 35.5 percent obtained in this report to a value between 38.5 and 40.1 percent. Then after normalizing for a more than three percent decrease in commodities inventory compared to the reference plant, the commodities-normalized efficiency lies between 40.0 and 41.3. This compares with a value of 43.9 for the reference plant. This latter plant has a reactor outlet temperature of 850 C and the two high temperature heat exchangers. The reduction in reactor outlet temperature from 850 C to 700 C reduces the tritium permeability rate in the IHX metal by a factor of three and thermal creep by five orders of magnitude. The design option for reducing PHX temperature from 800 C to 200 C reduces the permeability there by three orders of magnitude. In that design option this heat exchanger is the single 'choke-point' for tritium migration from the nuclear to the chemical plant.

  1. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, CB

    2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

  2. Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koenig, Daniel R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  3. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models: aggregated by SMSA market share central cooling all gas space heat all oilmodels: aggregated by regions market share central cooling all gas space heat all oil

  4. Operations improvement in a semiconductor capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yiming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in a high-mix and low-volume environment at Varian Semiconductor Equipment business unit of Applied Materials. Due to the demand growth over the past years, Varian has been ...

  5. Heat exchanger efficiently operable alternatively as evaporator or condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger adapted for efficient operation alternatively as evaporator or condenser and characterized by flexible outer tube having a plurality of inner conduits and check valves sealingly disposed within the outer tube and connected with respective inlet and outlet master flow conduits and configured so as to define a parallel flow path for a first fluid such as a refrigerant when flowed in one direction and to define a serpentine and series flow path for the first fluid when flowed in the opposite direction. The flexible outer tube has a heat exchange fluid, such as water, flowed therethrough by way of suitable inlet and outlet connections. The inner conduits and check valves form a package that is twistable so as to define a spiral annular flow path within the flexible outer tube for the heat exchange fluid. The inner conduits have thin walls of highly efficient heat transfer material for transferring heat between the first and second fluids. Also disclosed are specific materials and configurations.

  6. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR SRS RADIOACTIVE TANK OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the present work is to perform a heat balance study for type-I waste tank to assess the impact of using submersible mixer pumps during waste removal. The temperature results calculated by the model will be used to evaluate the temperatures of the slurry waste under various tank operating conditions. A parametric approach was taken to develop a transient model for the heat balance study for type-I waste tanks such as Tank 11, during waste removal by SMP. The tank domain used in the present model consists of two SMP?s for sludge mixing, one STP for the waste removal, cooling coil system with 36 coils, and purge gas system. The sludge waste contained in Tank 11 also has a decay heat load of about 43 W/m{sup 3} mainly due to the emission of radioactive gamma rays. All governing equations were established by an overall energy balance for the tank domain, and they were numerically solved. A transient heat balance model used single waste temperature model, which represents one temperature for the entire waste liquid domain contained in the tank at each transient time.

  7. Control and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles Jrgen B. Jensen and Sigurd Skogestad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles Jørgen B. Jensen and Sigurd Skogestad cycle. Keywords: Operation, heat pump cycle, cyclic process, charge, self-optimizing control 1. The coefficients of performance for a heating cycle (heat pump) and a cooling cycle (re- frigerator, A

  8. Control system for, and a method of, heating an operator station of a work machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Thomas M.; Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    There are situations in which an operator remains in an operator station of a work machine when an engine of the work machine is inactive. The present invention includes a control system for, and a method of, heating the operator station when the engine is inactive. A heating system of the work machine includes an electrically-powered coolant pump, a power source, and at least one piece of warmed machinery. An operator heat controller is moveable between a first and a second position, and is operable to connect the electrically-powered coolant pump to the power source when the engine is inactive and the operator heat controller is in the first position. Thus, by deactivating the engine and then moving the operator heat controller to the first position, the operator may supply electrical energy to the electrically-powered coolant pump, which is operably coupled to heat the operator station.

  9. The operation results with the modified charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.J.; Pi, Y.J.; Kim, J.R.; Lee, J.N. [POSCO, Kwangyang, Cheonnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There will be another blast furnace, the production capacity of which is 3.0 million tonnes per year in 1999 and mini mill plant, the production capacity of which is 1.8 million tonnes per year in 1996 at Kwangyang Works. Therefore, the coke oven gas and burnt lime will be deficient and more sinter will be needed. To meet with these situations, the authors modified the charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant in April 1995. After the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace, the consumption of burnt lime and coke oven gas could be decreased and the sinter productivity increased in spite of the reduction of burnt lime consumption. This report describes the operation results with the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace in No. 2 sinter plant Kwangyang works.

  10. IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 -19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan ENERGY EFFICIENT AIR TO AIR HEAT PUMP OPERATING WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    00149 -1- 10th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 - 19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan ENERGY EFFICIENT AIR TO AIR HEAT PUMP OPERATING WITH R-1234yf Sorina Mortada, Ph.D. student, Center for Energy and Processes Abstract: Significant improvements in energy performance of air-to-air heat pumps are the major reason

  11. R and D opportunities for commercial HVAC (heating, air conditioning, and ventilation) equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, S.A.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to identify and characterize generic HVAC equipment research that will provide the best investment opportunities for DOE R and D funds. The prerequisites of a DOE research program include research efforts that are potentially significant in energy conservation impact and that are cost-effective, long-term, and high risk. These prerequisites form the basic guidelines for the R and D opportunities assessed. The assessment excludes the R and D areas that have potential or current private sector sponsors. Finally, R and D areas which are included in DOE programs generally are not addressed.

  12. 7-117 The claim of a heat pump designer regarding the COP of the heat pump is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-47 7-117 The claim of a heat pump designer regarding the COP of the heat pump is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily. HP Wnet,in QH QL TL TH Analysis The maximum heat pump coefficient of performance would occur if the heat pump were completely reversible, 5.7 K026K300 K300 COP maxHP, LH H TT

  13. Degrees of freedom and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Degrees of freedom and optimal operation of simple heat pump cycles Jørgen Bauck Jensen and Sigurd in the opposite direction, the "heat pump", has recently become pop- ular. These two applications have also merged of performance for a heating cycle (heat pump) and a cooling cycle (refrigerator, A/C) are defined as COPh = Qh

  14. Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter....

  15. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research in the area of ash transport was to advance the capability of making reliable engineering predictions of the dynamics and consequences of net deposit growth for surfaces exposed to the products of coal combustion. To accomplish this for a wide variety of combustor types, coal types, and operating conditions, this capability must be based on a quantitative understanding of each of the important mechanisms of mineral matter transport, as well as the nature of the interactions between these substances and the prevailing fireside'' surface of the deposit. This level of understanding and predictive capability could ultimately be translated into very significant cost reductions for coal-fired equipment design, development and operation.

  16. Real-Time Combined Heat and Power Operational Strategy Using a Hierarchical Optimization Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing attempts to optimize the operation of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This paper considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm, i.e., a hierarchical controller, that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step. In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying, i.e., measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ?measured? values as initial conditions. The simulation environment presented in this paper features nonlinear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. The results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions have the potential to yield significant savings when compared to conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

  17. Improving Heating System Operations Using Water Re-Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, F.; Han, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to solve the imbalance problem of a heating system, brought about by consumer demand and regulation, and save the electricity energy consumed by a circulation pump, a water mixing and pressure difference control heating system is proposed...

  18. AC System Equipment Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirey, D. B.

    of 80?F (26.7?C) dry-bulb temperature and 67?F (19.4?C) wet-bulb temperature air entering the indoor unit (AHRI 2006), the equipment SHRs range from 0.67 to 0.8. Thus, the dehumidification fraction (one minus SHR) varies from 0.2 (20%) to 0.33 (33... Building Systems in Hot and Humid Climates, Plano, TX, December 15-17, 2008 Figure 3. Latent Capacity Degradation with Supply Air Fan Overrun at Reduced Air Flow compressor on cycle (Shirey et al. 2006). The plotted lines are results from a...

  19. Numerical Study of Convective Heat Transfer in Flat Tube Heat Exchangers Operating in Self-Sustained Oscillatory Flow Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fullerton, Tracy

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laminar, two-dimensional, constant-property numerical simulations of flat tube heat exchanger devices operating in flow regimes in which self-sustained oscillations occur were performed. The unsteady flow regimes were transition flow regimes...

  20. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  1. Heat-and-Run: Leveraging SMT and CMP to Manage Power Density Through the Operating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, T. N.

    Heat-and-Run: Leveraging SMT and CMP to Manage Power Density Through the Operating System Mohamed and thermal ability of packages to dissipate heat. Power den- sity is characterized by localized chip hot Performance, Reliability Keywords Power density, heat, CMP, SMT, migration 1 INTRODUCTION Power

  2. Optimal Operation of closed cycles for heating and Jrgen B. Jensen Sigurd Skogestad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    super-heating, pressure, liquid level or valve set-point. Unlike open systems the initial charge applications have also merged together to give a system able to operate in both heating and cooling mode indicates that 33% of the gained heat is addet as electricity. In industrial processes, especially

  3. Case Study on Enhancing Equipment Efficiency and Operational Practices of a Signature LEED Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, P.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -assurance and control process of commissioning has focused on HVAC systems. However, mechanical engineers charged with the task of acting as the commissioning authority (CA) are faced with non-HVAC building systems with which they may not have the expertise... • Improved building operation and maintenance • Improved building and worker productivity • Enhanced the market resale value for building owners Project Description Building Information The project is a 12 story mid-rise Class A office building...

  4. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  5. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  6. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A freezing point below 100C Stable at temperatures greater than 800C Low corrosion of stainless steel and high-nickel content alloys A heat capacity greater than 2...

  7. Effects of operating conditions on a heat transfer fluid aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukmarg, Passaporn

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heat transfer fluid aerosols from process leaks. To simulate industrial leaks, aerosol formation from a plain orifice into ambient air is studied by measuring liquid drop sizes and size distributions at various distances from an orifice. Measurements...

  8. Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.08.A1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.08.A1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures 21.01.08.A1.05 FARM EQUIPMENT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, 2012 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The safe operation and proper maintenance of farm equipment provides endurance

  9. Operation characteristics of cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guo-Shan; Song, Bin; Liu, Zhen-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the operation characteristics of a cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluid as the working fluid at some steady cooling conditions. The experiments were carried out under both the steady operation process and the unsteady startup process. The experiment results show that substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid can apparently improve the thermal performance of the heat pipe for steady operation. The total heat resistance and the maximum heat removal capacity of the heat pipe using nanofluids can maximally reduce by 50% and increase by 40% compared with that of the heat pipe using water, respectively. For unsteady startup process, substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid, cannot only improve the thermal performance, but also reduce significantly the startup time. (author)

  10. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  11. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  12. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant. A successful candidate fluid would allow for the reduction of the levelized cost of energy by increasing the operating temperature for the CSP plant power cycle, which...

  13. Preliminary Retro-Commissioning Study on Optimal Operation for the Heat Source System of a District Heating Cooling Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shingu, H.; Yoshida, H.; Wang, F.; Ono, E.

    Heating Water Suuply Chilled Water Return Heating Water Return To User New System ESL-IC-08-10-57 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 2 attract attention due..., R6 450 1, 1 ESL-IC-08-10-57 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 3 (one office building and one building with hotel rooms and leisure facilities) since November...

  14. Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Understand implications of reduced repetition rate, is it adequate for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Operations · Understand implications of ECRH to improve startup. Heating · ICRF is the base line heating system, compare with NBI and ECRH withstand the anticipated heat loads? Diagnostics · Capability of beam diagnostics for J(r), E(r), etc

  15. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  16. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  17. Measured Impact on Space Conditioning Energy Use in a Residence Due to Operating a Heat Pump Water Heater inside the Conditioned Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on space conditioning energy use due to operating a heat pump water heater (HPWH) inside the conditioned space is analyzed based on 2010-2011 data from a research house with simulated occupancy and hot water use controls. The 2700 ft2 (345 m2) house is located in Oak Ridge, TN (mixed-humid climate) and is equipped with a 50 gallon (189 l) HPWH that provided approximately 55 gallons/d (208 l/d) of hot water at 120 F (46 C) to the house during the test period. The HPWH has been operated every other week from December 2010 through November 2011 in two modes; a heat pump only mode, and a standard mode that utilizes 15355 Btu/hr (4500 W) resistance heating elements. The energy consumption of the air-source heat pump (ASHP) that provides space conditioning for the house is compared for the two HPWH operating modes with weather effects taken into account. Impacts during the heating and cooling seasons are compared.

  18. Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

  19. Design and Operation of Fluid Beds for Heating, Cooling and Quenching Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, W. E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Castings are then normalized and tempered in separate fluid bath furnaces with the entire operation being completed within a few hours of pouring. Fluid baths are also used for cooling of spent sand and for quenching of castings. Trial applications...

  20. 2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  1. Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...

  2. Entirely passive heat-pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koenig, D.R.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  3. Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secary, J. (Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

  4. Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secary, J. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

  5. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN (United States); [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - as-operated heat loss Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E424503 E 20102010 88 --rzrz 8.8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,Heat pumps, heat pipes, Summary: heat transfer capacity and rate...

  7. White Paper for U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force: Waste Heat Recovery with Thermoelectric and Lithium-Ion Hybrid Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By harvesting waste heat from engine exhaust and storing it in light-weight high-capacity modules, it is believed that the need for energy transport by convoys can be lowered significantly. By storing this power during operation, substantial electrical power can be provided during long periods of silent operation, while the engines are not operating. It is proposed to investigate the potential of installing efficient thermoelectric generators on the exhaust systems of trucks and other vehicles to generate electrical power from the waste heat contained in the exhaust and to store that power in advanced power packs comprised of polymer-gel lithium ion batteries. Efficient inexpensive methods for production of the thermoelectric generator are also proposed. The technology that exists at LLNL, as well as that which exists at industrial partners, all have high technology readiness level (TRL). Work is needed for integration and deployment.

  8. PUBLISHED VERSION Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUBLISHED VERSION Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations.1063/1.4884354 #12;Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-mode regime in Alcator C-Moda) Phys. Plasmas 20, 055904 (2013); 10.1063/1.4803914 Upgrade of the infrared

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: philippe.jacquet@ccfe.ac.uk; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Meigs, A.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Czarnecka, A. [Association Euratom-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, ERM-KMS, Brussels (Belgium); Mayoral, M.-L. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Klepper, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); and others

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall materials on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation is assessed and some important properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF are highlighted. A???20% reduction of the antenna coupling resistance is observed with the ILW as compared with the JET carbon (JET-C) wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas, quantified using Infra-Red thermography (maximum 4.5?MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing), are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. The location of the tungsten ICRF specific source could not be identified but some experimental observations indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: for example, the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions, and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong reduction of the impurity level. In L-mode plasmas, the ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 15%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating performance; the power is typically deposited at the plasma centre while the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma bulk. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas has started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core has been observed.

  10. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this third quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have obtained preliminary experimental results on the deposition behavior of submicron and supermicron solid particles (MgO, Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) on a two-dimensional surface exposed to a high temperature/velocity particle laden'' atmospheric pressure jet. The uniform velocity ( plug flow'') jet, with temperatures up to about 1520 K, derives from a pressurized gaseous fuel microcombustion chamber (110 cc) equipped with a platinum guiding (exit) channel. Particles were generated by several methods (Berglund-Liu type aerosol generator, ultrasonic nebulizer, or syringe feeder with aerodynamic particle off-take) and were introduced into the combustion chamber with a carrier stream of nitrogen or air. Laser light scattering and reflectivity techniques were used for the study of particle deposition, supplemented by post-mortem microscopy on the exposed surface. We observed a linear deposition rate of submicron particles due to the thermophoretic mechanism (until the first layer was developed) under both high and low velocity conditions. On the contrary, supermicron particle deposits reach a steady-state, evidently due to a dynamic equilibrium between particle deposition and dislodging caused by the impacting particles. At several temperatures particle-free subsonic gas jets (up to 120 m/sec) were unable to remove the submicron particle layer.

  11. Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

  12. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, September 1, 1986--April 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research in the area of ash transport was to advance the capability of making reliable engineering predictions of the dynamics and consequences of net deposit growth for surfaces exposed to the products of coal combustion. To accomplish this for a wide variety of combustor types, coal types, and operating conditions, this capability must be based on a quantitative understanding of each of the important mechanisms of mineral matter transport, as well as the nature of the interactions between these substances and the prevailing ``fireside`` surface of the deposit. This level of understanding and predictive capability could ultimately be translated into very significant cost reductions for coal-fired equipment design, development and operation.

  13. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of the ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the above mentioned objectives, we have initiated theoretical studies in the following three interrelated areas : (a) Interaction of inertial- and thermophoretic effects in well-defined laminar dusty-gas'' flows. (b) Self-regulated sticking and deposit erosion in the simultaneous presence of vapor or submicron glue'' (c) Use of packed bed and tube-bank heat transfer and friction correlations to provide the basis for future tube-bank fouling predictions.During the first three months of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have: (1) Designed and initiated construction of the microcombustor particle-laden jet facility described in Section 3.1. (2) Initiated theoretical studies of the interaction of inertial and thermophoretic effects, the role of simultaneous vapor arrival in determining particle sticking and erosion probabilities, and mass transport phenomena in deep tube banks.

  14. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the above mentioned objectives, we are carrying out theoretical studies in the following three interrelated areas: (a) Interaction of inertial- and thermophoretic effects in well-defined laminar dusty-gas'' flows; (b) Self-regulated sticking and deposit erosion in the simultaneous presence of vapor or submicron glue''; (c) Use of packed bed and tube-bank heat transfer and friction correlations to provide the basis for future tube-bank fouling predictions. During this second quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756. we have: (1) done preliminary gas velocity and temperature calibrations of the micro-combustor exit gas flow jet and initiated the development of both a monodispersed droplet feed system and powder feed system to provide monodispersed particle laden jets covering a broad spectrum of particle sizes (ca. 0.5--50 m diameter); and, (2) demonstrated the ability of impacting supermicron particles to remove predeposited submicron particles on a platinum target, using real-time optical reflectivity methods. These preliminary experiments will be extended and discussed in our next Quarterly Technical Report.

  15. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Little is yet known (theoretically or experimentally) about the simultaneous effects of particle inertia, particle thermophoresis and high mass loading on the important engineering problem of predicting deposition rates from flowing dusty'' gases. For this reason, we investigate the motion of particles present at nonnegligible mass loading in a flowing nonisothermal gaseous medium and their deposition on strongly cooled or heated solid objects by examining the instructive case of steady axisymmetric dusty gas'' flow between two infinite disks: an inlet (porous) disk and the impermeable target'' disk -- a flow not unlike that encountered in recent seeded-flame experiments. Since this stagnation flow/geometry admits interesting self-similar solutions at all Reynolds numbers, we are able to predict laminar flow mass-, momentum- and energy-transfer rate coefficients over a wide range of particle mass loadings, dimensionless particle relaxation times (Stokes numbers), dimensionless thermophoretic diffusivities, and gas Reynolds numbers. As a by-product, we illustrate the accuracy and possible improvement of our previous diffusion model'' for tightly coupled dusty gas systems. Moreover, we report new results illustrating the dependence of the important critical'' Stokes number (for incipient particle impaction) on particle mass loading and wall/gas temperature ratio for dust-laden gas motion towards overheated'' solid surfaces. The present formulation and insulating transport coefficients should not only be useful in explaining/predicting recent deposition rate trends in seeded'' flame experiments, but also highly mass-loaded systems of technological interest.

  16. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the present reporting period, we have initiated work on (a) the interpretation of our recent data (see QTR5) on deposition rates under the simultaneous influence of inertia and thermophoresis, (b) the possible rate of particle photophoresis in environments characterized by high radiative heat loads. and (c) the influence of particle size distributions on total mass deposition rates. The fruits of these initiatives will be reported in subsequent quarterly technical reports. Here, we focus on our recent theoretical results in the important but previously uncharted area of the relations between particulate deposition mechanisms, deposit microstructure and deposit properties. Experimental verification of some of the most interesting predictions will be the subject of future HTCRE-Lab studies. Recent discussions with fouling engineers have convinced us that despite recent advances in our ability to predict particle deposition rates in convective-diffusion environments, the important connection between resulting deposit properties (effective thermal conductivity permeability, [hor ellipsis]) and deposition mechanism remain poorly understood and only scarcely studied. Accordingly, as part of this DOE-PETC program we have developed a discrete stochastic model to simulate particulate deposition processes resulting from a combination of deposition mechanisms.

  17. Proceedings: Heat exchanger workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer processes are of controlling importance in the operation of a thermal power plant. Heat exchangers are major cost items and are an important source of problems causing poor power plant availability and performance. A workshop to examine the improvements that can be made to heat exchangers was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on June 10-11, 1986, in Palo Alto, California. This workshop was attended by 25 engineers and scientists representing EPRI-member utilities and EPRI consultants. A forum was provided for discussions related to the design, operation and maintenance of utility heat transfer equipment. The specific objectives were to identify research directions that could significantly improve heat exchanger performance, reliability and life cycle economics. Since there is a great diversity of utility heat transfer equipment in use, this workshop addressed two equipment categories: Boiler Feedwater Heaters (FWH) and Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG). The workshop was divided into the following panel sessions: functional design, mechanical design, operation, suggested research topics, and prioritization. Each panel session began with short presentations by experts on the subject and followed by discussions by the attendees. This report documents the proceedings of the workshop and contains recommendations of potentially valuable areas of research and development. 4 figs.

  18. Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 21.01.08.X1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oil filter replacement, air filter replacement, battery check) on equipment. C. Retain maintenance.6.1 by the equipment item in accordance with the System Records Retention Schedule Section 5.6. D. House equipment

  19. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  20. VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of a license/permit for each piece of equipment, an Operator Equipment Qualification Record (DA Form 348EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 18 VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents Section: Page...................................................................18-16 18.G Machinery And Mechanized Equipment.........................18-16 18.H Drilling Equipment

  1. Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    identifies the most energy-intensive equipment. The tool can be used to perform a heat balance that identifies major areas of energy use under various operating conditions and...

  2. Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

  3. Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

  4. Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating Temperature and Humidity Ranges Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating Temperature...

  5. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo.

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  6. Heat storage with CREDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

  7. Influence of viscous friction heating on the efficiency of columns operated under very high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When columns packed with very fine particles are operated at high mobile phase velocities, the friction of the mobile phase percolating through the column bed generates heat. This heat dissipates along and across the column and axial and radial temperature gradients appear. The wall region of the column tends to be cooler than its center, and due to the influence of temperature on the mobile phase viscosity and on the equilibrium constant of analytes, the band velocity is not constant across the column. This radial heterogeneity of the temperature distribution across the column contributes to band broadening. This phenomenon was investigated assuming a cylindrically symmetrical column and using the general dispersion theory of Aris, which relates the height equivalent to the theoretical plate (HETP) contribution due to a radial heterogeneity of the column to the radial distribution of the linear velocities of a compound peak and to the radial distribution of its apparent dispersion coefficients in the column bed. The former is known from the temperature gradient across the column, the temperature dependencies of the mobile phase viscosity, and the retention factor of the compound. The latter is derived from the known expression of the transverse reduced HETP equation for the column. The values of the HETP calculated with the Aris model and a classical HETP equation were compared to those measured on a 2.1 x 50 mm Acquity BEH-C{sub 18} column, run at flow rates of 0.6, 0.95, 1.30, and 1.65 mL/min, with pure acetonitrile as the mobile phase and naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene as the retained compound. These two sets of data are in generally good agreement, although the experimental values of the HETP tend to increase faster with increasing mobile phase velocity than the calculated values.

  8. PUBLISHED VERSION ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography

  9. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  10. A Simple Control Scheme for Near-optimal Operation of Parallel Heat Exchanger Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    . In the chemical and process industries, large amounts of energy can be saved by using heat recovery in heat exchanger networks, which transfer energy in form of heat Corresponding author: email: skoge@ntnu.no, phone exchanger networks for saving energy and costs has led to a large body of research, and most

  11. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential structures that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling and solar energy equipment for water heating...

  12. Power System Equipment Module Test Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilling, J.R.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of electric power generation when applying the binary process to hydrothermal resources had not yet been demonstrated in the United States. Accordingly, on November 10, 1977, the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy, acting through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, agreed to cofund the Power System Equipment Module Test Project. The Power System Equipment Module Test Project consisted of a field test program to accomplish the objectives listed below while heating hydrocarbon fluids to above their critical points, expanding these fluids, and subsequently, condensing them below their critical points: (1) Verify the performance of state-of-the-art heat exchangers in geothermal service; (2) Verify the heat exchangers' performance heating either selected pure light hydrocarbons or selected mixtures of light hydrocarbons in the vicinity of their respective critical pressures and temperatures; (3) Establish overall heat transfer coefficients that might be used for design of commercial-size geothermal power plants using the same geothermal brine and light hydrocarbon working fluids; (4) Perform and investigate the above under representative fluid operating conditions during which the production wells would be pumped. The project was accomplished by diverting approximately 200 gpm of the flow from one of Magma Power Company's geothermal wells in the East Mesa Geothermal Field. After the heat was removed from the geothermal brine flow, the cooled flow was returned to Magma Power Company and recombined with the main brine stream for disposal by reinjection. Approximately five thermal megawatts was transferred from geothermal brine to hydrocarbon working fluids in a closed system. This heat was removed from the working fluids in a condenser and subsequently rejected to the environment by a wet cooling tower. The thermodynamic performance of both the working fluids and the system components was measured during the test program to achieve the project's objectives.

  13. 7-84E The claim of an inventor about the operation of a heat engine is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat engine operates steadily.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    efficiency would be 0.45 R1000 R550 11maxth, H L T T K 550 R 1000 R HE HQ 15,000 Btu/h 5 hp When the first law is applied to the engine above, Btu/h720,27Btu/h000,15 hp1 Btu/h2544.5 )hp5(net ¸¸ ¹ · ¨¨ © § LH QWQ The actual thermal efficiency of the proposed heat engine is then 459.0 hp1 Btu/h2544.5 Btu/h27

  14. 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

  15. 2. Unit Operation Dynamic simulation Unit operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    specification . 2.2 Heat transfer equipment Air cooler, cooler/heater, heat exchanger, fired heater LNG multi flow heat exchanger . 2.3 Piping equipment Mixer, tee, pipe, gas pipe, valve, relief valve . 2.4 Rotating equipment Centrifugal compressor or expander, reciprocating compressor pump ,dynamic simulation

  16. Comparison between a spray column and a sieve tray column operating as liquid-liquid heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, A.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a spray column and a sieve tray column was compared as a liquid-liquid heat exchanger. In carrying out these studies a 15.2 cm (6.0 in.) diameter column, 183 cm (6.0 ft) tall was utilized. The performance of the spray column as a heat exchanger was shown to correlate with the model of Letan-Kehat which has as a basis that the heat transfer is dominated by the wakeshedding characteristics of the drops over much of the column length. This model defines several hydrodynamic zones along the column of which the wake formation zone at the bottom appears to have the most efficient heat transfer. The column was also operated with four perforated plates spaced two column diameters apart in order to take advantage of the wake formation zone heat transfer. The plates induce coalescence of the dispersed phase and reformation of the drops, and thus cause a repetition of the wake formation zone. It is shown that the overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient in a perforated plate column is increased by a minimum of eleven percent over that in a spray column. A hydrodynamic model that predicts the performance of a perforated plate column is suggested.

  17. Full-scale study of a building equipped with phase change material wallboards and a multi-layer rack latent heat thermal energy store system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -layer rack latent heat thermal energy store system Julien Borderon1 , Joseph Virgone2 , Richard Cantin1 installed as wallboard and as latent heat thermal energy storage system coupled with the ventilation system for the ventilation air is efficient. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, thermal energy storage systems are one way for reducing

  18. Industrial Heat Pumps Using Solid/Vapor Working Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockenfeller, U.

    INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMPS USING SOLID/VAPOR WORKING FLUIDS Uwe Rockenfeller, Desert Research Institute, Boulder City, Nevada ABSTRACT Industrial heat pumps have the potential to reduce the operating costs of chemical and heat treating processes... with vapor re-compression recovery systems. The state-of-the-art heat pump equipment employing liquid/vapor working fluids fulfills the requirements only in some applications. The employment of solid/vapor complex compounds leads to 'nore cost effective...

  19. Heat transfer in the plate heat exchanger of an ammonia-synthesis column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obolentsev, Y.G.; Chus', M.S.; Norobchanskii, O.A.; Teplitshi, Y.S.; Tovazhnyanskii, L.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planning and construction of high-capacity synthetic ammonia plants requires the development and fabrication of unique, high unit-power equipment with high technical and economic characteristics. In foreign and domestic practice, tubular heat exchangers with relatively low heat-transfer coefficients are used. Plate heat exchangers are a promising alternative. They are compact and have a high heat energy efficiency and a relatively small metal content. To make an experimental check of the operating capability of a plate heat exchanger under ammonia production conditions, a welded plate heat exchanger was designed for an ammonia synthesis column 800mm in diameter. On prolonged testing (four years), the device provided an autothermal operating mode in the column and the heat transfer coefficient was practically constant for fixed space velocities. Consequently, the heat exchange surface was not contaminated significantly with catalyst dust, confirmed by visual observation of the heat exchanger after disassembly.

  20. 2014-11-25 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Extension of Public Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register extension of the public comment period regarding energy conservation standards for small, large and very large air-cool commercial package air conditioning and heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on November 25, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  1. 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  2. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  3. Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreeger, A. H.

    on an aluminium melting furnace at the ALCOA Massena Integrated Aluminum Works in upstate New York. Waste heat from an aluminum melting furnace is captured for general plant use for the first time in this plant. It is accomplished with advanced fluid bed heat... recovery that typically can save energy equivalent to 40% of the furnace firing rate. Previous attempts to recovery energy conven tionally on this type of furnace were unsuccessful due to fouling. The resolution of this fouling problem by using...

  4. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Source Heat2 December 2006 DOEthe

  5. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

  6. Comparative Performance Analysis of IADR Operating in Natural Gas-Fired and Waste-Heat CHP Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Sand, James R [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel utilization can be dramatically improved through effective recycle of 'waste' heat produced as a by-product of on-site or near-site power generation technologies. Development of modular compact cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems for end-use applications in commercial and institutional buildings is a key part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy policy. To effectively use the thermal energy from a wide variety of sources which is normally discarded to the ambient, many components such as heat exchangers, boilers, absorption chillers, and desiccant dehumidification systems must be further developed. Recently a compact, cost-effective, and energy-efficient integrated active-desiccant vapor-compression hybrid rooftop (IADR) unit has been introduced in the market. It combines the advantages of an advanced direct-expansion cooling system with the dehumidification capability of an active desiccant wheel. The aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of the IADR operation in baseline mode, when desiccant wheel regeneration is driven by a natural gas burner, and in CHP mode, when the waste heat recovered from microturbine exhaust gas is used for desiccant regeneration. Comparative analysis shows an excellent potential for more efficient use of the desiccant dehumidification as part of a CHP system and the importance of proper sizing of the CHP components. The most crucial factor in exploiting the efficiency of this application is the maximum use of thermal energy recovered for heating of regeneration air.

  7. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  8. Confortable Performance: Retro-Commissioning Building Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botan, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    troubleshooting ? New controls strategies ? Equipment schedule optimization ? Comfort improvements 7 ESL-IC-13-10-07 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 Tools ? Actuator... Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 Example 1 ? Problem ? Monday morning ?too cold? complaints ? Solution ? Heating system start-up on Sunday at 2:00pm ? RCx Investigation ? Tenant MAU running 24x7 with no heat (space temperature...

  9. Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat...

  10. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Source Heat2 December 2006 DOEthe Public15/2014

  11. Operational limit of closed loop pulsating heat pipes Honghai Yang a,*, S. Khandekar b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandekar, Sameer

    a College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051, PR China b of a total of 40 copper tubes with 1 mm and 2 mm inner diameter, respectively. R123 was employed important ones. In both cases the limit will manifest itself by an unacceptable over- heating

  12. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  13. G129 S129 Equipment List Windbreaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    (optional) Water shoes (tevas or old tennis shoes) Gaitors (optional) COURSE EQUIPMENT*: Pocket or wrist operated) Bug Spray Deck of cards, musical instrument, Frisbee, etc (optional) * Textbooks should

  14. Improving central heating plant performance at the defense construction supply center (DCSC): Advanced operation and maintenance methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savoie, M.J.; Standerfer, J.; Schmidt, C.M.; Gostich, J.; Mignacca, J.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1987 air pollution emissions test done by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA) identified several problems with the central heating plant (CHP) at the Defense Construction Supply Center (DCSC), Columbus, OH. Though DCSC repaired the specified problems, improved coal specifications, and tried to reduce air infiltration, CHP performance remained at unacceptable levels. Consequently, DCSC contracted the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) to apply advanced operation and maintenance procedures to improve its combustion system. This study employed a system-wide approach to evaluate the CHP 5 fuel storage, combustion, heat distribution, and the control of air emissions. Many short-term improvements to the CHP were identified and tested. Subsequent combustion and air emissions tests revealed that the recommended improvements successfully increased CHP efficiency. Long-term improvements were also recommended to help maintain the short-term improvements.

  15. Method and apparatus for operating a self-starting air heating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Charles E. (Mentor, OH)

    1983-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-starting, fuel fired, air heating system including a fuel burner fired vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser and heating the air. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with a method and apparatus which on start-up prevents the vapor generator's vapor output from being conducted to the turbine until a predetermined pressure differential has been achieved. However, after the vapor flow is once permitted, it cannot again be prevented until after the fuel burner has been shut off and restarted.

  16. Thermionic converter with differentially heated cesium-oxygen source and method of operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasor, Ned S. (Cupertino, CA); Riley, David R. (West Newton, PA); Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Geller, Clint B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermionic converter having an emitter, a collector, and a source of cesium vapor is provided wherein the source of cesium vapor is differentially heated so that said source has a hotter end and a cooler end, with cesium vapor evaporating from said hotter end into the space between the emitter and the collector and with cesium vapor condensing at said cooler end. The condensed cesium vapor migrates through a porous element from the cooler end to the hotter end.

  17. Thermionic converter with differentially heated cesium-oxygen source and method of operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasor, N.S.; Riley, D.R.; Murray, C.S.; Geller, C.B.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermionic converter having an emitter, a collector, and a source of cesium vapor is provided, wherein the source of cesium vapor is differentially heated so that said source has a hotter end and a cooler end, with cesium vapor evaporating from said hotter end into the space between the emitter and the collector and with cesium vapor condensing at said cooler end. The condensed cesium vapor migrates through a porous element from the cooler end to the hotter end.

  18. Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, Victor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the indirect increase in home heating (and the decrease inincrease the home’s heating load in the heating season (Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces,

  19. ICRF heating at JET: From operations with a metallic wall to the long term perspective of a DT campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Graham, M.; Jacquet, Ph.; Monakhov, I.; Riccardo, V. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eriksson, L.-G. [European Commission, Brussels, B-1049 (Belgium); Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-'Belgian State' (Belgium)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The first series of experiments with the ITER-like wall (ILW) will start mid-2011 with D plasmas and will continue through 2012-13 with H, {sup 4}He and D plasmas, and up to 2014-15, when a DT campaign is proposed. In this paper, the previous experience at JET is reviewed to set the scene for the future challenges of ICRF operation including change in the ICRF coupling, W impurity production and evaluation of localized power loads due the RF sheaths. development in a Beryllium/Tungsten environment of ICRF heating schemes for the non activated and the DT phases of ITER.

  20. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using...

  1. Stirling cycle engine and heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M.P.

    1986-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of operating a hot gas engine comprising a cylinder having one end thereof connected to the other end thereof through at least two separate closed heat exchanger assemblies. Each comprises heated heat exchanger means and cooled heat exchanger means serially arranged, the hot end of each such closed heat exchanger assembly is attached to the same end of the cylinder. Each closed heat exchanger assembly is equipped with valve means at each end thereof, the cylinder accommodating a double-acting reciprocating piston means. The piston means cyclically displaces and is displaced by a volume of gas for each such closed heat exchanger assembly. The volumes of gas are alternately confined in and released from the closed heat exchanger assemblies by the valves.

  2. DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Direct Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heater Test Procedures DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heater Test Procedures October 24, 2013 -...

  3. CenterPoint Energy- Residential Gas Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage...

  4. Topic 14. Retrofit and optimal operation of the building energy systems Performances of Low Temperature Radiant Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    panel system are given by its energy (the consumption of gas for heating, electricity for pumps Temperature Radiant Heating Systems Milorad Boji1*, Dragan Cvetkovi1 , Jasmina Skerli1 , Danijela Nikoli1, wall heating, floor heating, ceiling heating, EnergyPlus SUMMARY Low temperature heating panel systems

  5. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  6. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  7. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anne Arundel County offers a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential dwellings that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling, and solar energy equipment...

  8. Renewable Energy Equipment Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts law exempts from the state's sales tax "equipment directly relating to any solar, windpowered; or heat pump system, which is being utilized as a primary or auxiliary power system for...

  9. Correctly specify insulation for process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulation serves as a thermal barrier to resist the flow of heat. When insulation is installed over piping or equipment to minimize heat losses, the insulation is categorized as heat conservation. Software programs for determining heat losses are based on ASTM C 680. If heat conservation insulation is calculated to determine the most cost-effective thickness for piping or equipment, then the insulation is categorized as economic insulation. Methods for manually determining economic thicknesses using various graphs and precalculated charts are given in Turner and Malloy. However, modern software programs available from industrial associations calculate economic thicknesses based on after-tax annual costs. Costs associated with owning insulation are expressed on an equivalent uniform annual cost basis. The thickness with the lowest annual cost is reported as the economic thickness. Some of the economic data needed to calculate economic thicknesses are fuel cost, depreciation period, annual fuel inflation rate, annual hours of operation, return on investment, effective income tax rate, annual insulation maintenance costs, and installed costs. To obtain accurate economical thicknesses, it is best to solicit installed costs from a local contractor likely to bid on the work. This paper covers the most suitable insulation materials for certain applications, the most economic material and thickness to use, and how the total insulation system should be designed.

  10. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly techical report, December 1, 1986--February 28, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the above mentioned objectives, we are carrying out theoretical studies in the following three interrelated areas: (a) Interaction of inertial- and thermophoretic effects in well-defined laminar ``dusty-gas`` flows; (b) Self-regulated sticking and deposit erosion in the simultaneous presence of vapor or submicron ``glue``; (c) Use of packed bed and tube-bank heat transfer and friction correlations to provide the basis for future tube-bank fouling predictions. During this second quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756. we have: (1) done preliminary gas velocity and temperature calibrations of the micro-combustor exit gas flow jet and initiated the development of both a monodispersed droplet feed system and powder feed system to provide monodispersed particle laden jets covering a broad spectrum of particle sizes (ca. 0.5--50 m diameter); and, (2) demonstrated the ability of impacting supermicron particles to remove predeposited submicron particles on a platinum target, using real-time optical reflectivity methods. These preliminary experiments will be extended and discussed in our next Quarterly Technical Report.

  11. Philadelphia Gas Works- Residential and Small Business Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Residential Heating Equipment rebates are available to all PGW residential or small business customers installing high efficiency boilers and furnaces, and...

  12. Commissioning Process and Operational Improvement in the District Heating and Cooling-APCBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takase,T.; Takada,O; Shima,K.; Moriya, M.; Shimoda,Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -09-25 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 18 Energy simulation In case of the variable cooling water flow system, the cooling water outlet temperature should be a parameter...,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 2012/10/072012/10/28 2012/11/18 2012/12/09 2012/12/30 2/24 ? 3/2 C o n su m ed e le ct ri ci ty p er h ea t u n it [ k W h /G J ] Variable water flow control Cooling tower fun Chilled...

  13. A Modified Analytical Method for Simulating Cyclic Operation of Vertical U-Tube Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, M. K.; O'Neal, D. L.; Aldred, W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a heat source/sink for heat pumps. Using the soil rather than the ambient air as the heat source in 1 heating and the heat sink in cooling offers potential thermodynamic advantages since the earth is normally at a more favorable temperature for heat...-coupled heat exchangers have proceeded in two different directions: (1) numerical solutions of the heat diffusion equation in the soil and the ground-coil [Mei and Fischer, 1984] and (2) modified analytical solutions [Al- Juwayhel, 1981; Bose et al., 1985...

  14. Design, development and validation of a training system for roof bolt equipment operators. Open file report, 21 September 1978-10 April 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinton, W.M. Jr.; Menzer, G.W.; Reilly, R.E.; Baker, R.M.

    1982-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the approach, procedures, and results of a program to develop training materials for roof bolter operators. The objective of the program was to design and produce a training sequence which would prepare roof bolter trainees for job performance. Data were collected and analyzed using the general procedures of Instructional Systems Development (ISD). Input data came from previous roof bolter training analysis program. These data were expanded and structured through a series of ISD steps: objectives hierarchies, media selection, syllabus, lesson specifications, and training materials development. The resulting program consisted of an ordered sequence of 15 lessons. The media mix for the 15 lessons included lectures, slide-tape lessons, and hands-on instruction using operational roof bolters. Contents of all lessons were reviewed and approved by the Bureau of Mines.

  15. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial-package air-conditioning and heating equipment, packaged terminal air condi- tioners and heat pumps, warm-air furnaces, packaged boilers, storage water heaters,

  16. Modern refining and petrochemical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugach, V.V.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum refining and petroleum chemistry are characterized by a whole set of manufacturing processes and methods, whose application depends on the initial raw material and the final products. Therefore, refining and petrochemical equipment has many different operational principles, design solutions, and materials. The activities of the Russian Petroleum Industry are discussed.

  17. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

  18. (Solar clothes dryer and wastewater heat exchanger). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, B.F.

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The first project investigated the technical possibilities of adapting a domestic electric clothes dryer to utilize solar-heated water as the heat source, replacing electric resistance heat. The second project attempted to extract wastewater heat from a commercial dishwasher to preheat fresh water to be used in the next dish washing cycle. It is felt that the clothes dryer project has met all of intended goals. Although a solar application has some real-world practical problems, the application of a dryer connected directly to the home heating system will prove to be cost-beneficial over the life of a dryer. The additional cost of a heat exchanger is not excessive, and the installation cost, if installed with the initial house plumbing is less than $100. From a practical point of view, the complexity of installing a wastewater heat extracter is considered impractical. The environment in which such equipment must operate is difficult at best, and most restaurants prefer to maintain as simple an operation as possible. If problems were to occur in this type of equipment, the kitchen would effectively be crippled. In conclusion, further research in the concept is not recommended. Recent advances in commercial dishwashers have also considerably reduced the heat losses which accompanied equipment only a few years old.

  19. Energy Audit Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tools (equipment) needed to perform an energy audit include those items which assist the auditor in measuring the energy used by equipment or lost in inefficiency. Each tool is designed for a specific measurement. They can be inexpensive simple...

  20. Optimal Sequencing of Central Refrigeration Equipment in an Industrial Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was developed to find a viable solution to the problem of selecting the optimal sequence of refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in a Central Utility Plant. The optimal equipment sequence is that sequence...

  1. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  2. Sludge, fuel degradation and reducing fouling on heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Litzke, Wai Lin; Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, under contract to the US Department of Energy, operates an oil heat research primarily to lower energy consumption in the 12 million oil heated homes in the US. The program objectives include: Improve steady state efficiency of oil heating equipment, Improve seasonal efficiencies, Eliminate or minimize factors which tend to degrade system performance. This paper provides an overview of the status of three specific projects which fall under the above objectives. This includes our fuel quality project, oil appliance venting and a project addressing efficiency degradation due to soot fouling of heat exchangers.

  3. Water and Space Heating Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, A. F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other domestic water heating systems. Domestic water is generally provided through...

  4. Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic test equipment Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NIST), Ceramics Division Collection: Materials Science 97 Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUTTAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT Summary: re-energize a machine equipment that is...

  6. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  7. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  8. Optimization of the design and mode of operation of a QD laser for reducing the heat-to-bitrate ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhukov, A. E., E-mail: zhukale@gmail.com; Savelyev, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kryzhanovskaya, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Gordeev, N. Yu.; Shernyakov, Yu. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Zubov, F. I.; Korenev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat dissipation under the high-speed modulation of quantum dot edge-emitting lasers is considered. It is shown that, for a given laser diode, there is a bias current at which the heat-to-bitrate ratio is minimized. Moreover, there exists a certain optimal optical loss of the laser cavity at which the lowest heat-to-bitrate ratio is provided for any design of edge-emitting lasers that can be fabricated from an epitaxial structure. The heat-to-bitrate ratio and the corresponding bitrate are numerically calculated and analytical expressions are derived. It is demonstrated that the heat-to-bitrate ratio of quantum dot edge-emitting lasers can be less than 0.4 pJ/bit at a bitrate exceeding 10 Gbit/s.

  9. Renewable Energy Equipment Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Iowa allow a sales tax exemption for solar, wind, and hydroelectricity equipment. As of May 2013, the Iowa sales tax rate is 6%.

  10. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  11. Low Level Heat Recovery Through Heat Pumps and Vapor Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this paper is to examine the methods and economics of recovering low level heat through heat pumps and vapor recompression. Actual commercially available equipment is considered to determine the near-term and future economic viability...

  12. Exergy Analysis and Operational Efficiency of a Horizontal Ground Source Heat Pump System Operated in a Low-Energy Test House under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents data, analyses, measures of performance, and conclusions for a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) providing space conditioning to a 345m2 house whose envelope is made of structural insulated panels (SIP). The entire thermal load of this SIP house with RSI-3.7 (RUS-21) walls, triple pane windows with a U-factor of 1.64 W/m2 K (0.29 Btu/h ft2 oF) and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of 0.25, a roof assembly with overall thermal resistance of about RSI-8.8 (RUS-50) and low leakage rates of 0.74 ACH at 50Pa was satisfied with a 2.16-Ton (7.56 kW) GSHP unit consuming negligible (9.83kWh) auxiliary heat during peak winter season. The highest and lowest heating COP achieved was 4.90 (October) and 3.44 (February), respectively. The highest and lowest cooling COP achieved was 6.09 (April) and 3.88 (August). These COPs are calculated on the basis of the total power input (including duct, ground loop, and control power losses ). The second Law (Exergy) analysis provides deep insight into how systemic inefficiencies are distributed among the various GSHP components. Opportunities for design and further performance improvements are identified. Through Exergy analysis we provide a true measure of how closely actual performance approaches the ideal, and it unequivocally identifies, better than energy analysis does, the sources and causes of lost work, the root cause of system inefficiencies.

  13. Dual source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  14. Universal null DTE (data terminal equipment)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, M.; Pierson, L.G.; Wilkins, M.E.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A communication device in the form of data terminal equipment permits two data communication equipments, each having its own master clock and operating at substantially the same nominal clock rate, to communicate with each other in a multi-segment circuit configuration of a general communication network even when phase or frequency errors exist between the two clocks. Data transmitted between communication equipments of two segments of the communication network is buffered. A variable buffer fill circuit is provided to fill the buffer to a selectable extent prior to initiation of data output clocking. Selection switches are provided to select the degree of buffer preload. A dynamic buffer fill circuit may be incorporated for automatically selecting the buffer fill level as a function of the difference in clock frequencies of the two equipments. Controllable alarm circuitry is provided for selectively generating an underflow or an overflow alarm to one or both of the communicating equipments. 5 figs.

  15. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  16. Effectiveness of cabs for dust and silica control on mobile mining equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.J.; Gresh, R.E.; Gareis, M.B.; Haney, R.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of cabs for controlling silica dust exposure during operation of mobile mining equipment. This study focused on bulldozers, front-end loaders and haul trucks, was conducted at surface coal mining operations and underground metal and nonmetal mining operations. Each piece of equipment tested was equipped with a cab. The vehicles sampled were from a range of manufacturers having different types of filter media and air intake configurations. The purpose of this study was to determine the reduction of dust and silica exposure that could be achieved through the use of a well-maintained cab. For each piece of equipment, dust and silica concentrations inside and outside the cab were determined and compared. In some cases, filtration efficiencies could be calculated. A properly designed environmental cab is sealed, has an intake air filtration system, and a heating and cooling system. Cabs should have good seals around the doors and windows. Factors such as cab pressurization filtration systems, filter media, and maintenance practices were also examined. In some cases, dust and silica reduction of 90 to 95% were observed.

  17. Optimum Design of Micro Bare-Tube Heat Exchanger Tomohisa OKU, Nobuhide KASAGI and Yuji SUZUKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    for automobiles, electronic equipement cooling system, and recuperator for micro gas turbine. Key words : Heat

  18. Solar Heating Contractor Licensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan offers a solar heating contractor specialty license to individuals who have at least three years of experience installing solar equipment under the direction of a licensed solar contractor...

  19. Solar Equipment Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota law requires that all active solar space-heating and water-heating systems, sold, offered for sale, or installed on residential and commercial buildings in the state meet Solar Rating and...

  20. MULTI-SENSOR MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME 3D VISUALIZATION OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    to workers and equipment operators due to their dynamic and unstructured nature. Narrow haul roads, crowded with the inherent poor visibility that operators of equipment such as dump trucks, loaders and excavators deal

  1. Solar Equipment Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Solar Energy Standards Act of 1976, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is responsible for certifying all solar equipment sold in Florida. A manufacturer who wishes to have their...

  2. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering&Dynamos ProfessorContact

  3. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering&Dynamos

  4. Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

  5. Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications. ”with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment,Carbon emissions; Combined heat and power; CHP; Distributed

  6. Utility vehicle safety Operator training program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Utility vehicle safety Operator training program #12;Permissible use Utility Vehicles may only Utility Vehicle operator · When equipped with the "Required Equipment" · On public roadways within Drivers" · Obey all traffic regulations · Trained; update training every two years · Operate vehicles

  7. Project Title: Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: Mining Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Thomas M [Principal Investigator; Erlach, Celeste [Communications Mgr.

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of small scale power generation from low temperature co-produced fluids. Phase I is to Develop, Design and Test an economically feasible low temperature ORC solution to generate power from lower temperature co-produced geothermal fluids. Phase II &III are to fabricate, test and site a fully operational demonstrator unit on a gold mine working site and operate, remotely monitor and collect data per the DOE recommended data package for one year.

  8. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used with data center energy use modeling software to estimate overall site energy use. These estimates show that an overall data center energy savings of approximately 20 percent can be expected if a center is retrofitted as specified in the models used. Increasing the portion of heat captured by this technology is an area suggested for further development.

  9. Multiple source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  10. 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification...

  11. Jones-Onslow EMC- Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation offers rebates to residential members who install energy efficient heating and cooling equipment. Members can replace an existing central AC or heat...

  12. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 3, Long term testing at the ECTC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, K.H.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to demonstrate long term operation of a condensing heat exchanger for coal-fired conditions. A small condensing heat exchanger will be installed at the Environmental Control Technology Center in Barker, New York. It will be installed downstream of the flue gas particulate removal system. The test will determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{trademark} covered internals of the heat exchanger. Visual inspection and measurements will be obtained for the Teflon{trademark} covered tubes during the test. The material wear study will conducted over a one year calendar period, and the CHX equipment will be operated to the fullest extent allowable.

  13. Survey of Canadian new household equipment purchases, 1994 and 1995: Statistical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews results of two surveys that collected information on household equipment: The 1994 and 1995 Household Equipment Surveys. The goal of this report is to present the features of energy-consuming equipment bought by Canadian households in 1994 and 1995. Data on equipment features are presented by type of equipment: Refrigerators, ranges, dishwashers, freezers, washers, dryers, air conditioners, heating systems, and water heaters. The appendix contains information on survey methodology and a copy of the survey questionnaire.

  14. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (< 1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program.

  15. Application of microwave heating to ceramic processing: Design and initial operation of a 2.45-GHz single-mode furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliflet, A.W. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Bruce, R.W.; Kinkead, A.K. [Sachs/Freeman Associates Inc., Landover, MD (United States)] [and others] [Sachs/Freeman Associates Inc., Landover, MD (United States); and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power microwave and millimeter-wave sources are currently being applied to ceramic processing studies at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). A single-mode cavity microwave furnace, operating in the TE{sub 103} mode at 2.45 GHz, is operational and is being used to investigate sintering of nanocrystalline ceramics. This paper reports the design of the 2.45-GHz furnace and its use in initial microwave sintering experiments on nanocrystalline alumina and titania compacts. The high purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline powders used in the sintering experiments were prepared by the sol-gel method. These powders were first uniaxially pressed to 14 MPa, cold isostatically pressed (CIP`ed) to various pressures {ge}420 MPa, and finally sectioned into wafers. The density of the green compacts was 30 to 38% theoretical density (TD). The compacts were placed in insulating fiberboard caskets which were sufficiently lossy to provide hybrid heating at room temperature. The compacts were heated in the microwave furnace for up to three hours at temperatures {ge}1720 C. The temperature of the workpiece was monitored using an optical pyrometer. Final densities up to 80% TD have been obtained to date for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and up to 52% TD for TiO{sub 2}. The sintered compacts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the phase and grain size.

  16. Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

  17. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Carbon Tax on Combined Heat and Power Adoption by ain energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, whilegeneration with combined heat and power (CHP) applications

  18. Winterizing Equipment Mulching Strawberries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    equipment. Drain all water from lines, and follow manufacturer's recommen- dations on winterizing pumps. Mulching Strawberries: If you haven't already done so you should make arrangements for you mulch supply now weed or wheat seeds. Any straw is suitable as long as it is heavy enough to resist blowing off

  19. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  20. Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Douglas E.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

  1. Standardized equipment labeling program for electrical utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this supporting document is to provide specific guidelines required for Electrical Utilities to implement and maintain a standard equipment and piping labeling program in accordance with WHC-SP-0708, Chapter 18, {open_quotes}Westinghouse Hanford Company Conduct of Operations Manual{close_quotes}. Specific guidelines include definition of program responsibilities.

  2. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  3. Heat collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  4. Heat collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

  5. Condensation in horizontal heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leyer, S.; Zacharias, T.; Maisberger, F.; Lamm, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, Erlangen, 91052 (Germany); Vallee, C.; Beyer, M.; Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Bautzner Landstrasse 400, Dresden, 01328 (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many innovative reactor concepts for Generation III nuclear power plants use passive safety equipment for residual heat removal. These systems use two phase natural circulation. Heat transfer to the coolant results in a density difference providing the driving head for the required mass flow. By balancing the pressure drop the system finds its operational mode. Therefore the systems depend on a strong link between heat transfer and pressure drop determining the mass flow through the system. In order to be able to analyze these kind of systems with the help of state of the art computer codes the implemented numerical models for heat transfer, pressure drop or two phase flow structure must be able to predict the system performance in a wide parameter range. Goal of the program is to optimize the numerical models and therefore the performance of computer codes analyzing passive systems. Within the project the heat transfer capacity of a heat exchanger tube will be investigated. Therefore the tube will be equipped with detectors, both temperature and pressure, in several directions perpendicular to the tube axis to be able to resolve the angular heat transfer. In parallel the flow structure of a two phase flow inside and along the tube will be detected with the help of x-ray tomography. The water cooling outside of the tube will be realized by forced convection. It will be possible to combine the flow structure measurement with an angular resolved heat transfer for a wide parameter range. The test rig is set up at the TOPLFOW facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), so that it will be possible to vary the pressure between 5 and 70 bar. The steam mass content will be varied between 0 and 100 percent. The results will be compared to the large scaled Emergency Condenser Tests performed at the INKA test facility in Karlstein (Germany). The paper will explain the test setup and the status of the project will be presented. (authors)

  6. Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated by the Department of Energy in response to a request from the HVAC industry for consolidated information about alternative heating and cooling cycles and for objective comparisons of those cycles in space conditioning applications. Twenty-seven different heat pumping technologies are compared on energy use and operating costs using consistent operating conditions and assumptions about component efficiencies for all of them. This report provides a concise summary of the underlying principals of each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, obstacles to commercial development, and economic feasibility. Both positive and negative results in this study are valuable; the fact that many of the cycles investigated are not attractive for space conditioning avoids any additional investment of time or resources in evaluating them for this application. In other cases, negative results in terms of the cost of materials or in cycle efficiencies identify where significant progress needs to be made in order for a cycle to become commercially attractive. Specific conclusions are listed for many of the technologies being promoted as alternatives to electrically-driven vapor compression heat pumps using fluorocarbon refrigerants. Although reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps using hydrocarbons have similar energy use to conventional electric-driven heat pumps, there are no significant energy savings due to the minor differences in estimated steady-state performance; higher costs would be required to accommodate the use of a flammable refrigerant. Magnetic and compressor-driven metal hydride heat pumps may be able to achieve efficiencies comparable to reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps, but they are likely to have much higher life cycle costs because of high costs for materials and peripheral equipment. Both thermoacoustic and thermionic heat pumps could have lower life cycle costs than conventional electric heat pumps because of reduced equipment and maintenance costs although energy use would be higher. There are strong opportunities for gas-fired heat pumps to reduce both energy use and operating costs outside of the high cooling climates in the southeast, south central states, and the southwest. Diesel and IC (Otto) engine-driven heat pumps are commercially available and should be able to increase their market share relative to gas furnaces on a life cycle cost basis; the cost premiums associated with these products, however, make it difficult to achieve three or five year paybacks which adversely affects their use in the U.S. Stirling engine-driven and duplex Stirling heat pumps have been investigated in the past as potential gas-fired appliances that would have longer lives and lower maintenance costs than diesel and IC engine-driven heat pumps at slightly lower efficiencies. These potential advantages have not been demonstrated and there has been a low level of interest in Stirling engine-driven heat pumps since the late 1980's. GAX absorption heat pumps have high heating efficiencies relative to conventional gas furnaces and are viable alternatives to furnace/air conditioner combinations in all parts of the country outside of the southeast, south central states, and desert southwest. Adsorption heat pumps may be competitive with the GAX absorption system at a higher degree of mechanical complexity; insufficient information is available to be more precise in that assessment.

  7. Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

  8. Performance Optimization of an Irreversible Heat Pump with Variable-temperature Heat Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Y.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An irreversible cycle model of a heat pump operating between two variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established and used to analyze the performance of the heat pump affected by heat resistances, heat leakage and internal dissipation...

  9. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  10. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  11. Early Equipment Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlie, Michelle

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    starting with the ones that could cause the most human harm. This is also an excellent time to discuss all the lockout/tagout points on the machine, determine how much safety training is necessary and if there are enough warning stickers. The idea... needed. One-point lessons should be completed on all inspection, lubrication, and lockout/tagout points. Equipment labels should be created at this time including lockout/tagout and predetermined set-points. The key to a successful EEM program...

  12. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipmentPool

  13. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipmentPoolPhilips

  14. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, D.M.; Bacon, D.J.; Massey-Norton, J.T.; Miller, J.D.

    1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  15. Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many building owners and facility managers are deeply interested in both operation and maintenance costs related to a building's life cycle. Optimizing energy consumption and obtaining long equipment activity requires sophisticated management...

  16. Improving reuse of semiconductor equipment through benchmarking, standardization, and automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silber, Jacob B. (Jacob Bradley)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6D program at Intel® Corporation was set up to improve operations around capital equipment reuse, primarily in their semiconductor manufacturing facilities. The company was faced with a number of challenges, including ...

  17. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 3, March 1, 1987--May 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this third quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have obtained preliminary experimental results on the deposition behavior of submicron and supermicron solid particles (MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a two-dimensional surface exposed to a high temperature/velocity particle ``laden`` atmospheric pressure jet. The uniform velocity (``plug flow``) jet, with temperatures up to about 1520 K, derives from a pressurized gaseous fuel microcombustion chamber (110 cc) equipped with a platinum guiding (exit) channel. Particles were generated by several methods (Berglund-Liu type aerosol generator, ultrasonic nebulizer, or syringe feeder with aerodynamic particle off-take) and were introduced into the combustion chamber with a carrier stream of nitrogen or air. Laser light scattering and reflectivity techniques were used for the study of particle deposition, supplemented by post-mortem microscopy on the exposed surface. We observed a linear deposition rate of submicron particles due to the thermophoretic mechanism (until the first layer was developed) under both high and low velocity conditions. On the contrary, supermicron particle deposits reach a steady-state, evidently due to a dynamic equilibrium between particle deposition and dislodging caused by the impacting particles. At several temperatures particle-free subsonic gas jets (up to 120 m/sec) were unable to remove the submicron particle layer.

  18. Using measured equipment load profiles to 'right-size' HVACsystems and reduce energy use in laboratory buildings (Pt. 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Frenze, David; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a general paucity of measured equipment load datafor laboratories and other complex buildings and designers often useestimates based on nameplate rated data or design assumptions from priorprojects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequentlyoverestimated, and load variation across laboratory spaces within abuilding is typically underestimated. This results in two design flaws.Firstly, the overestimation of peak equipment loads results in over-sizedHVAC systems, increasing initial construction costs as well as energy usedue to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. Secondly, HVAC systemsthat are designed without accurately accounting for equipment loadvariation across zones can significantly increase simultaneous heatingand cooling, particularly for systems that use zone reheat fortemperature control. Thus, when designing a laboratory HVAC system, theuse of measured equipment load data from a comparable laboratory willsupport right-sizing HVAC systems and optimizing their configuration tominimize simultaneous heating and cooling, saving initial constructioncosts as well as life-cycle energy costs.In this paper, we present datafrom recent studies to support the above thesis. We first presentmeasured equipment load data from two sources: time-series measurementsin several laboratory modules in a university research laboratorybuilding; and peak load data for several facilities recorded in anational energy benchmarking database. We then contrast this measureddata with estimated values that are typically used for sizing the HVACsystems in these facilities, highlighting the over-sizing problem. Next,we examine the load variation in the time series measurements and analyzethe impact of this variation on energy use, via parametric energysimulations. We then briefly discuss HVAC design solutions that minimizesimultaneous heating and cooling energy use.

  19. Rotating equipment shop testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godse, A.G. (Kuwait National Petroleum Co., Shuaiba (KW))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor performance of machinery after commissioning at first draws comments on whether the purchase specification was in order, whether there were any lapses in stage inspection or whether the performance test procedure was inadequate. Attempts are initiated to find out whether there were any deviations in operating conditions from the purchase specifications, inadvertent lapses in operation or any mistakes by the maintenance Dept. It will be of some interest to mention here a difference between operating companies who have taken over existing plants and engineering consulting companies who have engineered and constructed the plants. The specialist rotating machinery group of engineering consultant companies have a good understanding of what can be achieved at the manufacturer's test facility due to repeated dealings with manufacturers. However, operating company understanding varies from one organization to the next. This article gives an overview of rotating machinery with respect to test objectives and field problems.

  20. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of the ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1986--November 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the above mentioned objectives, we have initiated theoretical studies in the following three interrelated areas : (a) Interaction of inertial- and thermophoretic effects in well-defined laminar ``dusty-gas`` flows. (b) Self-regulated sticking and deposit erosion in the simultaneous presence of vapor or submicron ``glue`` (c) Use of packed bed and tube-bank heat transfer and friction correlations to provide the basis for future tube-bank fouling predictions.During the first three months of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have: (1) Designed and initiated construction of the microcombustor particle-laden jet facility described in Section 3.1. (2) Initiated theoretical studies of the interaction of inertial and thermophoretic effects, the role of simultaneous vapor arrival in determining particle sticking and erosion probabilities, and mass transport phenomena in deep tube banks.

  1. Equipment design guidance document for flammable gas waste storage tank new equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smet, D.B.

    1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to be used as guidance for design engineers who are involved in design of new equipment slated for use in Flammable Gas Waste Storage Tanks. The purpose of this document is to provide design guidance for all new equipment intended for application into those Hanford storage tanks in which flammable gas controls are required to be addressed as part of the equipment design. These design criteria are to be used as guidance. The design of each specific piece of new equipment shall be required, as a minimum to be reviewed by qualified Unreviewed Safety Question evaluators as an integral part of the final design approval. Further Safety Assessment may be also needed. This guidance is intended to be used in conjunction with the Operating Specifications Documents (OSDs) established for defining work controls in the waste storage tanks. The criteria set forth should be reviewed for applicability if the equipment will be required to operate in locations containing unacceptable concentrations of flammable gas.

  2. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  3. Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

  4. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECM Summaryand Contact InformationofEnergy 1

  5. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 10, December 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Little is yet known (theoretically or experimentally) about the simultaneous effects of particle inertia, particle thermophoresis and high mass loading on the important engineering problem of predicting deposition rates from flowing ``dusty`` gases. For this reason, we investigate the motion of particles present at nonnegligible mass loading in a flowing nonisothermal gaseous medium and their deposition on strongly cooled or heated solid objects by examining the instructive case of steady axisymmetric ``dusty gas`` flow between two infinite disks: an inlet (porous) disk and the impermeable ``target`` disk -- a flow not unlike that encountered in recent seeded-flame experiments. Since this stagnation flow/geometry admits interesting self-similar solutions at all Reynolds numbers, we are able to predict laminar flow mass-, momentum- and energy-transfer rate coefficients over a wide range of particle mass loadings, dimensionless particle relaxation times (Stokes numbers), dimensionless thermophoretic diffusivities, and gas Reynolds numbers. As a by-product, we illustrate the accuracy and possible improvement of our previous ``diffusion model`` for tightly coupled dusty gas systems. Moreover, we report new results illustrating the dependence of the important ``critical`` Stokes number (for incipient particle impaction) on particle mass loading and wall/gas temperature ratio for dust-laden gas motion towards ``overheated`` solid surfaces. The present formulation and insulating transport coefficients should not only be useful in explaining/predicting recent deposition rate trends in ``seeded`` flame experiments, but also highly mass-loaded systems of technological interest.

  6. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 6, December 1, 1987--February 28, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the present reporting period, we have initiated work on (a) the interpretation of our recent data (see QTR5) on deposition rates under the simultaneous influence of inertia and thermophoresis, (b) the possible rate of particle photophoresis in environments characterized by high radiative heat loads. and (c) the influence of particle size distributions on total mass deposition rates. The fruits of these initiatives will be reported in subsequent quarterly technical reports. Here, we focus on our recent theoretical results in the important but previously uncharted area of the relations between particulate deposition mechanisms, deposit microstructure and deposit properties. Experimental verification of some of the most interesting predictions will be the subject of future HTCRE-Lab studies. Recent discussions with fouling engineers have convinced us that despite recent advances in our ability to predict particle deposition rates in convective-diffusion environments, the important connection between resulting deposit properties (effective thermal conductivity permeability, {hor_ellipsis}) and deposition mechanism remain poorly understood and only scarcely studied. Accordingly, as part of this DOE-PETC program we have developed a discrete stochastic model to simulate particulate deposition processes resulting from a combination of deposition mechanisms.

  7. Bio/Pharmaceutical Facilities, Operations and Validation Technician/Manager Open Applicant Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    maintenance, equipment installation, operation, and performance qualification. Being on call and setting upMARC's equipment. Responsible for the conforming calibration, qualification and validation status of equipment to affected departments during qualification, routine maintenance or unplanned maintenance of equipment

  8. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  9. Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a “living” probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. “Risk monitors” extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in today’s nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which don’t have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

  10. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  11. Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater operating efficiency compared to conventional electric motor-driven units (SCGC 1998). In Japan, many hundreds of thousands of natural gas-driven heat pumps have been sold (typically 40,000 systems annually) (Yahagi et al. 2006). The goal of this program is to develop dependable and energy efficient GHPs suitable for U.S. commercial rooftop applications (the single largest commercial product segment). This study describes the laboratory performance evaluation of an integrated 10-ton GHP rooftop unit (a 900cc Daihatsu-Aisin natural gas engine) which uses R410A as the refrigerant (GEDAC No.23). ORNL Thermally-Activated Heat Pump (TAHP) Environmental Chambers were used to evaluate this unit in a controlled laboratory environment.

  12. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment heating Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - army rapid equipping Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Army Pamphlet 2201 Summary: , equipping, training Army units for progressive readiness to conduct full spectrum operations across... Department of the Army Pamphlet 220-1 Field...

  15. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  16. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  17. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  18. Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

  19. Combined Flue Gas Heat Recovery and Pollution Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbikowski, T.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field of heat recovery now make it possible to recover a portion of the wasted heat and improve the working conditions of the air purification equipment. Proper design and selection of heat recovery and pollution control equipment as a combination...

  20. PMR2088B September 2012 FOURTYPES OF EQUIPMENT FOR SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    , and falling debris, and tools. Made of lightweight fire resistant material. Goggles $25 ­ $100 Protect against Resistant Shirt and Pants $70 ­ $300 Absorb heat and resist burning and melting; Nomex or Indura Cotton burns to occur. Personal protective equipment (PPE), protects workers from thermal and other hazards

  1. Guide to good practices for equipment and piping labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Equipment and Piping Labeling, Chapter XVIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing labeling programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Equipment and Piping Labeling is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a coordinated labeling program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  2. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Indoor Pollutants Emitted by Electronic Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo; Russell, Marion L.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last few decades have seen major changes in how people collect and process information at work and in their homes. More people are spending significant amounts of time in close proximity to computers, video display units, printers, fax machines and photocopiers. At the same time, efforts to improve energy efficiency in buildings by reducing leaks in building envelopes are resulting in tighter (i.e., less ventilated) indoor environments. Therefore, it is critical to understand pollutant emission rates for office equipment because even low emissions in areas that are under-ventilated or where individuals are in close proximity to the pollutant source can result in important indoor exposures. We reviewed existing literature reports on pollutant emission by office equipment, and measured emission factors of equipment with significant market share in California. We determined emission factors for a range of chemical classes including volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), ozone and particulates. The measured SVOCs include phthalate esters, brominated and organophosphate flame retardants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were carried out in large and small exposure chambers for several different categories of office equipment. Screening experiments using specific duty cycles in a large test chamber ({approx}20 m{sup 3}) allowed for the assessment of emissions for a range of pollutants. Results from the screening experiments identified pollutants and conditions that were relevant for each category of office equipment. In the second phase of the study, we used a smaller test chamber ({approx}1 m{sup 3}) to measure pollutant specific emission factors for individual devices and explored the influence of a range of environmental and operational factors on emission rates. The measured emission factors provide a data set for estimating indoor pollutant concentrations and for exploring the importance of user proximity when estimating exposure concentrations.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fewell, N.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: NSLS operations organization and administration; shift routines and operating practices; NSLS control room activities; communications; control of on-shift training; investigation of abnormal events; notifications; control of equipment and system status; lock-out tagout; independent verification; logkeeping; shift turnover; required reading; shift orders; equipment operations guides; operator aid postings; and equipment labeling.

  5. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptionoperation or heat from solar thermal systems. As a result,in the case of PV or solar thermal equipment, by available

  6. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  7. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  8. EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type Size Category (Btu/h) Size.ahridirectory.org/ceedirectory/pages/ac/cee/defaultSearch.aspx 12,000 Btu/h = 1 ton Less than 65,000 Btu/h Air Conditioners, Air Cooled Air Conditioners, Water completed by the California Energy Commission at a rate of 12,000 Btu/h per ton of air conditioning Source

  9. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Murphy, Richard W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  10. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

  11. Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), evaluated a number of control strategies for packaged cooling equipment that can be implemented in an advanced controller, which can be retrofit into existing packaged heat pump units to improve their operational efficiency. This report documents the results of that analysis.

  12. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive.

  13. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  14. Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The [http://www.trs.virginia.gov/debt/MELP%20Guides.aspx Master Equipment Leasing Program] (MELP) ensures that all Commonwealth agencies, authorities and institutions obtain consistent and...

  15. Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be registered with the Department of Aeronautics if the...

  16. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab] [Oak Ridge National Lab

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High initial cost and lack of public awareness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, which is a heating only central GSHP system using shallow aquifer as heat source and installed at a warehouse and truck bay at Kalispell, MT. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, utility bills, and calculations of energy consumptions of conventional central heating systems for providing the same heat outputs as the central GSHP system did. The evaluated performance metrics include energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of GSHP system compared with conventional heating systems. This case study also identified areas for reducing uncertainties in performance evaluation, improving operational efficiency, and reducing installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future. Publication of ASHRAE at the annual conference in Seattle.

  17. Absorption heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  18. Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat...

  19. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  20. Heating Equipment Checklist for Winter Comfort and Efficiency | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossary ofGroundwaterHCHearings HearingsPump

  1. DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Direct Heating Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINEfor the Dehumidifierand Pool

  2. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | DepartmentRecruitPumping Costs

  3. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  4. Tennessee: Ground-Source Heat Pump Receives Innovation Award...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    equipment and greater than 30% versus current state-of-the-art two-stage geothermal heat pumps. This water-to-air packaged heat pump provides significantly lower energy...

  5. CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

  6. Heat pump apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Horowitz, Jeffrey S. (Woodridge, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  7. Positive materials identification of existing equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, H.A. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable engineering effort and expertise are expended for materials selection at refining and petrochemical facilities. However, the benefits of this effort are undermined if there is an inadvertent material substitution during construction. Although procedures have always been in place to reduce the chance of such substitutions, it is known that these errors have occurred. Accordingly, over the years the industry has periodically reviewed and improved quality control in this effort. However, many older facilities that did not benefit from today`s procedures are still in operation. As a consequence, some companies have conducted positive material identification (PMI) verification of existing equipment. This process is further complicated by the fact that the most susceptible components are typically insulated and must be located. Once located, accessibility and operating temperatures are complicating issues. This paper describes prioritization issues and hardware tradeoffs for conducting a PMI verification program.

  8. Operations Research + Information Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    and the equipment they operate to perform most efficiently. The allocation of resources may be represented of the techniques and modeling concepts needed to analyze and design complex systems. As an operations researcher. All business systems are complex and need sophisticated decision-making methods that enable employees

  9. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  10. Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume...

  11. Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Equipment Tests and Activities Bruce Glagola - Sept 2013 Construction Equipment Tests A series of tests were conducted by the APS Construction Vibration...

  12. TWO WELL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR COMBINED HEATING AND AIRCONDITIONING BY GROUNDWATER HEATPUMPS IN SHALLOW AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelka, Walter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In warmer climates air source heat pumps have gained widestadvantages over air source heat pumps. For example, theair source equipment is much less. The source for this kind of heat pump

  13. area operable unit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Separator, 3 phase separator, tank. Physics Websites Summary: , , , input . hold-up . heat input out put . multi feed liquid volume EQUIPMENT. . Centrifugal compressor,...

  14. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

  15. air operations vision: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 The Operational Strengths and Weaknesses of Military Night Vision Equipment Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: The Operational Strengths and...

  16. Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1st

  17. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  18. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including imaging equipment, which is covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  19. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I (Section 1), and F. Bruce Sanford (Section 1) Table of Contents Pages Section 1 - Cold Storage Design to be Considered in the Freezing and Cold Storage of Fishery Products - Preparing, Freezing, and Cold Storage

  20. In-Place Cleaning of Milk Pasteurizing Equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, F. E.; Moore, A. V.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proced- ure. In the study reported in this bulletin the critical part of the vat system used for pasteuri- zation was the preheater in which the tempera- ture gradient was high enough to cause a milk stone deposit. In-place cleaning and sanitizing... . In heated equipment surfaces. Such films been referred to for many years as "milk - = '7 Following the cleaning process, there I- ,, be a sanitizing treatment that will insure " limum of bacteriological contamination in ;/ - icceeding milk processed...

  1. Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10 producing wells, 11 injection wells and 1 water supply well. Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and drilling water supply wells...

  2. Adaptive Optimization of Central Chiller Plant Equipment Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    and outside air conditions and it insures that the central refrigeration system operates with the lowest possible energy cost at all times. PROBLEM BACKGROUND The specific industrial plant for which the control algorithm was developed is the Texas... was developed to select the optimal sequence of central refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in an industrial plant. The control algorithm adapts the optimal equipaent sequence to reflect changes in the plant's cooling load...

  3. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  4. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  5. Development of unique ISI equipment for an RPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, Katsumi; Aoki, Takayuki (Japan Atomic Power Co., Tsuruga-shi, Fukui (Japan)); Sasaki, Tsukasa (Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative effort involving the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and Hitachi Ltd. has provided unique automated ultrasonic testing equipment for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of JAPC's Tsuruga unit 1, which is a 357-MW (electric) non-jet-pumped boiling water reactor. Using this equipment package at the 20th scheduled outage of Tsuruga unit 1, the in-service inspection (ISI) performed in accordance with Japanese ISI standard JEAC 4205 (similar to ASME Sec. XI) was successfully completed. Through this field application, the capability and reliability of this equipment have been verified. Tsuruga unit 1 has an RPV that cannot be reached from the outside because of the limited space between the RPV and a biological shield. Therefore, it must be inspected with ID inspection equipment such as that for pressurized water reactors. A major consideration in the design of this new equipment was that it pass an ultrasonic testing head and arm through a very narrow gap between reactor internals and allow precise control from a great distance below the RPV flange (the maximum is {approximately}12m below). The design philosophy focused on how to avoid interference between any reactor internals and the equipment during the operation.

  6. Solar and Wind Equipment Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Collectors, heat exchangers and storage units of solar energy systems -- and the installation of these systems -- sold or installed in Arizona must have a warranty of at least two years. The...

  7. Industrial Heat Pump Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

    with operating the evaporator. The open-cycle heat pump design uses an electrically driven centrifugal compressor to recover the latent heat of the water vapor generated by the evaporator. (Steam was the original heat source but is now only needed for start...

  8. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  9. Energy Consumption and Demand as Affected by Heat Pumps that Cool, Heat and Heat Domestic Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cawley, R.

    heaters. The methods presented demonstrate how integrated systems can be of value in reducing daily summertime peaks. INTRODUCTION A need for descriptors to evaluate systems that condition space and heat domestic water has been recognized for several... added to and used by the water from the desuperheated refrigerant - heat normally provided by the electric water heater's resistance elements. DESCRIPTION OF EQUIPMENT The system considered for this study is best described by U.S. Patent No. 4...

  10. Steam generator operating experience: Update for 1984-1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, L.; Stokley, J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes operational events and degradation mechanisms affecting pressurized water reactor steam generator integrity, provides updated inspection results reported in 1984, 1985, and 1986, and highlights both prevalent problem areas and advances in improved equipment test practices, preventive measures, repair techniques, and replacement procedures. It describes equipment design features of the three major suppliers and discusses 68 plants in detail. Steam generator degradation mechanisms include intergranular stress corrosion cracking, primary water stress corrosion cracking, pitting, intergranular attack, and vibration wear that effects tube integrity and causes leakage. Plugging, sleeving heat treatment, peening, chemical cleaning, and steam generator replacements are described and regulatory instruments and inspection guidelines for nondestructive evaluations and girth weld cracking are discusses. The report concludes that although degradation mechanisms are generally understood, the elimination of unscheduled plant shutdowns and costly repairs resulting from leaking tubes has not been achieved. Highlights of steam generator research and unresolved safety issues are discussed. 21 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Refrigerant charge management in a heat pump water heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jie; Hampton, Justin W.

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pumps that heat or cool a space and that also heat water, refrigerant management systems for such heat pumps, methods of managing refrigerant charge, and methods for heating and cooling a space and heating water. Various embodiments deliver refrigerant gas to a heat exchanger that is not needed for transferring heat, drive liquid refrigerant out of that heat exchanger, isolate that heat exchanger against additional refrigerant flowing into it, and operate the heat pump while the heat exchanger is isolated. The heat exchanger can be isolated by closing an electronic expansion valve, actuating a refrigerant management valve, or both. Refrigerant charge can be controlled or adjusted by controlling how much liquid refrigerant is driven from the heat exchanger, by letting refrigerant back into the heat exchanger, or both. Heat pumps can be operated in different modes of operation, and segments of refrigerant conduit can be interconnected with various components.

  12. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

  13. Simulation study of a heat pump for simultaneous heating and cooling coupled to buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation study of a heat pump for simultaneous heating and cooling coupled to buildings Redouane) 141-149" DOI : 10.1016/j.enbuild.2013.12.047 #12;ABSTRACT In several situations, a heat pump occur. Unlike a reversible heat pump that works alternatively in heating or cooling, a HPS operates

  14. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipment Inventory

  15. Equipment Listing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipment Inventory

  16. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipment

  17. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr1stEquipmentPool What

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption-sorption heat pumps Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation Auxiliary - Heat pump water heater 50... -gal tank, electric auxiliary heating Multiple operating modes: heat pump, hybrid and standard... and Ventilation Systems...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption-type heat pumps Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation Auxiliary - Heat pump water heater 50... -gal tank, electric auxiliary heating Multiple operating modes: heat pump, hybrid and standard... and Ventilation Systems...

  20. Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction allows Kansas taxpayers to claim an expense deduction for business machinery and equipment, placed in service in Kansas during the tax year. The one-time...

  1. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    overboarding operations on the vessel. 7.16.2 Scope This procedure covers the design, installation, maintenance.16.1 Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to set forth standards to ensure safe overboarding equipment on RSAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.16 OVERBOARDING EQUIPMENT Originator: Approved By

  2. Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

  3. Rational analysis of mass, momentum, and heat transfer phenomena in liquid storage tanks under realistic operating conditions: 2. Application to a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrini, F.; Vitale, S. (ENEL-Italian National Electricity Board-CRTN, Milan (Italy)); Castellano, L. (MATEC S.r.l., Milan (Italy))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second part of a two-part paper that deals with modeling the thermal performances of storage tanks of liquid water coupled with solar-assisted heatpump systems. The computer code THESTA, described in detail in the first part, has been applied to compare configurations which differ from one another in the distribution and thickness of the insulating panels. These numerical experiments show very clearly the capability of the code in simulating realistic operating conditions. The validity of the present release is also discussed. The results obtained have been assumed to be a reliable theoretical support to the definition of the features of the storage device of a pilot plant.

  4. Energy Comparison Vacuum Producing Equipment - Mechanical Vacuum Pumps vs. Steam Ejectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foisy, E. C.; Munkittrick, M. T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vacuum on condensers, process reactors, or equipment and processes requiring subatmospheric conditions, has been to utilize steam ejectors. Due to the inherent operating inefficiency and wastefulness of the steam ejector, coupled with the rapidly...

  5. VALVE FUNNEL SPRING PIN PRESS PERFORMANCE AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS EVALUATION FOR SPECIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITHERSPOON JT

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This evaluation allows use of the valve funnel spring pin press and describes appropriate handling instructions for the tool. The engineering evaluation is required for operations and field use of special tools and equipment.

  6. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  7. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  8. Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

  9. arabidopsis small heat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wasted heat could be converted to useful power, it would Columbia University 369 Heat testing methodology comparison. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Pre-operative...

  10. alter heat chock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other...

  11. ampicillin increased heat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other...

  12. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

  13. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators This guide presents useful information for...

  14. Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

  15. Study of Frost Growth on Heat Exchangers Used as Outdoor Coils in Air Source Heat Pump Systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padhmanabhan, Sankaranarayanan K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??During winter heating operation, the outdoor coil of a heat pump acts as an evaporator and when the ambient temperature is near freezing, the moisture… (more)

  16. Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, R.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption heat Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for prototype hardware. Proof of concept. 9 12;At the present time, absorption heat... and air conditioning equipment. Therefore, the lower performance potential for the...

  18. Guide to good practices for equipment and piping labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Equipment and Piping Labeling, Chapter XVIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities.'' The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing labeling programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19.

  19. Guide to good practices for equipment and piping labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Equipment and Piping Labeling, Chapter XVIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, ``Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities.`` The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing labeling programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19.

  20. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  1. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized9 *ConcentratingCondensing

  2. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

  3. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  4. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

  5. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ManagementEarth ScienceEarth Science: Facilities and Equipment Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment Geoscience Facilities and Equipment High-pressure thermalmechanical...

  7. Application and Technology Requirements for Heat Pumps at the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priebe, S.; Chappell, R.

    APPLICATION AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR HEAT PUMPS AT THE PROCESS INDUSTRIESl Stephen Priebe Engineering Specialist EG&G Idaho, Inc. Idaho Falls, ID There are basically three categories of equip ment used to manage heat energy flows... in an indus trial process. First, heat exchangers are used to move heat through the process down the temperature gradient. Second, heat pumps are used to move heat through the process up the temperature gra dient. Third, heat engines are used to convert...

  8. List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolar (Texas) JumpEvent (2)Agricultural Equipment

  9. SECOND GENERATION EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT DESIGN TO SUPPORT VOLOXIDATION TESTING AT INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis L. Wahlquit; Kenneth J. Bateman; Brian R. Westphal

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voloxidation is a potential head-end process used prior to aqueous or pyrochemical spent-oxide-fuel treatment. The spent oxide fuel is heated to an elevated temperature in oxygen or air to promote separation of the fuel from the cladding as well as volatize the fission products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been collaborating on voloxidation research through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI). A new furnace and off-gas trapping system (OTS) with enhanced capability was necessary to perform further testing. The design criteria for the OTS were jointly agreed upon by INL and KAERI. First, the equipment must accommodate the use of spent nuclear fuel and be capable of operating in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the INL. This primarily means the furnace and OTS must be remotely operational and maintainable. The system requires special filters and distinctive temperature zones so that the fission products can be uniquely captured. The OTS must be sealed to maximize the amount of fission products captured. Finally, to accommodate the largest range of operating conditions, the OTS must be capable of handling high temperatures and various oxidizing environments. The constructed system utilizes a vertical split-tube furnace with four independently controlled zones. One zone is capable of reaching 1200°C to promote the release of volatile fission products. The three additional zones that capture fission products can be controlled to operate between 100-1100°C. A detailed description of the OTS will be presented as well as some initial background information on high temperature seal options.

  10. Household equipment of Canadians -- features of the 1993 stock and the 1994 and 1995 purchases: Analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the results of three surveys that collected information on household equipment: The 1994 and 1995 Household Equipment Surveys and the 1993 Survey of Household Energy Use. The goal of the report is to highlight the features of energy-consuming equipment bought by Canadian households in 1994 and 1995 in comparison to those owned by households in 1993. Results are presented by type of equipment: Refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, freezers, automatic washers, automatic dryers, air conditioning systems, heating systems, and water heaters. Appendices include information on survey methodology and a copy of the survey questionnaire.

  11. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

  12. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  13. Intrinsically irreversible heat engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

  14. Evaluation of heat stress in an aluminum smelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Stacy Rahkell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heat stress and heat strain was evaluated for the aluminum smelter workers at Alcoa, Rockdale Operations. Personal, environmental, and metabolic factors that contribute to heat-related illnesses were identified. The effectiveness of current...

  15. `Heat pumps in Smart Grids' IEA Annex 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    facility Scandinavian interconnections Demand side Response (via smart grid) Industrial Residential.M. Wagener Managing Consultant OPERATING AGENT: #12;GAS HEAT PUMPS COMMERCIAL SECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGY AUTOMATION HEAT PUMPS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WORKING GROUP THERMAL DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS TARGET

  16. FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    FALL 2011 EMEC 326 DR. RUHUL AMIN HEAT TRANSFER 201 C Roberts Hall Phone: 994-6295 POLICY STATEMENT, convection, and radiation formulations. Introduction to heat transfer equipment. Course credit: 4

  17. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

  18. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

  19. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  20. Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

  1. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  2. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  3. WRAP TRUPACT loading systems operational test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOSRAMOS, E.V.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operational Test Report documents the operational testing of the TRUPACT process equipment HNF-3918, Revision 0, TRUPACT Operational Test Procedure. The test accomplished the following: Procedure validation; Facility equipment interface; Facility personnel support; and Subcontractor personnel support interface. Field changes are documented as test exceptions with resolutions. All resolutions are completed or a formal method is identified to track the resolution through to completion.

  4. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  5. Workshop on environmental qualification of electric equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.; Gunther, W.; Villaran, M.; Lee, B.S.; Taylor, J. [comps.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions concerning the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of electrical equipment used in commercial nuclear power plants have recently become the subject of significant interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Initial questions centered on whether compliance with the EQ requirements for older plants were adequate to support plant operation beyond 40 years. After subsequent investigation, the NRC Staff concluded that questions related to the differences in EQ requirements between older and newer plants constitute a potential generic issue which should be evaluated for backfit, independent of license renewal activities. EQ testing of electric cables was performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under contract to the NRC in support of license renewal activities. Results showed that some of the environmentally qualified cables either failed or exhibited marginal insulation resistance after a simulated plant life of 20 years during accident simulation. This indicated that the EQ process for some electric cables may be non-conservative. These results raised questions regarding the EQ process including the bases for conclusions about the qualified life of components based upon artificial aging prior to testing.

  6. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project accomplishments, including the course development phases, tasks associated with each phase, and detailed list of the course materials developed. A summary of each year's activities is also included.

  7. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  8. Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents generic cost curves for several equipment types generated using ICARUS Process Evaluator. The curves give Purchased Equipment Cost as a function of a capacity variable. This work was performed to assist NETL engineers and scientists in performing rapid, order of magnitude level cost estimates or as an aid in evaluating the reasonableness of cost estimates submitted with proposed systems studies or proposals for new processes. The specific equipment types contained in this report were selected to represent a relatively comprehensive set of conventional chemical process equipment types.

  9. Decision support for operations and maintenance (DSOM) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarrell, Donald B. (Kennewick, WA); Meador, Richard J. (Richland, WA); Sisk, Daniel R. (Richland, WA); Hatley, Darrel D. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, Daryl R. (Richland, WA); Keibel, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Gowri, Krishnan (Richland, WA); Reyes-Spindola, Jorge F. (Richland, WA); Adams, Kevin J. (San Bruno, CA); Yates, Kenneth R. (Lake Oswego, OR); Eschbach, Elizabeth J. (Fort Collins, CO); Stratton, Rex C. (Richland, WA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for minimizing the life cycle cost of processes such as heating a building. The method utilizes sensors to monitor various pieces of equipment used in the process, for example, boilers, turbines, and the like. The method then performs the steps of identifying a set optimal operating conditions for the process, identifying and measuring parameters necessary to characterize the actual operating condition of the process, validating data generated by measuring those parameters, characterizing the actual condition of the process, identifying an optimal condition corresponding to the actual condition, comparing said optimal condition with the actual condition and identifying variances between the two, and drawing from a set of pre-defined algorithms created using best engineering practices, an explanation of at least one likely source and at least one recommended remedial action for selected variances, and providing said explanation as an output to at least one user.

  10. Industrial Heat Pump Design Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    There are numerous industries that can incorporate heat pumps into their operations to save energy costs and payoff the investment in well under two years. Many of these industries can cut energy costs associated with evaporation by over 75...

  11. Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

  12. Using a cold radiometer to measure heat loads and survey heat leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P. [Cryogenics and Fluids Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

  13. Heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishman, P.J.

    1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

  14. MIXED PHASE COMPRESSION HIGH EFFICIENCY HEAT PUMP.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, WenYen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The objective of this thesis is the design and realization of a higher efficiency air source heat pump. The improved pump???s operating cost must rival… (more)

  15. assemblies equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management MIT - DSpace Summary: Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in...

  16. A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

  17. Removable fibrous glass insulation fitted to complex equipment shapes results in $178,000/yr savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1980, PPG Industries embarked on a general plant energy conservation effort at its Lake Charles, LA plant where chlor-alkalis, various chlorinated hydrocarbons, and vinyl chloride monomer are manufactured. Company engineers sought a means of insulating process steam components that, because of their complex shapes, were not (and normally are not) insulated. These components included flanges on heat exchanger heads and reboilers, steam valves in process areas, manways and other equipment. PPG plant engineers specified removable, reusable blanket insulation. The blankets are constructed of a fibrous glass mat form insulation encased in a silicone-impregnated glass cloth or similar weather barrier. Each insulation blanket was custom-made for its particular equipment shape and service application to ensure a close fit and optimal energy efficiency. Insulation thickness, type of weather barrier, and mesh were specified according to intended use. For protection from abrasion or puncture, some of the blankets also were covered with stainless steel, Monel, or Inconel wire mesh. Overall, the blankets provide high strength, durability, low thermal conductivity ratings, and an operating range of up to 1200/sup 0/F. Reduced maintenance costs and improved worker productivity have been evidenced since installing the blanket insulation. Further, PPG has increased energy efficiency. Project savings were tracked for 30 months (insulation and installation costs vs. fuel and maintenance savings) and revealed annual plant savings of $178,000-$130,000 in energy savings and $48,000 in maintenance savings. With the cost of the insulation blankets being about $125,000, PPG recovered its investment in under a year.

  18. Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety SLAC-I-730-0A11A-001-R003 23 March 2005 Document Title: Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Original Publication Date: 19 January 2005 Revised Publication Date: 23 March 2005 (updated 29 November 2010) Department: Electrical Safety Document Number: SLAC

  19. General Restaurant Equipment: Order (2013-CE-5344)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered General Restaurant Equipment Co. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding General Restaurant Equipment had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  1. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  2. DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. K. Housley; J.E. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800°C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

  3. Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment must be ENERGY STAR®–qualified. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview explains how to meet energy-efficiency requirements for Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment and how to maximize energy savings throughout products' useful lives.

  4. The deterioration in heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure and high heat fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiralkar, B. S.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At slightly supercritical pressure and in the neighborhood of the pseudo-critical temperature (defined as the temperature corresponding to the peak in specific heat at the operating pressure), the heat transfer coefficient ...

  5. RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

  6. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banker, John G. [Dynamic Materials Corp., 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Massarello, Jack [Global Metallix, Consultant to DMC, 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Pauly, Stephane [DMC., Nobelclad Business Unit, 1 Allee Alfred NOBEL, 66600 Rivesaltes (France)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  7. Waste-heat utilization. (Latest citations from the U. S. Patent data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning processes employed for the recovery of useful heat from the environment, or from equipment which generates waste heat. Heat pump systems, furnaces, industrial boilers, and systems employed in the recovery of heat from internal combustion engines are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Safe Operating Procedure (Created 5/11)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    ://ehs.unl.edu (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: WRITTEN PROCEDURES during maintenance and repair operations. In these situations, a lockout/tagout (LO/TO) program must/TO procedures, as well as other program requirements. See EHS SOP, Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment

  9. Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

  10. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  11. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Cunningham and J. Shank

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner.

  12. Development of a High Latent Effectiveness Energy Recovery Ventilator with Integration into Rooftop Package Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory M. Dobbs; Norberto O. Lemcoff; Frederick J. Cogswell; Jeffrey T. Benolt

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report covers the Cooperative Program carried out to design and optimize an enhanced flat-plate energy recovery ventilator and integrate it into a packaged unitary (rooftop) air conditioning unit. The project objective was to optimize the design of a flat plate energy recovery ventilator (ERV) core that compares favorably to flat plate air-to-air heat exchanger cores on the market and to cost wise to small enthalpy wheel devices. The benefits of an integrated unit incorporating an enhanced ERV core and a downsized heating/cooling unit were characterized and the design of an integrated unit considering performance and cost was optimized. Phase I was to develop and optimize the design of a membrane based heat exchanger core. Phase II was the creation and observation of a system integrated demonstrator unit consisting of the Enhanced Energy Recovery Ventilator (EERV) developed in Phase I coupled to a standard Carrier 50HJ rooftop packaged unitary air conditioning unit. Phase III was the optimization of the system prior to commercialization based on the knowledge gained in Phase II. To assure that the designs chosen have the possibility of meeting cost objectives, a preliminary manufacturability and production cost study was performed by the Center for Automation Technologies at RPI. Phase I also included a preliminary design for the integrated unit to be further developed in Phase II. This was to assure that the physical design of the heat exchanger designed in Phase I would be acceptable for use in Phase II. An extensive modeling program was performed by the Center for Building Performance & Diagnostics of CMU. Using EnergyPlus as the software, a typical office building with multiple system configurations in multiple climatic zones in the US was simulated. The performance of energy recovery technologies in packaged rooftop HVAC equipment was evaluated. The experimental program carried out in Phases II and III consisted of fabricating and testing a demonstrator unit using Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) based controls. Augmenting the control signals, CCN was also used to monitor and record additional performance data that supported modeling and conceptual understanding. The result of the testing showed that the EERV core developed in Phase I recovered energy in the demonstrator unit at the expected levels based on projections. In fact, at near-ARI conditions the core recovered about one ton of cooling enthalpy when operating with a three-ton rooftop packaged unit.

  13. A performance data network for solar process heat systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

  14. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  15. LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    4.A.22 LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION/MAINTENANCE. 2.0 Scope This procedure applies to all personnel needing to operate this equipment. 3.0 Procedure 3 OF QUANTIFLEX ANESTHESIA MACHINE/ SURGIVET SAV2500 VENTILATOR UNIT 1.0 Purpose This procedure outlines how

  16. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Annual Site Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 226 Annual Site Maintenance Date Last Modified Modified This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for annual maintenance of equipment Sampler Operation Manual #12;SOP 226: Annual Site Maintenance 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

  17. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  18. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 authorized studies of several types of industrial equipment to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of labeling rules and minimum energy efficiency standards. An approach...

  19. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  20. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  1. Safety Topic: Rota/ng Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Topic: Rota/ng Equipment Jus/n Kleingartner #12;Safety protocols 2 #12;Safety protocols for opera/ng a lathe · Don'ts: ­ Do not wear gloves

  2. Clark Public Utilities- Solar Energy Equipment Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clark Public Utilities offers financing available to its customers for the purchase and installation of residential solar equipment. Loans up to $10,000 are available for solar pool heaters and...

  3. Solar and Wind Energy Equipment Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Wisconsin, any value added by a solar-energy system or a wind-energy system is exempt from general property taxes. A solar-energy system is defined as "equipment which directly converts and then...

  4. Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in...

  5. Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on steam turbine drives for rotating equipment provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  6. Dairy Manure Handling Systems and Equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station 8?1446 DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT John M. Sweeten, Ph....D., P.E.* A manure management system for a modern dairy should be capable of controlling solid or liquid manure and wastewater from the open corrals (manure and rainfall runoff), free stall barn , feeding barn , holding lot or holding shed , milking...

  7. Experience gained from equipment qualification inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobus, M.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes issues which have been identified during equipment qualification inspections. Generic qualification information is discussed first, such as qualification bases, utility/supplier interfaces, file auditability, and generic environmental qualification. Next, technical strategies with specific examples are discussed. Issues covered include functional performance requirements, post accident qualification, similarity, installation and interfaces, maintenance, aging, and testing. Finally, additions and deletions to equipment qualification master lists and environmental enveloping are discussed.

  8. Augmented reality building operations tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  9. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  10. Development of an integrated building load and ground source heat pump model to assess heat pump and ground loop design and performance in a commercial office building.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Jacob Dale

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) offer an efficient method for cooling and heating buildings, reducing energy usage and operating cost. In hot, arid regions such… (more)

  11. Guide to good practices for control of equipment and system status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Control of Equipment and System Status, Chapter VIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing equipment and system status control programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Control of Equipment and System Status is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the need for a formal status control program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  12. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative: High Operating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University Research Initiative (MURI) to develop high-operating temperature heat-transfer fluids for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The following...

  13. Energy Information Handbook: Applications for Energy-Efficient Building Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment, such as a chiller, boiler, or air-handling unit.Methods A heating system boiler load profile is shown for agiven the season, the boiler cycles on each night. C The

  14. Developing ''SMART'' equipment and systems through collaborative NERI research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARMON,DARYL L.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.; GOLAY,MICHAEL W.; MAYNARD,KENNETH P.; SPENCER,JOSEPH W.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy initiated the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) to conduct research and development with the objectives of: (1) overcoming the principal technical obstacles to expanded nuclear energy use, (2) advancing the state of nuclear technology to maintain its competitive position in domestic and world markets, and (3) improving the performance, efficiency, reliability, and economics of nuclear energy. Fiscal Year 1999 program funding is $19 Million, with increased finding expected for subsequent years, emphasizing international cooperation. Among the programs selected for funding is the ``Smart Equipment and Systems to Improve Reliability and Safety in Future Nuclear Power Plant Operations''. This program is a 30 month collaborative effort bringing together the technical capabilities of ABB C-E Nuclear Power, Inc. (ABB CENP), Sandia National Laboratories, Duke Engineering and Services (DE and S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The program's goal is to design, develop and evaluate an integrated set of smart equipment and predictive maintenance tools and methodologies that will significantly reduce nuclear plant construction, operation and maintenance costs. To accomplish this goal the Smart Equipment program will: (1) Identify and prioritize nuclear plant equipment that would most likely benefit from adding smart features; (2) Develop a methodology for systematically monitoring the health of individual pieces of equipment implemented with smart features (i.e. smart equipment); (3) Develop a methodology to provide plant operators with real-time information through smart equipment Man-Machine Interfaces (MMI) to support their decision making; (4) Demonstrate the methodology on a targeted component and/or system; (5) Expand the concept to system and plant levels that allow communication and integration of data among smart equipment. This paper will discuss (1) detailed subtask plans for the entire program, including expected achievements, (2) preliminary results from the early program phases and (3) the program's relationship to other NERI programs being conducted by the same team.

  15. Cyclic Operation of Power Plant: Technical, Operational and Cost Issues -- An International Seminar: Proceedings: ''Two Shifting'' Seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of changes in demand and competition within the power industry, fossil fuel plants in many countries are now subject to two-shift operation, that is, generating power for 10-15 hours during the day only, usually in combination with a complete shutdown on weekends. Other fossil-fueled units, although running around the clock, need to follow changes in electricity demand. This mode of functioning, in which temperatures and pressures are never stable for more than a few hours, is referred to as ''cyclic operation of plant.'' The aim of the seminar at which these papers were presented was to identify the basic causes of component and equipment problems in two-shift operation, and to begin to identify procedures that could minimize operating and maintenance costs. The papers cover the following topics: Session 1: Plant Operation Experience and Design Issues; Session 2: Materials Issues; Session 3: Cost, Manpower and Management Issues; Session 4: Plant Automation Issues; Session 5: Hot Section Gas Turbine Issues; and Session 6: HRSG [heat recovery steam generator] Issues.

  16. Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-45917 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report..............................................................................................46 #12;#12;1 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity

  17. Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton...

  18. www.heatpumpcentre.or IEA HEAT PUMP PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ) #12;www.heatpumpcentre.or g Annex 41 ­ Cold climate heat pumps (Improving low ambient temperature to efficient and reliable systems and equipment for buildings in cold climates Annex 40 Heat pump concepts technologies, such as pellet boilers and gas boilers Annex 38 Systems using solar thermal energy

  19. Research and Development Roadmap for Water Heating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Gagne, Claire [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Lutz, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Merrigan, Tim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although water heating is an important energy end-use in residential and commercial buildings, efficiency improvements in recent years have been relatively modest. However, significant advancements related to higher efficiency equipment, as well as improved distribution systems, are now viable. DOE support for water heating research, development and demonstration (RD&D) could provide the impetus for commercialization of these advancements.

  20. 1982 analyses and reports: equipment availability report; component cause code report; and equipment availability report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This equipment availability report (1973 to 1982, 1982) presents statistical information on the performance of the major types of generating units and their major component groups. (DLC)

  1. Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Bruce Turner; Tim Brown; Ed Mardiat

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nationâ??s best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission â?? providing top quality medical care and instruction â?? without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power outages. TECOâ??s operation is the largest Chilled Water District Energy System in the United States. The company used DOEâ??s funding to help install a new high efficiency CHP system consisting of a Combustion Turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This CHP installation was just part of a larger project undertaken by TECO to ensure that it can continue to meet TMCâ??s growing needs. The complete efficiency overhaul that TECO undertook supported more than 1,000 direct and indirect jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and construction, with approximately 400 of those being jobs directly associated with construction of the combined heat and power plant. This showcase industrial scale CHP project, serving a critical component of the nationâ??s healthcare infrastructure, directly and immediately supported the energy efficiency and job creation goals established by ARRA and DOE. It also provided an unsurpassed model of a district energy CHP application that can be replicated within other energy intensive applications in the industrial, institutional and commercial sectors.

  2. michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators approach! · directly Smith, Rolfs, Barnes NIMA306 (1991) 233 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators proof of concept with 12C

  3. HEAT BUMP MODELING IN HIGH HEAT-LOAD X-RAY OPTICS* E. Windisch IV, Wayne State, Detroit, MI, 48201, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    HEAT BUMP MODELING IN HIGH HEAT-LOAD X-RAY OPTICS* E. Windisch IV, Wayne State, Detroit, MI, 48201, U.S.A. Abstract Thermal deformation in high heat load X-Ray optics limits coherence and reduces flux-equipped MATLAB program designed to calculate three dimensional energy depostion in a solid. It uses an executable

  4. Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Nancy

    Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this one-year investigation is to perform a technology integration/search, thereby ensuring that the safest and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Issues of worker health and safety are the main concern, followed by cost. Two lines of action were explored: innovative Personal Cooling Systems (PCS) and Personal Monitoring Equipment (PME). PME refers to sensors affixed to the worker that warn of an approaching heat stress condition, thereby preventing it. Three types of cooling systems were investigated: Pre-Chilled or Forced-Air System (PCFA), Umbilical Fluid-Chilled System (UFCS), and Passive Vest System (PVS). Of these, the UFCS leads the way. The PVS or Gel pack vest lagged due to a limited cooling duration. And the PCFA or chilled liquid air supply was cumbersome and required an expensive and complex recharge system. The UFCS in the form of the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) performed exceptionally. The technology uses a chilled liquid circulating undergarment and a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) external pump and ice reservoir. The system is moderately expensive, but the recharge is low-tech and inexpensive enough to offset the cost. There are commercially available PME that can be augmented to meet the DOE's heat stress alleviation need. The technology is costly, in excess of $4,000 per unit. Workers easily ignore the alarm. The benefit to health & safety is indirect so can be overlooked. A PCS is a more justifiable expenditure.

  6. DIVING OPERATIONS 30.A GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    as in the contract, using the particular diving techniques and equipment to be used under the contract. Divers shall demonstrate that at least one (1) of the four (4) qualification dives was performed in the last 6 months prior to the start of dive operations. The DDC will ensure USACE divers meet the training and qualification

  7. Liquid metal heat exchanger for efficient heating of soils and geologic formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wesolowski, David J. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for efficient heating of subterranean earth includes a well-casing that has an inner wall and an outer wall. A heater is disposed within the inner wall and is operable within a preselected operating temperature range. A heat transfer metal is disposed within the outer wall and without the inner wall, and is characterized by a melting point temperature lower than the preselected operating temperature range and a boiling point temperature higher than the preselected operating temperature range.

  8. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes washers, storage water...

  9. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial High-Efficiency Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Arizona who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes natural gas storage and tankless...

  10. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Project objective: Develop...

  11. Steam generator operating experience, update for 1989--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes operational events and degradation mechanisms affecting pressurized water reactor steam generator integrity. It provides: results of 1989 and 1990 steam generator inspections; highlights prevalent problem areas; improvements that have been made in nondestructive testing methods; preventive measures; repair techniques; and replacement procedures. It describes the equipment of the three (3) major suppliers and discusses recent examinations of 76 plants. Major areas of concern are the steam generator degradation mechanisms that affect tube integrity or cause tube leakage and tube failure. These include; (1) intergranular attack (IGA); (2) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); (3) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC); (4) pitting; and (5) vibrational wear and fatigue. Also discussed are plugging, sleeving, heat treatment, peening, chemical cleaning, and steam generator replacements. The current status of regulatory instruments and inspection guidelines for ensuring the steam generator integrity, is discussed with the highlights of steam generator research. New potential safety issues such as circumferential cracking and tube plug cracking are also discussed.

  12. Modeling of Heat Transfer in Geothermal Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, P.; Man, Y.; Fang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , University of Lund, Sweden, [7] Fang, Z., Diao, N., and Cui, P., Discontinuous operation of geothermal heat exchangers [J], Tsinghua Science and Technology. , 2002, 7 194?197. [8] Hellstrom, G., Ground heat storage -- Thermal analysis of duct storage... systems [D], Department of Mathem Sweden, 1991. [9] Mei, V. C. and Baxter, V. D., Performance of a ground-coupled heat pump with multiple dissimilar U-tu Transactions, 1986, 92 Part 2, 22-25. [10] Yavuzturk, C., Spitler, J. D. and Rees, S. J., A...

  13. Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papier, I.I. [Underwriters Labs., Inc., Northbrook, IL (United States)

    1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., (UL) have jointly established the Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP). The goal of this program is to enhance industrial and national security by providing a nationally recognized method for making informed selection and use decisions when buying security equipment and systems. The SESCP will provide a coordinated structure for private and governmental security standardization review. Members will participate in meetings to identify security problems, develop ad-hoc subcommittees (as needed) to address these identified problems, and to maintain a communications network that encourages a meaningful exchange of ideas. This program will enhance national security by providing improved security equipment and security systems based on consistent, reliable standards and certification programs.

  14. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  15. Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor is disclosed. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area. 4 figs.

  16. Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Steve; Letschert, Virginie

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are over twice as energy-efficient as conventional electric resistance water heaters, with the potential to save substantial amounts of electricity. Drawing on analysis conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's recently-concluded rulemaking on amended standards for water heaters, this paper evaluates key issues that will determine how well, and to what extent, this technology will fit in American homes. The key issues include: 1) equipment cost of HPWHs; 2) cooling of the indoor environment by HPWHs; 3) size and air flow requirements of HPWHs; 4) performance of HPWH under different climate conditions and varying hot water use patterns; and 5) operating cost savings under different electricity prices and hot water use. The paper presents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis of the adoption of HPWHs in a representative sample of American homes, as well as national impact analysis for different market share scenarios. Assuming equipment costs that would result from high production volume, the results show that HPWHs can be cost effective in all regions for most single family homes, especially when the water heater is not installed in a conditioned space. HPWHs are not cost effective for most manufactured home and multi-family installations, due to lower average hot water use and the water heater in the majority of cases being installed in conditioned space, where cooling of the indoor environment and size and air flow requirements of HPWHs increase installation costs.

  17. dieSel/heAvy equipMent College of Rural and Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    907-455-2809 www.ctc.uaf.edu/programs/diesel/ certificate Minimum Requirements for Certificate: 36 credits The diesel and heavy equipment mechanics program offers the student training in the maintenance and equipment overhauls. Students work on large truck fuel, electrical and air systems, diesel engines

  18. www.heatpumpcentre.org IEA HEAT PUMP PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    for buildings in cold climates Annex 40 - Heat pump concepts for near zero- energy buildings (Operating Agent boilers and gas boilers Annex 38 - Systems using solar thermal energy in combination with heat pumps (Operating Agent: CH) The aim is to analyse solar and heat pump configurations with respect to energy savings

  19. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  20. Minimal universal quantum heat machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally-separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistently with the second-law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed.

  1. Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.C.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Scott Hackel, Graduate Research Assistant; Gregory Nellis, Professor; Sanford Klein,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    1 OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Scott Hackel, Graduate Research Assistant, Madison, WI, United States Abstract: Hybrid ground-coupled heat pump systems (HyGCHPs) couple conventional ground- coupled heat pump (GCHP) equipment with supplemental heat rejection or extraction systems

  3. Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Heat exchanger with ceramic elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

  6. NREL Documents Efficiency of Mini-Split Heat Pumps (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new report delivers mini-split heat pump (MSHP) performance data for use in whole-building simulation tools. Mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs) are highly efficient refrigerant-based air conditioning and heating systems that permit room-by-room conditioning and control in homes. Because of their size, efficiency, and price, MSHPs are very popular overseas and are gaining market share in energy-efficient home upgrades in the United States. They are a good option for retrofitting older homes that lack ductwork. To evaluate MSHP cost effectiveness and performance in U.S. homes, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers are studying these systems in the laboratory, simulated buildings, and field test settings. A new NREL report describes an innovative laboratory approach to testing MSHPs and includes experimental performance maps for use in whole-building simulation tools. Most public information on MSHP performance is provided by equipment manufacturers, and is typically limited to performance at a single operating speed for heating and cooling. Mini-split heat pumps use variable speed components that spin up and down to continuously meet the heating or cooling need, significantly improving a system's operating efficiency. Measuring that efficiency in a laboratory is challenging and required new approaches to performance testing. NREL researchers worked with colleagues at Purdue University's Herrick Labs and Ecotope, Inc. to refine and apply this new approach to a suite of MSHP products. Researchers measured the performance of two MSHPs across a variety of operating conditions, which allowed, for the first time, development of accurate building simulation MSHP models. In the laboratory tests, researchers found that both MSHPs achieved manufacturer-reported performance at rating conditions. However, at other temperature and humidity conditions, the heat pumps capacity ranged from 40% above to 54% below the manufacturer-reported values. Knowing how performance varies is critical in order to reasonably estimate annual energy consumption of a MSHP, and to compare MSHPs to other heating and cooling options. Mini-split heat pump efficiency (COP) was seen to significantly exceed rated efficiency at low compressor speeds-a very important effect.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, W. Travis [Purdue University] [Purdue University; Groll, Eckhard A. [Purdue University] [Purdue University; Braun, James E. [Purdue University] [Purdue University

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goals of the proposed project were to develop, test, and evaluate a high performance and cost-effective vapor compression air-source heat pump for use in cold climate regions. Vapor compression heat pumps are a proven technology, and have been used for many years to meet heating requirements for buildings in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. However, in climate regions that experience very low outdoor ambient temperatures both the heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) of traditional air-source vapor compression heat pumps drops dramatically with a decrease in the outdoor air temperature. The efficiency of heat pumping equipment has improved substantially over the past 20 years; however, the efficiencies of the highest rated equipment on the market are approaching practical limits that cannot be surpassed without modifications to the basic cycle and possibly the use of additional hardware. In this report, three technologies to improve the efficiency of vapor compression systems are described. These are a) vapor injected compression, b) oil flooded compression and c) hybrid flow control of the evaporator. Compressor prototypes for both, oil flooded and vapor injected compression were developed by Emerson Climate Technologies. For the oil flooded compressor, the oil injection port location was optimized and an internal oil separator was added using several design iterations. After initial testing at Emerson Climate Technologies, further testing was done at Purdue University, and compressor models were developed. These models were then integrated into a system model to determine the achievable improvement of seasonal energy efficiency (SEER) for Minneapolis (Minnesota) climate. For the oil flooded compression, a 34% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency was found while a 21% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency ratio was found for the vapor injected compression. It was found that one benefit of both tested compression technologies is a lower discharge temperature, which allows for continued operation at lower ambient temperatures. A bin analysis of the vapor injected prototype cold climate heat pump predicts a 6% improvement in HSPF for Minneapolis. This improvement is mainly a result of the increased capacity of the system for active vapor injection. For the oil flooded system, a slightly larger performance improvement is predicted, in this case mostly caused by an increase in heating COP. Based on an economic analysis of these results, the maximum additional cost of the system changes, for the Minneapolis location, are $430 for the vapor injected system and $391 for the oil flooded system. These estimates assume that a 3-year simple payback period is accepted by the customer. For the hybrid flow control of evaporators, a new type of balancing valve was developed together with Emerson Climate technologies to reduce the cost of the control scheme. In contrast to conventional stepper motor valves, this valve requires less cables and can be driven by a cheaper output circuit on the control board. The correct valve size was determined in a dedicated test stand in several design iterations. The performance benefits of the hybrid control of the evaporator coil were determined for clean coil conditions as well as with partial blockage of the air inlet grille and under frosting conditions. For clean coil conditions, the benefits in terms of COP and capacity are negligible. However, significant benefits were noted for severely air-maldistributed operating conditions. For the H2-test, the maximum COP improvement of 17% along with a capacity improvement of nearly 40% was observed. Overall, the hybrid control scheme leads to a significant amount of performance improvement, if the air inlet conditions to the evaporator are maldistributed.

  8. Chemical heat pump project: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid/vapor working media can be used as working fluids in industrial heat pumps for heat amplifier and temperature amplifier concepts. This report describes the theoretical investigation of candidate solid/vapor fluids and the development of single and multi-stage heat pump cycles. Ammoniated complex compounds, hydrated complex compounds, metal carbonate-metal oxide media, and metal hydrides were investigated. A preliminary computer model was developed to predict the performance characteristics of a single-stage complex compound temperature amplifier and to outline the limitations of such concepts. A preliminary first cost calculation was performed in order to determine the economical feasibility of solid/vapor industrial heat pumps in comparison to boilers nd state-of-the-art heat pump equipment.

  9. Discussions on Disposal Forms of Auxiliary Heat Source in Surface Water Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents two common forms of auxiliary heat source in surface water heat pump system and puts forward the idea that the disposal forms affect operation cost. It deduces operation cost per hour of the two forms. With a project...

  10. Interactions between Brown-out Accidents and Night Vision Equipment in Military Aviation Accidents C.W. Johnson, Ph.D.; Department of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Scotland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    , including flaws in the design of equipment, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or maintenance procedures risks in low visibility operations through image intensification or infrared imaging. However, NVDs create new risks, including a host of human factors problems. The operation of night vision equipment has

  11. Application of Diagnostic/Prognostic Methods to Critical Equipment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Cleanup Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casazza, Lawrence O.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Wallace, Dale E.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project at the Hanford K-Basin in the 100 N Area has successfully restructured the preventive maintenance, spare parts inventory requirements, and the operator rounds data requirements. In this investigation, they continue to examine the different facets of the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the K-Basin cleanup project in search of additional reliability and cost savings. This report focuses on the initial findings of a team of PNNL engineers engaged to identify potential opportunities for reducing the cost of O&M through the application of advanced diagnostics (fault determination) and prognostics (residual life/reliability determination). The objective is to introduce predictive technologies to eliminate or reduce high impact equipment failures. The PNNL team in conjunction with the SNF engineers found the following major opportunities for cost reduction and/or enhancing reliability: (1) Provide data routing and automated analysis from existing detection systems to a display center that will engage the operations and engineering team. This display will be operator intuitive with system alarms and integrated diagnostic capability. (2) Change operating methods to reduce major transients induced in critical equipment. This would reduce stress levels on critical equipment. (3) Install a limited sensor set on failure prone critical equipment to allow degradation or stressor levels to be monitored and alarmed. This would provide operators and engineers with advance guidance and warning of failure events. Specific methods for implementation of the above improvement opportunities are provided in the recommendations. They include an Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) decision support system, introduction of variable frequency drives on certain pump motors, and the addition of limited diagnostic instrumentation on specified critical equipment.

  12. A heat engine with unique characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranescu, G.S. [ATR Corp., Western Springs, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat engine which operates with one heat reservoir is described. The engine transforms the heat input completely into work by using a compressed fluid from a resource of the environment. For this reason the engine is not a perpetual motion machine of the second kind. The characteristics of the engine are analyzed, and the ways for achieving the most economic use of the compressed fluid are described. The principle of operation of the engine shows that the concepts of phenomenological thermodynamics regarding heat and its transformation in other forms of energy are not true.

  13. Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System Modeling and Equipment Performance Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a variable refrigerant flow (VRF) vapor compression system model, which has five indoor units, one outdoor unit and one water heater. The VRF system can run simultaneous space conditioning (cooling or heating) and water heating. The indoor units and outdoor unit use fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers, and the water heater uses a tube-in-tube heat exchanger. The fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers are modeled using a segment-by-segment approach and the tube-in-tube water heater is modeled using a phase-by-phase approach. The compressor used is a variable-speed rotary design. We calibrated our model against a manufacturer s product literature. Based on the vapor compression system model, we investigated the methodology for generating VRF equipment performance maps, which can be used for energy simulations in TRNSYS and EnergyPlus, etc. In the study, the major independent variables for mapping are identified and the deviations between the simplified performance map and the actual equipment system simulation are quantified.

  14. TEELINDUSTRIAL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS & PARTS MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    -stage zoning applications in hydronic heating and cooling systems for residential, commercial and/or inTEELINDUSTRIAL SERIES OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS & PARTS MANUAL WATER CIRCULATING PUMPS MODELS 1P899A INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL, OPERATE, OR SERVICE TEEL PUMPS. PROTECT YOURSELF

  15. WAMPANOAG WELLNESS EQUIPMENT LENDING BANK POLICIES & PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vacuums and steam cleaners, can be used to address immediate concerns, such as intense cleaning to remove to enable the Health Service to measure the environmental impact of the use of the equipment in the homes moisture levels or improve air quality. STEP TWO: RECOMMENDATIONS As noted, recommendations in the Home

  16. Processing Equipment 2" Davis-Standard Extruder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bone, Gary

    Processing Equipment 2" Davis-Standard Extruder Improved Melting Grooved Feeding Capabilities Multiple Pressure Ports Along the Barrel Screw Cooling Kit Rod Die With Valved Adapter Higher Throughputs L Ring 1'' General Purpose Screw 3 Air-Cooled Barrel Zones Gala Industries Underwater Micropelletizer

  17. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  18. PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY ANALYSIS TOOLS APPLICABLE TO MULTI Commercial HVAC Design Process 12 5.0 Conclusion 18 6.0 References 19 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTIONS #12;MULTI performance by collectively improving the enve- lope, lighting and HVAC systems. The primary goals of the UC

  19. Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

  20. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    enters the waste stream with the charge intact (e.g., motor vehicle air conditioners, refrigeratorsAsset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have

  1. Equipment Policy for Federal Sponsored Effective Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Property Manager I. Background Division of Research Florida Atlantic University is required to comply. Equipment shall be defined as an article of nonexpendable tangible personal property. Florida Atlantic and a useful life of more than one year. III. General Statement Research Accounting and Property Management

  2. NOMINAL RISK Development or Equipment Acquisition Grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    NOMINAL RISK Development or Equipment Acquisition Grants Land Grants Planning Grants Required and at the grant's closeout. The FAA audit recommended develop- ing a risk-based approach to monitoring grant levels of risk are identified to rank each sponsor, and the rank deter- mines the level of grant

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE: VEHICLE FUELING Standard Operating Procedure: Vehicle Fueling I. Introduction and Purpose Vehicle and equipment maintenance yards with fueling, including mobile fueling operations. III. Standards and Specifications (for

  4. Powerline Communication System for Monitoring and Supervision of Feeder Equipments for MV Substation Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to integrated volt/var control in order to optimize the management of capital assets and enhance operation With the deregulation of power market and for providing better services to electric consumers, the current substation primary equipments which are outsider substations such as MV/LV transformer and switchgears. For those

  5. WSC 2000 1http://www.isr.umd.edu/IPDPM/ Understanding the Impact of Equipment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    simulation applications Process, equipment or industrial engineers Operations engineer Lot Process Times # process chambers 2 Scheduling algorithm push OD time 15 sec Robot move time 6 sec W CVD cluster tool # process chambers 3 Scheduling algorithm pull OD time 12 sec Robot move time 5 sec TiN PVD Thickness 30 nm

  6. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  7. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  8. North American Overview - Heat Pumps Role in Buildings Energy Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Bouza, Antonio [U.S. Department of Energy; Gigučre, Daniel [Natural Resources Canada; Hosatte, Sophie [Natural Resources Canada

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview of the situation in North America regarding buildings energy use and the current and projected heat pump market is presented. R&D and deployment strategies for heat pumps, and the impacts of the housing market and efficiency regulations on the heating and cooling equipment market are summarized as well.

  9. Condensing heat exchanger systems for residential/commercial furnaces and boilers. Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razgaitis, R.; Payer, J.H.; Talbert, S.G.; Hindin, B.; White, E.L.; Locklin, D.W.; Cudnik, R.A.; Stickford, G.H.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of condensing heat exchanger systems is studied. In the work reported here, the focus is on the corrosion resistance of materials to condensate produced by gas-fired heating equipment, and the characterization of the spatial variation of condensation corrosivity in condensing heat exchangers.

  10. Optimization of a Phase Change Heat Sink for Extreme Environments Jason Leland and Gerald Recktenwald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recktenwald, Gerald

    -levelling in an electrical power grid. Here we consider a different application of a phase change heat sink: as the primaryOptimization of a Phase Change Heat Sink for Extreme Environments Jason Leland and Gerald--Results of numerical optimization are reported for a phase change heat sink used to cool electronic equipment in ex

  11. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  12. Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzi, Kimberly Irene

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of identical effective length, this research shows that sufficient heat can be transferred across the system to work effectively in situations where the single heat pie will fail to operate. The thermal resistance in the condenser and evaporator sections need...

  13. Geothermal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aureille, M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

  14. Development of bonded composite doublers for the repair of oil recovery equipment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David W.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack and corrosion flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, this effort is adapting bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are no rehabilitation options. It promises to be cost-effective with minimal disruption to the users of the structure. This report concludes a study into the application of composite patches on thick steel structures typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. The use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, can help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This study developed and proved an optimum field installation process using specific mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques coupled with unique, in-situ heating methods. In addition, a comprehensive performance assessment of composite doubler repairs was completed to establish the viability of this technology for large, steel structures. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments were evaluated along with related laminate design issues.

  15. Optimal operation of simple vapour compression cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    is the air-conditioner (A/C). In colder regions a cycle operating in the opposite direction, the "heat pump. The coefficients of performance for a heating cycle (heat pump) and a cooling cycle (refrigerator, A/C) are defined as COPh = Qh Ws = h1 - h2 h1 - h4 and COPc = Qc Ws = h4 - h3 h1 - h4 (1.1) respectively. Heat pumps

  16. System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

  17. A new cascade-type heat conversion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, E. [Twenty-First Century Power Co., Northridge, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various heat conversion systems have different operating temperatures. This paper shows how, in a solar energy system some of the waste heat from a thermophotovoltaic arrangement can be made to operate a thermionic power generator. The waste heat of the thermionic power generator can then be made to operate an alkali-metal thermal electric converter, and the waste heat from the alkali-metal thermal electric converter as well as the rest of the waste heat of the thermophotovoltaic system can be made to operate a methane reformation system. Stored heat from the methane reformation system can be made to operate the system at night. The overall system efficiency of the example shown is 42.6%. As a prime source of heat a nuclear pile or burning hydrogen may be used.

  18. Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump Installations: Experiences, Improvements, and Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hackel; Amanda Pertzborn

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One innovation to ground-source heat pump (GSHP, or GHP) systems is the hybrid GSHP (HyGSHP) system, which can dramatically decrease the first cost of GSHP systems by using conventional technology (such as a cooling tower or a boiler) to meet a portion of the peak heating or cooling load. This work uses three case studies (two cooling-dominated, one heating-dominated) to demonstrate the performance of the hybrid approach. Three buildings were studied for a year; the measured data was used to validate models of each system. The models were used to analyze further improvements to the hybrid approach, and establish that this approach has positive impacts, both economically and environmentally. Lessons learned by those who design and operate the systems are also documented, including discussions of equipment sizing, pump operation, and cooling tower control. Finally, the measured data sets and models that were created during this work are described; these materials have been made freely available for further study of hybrid systems.

  19. Heat pump system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  20. Tipmont REMC- Energy Efficiency Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tipmont REMC customers are eligible for rebates for the installation of efficient water heaters and air-source and geothermal heat pumps. A rebate is also available for the recycling of older, less...

  1. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

  2. Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Tip Fact Sheet No.21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines are well suited as prime movers for driving boiler feedwater pumps, forced or induced-draft fans, blowers, air compressors, and other rotating equipment. This service generally calls for a backpressure non-condensing steam turbine. The low-pressure steam turbine exhaust is available for feedwater heating, preheating of deaerator makeup water, and/or process requirements.

  3. All milking equipment, lines, and utensil surfaces that come into contact with milk or dirt or manure must be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    , decrease rinsability, create films on equipment, and cause problems with water heaters. The compatible calcium, magnesium, or iron) in milk or water, are precipitated by alkaline conditions or heat. Cleaning agents can actually enhance precipitation of these salts if they are not compatible with water hardness

  4. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

  5. Verification of a VRF Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigusse, Bereket; Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides verification results of the EnergyPlus variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pump computer model using manufacturer's performance data. The paper provides an overview of the VRF model, presents the verification methodology, and discusses the results. The verification provides quantitative comparison of full and part-load performance to manufacturer's data in cooling-only and heating-only modes of operation. The VRF heat pump computer model uses dual range bi-quadratic performance curves to represent capacity and Energy Input Ratio (EIR) as a function of indoor and outdoor air temperatures, and dual range quadratic performance curves as a function of part-load-ratio for modeling part-load performance. These performance curves are generated directly from manufacturer's published performance data. The verification compared the simulation output directly to manufacturer's performance data, and found that the dual range equation fit VRF heat pump computer model predicts the manufacturer's performance data very well over a wide range of indoor and outdoor temperatures and part-load conditions. The predicted capacity and electric power deviations are comparbale to equation-fit HVAC computer models commonly used for packaged and split unitary HVAC equipment.

  6. Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors Appendix D -Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D ­ Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors #12;D.1 Appendix D - Electrical Metering schedules, and view system status from the convenience of a standard web-browser. D.2 Metering Data Logger

  7. Investigation of a radiantly heated and cooled office with an integrated desiccant ventilation unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xiangyang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiant heating and cooling has a reputation of increasing the comfort level and reducing the energy consumption of buildings. The main advantages of radiant heating and cooling are low operational noise and reduced fan power cost. Radiant heating...

  8. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  9. Viewing device for electron-beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasyrov, R.S.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viewing devices are used to observe melting, welding, and so on in vacuum systems, an it is necessary to protect the windows from droplets and vapor. A viewing device for electron-beam equipment is described in which the viewing tube and mounting flange are made as a tubular ball joint enclosed in a steel bellows, which render the viewing device flexible. Bending the viewing tube in the intervals between observations protects the viewing window from sputtering and from drops of molten metal.

  10. PPP Equipment Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP Equipment Corporation Jump to: navigation,

  11. DCO Operations Interesting Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DCO Operations Interesting Statistics 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 Chart by: HANDS DOWN SOFTWARE, www.handsdownsoftware.com 1.00 0.95 0.90 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.70 0.65 0.60 0 is annotated with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE

  12. Preliminary Market Assessment for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, Karen [Sentech, Inc.; Khowailed, Gannate [Sentech, Inc.; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold climate heat pump (HP) technology is relevant to a substantial portion of the U.S. population, especially with more than one-third of U.S. housing stock concentrated in colder regions of the country and another 31% in the mixed-humid climate region. Specifically, it is estimated that in 2010 almost 1.37 million heating equipment units were shipped to the cold/very cold climate regions and that 1.41 million were shipped to the nation s mixed-humid region. On a national level, the trend in the last decade has indicated that shipments of gas furnaces have grown at a slower rate than HPs. This indicates a potential opportunity for the cold climate HP, a technology that may be initially slow to penetrate its potential market because of the less expensive operating and first costs of gas furnaces. Anticipated implementation of regional standards could also negatively affect gas furnace shipments, especially with the higher initial cost for more efficient gas furnaces. However, as of 2011, the fact that there are more than 500 gas furnace product models that already achieve the expected efficiency standard indicates that satisfying the regional standard will be a challenge but not an obstacle. A look at the heating fuel and equipment currently being used in the housing stock provides an insight into the competing equipment that cold climate HPs hope to replace. The primary target market for the cold climate HP is the 2.6 million U.S. homes using electric furnaces and HPs in the cold/very cold region. It is estimated that 4.75% of these homeowners either replace or buy new heating equipment in a given year. Accordingly, the project team could infer that the cold climate HP primary market is composed of 123,500 replacements of electric furnaces and conventional air-to-air HPs annually. A secondary housing market for the cold climate HP comprises homes in the mixed-humid region of the country that are using electric furnaces. Homes using gas furnaces across both the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions represent another secondary market for the cold climate HP. The cold climate HP could also target as a secondary market homes across both the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions that use propane and fuel oil as their primary heating fuel. The combined total of homes in these three secondary markets is 46 million, and we can also infer that about 2.2 million of these systems are replaced annually. When comparing heating equipment stock in 2001, 2005, and 2009 in the cold/very cold region of the country, it appears that gas furnaces are slowly losing market share and that electric furnaces and HPs are making gains. The fact that electricity-dependent heating equipment is rising in preference among homeowners in the colder regions of the country shows that future penetration of the cold climate HP holds promise. Accordingly, cold climate HP technology could achieve an attractive position, given certain favorable market conditions such as reaching a competitive cost point, strong federal incentives, a consistent level of reliable performance, and a product rollout by a credible market leader. The project team relied on payback analysis to estimate the potential market penetration for the cold climate HP in each of its primary and secondary markets. In this analysis, we assumed a $250 price premium for the cold climate HP over the baseline HP. Electricity and gas prices and emissions were based on the 2010 Buildings Energy Data Book. The average heating load was calculated as 25.2 MMBTU per year in the cold/very cold and mixed-humid regions of the United States. Typical installed costs were obtained from the technical document supporting the U.S. Department of Energy rulemaking. The analysis showed that the cold climate HP will have a 2.2 year payback period when replacing an existing electric HP in the colder regions of the nation. The cold climate HP will have a 6 year payback period when replacing gas furnaces in the same climate regions. Accordingly, we estimated that the cold climate HP will have a penetration ratio rangin

  13. Heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbury, P.J.

    1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  14. Heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  15. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

  16. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  18. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators, July 2004 Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators, July 2004 Many owners...

  19. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  20. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.