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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

2

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID Utility Name - Operator Owner Name % Owned Arkansas Nuclear One 1 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Beaver Valley 1 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Beaver Valley 2 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Braidwood Generation Station 1 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Braidwood Generation Station 2 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Browns Ferry 1 Tennessee Valley Authority Tennessee Valley Authority 100

3

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

4

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

5

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 2. Ownership Data Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History PDF XLS Plant Name Generator ID Type Reactor Supplier and Model Construction Start Grid Connection Original Expiration Date License Renewal Application License Renewal Issued Extended Expiration Arkansas Nuclear One 1 PWR Babcock&Wilcox, Lower Loop 10/1/1968 8/17/1974 5/20/2014 2/1/2000 6/20/2001 5/20/2034 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 PWR Combustion Eng. 7/1/1971 12/26/1978 7/17/2018 10/15/2003 6/30/2005 7/17/2038

6

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Operations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations Operations NNSA's Emergency Response Operations program acts as the headquarters command and control, functioning as the coordinating focal point for all

7

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Operations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations Operations NNSA's Emergency Response Operations program acts as the headquarters command and control, functioning as the coordinating focal point for all

8

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR...analytically for a multiregional nuclear reactor whose subregions are of arbitrary...Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAU H. S. HAIDAR......

NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Predicting Operator Capacity for Supervisory Control of Multiple UAVs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Operator Capacity for Supervisory Control of Multiple UAVs M.L. Cummings, C. E. Nehme, J, uninhabited (also known as unmanned) ae- rial vehicles (UAVs) have become indispensable assets to militarized forces. UAVs require human guidance to varying degrees and often through several operators. However

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

11

Safety of Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes responsibilities and requirements to ensure the safety of routine and planned nuclear explosive operations and associated activities and facilities. Cancels DOE O 452.2A and DOE G 452.2A-1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.2C.

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

13

Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Infrastructure and Operations Home > About Us > Our Operations > Infrastructure and Operations Infrastructure and Operations NNSA's missions require a secure production and laboratory infrastructure meeting immediate and long term needs. The Associate Administrator for

14

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Emergency Operations Training Academy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Training > Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy Rotating image showing pictures of Classroom, Online and Hands on trainings

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing nuclear capacity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing nuclear capacity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Enabling a Sustainable Nuclear Energy Future...

17

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Operating Plan Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan This operating...

18

emergency operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Congressional...

19

Nuclear Facility Operations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Operations Facility Operations Nuclear Facility Operations INL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to meeting the nation's environmental, energy, nuclear technology, and national security needs. INL is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to meeting the nation's environmental, energy, nuclear technology, and national security needs. The Idaho Operations Office oversees these contract activities in accordance with DOE directives. INL is a multi-program laboratory In addition to enabling the Office of Nuclear Energy to develop space power systems and advanced fuel cycle and reactor technologies, INL facilities are used by the National Nuclear Security Administration and other DOE offices, together with other Federal agencies such as the Department of

20

Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

Saum-Manning,L.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

22

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, Robert W. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, R.W.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Projections of U. S. GHG Reductions from Nuclear Power New Capacity Based on Historic Levels of Investment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical rates of capital investment in nuclear plant construction was used as a guide to estimate the rate of future capacity introduction. The magnitude of nuclear capacity was then used to determine the effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electrical production in the U.S. to 2050. Total capital investment in nuclear power plant construction for every U.S. nuclear unit from 1964 to 1990 were obtained and the total investment and divided by their construction period to provide a value for possible rate of investment. The total linear rate of capital expenditure over the entire period was determined as well as that for the period of peak construction from 1973 to 1985, $11.5 billion/y and $17.9 billion/y, respectively in 2004$. These were used with a variety of capital cost estimates for nuclear construction to obtain several scenarios for nuclear capacity additions. Total nuclear generation out to 2050 was calculated assuming current plants would be constrained by 60-year operating licenses (i.e., a single 20-year life extension). The effect on nuclear generating capacity was projected and the resultant impact on GHG emissions determined assuming nuclear would directly replace coal-fired generation. It was concluded that actually reductions in emissions would not be experienced until 2038, yet growth in emissions from electrical production would be slowed up through that point. Nuclear energy, therefore cannot have a dramatic short-term effect on emissions, as likely cannot any energy producing technology due to the significant time to introduce large-scale changes. Nuclear power, however, can have a major longer term impact on emissions, particularly under more favorable cost and investment conditions.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design...

26

DHS/National Operations Center | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations...

27

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

,"U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",11,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

30

,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",32,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

31

,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

32

,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

33

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

34

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

35

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

36

Operational Experience in Nuclear Power Stations [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Operational Experience in Nuclear Power Stations...self-sustaining nuclear reaction to the present...time large-scale generation of electrical power from nuclear energy has become...the C.E.G.B. reactors have been in service...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CRAD, Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-08, Rev. 0) CRAD, Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-08, Rev. 0) December 4, 2014...

38

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Operating Principles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operating Principles Operating Principles Our wtis.sion is vitcrl ~ r i r l urgent - rue corrstnntly jOcus on missiort outconles. - US nuclear security is the fundamental mission of the NNSA and its laboratories, plants, and test site. - Mission managers bear responsibility for achieving mission outcomes. - Support managers provide technical assistance and support to enable mission delivery. - Our activities reflect a mission-focused, high performing. high reliability enterprise consistently delivering on its commitmerits and addressing national needs. - We constantly strive to drive innovation and reduce barriers to effectively and collaboratively accomplish our mission. Scierrce crnd fecltnology lie crt the hetrrt ?four mission. - The NNSA and its laboratories, plants, and test site are resources to organizations in the US Government

39

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Operations Specialist | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Operations Specialist Nuclear Operations Specialist FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Operations Specialist A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearOperationsSpecialist.docx Description Nuclear Operations Specialist Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

40

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy Emergency Operations Training Academy The Office of Emergency Operations, NA-40-The Emergency Operations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

QUOTIENTS, EXACTNESS AND NUCLEARITY IN THE OPERATOR SYSTEM CATEGORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUOTIENTS, EXACTNESS AND NUCLEARITY IN THE OPERATOR SYSTEM CATEGORY ALI S. KAVRUK, VERN I. PAULSEN system category. We define operator system quotients and exactness in this setting and refine the notion of nuclearity by studying operator systems that preserve various pairs of tensor products. One of our main goals

42

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

43

New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

44

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

45

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

46

Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History" "Plant Name","Generator ID","Type","Reactor Supplier and Model","Construction Start","Grid Connection","Commercial...

47

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@illinois.edu, yclai@ntu.edu.tw, cbarkan@illinois.edu ABSTRACT Long-term demand for freight and passenger is critical for cost-effective planning of new capacity. A key aspect of this is the effect of heterogeneous conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various operational changes to reduce delays. The trade

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

48

Optimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa Balakrishnan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Boston's Logan International Airport in the US are used to illustrate the advantages of the proposed for Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) is shown in Fig. 1. Gates at each of the four main terminalsOptimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints Harshad Khadilkar and Hamsa

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

49

Table 39. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a

50

Our Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

51

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Operating Plan Program Operating Plan Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan This operating plan outlines the mission, goals, and processes for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research & Development (NSR&D) Program. This first version of the operating plan also discusses the startup phase of the program. NSR&D involves a systematic search for knowledge to advance the fundamental understanding of nuclear safety science and technology through scientific study, analysis, modeling, and experiments. Maintaining an effective NSR&D program will support DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in standards development, validation of analytical models and

52

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License &  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report The Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) Construction and Operating License/Design Certification (COL/DC) Demonstration program together with the financial incentives provided by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 are the two primary reasons why a number of license applications for new nuclear construction are before the NRC today, and why the first new nuclear plants in over 30 years are under construction in the United States. As with all significant endeavors, there are lessons to be learned from the

53

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Utility Program Info State Vermont Program Type Siting and Permitting Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date established in a certificate of public good issued under this title, must be submitted to the public service board no later than four years before the date upon which the approval may take effect. Upon receipt of a petition for approval of construction or operation as provided under this section, the public service board shall notify the

54

Nuclear Facility Operations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to meeting the nation's environmental, energy, nuclear technology, and national security needs. INL is a science-based, applied...

55

EIS-0373: Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

373: Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to 373: Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to the Production of Radioisotope Power Systems EIS-0373: Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to the Production of Radioisotope Power Systems Summary NOTE: EIS-0373 has been cancelled. This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of consolidating nuclear activities related to production of radioisotope power systems (RPS) for space and national security missions at a single DOE site: the preferred alternative is the Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 9, 2013 EIS-0373: Notice of Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to the Production of

56

Lempke receives Sandia Emergency Operations Center tour | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

receives Sandia Emergency Operations Center tour | National Nuclear receives Sandia Emergency Operations Center tour | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Lempke receives Sandia Emergency Operations Center tour Lempke receives Sandia Emergency Operations Center tour Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog Brian Bielecki, Director & Facility Security Officer for Security &

57

Institute of Nuclear Power Operations 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1994 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Identifying and Characterizing Candidate Areas for Siting New Nuclear Capacity in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff recently completed an internal 'Energy Assurance' study examining the key issues associated with the country's energy needs for the future focusing on generation sources, baseload options, transmission and distribution, reduction of greenhouse gases, and overall energy security issues. In examining the various generation sources including nuclear power and renewables, one principal finding was that 300 GW(e) of new nuclear electrical generating capacity would be needed by 2050. With that need, the initial, obvious question is can 300 GW(e) of nuclear capacity be sited in the United States? In an attempt to address that question as well as others, ORNL initiated a 'National Electric Generation Siting Study,' which is to be a multiphase study to address several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. The initial phase of this study is to examine the nuclear option. This paper summarizes the approach developed for screening sites, the methodology employed that includes spatial modeling, and preliminary results using the southeast United States to demonstrate the usefulness of the overall approach as a test case.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL] [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL] [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL] [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

operations center | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Operations Media Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home ...

60

Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Introduction Monitoring Division Mgr Training, Adv NARAC Dispersion Modeling NARAC Web Operations Overview of Consequence Management Overview of the DOENNSA Emergency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License &  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report The Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) Construction and Operating License/Design Certification (COL/DC) Demonstration program together with the financial incentives provided by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 are the two primary reasons why a number of license applications for new nuclear construction are before the NRC today, and why the first new nuclear plants in over 30 years are under construction in the United States. As with all significant endeavors, there are lessons to be learned from the

62

LMFBR operation in the nuclear cycle without fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantiation is given to expediency of investigation of nuclear power (NP) development with fast reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy operating during extended time in the open nuclear fuel cycle with slightly enriched or depleted uranium make-up. 9 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Toshinsky, S.I. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Operation TEAPOT, 1955 continental nuclear weapons test series. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of an estimated 11,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation TEAPOT, the fifth atmospheric nuclear weapons testing series conducted in Nevada from 18 February to 15 May 1955. Activities engaging DOD personnel included Exercise Desert Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear device; DOD operational programs; and air support.

Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Shepanek, R.F.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nuclear Power - Operation, Safety and Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as operation, safety, environment and radiation effects. The book is not offering a comprehensive coverage of the material in each area. Instead, selected themes are highlighted by authors of individual chapters representing contemporary interests worldwide...

65

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Training program requirements for remote equipment operators in nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most neglected areas in the engineering development of remotely operated equipment applications in nuclear environments is the planning of adequate training programs for the equipment operators. Remote equipment accidents cannot be prevented solely by engineered safety features on the equipment. As a result of the experiences in using remote equipment in the recovery effort at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), guidelines for the development of remote equipment operator training programs have been generated. The result is that a successful education and training program can create an environment favorable to the safe and effective implementation of a remote equipment program in a nuclear facility.

Palau, G.L.; Auclair, K.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear Power - Deployment, Operation and Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t e su bmersion time. In addition, the high specific energy, or energy per unit weight of nuclear fuel, eliminat e s the need for consta n t refuel i n g by fleets of vulner a b l e tanke r s follo w i n g a fleet of surfa c e or subsur f a c e... onal Labora t o r y (INL) in 1989. The section of the hull containi n g the reactor rested in a ?sea tank? of water 40 feet deep and 50 feet in diameter. The purpose of the water was to help the shiel di n g designe r s stud y the ?backsca t t e r...

68

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

69

Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation Place Burlington, Kansas Zip 66839-0411 Product Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation operates the Wolf Creek Generating Station, Kansas' first nuclear power generating station, for three utility owners in Kansas and Missouri. Coordinates 44.446275°, -108.431704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.446275,"lon":-108.431704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Operating nuclear plant feedback to ASME and French codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French have an advantage in nuclear plant operating experience feedback due to the highly centralized nature of their nuclear industry. There is only one utility in charge of design as well as operations (EDF) and only one reactor vendor (Framatome). The ASME Code has played a key role in resolving technical issues in the design and operation of nuclear plants since the inception of nuclear power. The committee structure of the Code brings an ideal combination of senior technical people with both broad and specialized experience to bear on complex how safe is safe enough technical issues. The authors now see an even greater role for the ASME Code in a proposed new regulatory era for the US nuclear industry. The current legalistic confrontational regulatory era has been quite destructive. There now appears to be a real opportunity to begin a new era of technical consensus as the primary means for resolving safety issues. This change can quickly be brought about by having the industry take operating plant problems and regulatory technical issues directly to the ASME Code for timely resolution. Surprisingly, there is no institution in the US nuclear industry with such a mandate. In fact, the industry is organized to feedback through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues which could be far better resolved through the ASME Code. Major regulatory benefits can be achieved by closing this loop and providing systematic interaction with the ASME Code. The essential elements of a new regulatory era and ideas for organizing US institutional industry responsibilities, taken from the French experience, are described in this paper.

Journet, J. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

20 - Licensing for nuclear power plant siting, construction and operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter addresses the need for licensing of nuclear power plants, and how such licenses can be requested by an applicant and granted by a regulatory authority. The licensing process is country dependent, although based on the common principle that the applicant must demonstrate that the proposed nuclear power plant will comply with the established regulations, and that it will operate safely without undue risks to the health and safety of plant personnel, the population and the environment. During the construction and operational phases the regulatory authority ensures compliance with the the license conditions through evaluation, monitoring and inspection. The license may be a single document covering all the phases in the life of the plant, or a set of consecutive documents requested and issued for different phases, which may include design certification, site approval, design and construction, commissioning and operation, design changes during operation, life extension and, finally, decommissioning.

A. Alonso; S.K. Sharma; D.F. Torgerson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nuclear Safety Reserch and Development Program Operating Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Research and Development Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan Office of Nuclear Safety Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy June 2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK NSR&D Program Operating Plan June 2012 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 OBJECTIVES ....................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 NSR&D PROGRAM PROCESSES .................................................................................... 3

73

Modeling the performance of small capacity lithium bromide-water absorption chiller operated by solar energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the performance of a solar operated small capacity (two-ton) Lithium Bromide-Water (LiBr-H{sub 2}O) absorption system is conducted. The analysis is based on the first law of thermodynamics with lithium bromide as the absorbent and water as the refrigerant. The effect of various parameters affecting the machine coefficient of performance under various operating conditions is reported. Coefficient of performance of up to 0.8 can be obtained using flat plate solar collectors with generator temperatures in the range of 80--95 C (176--203 F). Liquid heat exchangers with effectiveness based on an NTU of the order of one would be a good design choice. The chiller can save approximately 3,456 kWh/yr per a two-ton unit, and it will reduce emissions by 19 lb of NO{sub x}, 5,870 lb of CO{sub 2}, and 16 lb of SO{sub x} per year per machine.

Saman, N.F. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.; Sa`id, W.A.D.K. [Univ. of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq). Control and Systems Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integrating Nuclear Energy to Oilfield Operations Two Case Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuel resources that require large energy inputs for extraction, such as the Canadian oil sands and the Green River oil shale resource in the western USA, could benefit from the use of nuclear power instead of power generated by natural gas combustion. This paper discusses the technical and economic aspects of integrating nuclear energy with oil sands operations and the development of oil shale resources. A high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) that produces heat in the form of high pressure steam (no electricity production) was selected as the nuclear power source for both fossil fuel resources. Both cases were based on 50,000 bbl/day output. The oil sands case was a steam-assisted, gravity-drainage (SAGD) operation located in the Canadian oil sands belt. The oil shale development was an in-situ oil shale retorting operation located in western Colorado, USA. The technical feasibility of the integrating nuclear power was assessed. The economic feasibility of each case was evaluated using a discounted cash flow, rate of return analysis. Integrating an HTGR to both the SAGD oil sands operation and the oil shale development was found to be technically feasible for both cases. In the oil sands case, integrating an HTGR eliminated natural gas combustion and associated CO2 emissions, although there were still some emissions associated with imported electrical power. In the in situ oil shale case, integrating an HTGR reduced CO2 emissions by 88% and increased natural gas production by 100%. Economic viabilities of both nuclear integrated cases were poorer than the non-nuclear-integrated cases when CO2 emissions were not taxed. However, taxing the CO2 emissions had a significant effect on the economics of the non-nuclear base cases, bringing them in line with the economics of the nuclear-integrated cases. As we move toward limiting CO2 emissions, integrating non-CO2-emitting energy sources to the development of energy-intense fossil fuel resources is becoming increasingly important. This paper attempts to reduce the barriers that have traditionally separated fossil fuel development and application of nuclear power and to promote serious discussion of ideas about hybrid energy systems.

Eric P. Robertson; Lee O. Nelson; Michael G. McKellar; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Mike W. Patterson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The nuclear heated steam reformer Design and semitechnical operating experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Good operating experiences of the EVA I- and EVA II-plant have been described. Therin the comparison of the different catalyst concepts has been given. Further the behaviour of the bundle of EVA II plant by isolation of individual reformer tubes as well as the performance of the bundle under transient conditions have been explained. Different design concepts for a nuclear heated steam reformer based on the concentric tubes and baffles have been given. Main points of studies are constructional details, thermohydraulic of the bundle and stress analysis. It can be shown that the present standard of knowledge allows the application of the steam reformer for coal refinement with nuclear heat.

J. Singh; H.F. Niessen; R. Harth; H. Fedders; H. Reutler; W. Panknin; W.D. Mller; H.G. Harms

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Capacity analysis, cycle time optimization, and supply chain strategy in multi-product biopharmaceutical manufacturing operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of system optimization theory, supply chain principles, and capacity modeling are increasingly valuable tools for use in pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. The dynamics of the pharmaceutical industry - ...

Fetcho-Phillips, Kacey L. (Kacey Lynn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Resilience and Procedure Use in the Training of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Crews.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Control room operating crews are a crucial component in maintaining the safety of nuclear power plants. The primary support to operators during disturbances or (more)

Gustavsson, Pr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Seismic functionality of essential relays in operating nuclear plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The regulatory criteria for licensing of nuclear power plants require that certain safety-related equipment and systems be designed to function during and following a postulated, design basis earthquake. Demonstration of seismic adequacy must be performed and formally documented by shake-table testing, analysis or other specified methods. Since many older, operating nuclear power plants were designed and constructed prior to the issuance of the current seismic qualification criteria, the NRC has questioned whether the seismic adequacy of the essential equipment has been adequately demonstrated and documented. This concern is identified in Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Power Plants. In response to this concern, a group of affected plant owners, the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG), with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has undertaken a program to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of essential equipment by the use of actual experience with such equipment in plants which have undergone significant earthquakes and by the use of available seismic qualification data for similar equipment. An important part of this program is the development of data and the methodology for verifying the functionality of electrical relays used in essential circuits needed for plant shutdown during a seismic event. This paper describes this part of the Seismic Qualification Utility Group program. The relay functionality evaluation methodology is being developed under EPRI Project No. RP2849-1.

W.R. Schmidt; R.P. Kassawara

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cell Activity Is Associated with Metastatic Capacity in Colon Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gene expression datasets and applied expression...module predicted nuclear factor of activated...human microarray datasets, representing data...further predicted the nuclear factor of activated...signaling driving nuclear transport where...gene expression datasets were downloaded...

Manish K. Tripathi; Natasha G. Deane; Jing Zhu; Hanbing An; Shinji Mima; Xiaojing Wang; Sekhar Padmanabhan; Zhiao Shi; Naresh Prodduturi; Kristen K. Ciombor; Xi Chen; M. Kay Washington; Bing Zhang; and R. Daniel Beauchamp

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Projection Operator Formalisms and the Nuclear Shell Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shell model solve the nuclear many-body problem in a restricted model space and takes into account the restricted nature of the space by using effective interactions and operators. In this paper two different methods for generating the effective interactions are considered. One is based on a partial solution of the Schrodinger equation (Bloch-Horowitz or the Feshbach projection formalism) and other on linear algebra (Lee-Suzuki). The two methods are derived in a parallel manner so that the difference and similarities become apparent. The connections with the renormalization group are also pointed out.

B. K. Jennings

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

82

Savannah River Operations Office Interim Management of Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 70 / Friday, April 11, 1997 / Notices 1 The term ''failed'' means that the cladding on the fuel has been breached. The ROD, 60 Fed. Reg. 65300 (December 19, 1995), stated that failed fuel is indicated by gas releases from a fuel storage canister or visible failure of the cladding or canisters. select samples for specialized surveys for example on children's services or on access for persons with disabilities. [FR Doc. 97-9341 Filed 4-10-97; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Savannah River Operations Office Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis determination. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared a final

83

Identification of good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work developed an approach to diagnose problems and identify good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants using the system dynamics technique. The research began with construction of the ORSIM (Nuclear Power ...

Chen, Haibo, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Problems of regional energy provision in the energy strategy of Russia to 2030 and prospects for low-capacity nuclear power plant development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One problem of energy policy is stimulation of comprehensive development of a regional power supply, including power generation by low-capacity nuclear power plants in the regions where such sources could be comp...

N. I. Voropai; O. V. Marchenko; V. A. Stennikov

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Concept of Operations for Nuclear Warhead Embedded Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Embedded arms-control-sensors provide a powerful new paradigm for managing compliance with future nuclear weapons treaties, where deployed warhead numbers will be reduced to 1000 or less. The CONOPS (Concept of Operations) for use with these sensors is a practical tool with which one may help define design parameters, including size, power, resolution, communications, and physical structure. How frequently must data be acquired and must a human be present? Will such data be acquired for only stored weapons or will it be required of deployed weapons as well? Will tactical weapons be subject to such monitoring or will only strategic weapons apply? Which data will be most crucial? Will OSI's be a component of embedded sensor data management or will these sensors stand alone in their data extraction processes? The problem space is massive, but can be constrained by extrapolating to a reasonable future treaty regime and examining the bounded options this scenario poses. Arms control verification sensors, embedded within the warhead case or aeroshell, must provide sufficient but not excessively detailed data, confirming that the item is a nuclear warhead and that it is a particular warhead without revealing sensitive information. Geolocation will be provided by an intermediate transceiver used to acquire the data and to forward the data to a central processing location. Past Chain-of-Custody projects have included such devices and will be primarily responsible for adding such indicators in the future. For the purposes of a treaty regime a TLI will be verified as a nuclear warhead by knowledge of (a) the presence and mass of SNM, (b) the presence of HE, and (c) the reporting of a unique tag ID. All of these parameters can be obtained via neutron correlation measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and fiber optic grating fabrication, respectively. Data from these sensors will be pushed out monthly and acquired nearly daily, providing one of several verification layers in depth, including on-site inspections, NTM, declarations, and semi-annual BCC meetings. Human intervention will not be necessary. The sheer numbers, small size, and wide distribution of warhead TLIs will mandate the added level of remote monitoring that Embedded Sensors can provide. This multilayer protection will limit the need to increase the frequency of OSIs, by adding confidence that declared TLIs remain as declared and that no undeclared items enter the regime without the other States Party's knowledge. Acceptance of Embedded arms control Sensor technologies will require joint development by all State's Parties involved. Principles of operation and robustness of technologies must be individually evaluated to sustain confidence in the strength of this system against attack. Weapons designers must be assured that these sensors will in no way impact weapon performance and operation, will not affect weapons security and safety, and will have a neutral impact upon weapon system surety. Each State's Party will need to conduct an in depth review of their weapons lifecycle to determine where moves may be reduced to minimize vulnerabilities and where random selection may be used to minimize the ability to make undeclared changes. In the end Verification is a political measure, not a technical one. If the potential users can gain sufficient confidence in the application of Embedded arms control Sensors, they could constitute the final layer of glue to hold together the next Nuclear Arms Control agreement.

Rockett, P D; Koncher, T R

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Refinery Capacity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum...

87

U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Nuclear Facility Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Nuclear Facility U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals, Self-Study Guide U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals, Self-Study Guide This is an open-book evaluation. Complete the questions, and submit your answers (hand-written or electronically) to the Training Center. Someone will check and grade your answers. If you achieve a score of at least 80%, you will receive a completion certificate. Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide Review Questions More Documents & Publications Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities Cross-referenced to DOE O 422.1, Conduct of Operations. U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility

88

Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion...the Calder Hall reactors were ordered...building and operating nuclear power stations...situations, a high nuclear share of new capacity...1980s. The fast reactor, prototypes of...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon Gipsa of nuclear power plants. Unfortunately, today's policies present a major drawback. Indeed, these monitoring is illustrated through experimental data. 1. Introduction Nuclear power provides about 14% of the world

Boyer, Edmond

90

Functional segmentation of dynamic nuclear images by cross-?B-energy operator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new segmentation method of dynamic nuclear medicine images based on the cross-@J"B-energy operator. @J"B is a nonlinear measure which quantifies the interaction between two time-signals including their first and second derivatives. Similarity ... Keywords: Cross-?B-energy operator, Functional segmentation, Nuclear cardiac images, Time activity curve

Abdel-Ouahab Boudraa; Jean-Christophe Cexus; Habib Zaidi

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

EIS-0144: Siting, Construction, and Operation of New Production Reactor Capacity; Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation's nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century.

92

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

KCP operations began 65 years ago today | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Corporation signed a prime contract to operate the Kansas City Plant for the Atomic Energy Commission. Today, the Kansas City Plant is celebrating 65 years of delivering on...

94

A study of the operating conditions and power performance characteristics of power units upon increasing the cooling capacity of their chimney-type cooling towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating conditions and power performance characteristics of the Armenian nuclear power stations Unit 2 equipped with a ... 4.3 turbine and of the Razdan district power stations units equipped with K-200- ...

A. K. Muradyan; D. T. Arshakyan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)] U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)] "This self-study guide provides an overview of safety basis terminology, requirements, and activities that are applicable to DOE and Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) nuclear facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation. By completing this self-study guide, the reader will fulfill ORO Safety Basis Qualification Standard Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1) and gain a familiarity level of knowledge regarding the following:

96

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)] U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)] "This self-study guide provides an overview of safety basis terminology, requirements, and activities that are applicable to DOE and Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) nuclear facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation. By completing this self-study guide, the reader will fulfill ORO Safety Basis Qualification Standard Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1) and gain a familiarity level of knowledge regarding the following:

97

The LPMS-V installation and operational experience at Arkansas nuclear one  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new replacement system for the existing vibrations and loose parts monitoring system for the Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) units 1 and 2, in Russellville, Arkansas. The installation and operational history are also discussed.

Lexa, A.F. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, Lynchburg, VA (United States)]: Hudson, E. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Russelville, AR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - EM Statement - November 24, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex High Hazard Nuclear Operations Statement of Dr. Ines Triay Assistant Secretary, DOE Office of Environmental Management November 24, 2009 Good morning Mr. Vice Chairman and Members of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to represent the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and address the actions our office has taken regarding oversight of complex high hazard nuclear operations. My remarks cover the six topics you provided to the Secretary in your letter dated August 25, 2009. Expectations of the senior Department of Energy (DOE) leadership with respect to safety philosophy and safety management approach.

100

DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its Savannah River Site January 10, 2007 - 10:24am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC has been selected as the management and operating contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $800 million per year and is for a five-year base period with the option to extend it for up to five additional years. SRNS is a limited liability corporation consisting of Fluor Federal Services, Inc., Honeywell International, Inc., and Newport News

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC to Manage and Operate its Savannah River Site January 10, 2007 - 10:24am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC has been selected as the management and operating contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $800 million per year and is for a five-year base period with the option to extend it for up to five additional years. SRNS is a limited liability corporation consisting of Fluor Federal Services, Inc., Honeywell International, Inc., and Newport News

102

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - NNSA Statement - November 24, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations Statement of Garrett Harencak, BRIG GEN, USAF Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application Office of Defense Programs November 24, 2009 Good Morning, Mr. Vice-Chairman. I appreciate the opportunity to speak to the Board this morning regarding the Defense Programs approach to ensuring the safe management and operation of the nuclear security enterprise. Defense Programs Safety Approach and Safety Philosophy Consistent with the rest of the Department of Energy, the foundation of Defense Program's safety philosophy is Integrated Safety Management (ISM). Defense Programs and its Management and Operating Contractors continue to mature their implementation of ISM.

103

Transition Operators Entering Neutrinoles Double Electron Capture to Excited Nuclear States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the effective transition operators relevant for neutrinoless double electron capture leading to final nuclear states different than $0^{+}$. From the structure of these operators we see that, if such a process is observed experimentally, it will be very helpful in singling out the very important light neutrino mass contribution from the other lepton violating mechanisms

J. D. Vergados

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Oconee","Nuclear","Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC",2538 2,"Cross","Coal","South Carolina Public Service...

106

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"PPL Susquehanna","Nuclear","PPL Susquehanna LLC",2520 2,"FirstEnergy Bruce...

107

Human-centered HMI design to support cognitive process of operators in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, an operation advisory system to aid cognitive process of operators is proposed for advanced main control rooms (MCRs) in future nuclear power plants (NPPs). As MCRs are fully digitalized and designed based on computer technologies, MCRs have much evolved by improving human-machine interface (HMI) design and by adapting automation or support systems for helping operator's convenient operation and maintenance. Various kinds of support systems for operators are developed or developing for advanced MCRs. The proposed system is suggesting a design basis about 'What kinds of support systems are most efficient and necessary for MCR operators ' and 'how to use them together.' In this paper, the operator's operation processes are analyzed based on a human cognitive process model and appropriate support systems that support each activity of the human cognitive process are suggested. Also, the proposed support system is evaluated using Bayesian belief network model and human error probabilities in order to estimate its effect. (authors)

Lee, S. J.; Seong, P. H. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Applications of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (1) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions or problems in nuclear power plants, (2) detection of the change of mode of operation of the plant, (3) validating signals coming from detectors, (4) review of noise'' data from TVA's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, and (5) examination of the NRC's database of Letter Event Reports'' for correlation of sequences of events in the reported incidents. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this paper. This broad based program has as its objective the definition of the state-of-the-art in using neural networks to enhance the performance of commercial nuclear power plants.

Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Operator support for ageing nuclear critical infrastructure systems: integrating ecological interface design with prospect theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operator support is essential for making decisions involving ageing infrastructure. In particular, ageing plants may have deviated from their original condition into a new state with a less predictable set of possible actions and outcomes. Standard procedures and practices may be insufficient to handle the risks and vulnerabilities of ageing nuclear infrastructure. Operator support must be designed with an understanding of how operators make decisions under uncertainty and a view to supporting unexpected situations. Prospect theory (PT) and ecological interface design (EID) are proposed as two complementary approaches for guiding operator support. PT describes how people make decisions under uncertainty and EID is an interface design approach for aiding operators with the problem-solving process in unanticipated situations. We suggest that these two approaches can be integrated to improve complex decision making in ageing nuclear plants.

Catherine Burns; Ali Asgary; Jason K. Levy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sustainable Forward Operating Base Nuclear Power Evaluation (Relationship Mapping System) Users Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sustainable Forward Operating Base (FOB) Nuclear Power Evaluation was developed by the Idaho National Laboratory Systems Engineering Department to support the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in assessing and demonstrating the viability of deploying small-scale reactors in support of military operations in theatre. This document provides a brief explanation of how to access and use the Sustainable FOB Nuclear Power Evaluation utility to view assessment results as input into developing and integrating the program elements needed to create a successful demonstration.

Not Listed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An adaptive simulation model for analysis of nuclear material shipping operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos has developed an advanced simulation environment designed specifically for nuclear materials operations. This process-level simulation package, the Process Modeling System (ProMoS), is based on high-fidelity material balance criteria and contains intrinsic mechanisms for waste and recycle flows, contaminant estimation and tracking, and material-constrained operations. Recent development efforts have focused on coupling complex personnel interactions, personnel exposure calculations, and stochastic process-personnel performance criteria to the material-balance simulation. This combination of capabilities allows for more realistic simulation of nuclear material handling operations where complex personnel interactions are required. They have used ProMoS to assess fissile material shipping performance characteristics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory plutonium facility (TA-55). Nuclear material shipping operations are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and require the largest suite of varied personnel interacting in a well-timed manner to accomplish the task. They have developed a baseline simulation of the present operations and have estimated the operational impacts and requirement of the pit production mission at TA-55 as a result of the SSM-PEIS. Potential bottlenecks have been explored and mechanisms for increasing operational efficiency are identified.

Boerigter, S.T.; Sena, D.J.; Fasel, J.H.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Comparing cultural profiles of MCR operators with those of non-MCR operators working in domestic Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Operation experience of complex socio-technical systems such as Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) shows that most significant events are attributable to human error. Thus, various kinds of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) techniques were used to manage human error for safety-critical tasks. However, a lack of available HRA data is a critical issue in conducting an HRA. For this reason, many researchers have tried to provide HRA data extracted from simulated emergency conditions. Unfortunately, it is still doubtful to directly use these HRA data because different operational cultures may result in different human performances even under a similar task context. From this concern, previous studies claimed that Main Control Room (MCR) operators working in different \\{NPPs\\} share very similar cultural profile. In order to confirm this claim, the culture profiles of operating personnel (i.e., non-MCR and MCR operators) working in domestic \\{NPPs\\} are compared. As a result, although some discrepancies are observed, it is positive to say that operating personnel of \\{NPPs\\} share similar cultural profiles to some extent. This result can be regarded as the first step to provide technical underpinnings that are helpful for understanding human performance data collected from different countries.

Jinkyun Park; Wondea Jung

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0???) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or imkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0??? decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0??? decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

Menndez, Javier [Institut fr Kernphysik, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations, January 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ......................................................................................................................................... 2

119

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - HSS Statement draft, November 24, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-20-09 -20-09 1 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations Statement of Mr. Glenn Podonsky Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer U. S. Department of Energy November 24, 2009 INTRODUCTION Mr. Vice Chairman and Members of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB or "Board"), I am pleased to have this opportunity to discuss the Department's actions in response to the Board's Recommendation 2004-1 and other significant recommendations, initiatives, and management actions affecting nuclear safety in the Department. As the Department's Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, I am here to update you on what we are doing and where we stand on pertinent issues, including our commitment to programs and processes aimed at the safe

120

Nuclear & Uranium - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net Find statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional Formats Nuclear Overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly statistics on nuclear operable units, nuclear electricity net generation, nuclear share of electricity net generation, and capacity factor. PDFXLS Annual statistics on nuclear generating units, power plants operations, and uranium. › Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2010 › PDF XLS Nuclear Power Plant Operations, 1957-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium Overview, 1949-2010 › PDF XLS Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Additional Formats U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates › Release Date: July 2010 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has updated its estimates of uranium reserves for year-end 2008. This represents the first revision of the estimates since 2004. PDF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Long-Term Environmental Monitoring of an Operating Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present energy dilemma in which we find ourselves, the magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. Nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution. One often-cited strategic hurdle to the commercial production of nuclear energy is the apparent lack of an acceptable nuclear waste repository. This issue has been quietly addressed at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP; see http://www.wipp.energy.gov), the closest population center of significant size being Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP has been operating for about nine years, disposing of over 250,000 drum-equivalents of nuclear waste. From the standpoint of addressing operational and environmental risk, as well as public fear, WIPP has had extensive human health and environmental monitoring. The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center is in the Institute for Energy and the Environment, in the College of Engineering at New Mexico State University. Located in Carlsbad, NM, CEMRC has been the independent monitoring facility for the area around WIPP from 1993 to the present, i.e., from six years before disposal operations began to nine years of waste disposal operations (www.cemcr.org). Based on the radiological analyses of monitoring samples completed to date for area residents and site workers, and for selected aerosols, soils, sediments, drinking water and surface waters, there is no evidence of increases in radiological contaminants in the region of WIPP that could be attributed to releases from WIPP. Levels of radiological and non-radiological analytes measured since operations began in 1999 have been within the range of baseline levels measured previously, and are within the ranges measured by other entities at the State and local levels since well before disposal phase operations began in 1999. (authors)

Conca, J.; Kirchner, Th.; Monk, J.; Sage, S. [Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, IEE NMSU, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"PSEG Salem Generating Station","Nuclear","PSEG Nuclear LLC",2365.7 2,"PSEG Linden...

123

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Millstone","Nuclear","Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc",2102.5 2,"Middletown","Petroleum","...

124

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Vermont Yankee","Nuclear","Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee",604.3 2,"Kingdom Community...

125

Analysis of Operation TEAPOT nuclear test BEE radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the BEE nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis of operation TEAPOT nuclear test ZUCCHINI radiological and meterological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the ZUCCHINI nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1986 fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Concept of development of nuclear power based on LMFBR operation in open nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preliminary assessments performed show that it is reasonable to investigate in the future the possibilities of FBR efficient operation with the open NFC. To improve its safety it is expedient to use the lead-bismuth alloy as a coolant. In order to operate with depleted uranium make-up it is necessary to meet a number of requirements providing the reactor criticality due to plutonium build-up and BR > 1. These requirements are as follows: a large core (20--25 m{sup 3}); a high fuel volume fraction (> 60%); utilization of dense metallic fuel; a high fuel burn-up--at a level of 20% of h.a. Making use of these reactors should allow the NP fuel base to be extended more than 10 times without making NFC closed. It provides improving NP safety during a sufficiently long stage of its development.

Toshinsky, G.I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Operational air pollution prediction and doses calculation in case of nuclear emergency at Krko Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents fully operational air pollution prediction and doses calculation system working in 2/24/7/365 mode for more than a decade in Krko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Krko NPP lies in complex terrain in Slovenia very close to Croatia border. A dedicated software is available for detailed estimation of possible radioactive emission (source term). This part of the procedure is used by trained NPP operators and then automatically coupled with dilution coefficients to obtain radionuclide air pollution concentrations. As radioactive material causes dose also with distant cloud shine not only by direct touch or inhalation, special procedure is implemented for dose estimation. We present in detail our algorithm for distant cloud shine estimation based on dilution coefficients calculation. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of correct air pollution prediction with best possible modelling techniques where achieving time and space accurate modelling is required for proper population protection.

Primož Mlakar; Marija Zlata Božnar; Borut Breznik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Behavior-Based Simulation Approach for the Capacity and Traffic Operational Characteristic Study of Four-Way-Stop-Controlled Intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of the proposed research is to study the traffic operational characteristics at four-way-stop-controlled (FWSC) intersections with single -lane approaches. Observational data were collected at six FWSC ...

Yin, Juan

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Use of neural networks in the operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (a) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, (b) detection of the change of mode of operation, (c) signal validation, (d) monitoring of check valves, (e) modeling of the plant thermodynamics, (f) emulation of core reload calculations, (g) analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's licensee event report,'' (h) monitoring of plant parameters, and (i) analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. the objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks. 6 refs.

Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations, January 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of the Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ......................................................................................................................................... 2

132

Experience in operating and upgrading the No. 5 unit of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant practical base for developing a reliable source of nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The No. 5 unit of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant, starting commercial operations on September 26, 1980, is the first power-generating unit with a 1000 MW VVER in our country. The assimilation of its power g...

I. L. Vitkovskii

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - NNSA Lines of Inquiry, November 24, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Written Reponse to DNFSB Lines of Inquiry Garrett Harencak, BRIG GEN, USAF Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application DNFSB Public Meeting Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations 1. Expectations of the senior Department leadership with respect to safety philosophy and safety management approach. LOI 1.1, What are your nuclear safety goals? Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, established nuclear safety goals for DOE. The goals in this notice have not been updated or revised since its publication. The notice states: DOE has adopted two quantitative safety goals to limit the risks of fatalities associated with its nuclear operations. These goals are the same as those established for nuclear power plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

134

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

135

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Regional long-term co-operation in the field of nuclear and radiation emergency preparedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......information concerning energy policy, nuclear programme, nuclear safety...progressive governmental policy and interest to increase nuclear safety in the region. In...information concerning energy policy, nuclear programme, nuclear safety......

V. Sladek; E. Metke; K. Janko; J.-K. Hohenberg; P. Hofer

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tudies/B ackground tudies/B ackground Book 1 CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing Areas Vol. 11, April 1988 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CERCLA PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DOE'S NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE WCILEAR WEAPONS T E S r n G AREAS Prepared by Water Resources Center Desert Research Institute University of Nevada System ,Prepared for U . S . Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada under contract DE-AC08-85NV10384 A p r i l 1988 CONTENTS VOLUME I I. INTRODUCTION 1.1 11. NEVADA TEST SITE TESTING AREAS 2.1 Frenchman Flat (Area 5) 2.1.1 2.2 Yucca Flat (Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 15)

138

Development of a hybrid intelligent system for on-line real-time monitoring of nuclear power plant operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nuclear power plant (NPP) has an intricate operational domain involving systems, structures and components (SSCs) that vary in scale and complexity. Many of the large scale SSCs contribute to the lost availability in the ...

Yildiz, Bilge, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

November 24, 2009, Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - Transcript  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc. Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc. 202-234-4433 Page 1 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA + + + + + DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD + + + + + OVERSIGHT OF COMPLEX, HIGH-HAZARD NUCLEAR OPERATIONS + + + + + TUESDAY NOVEMBER 24, 2009 + + + + + The Board met in the DNFSB Hearing Room at 625 Indiana Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004, at 9:00 a.m., John E. Mansfield, Vice Chairman, presiding. UPRESENTU : JOHN E. MANSFIELD, Ph.D., Vice Chairman JOSEPH F. BADER, Board Member LARRY W. BROWN, Board Member PETER S. WINOKUR, Ph.D., Board Member USTAFF PRESENTU : RICHARD A. AZZARO, General Counsel TIMOTHY J. DWYER, Technical Director BRIAN GROSNER, General Manager RICHARD E. TONTODONATO, Deputy Technical Director Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc.

140

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security Nuclear Security The Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) is responsible for the development and implementation of security programs for NNSA. In this capacity, DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for

142

International Conference on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, Operations and Safety (NUTHOS-6) Nara, Japan, October 4-8, 2004.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for assuring quality of software. In the area of nuclear power plant control systems, testing on softwareThe 6th International Conference on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, Operations and Safety (NUTHOS-6) Nara, Japan, October 4-8, 2004. Paper ID. N6P298 Direct Control Flow Testing on Function Block Diagrams

143

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Utilization of the Philippine Research Reactor as a training facility for nuclear power plant operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philippines has a 1-MW swimming-pool reactor facility operated by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). The reactor is light-water moderated and cooled, graphite reflected, and fueled with 90% enriched uranium. Since it became critical in 1963 it has been utilized for research, radioisotope production, and training. It was used initially in the training of PAEC personnel and other research institutions and universities. During the last few years, however, it has played a key role in training personnel for the Philippine Nuclear Power Project (PNPP).

Palabrica, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

147

Enterprise SRS: Leveraging Ongoing Operations To Advance Nuclear Fuel Cycles Research And Development Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is repurposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for ''all things nuclear'' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research (hereafter referred to as the Center). The key proposition of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear fuel cycle processing discoveries and large commercial-scale-technology deployment by leveraging SRS assets as facilities for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. The Center will coordinate the demonstration of R&D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R&D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the research team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of the Center will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, the Center also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform research demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE's critical nuclear material missions (e.g., processing in H-Canyon and plutonium storage in K-Area). Thus, the demonstration can be accomplished by leveraging the incremental cost of performing demonstrations without needing to cover the full operational cost of the facility. Current Center activities have been focused on integrating advanced safeguards monitoring technologies demonstrations into the SRS H-Canyon and advanced location technologies demonstrations into K-Area Materials Storage. These demonstrations are providing valuable information to researchers and customers as well as providing the Center with an improved protocol for demonstration management that can be exercised across the entire SRS (as well as to offsite venues) so that future demonstrations can be done more efficiently and provide an opportunity to utilize these unique assets for multiple purposes involving national laboratories, academia, and commercial entities. Key among the envisioned future demonstrations is the use of H-Canyon to demonstrate new nuclear materials separations technologies critical for advancing the mission needs DOE-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to advance the research for next generation fuel cycle technologies. The concept is to install processing equipment on frames. The frames are then positioned into an H-Canyon cell and testing in a relevant radiological environment involving prototypic radioactive materials can be performed.

Murray, Alice M.; Marra, John E.; Wilmarth, William R.; Mcguire, Patrick W.; Wheeler, Vickie B.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity.

Leuze, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

150

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

151

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

152

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

153

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

154

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

155

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

156

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

157

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

158

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

159

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

160

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

162

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

163

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

164

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

165

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

166

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

167

The Role of Nuclear Power in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given these concerns, what is driving the recent renewed interest in the construction and operation of new nuclear reactors? The current generation of reactors has demonstrated a very high capacity factor,...15.....

Anthony Baratta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Applications of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants. Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (1) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions or problems in nuclear power plants, (2) detection of the change of mode of operation of the plant, (3) validating signals coming from detectors, (4) review of ``noise`` data from TVA`s Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, and (5) examination of the NRC`s database of ``Letter Event Reports`` for correlation of sequences of events in the reported incidents. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this paper. This broad based program has as its objective the definition of the state-of-the-art in using neural networks to enhance the performance of commercial nuclear power plants.

Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Minimization of formation of wastes from the operation of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of generation of liquid radioactive wastes at VVER 440 reactor type nuclear power plants at Jaslovske Bohunice, and Dukovany is discussed. Treatment processes at the NPPs are described. The process during which the operating liquid radioactive wastes emerge is analyzed and the major contributors are identified. The technical approaches to the optimization of the performance of the purification stations that have been implemented at the NPPs with the aim to reduce the generation of radioactive wastes are outlined. The basic results of investigation into the potential of membrane processes are given, as are the results of pilot scale experiments concerned with the use of reverse osmosis in the purification of selected water streams. Attention is also devoted to technical solutions that have been introduced in the design of the Temelin NPP. These solutions are based on the acquired experience and recommendations of foreign experts.

Stepanek, J.; Mohyla, O. [DIAMO, Prague (Czech Republic); Kniz, I.; Zboray, L. [Nuclear Power Plant, Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia); Cada, K.; Wild, J. [Nuclear Power Plant, Dukovany (Czech Republic); Seifert, P. [Nuclear Power Plant, Temelin (Czech Republic); Lastovicka, Z. [Energoproject Prague (Czech Republic)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters.

172

Method for loading, operating, and unloading a ball-bed nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of operating a ball-bed nuclear reactor with fuel element balls. Some have a fissionable material content different from that of others of the balls. It consists of: initially partly filling a reactor core with fuel balls of sufficient fissionable material content for establishing criticality and a desired level of power production at the completion of the partial filling and then, without any further filling of the reactor cavern, starting reactor operation; thereafter without any removal of fuel balls from the reactor cavern, filling fuel balls continually or in groups at relatively short intervals into the reactor cavern during increasing burning up of the fuel balls already, for compensation of the diminishing fissionable material content of the reactor core constituted by the fuel balls until a final total quantity of filling is reached; after the final filling quantity is reached and burning up has occurred, shutting down the reactor, cooling it off, releasing the pressure in the cavern, and thereafter unloading all the fuel balls from the reactor cavern, unloading being begun when the reactor is shut down and being completed before the reactor is restarted.

Teuchert, E.; Haas, K.A.; Gerwin, H.

1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Panama Canal capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

Bronzini, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fundamentals of Capacity Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whereas capacity planning determines in advance the capacities required to implement a production program, capacity control determines the actual capacities implemented shortly beforehand. The capacity control...

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Hermann Ldding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sliding Mode Control for Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactors in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, sliding mode control (SMC) which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) power for the load-following operation problem that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model and one delayed neutron group. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is sufficiently effective so that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the considered region.

G.R. Ansarifar; S. Saadatzi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

178

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service...

179

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Monroe","Coal","The DTE Electric Company",2944 2,"Donald C Cook","Nuclear","Indiana...

180

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1246.2 2,"Granite Ridge","Natural Gas","Granite...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Browns Ferry","Nuclear","Tennessee Valley Authority",3309.4 2,"James H Miller...

182

Implementation of the MPC and A Operations Monitoring (MOM) System at IRT-T FSRE Nuclear Power Institute (NPI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program has been working since 1994 with nuclear sites in Russia to upgrade the physical protection (PP) and material control and accounting (MC&A) functions at facilities containing weapons usable nuclear material. In early 2001, the MPC&A program initiated the MPC&A Operations Monitoring (MOM) Project to monitor facilities where MPC&A upgrades have been installed to provide increased confidence that personnel are present and vigilant, provide confidence that security procedures are being properly performed and provide additional assurance that nuclear materials have not been stolen. The MOM project began as a pilot project at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and a MOM system was successfully installed in October 2001. Following the success of the MEPhI pilot project, the MPC&A Program expanded the installation of MOM systems to several other Russian facilities, including the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) in Tomsk. The MOM system was made operational at NPI in October 2004. This paper is focused on the experience gained from operation of this system and the objectives of the MOM system. The paper also describes how the MOM system is used at NPI and, in particular, how the data is analyzed. Finally, potential expansion of the MOM system at NPI is described.

Sitdikov,I.; Zenkov, A.; Tsibulnikov, Y.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Pratt, W.T.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

184

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Nuclear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear Power Nuclear Power picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Nuclear power is projected to represent a growing share of the developing world’s electricity consumption from 1999 through 2020. New plant construction and license extensions for existing plants are expected to produce a net increase in world nuclear capacity. Nuclear power plants generated electricity in 29 countries in 1999. A total of 433 nuclear power reactors were in operation (Figure 61), including 104 in the United States, 59 in France, and 53 in Japan. The largest national share of electricity from nuclear power was in France, at 75 percent (Figure 62). Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Lithuania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Ukraine, and South Korea depended on nuclear power for at least 40

185

Electricity investments and development of power generation capacities : An approach of the drivers for investment choices in Europe regarding nuclear energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In a context of growing energy prices and climate change mitigation, the thesis addresses the issues of investments in power generation capacities and in particular (more)

Shoai Tehrani, Bianka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

1992 Annual Capacity Report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR Part 961) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to issue an Annual Capacity Report (ACR) for planning purposes. This report is the fifth in the series published by DOE. In May 1993, DOE published the 1992 Acceptance Priority Ranking (APR) that established the order in which DOE will allocate projected acceptance capacity. As required by the Standard Contract, the acceptance priority ranking is based on the date the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) was permanently discharged, with the owners of the oldest SNF, on an industry-wide basis, given the highest priority. The 1992 ACR applies the projected waste acceptance rates in Table 2.1 to the 1992 APR, resulting in individual allocations for the owners and generators of the SNF. These allocations are listed in detail in the Appendix, and summarized in Table 3.1. The projected waste acceptance rates for SNF presented in Table 2.1 are nominal and assume a site for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility will be obtained; the facility will initiate operations in 1998; and the statutory linkages between the MRS facility and the repository set forth in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), will be modified. During the first ten years following projected commencement of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operation, the total quantity of SNF that could be accepted is projected to be 8,200 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This is consistent with the storage capacity licensing conditions imposed on an MRS facility by the NWPA. The annual acceptance rates provide an approximation of the system throughput and are subject to change as the program progresses.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using selective laser extraction technique combined with sensitive ion-counting mass spectrometry, we have analyzed the isotopic structure of fission noble gases in U-free La-Ce-Sr-Ca aluminous hydroxy phosphate associated with the 2 billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce, and Sr, we discovered high (up to 0.03??cm3???STP/g) concentrations of fission Xe and Kr, the largest ever observed in any natural material. The specific isotopic structure of xenon in this mineral defines a cycling operation for the reactor with 30-min active pulses separated by 2.5h dormant periods. Thus, nature not only created conditions for self-sustained nuclear chain reactions, but also provided clues on how to retain nuclear wastes, including fission Xe and Kr, and prevent uncontrolled runaway chain reaction.

A. P. Meshik; C. M. Hohenberg; O. V. Pravdivtseva

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Enterprise SRS: leveraging ongoing operations to advance nuclear fuel cycles research and development programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is re-purposing its vast array of assets (including H Canyon - a nuclear chemical separation plant) to solve issues regarding advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies, nuclear materials processing, packaging, storage and disposition. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into SRS facilities but also in other facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research has been established in SRS.

Murray, A.M.; Marra, J.E.; Wilmarth, W.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B. [Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

192

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

193

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

194

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Operators Using Probabilistic Network Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human factors are very important for the reliability of a nuclear power plant. Human behavior has essentially time-dependent nature. The details of thinking and decision making processes are important for deta...

Yoshiaki Oka; Kenji Miyata; Hideki Kodaira

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

197

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Robust nonlinear model predictive control for nuclear power plants in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, a robust nonlinear model predictive control for the load-following operation problem is proposed that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The controller imposes restricted state constraints on the predicted trajectory during optimization which guarantees robust satisfaction of state constraints without restoring to a minmax optimization problem. Simulation results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is so effective so that the xenon oscillations kept bounded in the given region.

H. Eliasi; M.B. Menhaj; H. Davilu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Considerations for increasing unit 1 spent fuel pool capacity at the Laguna Verde station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To increase the spent fuel storage capacity at the Laguna Verde Station in a safe and economical manner and assure a continuous operation of the first Mexican Nuclear Plant, Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), the Nation's Utility, seeked alternatives considering the overall world situation, the safety and licensing aspects, as well as the economics and the extent of the nuclear program of Mexico. This paper describes the alternatives considered, their evaluation and how the decision taken by CFE in this field, provides the Laguna Verde Station with a maximum of 37 years storage capacity plus full core reserve.

Vera, A. (Comision Federal de Electricidad, Veracruz, Ver. (Mexico))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the world’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

203

May 21, 2004, Board letter forwarding Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John I Conway, Chdmnm A J Fggenberger, Vice C h u m a n John F Mmsfield R Bruce lMalrhews 625 Indmna Avenue, NW, Suite 700, Washmgton, D C 20004-290 1 (202) 694-7000 May 2 1,2004 The Honorable Spencer Abraham Secretary of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585- 1000 Dear Secretary Abraham: On May 2 1 , 2004, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), in accordance with 42 U.S.C. 8 2286d(a), unanimously approved Recommendation 2004-1, which is enclosed for your consideration. Recommendation 2004- 1 deals with Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations. After your receipt of this recommendation and as required by 42 U.S.C. 0 2286d(a), the Board will promptly make it available to the public. The Board believes that the

204

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

205

Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

works with Idaho Power engineers to train system operators in the use of weather station data and software tools to generate transmission capacity operat- ing limits. The ability...

206

Solar Energy and Capacity Value (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a one-page, two-sided fact sheet on the capacity of solar power to provide value to utilities and power system operators.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

208

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

209

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

210

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

211

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andprof id=pjoskow. Capacity Markets for Electricity [13]Utility Commission- Capacity Market Questions, available at

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

System dynamics modeling for human performance in nuclear power plant operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perfect plant operation with high safety and economic performance is based on both good physical design and successful organization. However, in comparison with the affection that has been paid to technology research, the ...

Chu, Xinyuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Nuclear Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide Review Questions More Documents & Publications Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities Cross-referenced to DOE O 422.1,...

214

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Orders Self-Study Program Safety Basis Documentation Requirements in DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities Cross-referenced to DOE O 422.1,...

215

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Millstone  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Millstone" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

216

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Vogtle  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vogtle" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

217

November 24, 2009, Board Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - Transcript  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-234-4433 2-234-4433 Neal R. Gross & Co., Inc. Page 1 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA + + + + + DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD + + + + + WEDNESDAY MAY 12, 2010 + + + + + The Board met in the DNFSB Hearing Room at 625 Indiana Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, D.C., Peter S. Winokur, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: PETER S. WINOKUR, Chairman JOHN E. MANSFIELD, Vice Chairman JOSEPH F. BADER, Board Member LARRY W. BROWN, Board Member JESSIE H. ROBERSON, Board Member STAFF PRESENT: RICHARD A. AZZARO, General Counsel TIMOTHY J. DWYER, Technical Director

218

Study of power distribution in the CZP, HFP and normal operation states of VVER-1000 (Bushehr) nuclear reactor core by coupling nuclear codes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research, the simulation of one-sixth of VVER-1000 (Bushehr) reactor core is carried out by WIMS-D4 nuclear code, based on symmetry of core and also by information obtained from FSAR. The cross sections of some nuclides are obtained by WIMS-D4 from the beginning of cycle (BOC) to the end of cycle (EOC), and they are transferred into the CITATION code as inputs. In the next stage, the amounts of neutron fluxes and power of reactor core are obtained by CITATION code in the CZP and HFP states. Then, the received products are returned again into the extended program cycle, thereby distributions of neutron fluxes and power are finally depicted. In the meantime, the space distribution of neutron fluxes and power throughout the core are presented during the normal operation by this simulation. It can be inferred that if the reactor operation continues, a flat power distribution will be made in the reactor core that might cause maximum power.

Mohsen Rafiei Karahroudi; Seyed Alireza Mousavi Shirazi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - Chairman's Opening Statement - May 12, 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHAIRMAN'S OPENING STATEMENT CHAIRMAN'S OPENING STATEMENT GOOD MORNING. MY NAME IS PETER WINOKUR AND I AM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD. I WILL PRESIDE OVER THIS PUBLIC MEETING AND HEARING. I WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE THE MEMBERS OF THE SAFETY BOARD WHO ARE ALL PRESENT HERE TODAY. TO MY IMMEDIATE LEFT IS DR. JOHN MANSFIELD, AND TO HIS LEFT IS MR. JOSEPH BADER. ON MY RIGHT IS MR. LARRY BROWN, AND TO HIS RIGHT IS MS. JESSIE ROBERSON. WE FIVE CONSTITUTE THE BOARD. THE BOARD'S GENERAL COUNSEL, RICHARD AZZARO, IS SEATED TO MY FAR LEFT, AND NEXT TO HIM IS THE BOARD'S GENERAL MANAGER, BRIAN GROSNER. THE BOARD'S TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, TIMOTHY DWYER, IS SEATED TO MY FAR RIGHT. SEVERAL MEMBERS OF OUR STAFF CLOSELY INVOLVED WITH OVERSIGHT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S DEFENSE

220

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

Winter, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Lessons Learned Report on the Combined Construction and Operating License/Design Certification Demonstration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report August 30, 2012 Prepared by Longenecker and Associates DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

223

An Overview of strategic measures to assess workforce needs and ensure technology transfer to meet current and future nuclear power operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1956 and 1989, the number of operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States increased from none to 109. With the exception of a few plants that were still in final construction, no new nuclear power plants were ordered in the United States as the new millennium began. In 2005, the federal government pronounced the need for new electric power generating systems during the first quarter of the 21. century. The need comes from a desire to curb our reliance on fossil fuels, as well as to provide for a cleaner environment. One of those fuel systems noted was nuclear energy. Given the time between the last active period of nuclear power plant development and construction, there is a need to supply a talented and well-prepared workforce to operate the new plants. It will also be necessary to assess the needs of our current fleet of operating nuclear power plants, of which many are in the process of re-licensing, yet also facing an aging plant workforce. This paper will review and discuss measures to assess diverse workforce needs and technology transfer to meet current licensing requirements as that of future nuclear power plant development in the United States. (authors)

Vincenti, J.R. [acuri.net, 1344 Curtin Street, State College, PA (United States); Stigers, R.A. [Senior Health Physicist-Radwaste, PPL Susquehanna, Berwick, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

Levinson, David M.

225

"1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" Texas" "1. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3664 "2. South Texas Project","Nuclear","STP Nuclear Operating Co",2560 "3. Martin Lake","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",2425 "4. Comanche Peak","Nuclear","TXU Generation Co LP",2406 "5. Monticello","Coal","TXU Generation Co LP",1890 "6. Sabine","Gas","Entergy Texas Inc.",1814 "7. Limestone","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",1689 "8. Fayette Power Project","Coal","Lower Colorado River Authority",1641 "9. Forney Energy Center","Gas","FPLE Forney LP",1640

226

Nuclear Fabrication Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) â?? Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : â?¢ Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. â?¢ Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. â?¢ Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. â?¢ Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. â?¢ Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. â?¢ Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. â?¢ Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. â?¢ Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

Levesque, Stephen

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Report on Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at Richland Operations, IG-0378  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 INFORMATION: Report on "Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at the Richland Operations Office" The Secretary BACKGROUND: On June 3, 1993, the Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Inspections issued a Letter Report to the Department's Acting Chief Financial Officer which stated that during Fiscal Year 1993 the Department had requested and received $60 million, double the funding needed, for the safeguard and security of special nuclear material at the Richland Operations Office. In response to that Report, the Acting Chief Financial Officer took control of the funds and placed them into a management reserve account. A follow-up inspection was initiated to:

228

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the world’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the world’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

229

Expert Identity construct in analysing prerequisites for expertise development: a case study of nuclear power plant operators on-the-job training  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses how shifting the focus of research to the emotional side of human actions and cognition could create new perspectives on the problem of how to support the human operator in the control of rare disturbances. A new construct, Expert ... Keywords: Emotions, Expert Identity, Nuclear power plant, On-the-job training, Process control, Work analysis

Maaria Nuutinen

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling fabrication of nuclear components: An integrative approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. This dissertation presents an integrative two-stage approach to modeling the casting operation for fabrication of nuclear weapon primary components. The first stage optimizes personnel radiation exposure for the casting operation layout by modeling the operation as a facility layout problem formulated as a quadratic assignment problem. The solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

Hench, K.W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of variability of the long-term fundamental physical constants [5,6] to storage of nuclear wastes in geological on how to retain nuclear wastes, including fission Xe and Kr, and prevent uncontrolled runaway chain

232

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

233

Definition: Deferred Generation Capacity Investments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Capacity Investments Generation Capacity Investments Utilities and grid operators ensure that generation capacity can serve the maximum amount of load that planning and operations forecasts indicate. The trouble is, this capacity is only required for very short periods each year, when demand peaks. Reducing peak demand and flattening the load curve should reduce the generation capacity required to service load and lead to cheaper electricity for customers.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, peak demand, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Deferred_Generation_Capacity_Investments&oldid=50257

234

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

235

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

236

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

237

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the add a source basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Vermont Yankee  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Yankee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

239

California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

240

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Palo Verde  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Palo Verde" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

242

Florida Nuclear Profile - St Lucie  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

St Lucie" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

243

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

244

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Catawba  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Catawba" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

245

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Harris  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Harris" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

246

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Seabrook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Seabrook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

247

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Oconee  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oconee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

248

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Brunswick  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Brunswick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

249

U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units 15,027 14,659 15,177 15,289 15,373 15,724 1985-2013 Operable Capacity (Calendar...

250

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power planta dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Supplement Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE CONTINUED OPERATION OF THE PANTEX PLANT AND ASSOCIATED STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WEAPON COMPONENTS DOE/EIS-0225/SA-03 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Operations P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120-0030 February 2003 i Summary The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures at 10 CFR 1021.330(d) require evaluation of its site-wide environmental impact statements (EISs) at least every 5 years by preparation of a supplement analysis (SA), as provided in 10 CFR 1021.314. Based on the SA, a determination is made as to whether the existing EIS remains

253

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Initiative Science-Based R&D to Extend Nuclear Plant Operation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Updates Dr. Pete Lyons Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy December 9, 2010 NEAC Meeting Leadership Changes Pete Miller retired Pete Lyons - Acting NE-1 Shane Johnson - Acting NE-2 Dennis Miotla - Acting COO Monica Regalbuto - Acting DAS for Fuel Cycle Technologies John Herczeg- Acting ADAS for Fuel Cycle Technologies John Kelly - DAS for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Bob Boudreau- Acting ADAS International Nuclear Energy Coop Monica Regalbuto John Kelly NE University Programs (NEUP) - Overview and FY 2011 Schedule NEUP FY 2011 Solicitations Schedule RPA/FOA Pre- Applications Proposals Due Awards Announced R&D (PS and Blue Sky) Oct. '10 Dec. '10 Feb. '11 May '11 Integrated Research Projects (IRP) Dec. '10 Late Jan '11

254

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

255

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

256

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 29, 2013 Previous Issues Year: September 2013 March 2013 September 2012 March 2012 September 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Go Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an

257

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the worlds electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Associations data, the realization of Chinas deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Examining Repository Loading Options to Expand Yucca Mountain Repository Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siting a high level nuclear waste repository entails high economic, social, and political costs. Given the difficulty in siting the Yucca Mountain repository and the already identified need for additional capacity, the concept of expanding the capacity of the Yucca Mountain repository is of significant interest to the nuclear industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). As the capacity of the repository is limited by the decay heat inventory of the spent nuclear fuel in relation to the thermal design limits, expanding the capacity requires appropriate schemes for decay heat and spent fuel loading management. The current Yucca Mountain repository is based on a single level, fixed drift spacing design for a fixed area or footprint. Studies performed to date investigating the capacity of Yucca Mountain often assume that the loading of spent fuel is uniform throughout the repository and use the concept of a linear loading or areal power density (APD). However, use of linear loading or APD can be problematic with the various cooling times involved. The temperature within the repository at any point in time is controlled by the integral of the heat deposited in the repository. The integral of the decay heat varies as a function of pre-loading cooling periods even for a fixed linear loading. A meaningful repository capacity analysis requires the use of a computer model that describes the time-dependent temperature distributions of the rock from the dissipation of the heat through the repository system. If variations from the current Yucca Mountain repository design were to be considered, expanding the capacity of the repository would be pursued in several ways including: (1) increase the footprint size; (2) implement multiple-levels in the repository for the given footprint; (3) allow the drift distance to vary within thermal limits; and, (4) allow non-uniform loading of wastes into the drifts within thermal limits. Options (1) and (2) have been investigated by other researchers. This paper investigates options (3) and (4) for possible expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository capacity. To support the work, a thermal analysis model was needed to describe the temperature changes in the rock around the waste packages against the thermal design limits as a function of spent fuel characteristics and composition. Under the high temperature operating mode (HTOM), the relevant thermal design limits are: (1) the rock temperature midway between adjacent drifts must remain below the local boiling point (96 deg. C); and (2) the rock temperature at drift walls must remain below 200 deg. C. As the work involves a large number of calculations, examining the compliance within thermal design limits, the capability to perform efficient mountain-scale heat-transfer analyses was necessary. A related topic of importance in this investigation was also the effect of uncertainty. As the modeling exercise relies on the use of computational models, uncertainties are unavoidable and understanding the uncertainty in the interpretation of the results is important. The concept of variable drift spacing and variable drift thermal loading was investigated with respect to possible capacity expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository. Also, a computer model was developed for efficient repository heat transfer calculations and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to identify key parameters and to estimate the uncertainty in the results and understand how the repository capacity estimation would be affected by the uncertainty. (authors)

Li, Jun; Nicholson, Mark; Proctor, W. Cyrus; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Blue Ribbon Commission, Yucca Mountain Closure, Court Actions - Future of Decommissioned Reactors, Operating Reactors and Nuclear Power - 13249  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues related to back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle continue to be difficult for the commercial nuclear power industry and for the decision makers at the national and international level. In the US, the 1982 NWPA required DOE to develop geological repositories for SNF and HLW but in spite of extensive site characterization efforts and over ten billion dollars spent, a repository opening is nowhere in sight. There has been constant litigation against the DOE by the nuclear utilities for breach of the 'standard contract' they signed with the DOE under the NWPA. The SNF inventory continues to rise both in the US and globally and the nuclear industry has turned to dry storage facilities at reactor locations. In US, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its report in January 2012 and among other items, it recommends a new, consent-based approach to siting of facilities, prompt efforts to develop one or more geologic disposal facilities, and prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. In addition, the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident had a severe impact on the future growth of nuclear power. The nuclear industry is focusing on mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events and in the US, the industry is in the process of implementing the recommendations from NRC's Near Term Task Force. (authors)

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Aspects of operational radiation protection during dismantling of nuclear facilities relevant for the estimation of internal doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......its decommissioning plan. In that period...including clearance from regulatory control, and to...analysis includes a review of the documentation...decommissioning standard review plan. NUREG 1727. 6...Journal Article Review | Humans Nuclear......

T. Labarta

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement Number 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), and Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER. These issues relate to: Design criteria -- structures, components, equipment, and systems; Reactor; Instrumentation and controls; Electrical power systems; Auxiliary systems; Conduct of operations; Accident analysis; and Quality assurance.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Partial energies fluctuations and negative heat capacities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We proceed to a critical examination of the method used in nuclear fragmentation to exhibit signals of negative heat capacity. We show that this method leads to unsatisfactory results when applied to a simple and well controlled model. Discrepancies are due to incomplete evaluation of potential energies.

Xavier Campi; H. Krivine; E. Plagnol; N. Sator

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nuclear Science & Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

267

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

268

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - Statement of Thomas P. DAgostino - May 12, 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Thomas P. D'Agostino of Thomas P. D'Agostino Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Hearing on Line and Independent Oversight May 12, 2010 Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, thank you for this opportunity to meet with you in this public forum to discuss effective oversight of our nuclear facilities. You provided written lines of inquiry prior to this meeting, and my formal response is organized around them. Of course, I will also be happy to answer any additional questions you may have. Let me begin by describing our overall oversight approach as it currently exists. I will discuss its effectiveness, point out both its strengths and weaknesses, and use it as a basis for describing the changes we are considering. I will then discuss our approach to

269

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

270

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This self-study guide provides an overview of safety basis terminology, requirements, and activities that are applicable to DOE and Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) nuclear facilities on the Oak...

271

July 24, 2006, Department letter providing status and path forward for the 2004-1 implementation plan, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 24, 2006 July 24, 2006 The Honorable A. J. Eggenberger Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20004-294 1 Dear Mr. Chairman: In June 2005, I provided you with a copy of the Department's revised Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations in response to Board recommendation 2004- 1 . Since that time, the Department has completed numerous planned actions and has learned from this experience how best to sustain real improvement in this area. Based on the feedback to date, we are preparing to make a course correction on our implementation plan to improve its effectiveness and to bolster line management accountability. To this end, we plan to revise our 2004-1 implementation plan and provide you with this revision by

272

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Countering Nuclear Terrorism Home > Our Mission > Countering Nuclear Terrorism Countering Nuclear Terrorism NNSA provides expertise, practical tools, and technically informed policy

273

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Available Shell Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 Net Available Shell Storage Capacity by PAD District as of September 30, 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 In Operation Idle 1 Refineries Crude Oil 17,334 831 21,870 1,721 86,629 3,468 4,655 174 39,839 1,230 170,327 7,424 Fuel Ethanol 174 - 175 1 289 - 134 - 92 - 864 1 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2 1,267 23 11,599 382 28,865 78 641 19 2,412 23 44,784 525 Propane/Propylene (dedicated)

274

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Forensics Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Forensics Forensics Operations The National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) program is a Homeland Security Council and National Security

276

EIA - AEO2010 - U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement after 60? Background Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating. The nuclear industry has expressed strong interest in continuing the operation of existing nuclear facilities, and no particular technical issues have been identified that would impede their continued operation. Recent AEOs had assumed that existing nuclear units would be retired after 60 years of operation (the initial 40-year license plus one 20-year license renewal). Maintaining the same assumption in AEO2010, with the projection horizon extended to 2035, would result in the retirement of more than one-third of existing U.S. nuclear capacity between 2029 and 2035. Given the uncertainty about when existing nuclear capacity actually will be retired, EIA revisited the assumption for the development of AEO2010 and modified it to allow the continued operation of all existing U.S. nuclear power plants through 2035 in the Reference case.

277

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

278

Nanofluid heat capacities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-? olefin mineral oil ethylene glycol a mixture of water and ethylene glycol and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate) and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

Anne K. Starace; Judith C. Gomez; Jun Wang; Sulolit Pradhan; Greg C. Glatzmaier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear Safety and Global Cooperation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis of is to strengthen the capacity building of nuclear safety and disaster prevention all over the world from a preventive perspective, and to (more)

Chang, Yu-shan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Public Meeting on Oversight of Complex, High Hazard Nuclear Operations - Vice Chairman's Opening Statement - November 24, 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VICE CHAIRMAN'S OPENING STATEMENT VICE CHAIRMAN'S OPENING STATEMENT GOOD MORNING. MY NAME IS JOHN MANSFIELD AND I AM THE VICE CHAIRMAN OF THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD. I WILL PRESIDE OVER THIS PUBLIC MEETING AND HEARING. I WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE THE MEMBERS OF THE SAFETY BOARD WHO ARE PRESENT HERE TODAY. TO MY IMMEDIATE LEFT IS MR. JOSEPH BADER. AND TO HIS LEFT IS DR. PETER WINOKUR. ON MY RIGHT IS MR. LARRY BROWN. WE FOUR CONSTITUTE THE BOARD. THE BOARD'S GENERAL COUNSEL, RICHARD AZZARO, IS SEATED TO MY FAR LEFT, AND NEXT TO HIM IS THE BOARD'S GENERAL MANAGER, BRIAN GROSNER. THE BOARD'S TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, TIM DWYER, IS SEATED TO MY FAR RIGHT. SEVERAL MEMBERS OF OUR STAFF CLOSELY INVOLVED WITH OVERSIGHT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES ARE ALSO

285

New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

286

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

287

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Joseph M Farley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

288

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

289

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Edwin I Hatch  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Edwin I Hatch" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

290

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - McGuire  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

McGuire" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

291

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - V C Summer  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

V C Summer" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

292

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - H B Robinson  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

H B Robinson" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

293

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

294

"ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per calendar day)",14250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

CORPORATION","SURVEY","PERIOD","COMPANY_NAME","RDIST_LABEL","STATE_NAME","SITE","PADD","PRODUCT","SUPPLY","QUANTITY" CORPORATION","SURVEY","PERIOD","COMPANY_NAME","RDIST_LABEL","STATE_NAME","SITE","PADD","PRODUCT","SUPPLY","QUANTITY" "ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per calendar day)",14250 "ALON ISRAEL OIL COMPANY LTD",820,13,"ALON BAKERSFIELD OPERATING INC","West Coast","California","BAKERSFIELD",5,"CAT HYDROCRACKING, GAS OIL","Downstream Charge Capacity, Current Year (barrels per stream day)",15000

295

Thermodynamics of a desalination system at nuclear power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear power engineering is developing steadily in industrial countries. This is caused by features of using nuclear fuel and high environmental safety of nuclear power stations. At the same time, the thermodynamic efficiency of nuclear power stations is lower than indices of thermal power stations operating on gas, coal or oil fuel. This efficiency does not usually exceed 30??35%. Hence more than 60% of the energy of nuclear fuel being used escapes into the environment through turbine condensers at nuclear power stations. Cogeneration turbines that reduce heat loss by 20??30% are used at thermal power stations for efficiency upgrading. However, cogeneration schemes have not found wide utility at nuclear power stations due to safety conditions. Thus, it is possible to use, in addition, a major part of nuclear fuel energy for desalination at nuclear power stations located on the coast. In this case, some main problems are solved: production of fresh water consumed by nuclear power station for technological purposes and sold to external consumers; upgrading of effectiveness of using nuclear fuel including the cost of steady operation of nuclear power stations at high loads; reduction of non-productive thermal pollutants from nuclear power stations into the environment. It is required to provide maximum upgrading of power station heat efficiency and high capacity of distillers when connecting desalination installations to the thermal scheme of nuclear power stations. The use of energy of the heat carrier's low-temperature flows being emitted by turbine condensers into the environment is of particular value. In this case, different thermodynamic analysis methods are used for the justification of optimal engineering solutions In the article under consideration some results of research of thermodynamics of cycles of nuclear power stations where thermal schemes includes different types of thermal desalination installations are given. From the analysis of thermodynamic processes carried out at nuclear power stations, recommendations related to improvement of desalination installations' thermal schemes providing power system efficiency upgrading have been obtained.

V.V. Slesarenko

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

WINDExchange: Wind Potential Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

area with a gross capacity factor1 of 35% and higher, which may be suitable for wind energy development. AWS Truepower LLC produced the wind resource data with a spatial...

297

Energy efficiency as a resource in the ISO New England Forward Capacity Market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resources associated with the Efficiency Vermont portfolio have successfully cleared all three auctions, ... 2012. The largest cleared capacity commitment in Vermont comes from the Vermont Yankee nuclear generati...

Cheryl Jenkins; Chris Neme; Shawn Enterline

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optimization Online - Operations Risk Management by Planning ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 1, 2007 ... Operations Risk Management by Planning Optimally the Qualified Workforce Capacity. Emmanuel Fragni re(Emmanuel.Fragniere ***at***...

Emmanuel Fragni re

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Radiation source rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose rate measurements for operational nuclear emergency response systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an innovative data assimilation method that has been recently developed in NCSR Demokritos for estimating an unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere, with real-scale experimental data. The efficient algorithm is based on the assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model DIPCOT and uses variational principles. The DIPCOT model is used in the framework of the nuclear emergency response system (ERS) RODOS. The evaluation is performed by computational simulations of dispersion of Ar-41 that was emitted routinely by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) previous research reactor, HIFAR, located in Sydney, Australia. In this paper the algorithm is evaluated against a more complicated case than the others used in previous studies: there was only one monitoring station available each day and the site topography is characterised as moderately complex. Overall the estimated release rate approaches the real one to a very satisfactory degree as revealed by the statistical indicators of errors.

Vasiliki Tsiouri; Spyros Andronopoulos; Ivan Kovalets; Leisa L. Dyer; John G. Bartzis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program Joint Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nations electrical generation capability.

Don Williams

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

IDAHO STATE UNIVERSITY Chad Pope Department of Nuclear Engineering...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of nuclear safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility operations and pyroprocessing. He teaches courses in reactor physics, nuclear criticality safety, Monte Carlo...

303

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Release Date: May 20, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 Go Notice: Changes to Petroleum Supply Survey Forms for 2013 This is the third release of U.S. Energy Information Administration data on fuel ethanol production capacity. EIA first reported fuel ethanol production capacities as of January 1, 2011 on November 29, 2011. This new report contains production capacity data for all operating U.S. fuel ethanol production plants as of January 1, 2013. U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity as of January 1, 2013 PAD District Number of Plants 2013 Nameplate Capacity 2012 Nameplate Capacity (MMgal/year) (mb/d) (MMgal/year) (mb/d) PADD 1 4 360 23 316 21

304

Nuclear reactors in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors in the United States ... A chart listing the operating and planned nuclear reactors in the United States. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Hubert N. Alyea

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Initiative Science-Based R&D to Extend Nuclear Plant Operation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2010 9, 2010 New Program Proposal for Fiscal Year 2011 - Modified Open Cycle Carter "Buzz" Savage Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting April 29, 2010 Washington, DC April 29, 2010 Recycle of Used Fuel Option to recycle used fuel has been the subject of much debate and discussion. Nonproliferation issues and economics have limited recycle options. Recycle of used fuel enables increased utilization of uranium resource and potential waste management benefits. - Once through fuel cycle uses less than 1% of energy value of the uranium. Courtesy AREVA 2 April 29, 2010 Summary of Fuel Cycle Options 3 Once-Through Fuel Cycle - One pass through reactor, used fuel directly disposed in a geologic repository. Modified Open Cycle - No or limited separations steps and

306

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

307

Nuclear Deterrence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

308

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4...

309

Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary GIS Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report, configuration notes American Samoa Spatial Data Infrastructure Maps GIS Data CDs Operating System, a number of issues regarding map projections and datums were resolved allowing GIS users to processFagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary GIS Capacity Binder Index Background 2 Hardware, Software

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

310

Review and evaluation of Transamerica Delaval, Inc. , diesel engine reliability and operability: Grand Gulf Nuclear Station Unit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNL and its consultants conclude that the TDI diesel engines at the GGNS have the needed operability and reliability to fulfill their intended (auxiliary) emergency power function for the first refueling cycle. This conclusion is reached with a number of understandings regarding limits to the engine requirements, NRC concurrence with MP and L findings/conclusions regarding items to be supplied to NRC, limitations on the engine Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), and MP and L's implementation of the modifications to their proposed surveillance and maintenance program.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

312

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

313

Capacity of steganographic channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An information-theoretic approach is used to determine the amount of information that may be safely transferred over a steganographic channel with a passive adversary. A steganographic channel, or stego-channel is a pair consisting of the channel transition ... Keywords: information spectrum, information theory, steganalysis, steganographic capacity, steganography, stego-channel

Jeremiah J. Harmsen; William A. Pearlman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

316

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Nuclear Generation and Generating Capacity Data Released: September 26, 2014 Data for: July 2014 Next Release: October 2014 Year Capacity and Generation by State and Reactor...

319

Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States - progress or stalemate?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The U.S. nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW - industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW - face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of U.S. low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change.

Devgun, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Larson, G.S. [Midwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

NRC okays nuclear merger at Entergy Corp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the consolidation of Entergy Corp's nuclear operations into the utility's proposed nuclear management company, Entergy Operations Inc. The NRC action is a significant step in a consolidation process that would place operational responsibility for Entergy's nuclear plants in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana with Entergy Operations. The NRC action would authorize transfer of the operating licenses for Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) at Russellville, Ark, Waterford-3 at Taft, La, and Grand Gulf-1 at Port Gibson, Miss, to Entergy Operations. A consolidated nuclear organization will allow for a more focused management structure in its nuclear operations and will result in greater operational efficiencies.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Capacity of a UMTS system for aeronautical communications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current Air Traffic Management and Air Traffic Control systems will experience a demand increase in the following years due to the large number of operating aircrafts. As a consequence, new solution must be studied to overcome this capacity limitation ... Keywords: ATC, ATM, ENR, SDR, TMA, UMTS, W-CDMA, air traffic, capacity

Miguel Calvo Ramn; Ramn Martnez Rodrguez-Osorio; Bazil Taha Ahmed; Juan Jos Iglesias Jimnez

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

323

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

324

Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nuclear Energy & Energy Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Safety issues related to use of nuclear energy and secure operation of nuclear installations are mail stones of great importance. Although none of technologies producing energy are absolutely safe it is obvious t...

Jumber Mamasakhlisi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL ­ Supply chains and logistics ­ Systems of systems (e.g., the nuclear fuel cycle, fleet management) #12

Langerhans, Brian

328

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable 1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 - = No data reported. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

329

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Nebraska Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,363 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,849 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable 1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

330

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

331

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

332

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Iowa Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable 1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100.0 Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts,

333

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 Kansas Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable 1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

334

Optimization of automation: I. Estimation method of cognitive automation rates reflecting the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since automation was introduced in various industrial fields, the concept of the automation rate has been used to indicate the inclusion proportion of automation among all work processes or facilities. Expressions of the inclusion proportion of automation are predictable, as is the ability to express the degree of the enhancement of human performance. However, many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, this paper proposes a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Automation in \\{NPPs\\} can be divided into two types: system automation and cognitive automation. Some general descriptions and characteristics of each type of automation are provided, and the advantages of automation are investigated. The advantages of each type of automation are used as measures of the estimation method of the automation rate. One advantage was found to be a reduction in the number of tasks, and another was a reduction in human cognitive task loads. The system and the cognitive automation rate were proposed as quantitative measures by taking advantage of the aforementioned benefits. To quantify the required human cognitive task loads and thus suggest the cognitive automation rate, Conants information-theory-based model was applied. The validity of the suggested method, especially as regards the cognitive automation rate, was proven by conducting experiments. The result showed that a decreased rate of the operator working time was significantly related to the cognitive automation rate and that the calculation of the cognitive task load was useful as a measure of the cognitive automation rate.

Seung Min Lee; Jong Hyun Kim; Poong Hyun Seong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

Siefert, Chris

336

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

337

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

338

Nuclear & Uranium - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Nuclear Short, timely articles with graphs about recent nuclear energy issues and trends Monthly Reports Monthly Energy Review - Nuclear Section Released: November 25, 2013 Recent statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors. Electricity Monthly Update Released: November 22, 2013 Provides analysis and of the highlights of the data included in the Electric Power Monthly publication and presents tables of electricity generation, fuel consumption for generation, fossil fuel stocks, and average retail sales and prices of electricity. The EMU is published at the

339

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470 OAS-L-13-08 April 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 19, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470" BACKGROUND The attached report presents the results of an audit of home office expenses submitted by Fluor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P. [Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABSG Consulting, Inc., Shillington, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

INL @ work: Nuclear Reactor Operator  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL @ work features jobs at the Idaho National Laboratory. Learn more about careers and energy research at INL's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

Russell, Patty

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

344

World nuclear outlook 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

NONE

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Security Enterprise Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Nuclear Security Enterprise Nuclear Security Enterprise The Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) mission is to ensure the Nation sustains a safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent through the

346

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Public comments on the proposed 10 CFR Part 51 rule for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses and supporting documents: Review of concerns and NRC staff response. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review of public comments provided in response to the NRC`s proposed amendments to 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 51, which establish new requirements for the environmental review of applications for the renewal of operating licenses of nuclear power plants. The public comments include those submitted in writing, as well as those provided at public meetings that were held with other Federal agencies, State agencies, nuclear industry representatives, public interest groups, and the general public. This report also contains the NRC staff response to the various concerns raised, and highlights the changes made to the final rule and the supporting documents in response to these concerns.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

First mideast capacity planned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kuwait catalyst Co.`s (KCC) plans to build a hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts plant in Kuwait will mark the startup of the first refining catalysts production in the Persian Gulf region. KCC, owned by a conglomerate of Kuwait companies and governmental agencies, has licensed catalyst manufacturing technology from Japan Energy in a deal estimated at more than 7 billion ($62 million). Plant design will be based on technology from Orient Catalyst, Japan Energy`s catalysts division. Construction is expected to begin in January 1997 for production startup by January 1998. A source close to the deal says the new plant will eventually reach a capacity of 5,000 m.t./year of HDS catalysts to supply most of Kuwait`s estimated 3,500-m.t./year demand, driven primarily by Kuwait National Petroleum refineries. KCC also expects to supply demand from other catalyst consumers in the region. Alumina supply will be acquired on the open market. KCC will take all production from the plant and will be responsible for marketing.

Fattah, H.

1996-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nuclear desalination in the Arab world ?? Part II: advanced inherent and passive safe nuclear reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid increases in population levels have led to greater demands for fresh water and electricity in the Arab World. Different types of energies are needed to contribute to bridging the gap between increased demand and production. Increased levels of safeguards in nuclear power plants have became reliable due to their large operational experience, which now exceeds 11,000 years of operation. Thus, the nuclear power industry should be attracting greater attention. World electricity production from nuclear power has risen from 1.7% in 1970 to 17%-20% today. This ratio had increased in June 2002 to reach more than 30%, 33% and 42% in Europe, Japan, and South Korea respectively. In the Arab World, both the public acceptance and economic viability of nuclear power as a major source of energy are greatly dependent on the achievement of a high level of safety and environmental protection. An assessment of the recent generation of advanced reactor safety criteria requirements has been carried out. The promising reactor designs adapted for the Arab world and other similar developing countries are those that profit from the enhanced and passive safety features of the new generation of reactors, with a stronger focus on the effective use of intrinsic characteristics, simplified plant design, and easy construction, operation and maintenance. In addition, selected advanced reactors with a full spectrum from small to large capacities, and from evolutionary to radical types, which have inherent and passive safety features, are discussed. The relevant economic assessment of these reactors adapted for water/electricity cogeneration have been carried out and compared with non-nuclear desalination methods. This assessment indicates that, water/electricity cogeneration by the nuclear method with advanced inherent and passive safe nuclear power plants, is viable and competitive.

Aly Karameldin; Samer S. Mekhemar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Hypergraph on FErari ­ Optimization of FFC generated code ­ Equivalent to optimizing matrix-vector product code ­ Graph

Wolf, Michael M.

351

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

352

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

Hartfield, R.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1991. Volume 16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1991) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

356

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

357

Nuclear Forensics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

358

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiencythe economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal levelstrongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

362

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

363

The Office of Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Verification Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Verification The Office of Nuclear Verification

364

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing August 22, 1958 Washington, DC Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing

365

continuity program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations...

366

October 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief Operating Officer, Consolidated Nuclear Security. The free course taught at...

367

DOE/EIS-0373D; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to Production of Radioisotope Power Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For For additional information or for copies of this Draft EIS, contact: AVAILABILITY OF THE DRAFT CONSOLIDATION EIS Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Timothy A. Frazier, EIS Document Manager NE-50/Germantown Building Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1290 Telephone: 1-800-919-3706 E-mail: ConsolidationEIS@nuclear.energy.gov This document is available on the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology's Website (http://consolidationeis.doe.gov) for viewing and downloading. TABLE OF CONTENTS vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Sheet ..................................................................................................................................................................iii Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................vii

368

Capacity computations of right-turn-on-red using the Highway Capacity Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Right-turn-on-red (RTOR) is a traffic control strategy at signalized intersections that allows vehicles to turn right during red phases provided they do not impede the vehicles and pedestrians in green phases. RTOR is primarily a delay and energy conservation measure. Several studies that examined the impact of RTOR on vehicular delays have shown the potential of reducing fuel consumption by about 5 percent on urban streets. The reduction of delay and fuel consumption is related to extra capacity because RTOR allows vehicles to pass through an intersection in red phases. The extra capacity can be significant if an exclusive right-turn lane is provided. The 1985 {ital Highway Capacity Manual} (HCM) provides a powerful technique for evaluating how well an intersection will operate. This technique, however, is less successful in dealing with intersections where RTOR movement is permitted because it requires the analyst to supply RTOR volumes. This situation has led to a need for a formula to compute RTOR capacity. This paper proposes a method to calculate this capacity.

Luh, J.Z. (Langan Engineering Associates, NJ (US)); Lu, Y.J. (Concordia Univ., Loyola Campus, Montreal, PQ (Canada))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

370

Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

101 | National Nuclear Security Administration 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Nuclear Security 101 Fact Sheet Nuclear Security 101 Mar 23, 2012 The goal of United States Government's nuclear security programs is to prevent the illegal possession, use or transfer of nuclear material,

371

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

372

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

373

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

374

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Process Chart: From Agency to Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

375

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National&T Department #12;Nuclear Energy Today 435 Operable Power Reactors, 12% electrical generation (100 in US, 19

Ohta, Shigemi

376

Weak locking capacity of quantum channels can be much larger than private capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that it is possible for the so-called weak locking capacity of a quantum channel [Guha et al., PRX 4:011016, 2014] to be much larger than its private capacity. Both reflect different ways of capturing the notion of reliable communication via a quantum system while leaking almost no information to an eavesdropper; the difference is that the latter imposes an intrinsically quantum security criterion whereas the former requires only a weaker, classical condition. The channels for which this separation is most straightforward to establish are the complementary channels of classical-quantum (cq-)channels, and hence a subclass of Hadamard channels. We also prove that certain symmetric channels (related to photon number splitting) have positive weak locking capacity in the presence of a vanishingly small pre-shared secret, whereas their private capacity is zero. These findings are powerful illustrations of the difference between two apparently natural notions of privacy in quantum systems, relevant also to quantum key distribution (QKD): the older, naive one based on accessible information, contrasting with the new, composable one embracing the quantum nature of the eavesdropper's information. Assuming an additivity conjecture for constrained minimum output Renyi entropies, the techniques of the first part demonstrate a single-letter formula for the weak locking capacity of complements to cq-channels, coinciding with a general upper bound of Guha et al. for these channels. Furthermore, still assuming this additivity conjecture, this upper bound is given an operational interpretation for general channels as the maximum weak locking capacity of the channel activated by a suitable noiseless channel.

Andreas Winter

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ______________________________ ______________________________ Ralph Wurbs Anthony Cahill (Chair of Committee) (Member) ______________________________ ______________________________ Francisco Olivera Patricia Haan... to perform the computations to develop risk-based EOS. The computational algorithm in REOS is divided in three major components: (1) synthetic streamflow generation, (2) mass balance computations, and (3) frequency analysis. The methodology computes...

Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Total 765,593 758,619 710,413 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Crude Oil 180,830 179,471 180,846 -- -- -- 1985-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34,772 32,498 33,842 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Propane/Propylene 10,294 8,711 8,513 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,478 23,787 25,329 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Other Liquids 95,540 96,973 96,157 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Oxygenates 1,336 1,028 1,005 -- -- -- 1994-2013

379

U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Day, Except Where Noted) Day, Except Where Noted) Area: U.S. PAD District 1 Delaware Florida Georgia Maryland New Jersey New York North Carolina Pennsylvania Virginia West Virginia PAD District 2 Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Tennessee Wisconsin PAD District 3 Alabama Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi New Mexico Texas PAD District 4 Colorado Montana Utah Wyoming PAD District 5 Alaska Arizona California Hawaii Nevada Oregon Washington Guam Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes

380

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

382

Trial operation of material protection, control, and accountability systems at two active nuclear material handling sites within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses Russian Federal Nuclear Center (RFNC)-VNIIEF activities in the area of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) procedures enhancement. The goal of such activities is the development of an automated systems for MPC and A at two of the active VNIIEF research sites: a research (reactor) site and a nuclear material production facility. The activities for MPC and A system enhancement at both sites are performed in the framework of a VNIIEF-Los Alamos National Laboratory contract with participation from Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and PANTEX Plant in accordance with Russian programs supported by MinAtom. The American specialists took part in searching for possible improvement of technical solutions, ordering equipment, and delivering and testing the equipment that was provided by the Americans.

Skripka, G.; Vatulin, V.; Yuferev, V. [VNIIEF, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

384

Plutonium and Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...might spawn nuclear terrorism. Less than...reprocessing plant. The U.S. nuclear-energy...current fleet of power reactors (15...operational risk of transmutation...future of nuclear power is clarified...constructed plant increased...

Frank N. von Hippel

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL Sandia National Laboratories CSRI Student Seminar July 2008 #12;Motivation · Graph algorithms perform extremely well on multithreaded architectures like the Cray MTA-2. ­ Won IC graph benchmarking contest

Devine, Karen

386

Simulation of operational transients in a VVER-1000 nuclear power plant using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A RELAP5/MOD3.2 nodalization model of a VVER-1OOO (V-320) nuclear power plant was updated, improved and validated against available experimental data. The data included integrated test results obtained from actual power plant testing. The steady...

Moscalu, Dionisie Radu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Forecast of criticality experiments and experimental programs needed to support nuclear operations in the United States of America: 1994--1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Forecast is generated by the Chair of the Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup (ENIWG), with input from Department of Energy and the nuclear community. One of the current concerns addressed by ENIWG was the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board`s Recommendation 93-2. This Recommendation delineated the need for a critical experimental capability, which includes (1) a program of general-purpose experiments, (2) improving the information base, and (3) ongoing departmental programs. The nuclear community also recognizes the importance of criticality theory, which, as a stepping stone to computational analysis and safety code development, needs to be benchmarked against well-characterized critical experiments. A summary project of the Department`s needs with respect to criticality information includes (1) hands-on training, (2) criticality and nuclear data, (3) detector systems, (4) uranium- and plutonium-based reactors, and (5) accident analysis. The Workgroup has evaluated, prioritized, and categorized each proposed experiment and program. Transportation/Applications is a new category intended to cover the areas of storage, training, emergency response, and standards. This category has the highest number of priority-1 experiments (nine). Facilities capable of performing experiments include the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) along with Area V at Sandia National Laboratory. The LACEF continues to house the most significant collection of critical assemblies in the Western Hemisphere. The staff of this facility and Area V are trained and certified, and documentation is current. ENIWG will continue to work with the nuclear community to identify and prioritize experiments because there is an overwhelming need for critical experiments to be performed for basic research and code validation.

Rutherford, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of March 31, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity Archives With Data for March 2011 | Release Date: May 31, 2011 Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data

389

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Massachusetts Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable 1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

390

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Mississippi Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable 1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 81 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

391

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

392

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63 63 Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable 1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

393

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.2 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 17.4 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable 1 637 1.7 3,181 2.3 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 137,577 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1

394

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

395

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Arizona Total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable 1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

396

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Illinois Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable 1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

397

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable 1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

398

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48 48 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

399

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other 1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable 1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

400

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

41 41 New Jersey New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by source, 2010 Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable 1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable 1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

402

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable 1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

403

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable 1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

404

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable 1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

405

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other 1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable 1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

406

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable 1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

407

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

21 21 Louisiana Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable 1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

408

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Georgia Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.4 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 53.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.2 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 17.4 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable 1 637 1.7 3,181 2.3 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 137,577 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1

409

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

34 34 North Carolina North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable 1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

410

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 South Carolina South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable 1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

411

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other 1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable 1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

412

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Massachusetts Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable 1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

413

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 California California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable 1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 67,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

414

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 New York New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

415

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 63 Wisconsin Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable 1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

416

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Connecticut Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable 1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

417

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable 1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

418

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 California California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable 1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 67,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

419

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Missouri Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable 1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

420

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Florida Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other 1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable 1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable 1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

422

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Minnesota Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,594 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable 1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

423

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable 1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

424

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34 34 North Carolina North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable 1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

425

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Texas Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable 1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

426

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 New York New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

427

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Ohio Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable 1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

428

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48 48 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable 1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

429

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable 1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent)

430

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 New Hampshire New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable 1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

431

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Virginia Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable 1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent)

432

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Mississippi Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable 1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 81 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

433

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Maryland Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable 1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

434

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 South Carolina South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable 1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

435

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Michigan Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable 1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 - = No data reported. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Share of State total (percent) 1 Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal

436

Nuclear power: the threat to personal freedom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... nuclear capacity will increase debate on the long term impact of nuclear power on civil liberties. This issue has already become central to the debate in other European countries.The ... Royal Commission on Environ-mental Pollution first raised the issue of nuclear power and civil liberties in its sixth report (Cmnd 6618) in 1976. Together with subsequent independent studies, ...

Robin Grove White

1979-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Nuclear Iran? Why this particular topic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Nuclear Iran? #12;#12;Why this particular topic? · State Department internship · Personal · NPT (Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty) developed after WWII and Japan · IAEA (International Atomic of capacity #12;Iran's nuclear program · Initiated in 1959 · Strong ties to Russia, China and Pakistan · 2002

New Hampshire, University of

438

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

439

Nuclear power grows in China`s energy mix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China`s rapid economic growth in the past two decades has caused the nations`s demand for electricity to exceed its capacity. AS of 1992, with power shortages as high as 25 percent, {open_quotes}power plant operators were often forced to resort to rolling brownouts to avoid complete system breakdowns,{close_quotes} says Xavier Chen, an assistant professor with the Asian Institute of Technology`s Energy Program in Bangkok, Thailand. To keep pace with China`s economic development, Chen estimates that {open_quotes}China must increase its electricity capacity 6 to 8 percent a year each year into the foreseeable future.{close_quotes} For now, coal is transported to power plants in the rapidly developing eastern coastal provinces at great expense. Chen also notes that the environmental disadvantages of coal make it a less desirable source of energy than nuclear. Development of nuclear energy is likely to go forward for another reason: In China, there is much less opposition to nuclear power plants than in other developing nations. {open_quotes}Nuclear energy likely will plan an important role in China`s future energy mix and help close the gap between electricity production and demand,{close_quotes} Chen says.

Chen, Xavier [Institute of Technology`s Energy Program, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a significant number of nuclear facilities from Saddam Hussein's dictatorship. Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there is now an enormous radioactive waste problem at Al Tuwaitha. Al Tuwaitha contains uncharacterised radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals. The current security situation in Iraq hampers all aspects of radioactive waste management. Further, Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility, which means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive waste and material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS has funded the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to provide technical assistance to the GOI via a Technical Cooperation Project. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with U.S. and GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and for providing waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for the vast majority of the implementation of the NDs Program. (authors)

Cochran, J.R.; Danneels, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kenagy, W.D. [U.S. Department of State, Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security, Washington, DC (United States); Phillips, C.J.; Chesser, R.K. [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nuclear energy in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After early interest in the possible uses of uranium in 1937, Argentina's scientists and politicians showed an inclination to support nuclear development that has kept quite steady compared with other areas. The Argentinean government prohibited the export of uranium in 1945, because of the emerging possibility of producing nuclear energy. The creation of the Atomic Energy Commission soon followed, and the first experimental reactor was set critical in 1958. Since then, nuclear development has allowed the successful operation of two nuclear power reactors, a quite integrated nuclear fuel cycle, and sustained activity in the development, production and use of radioisotopes. Nowadays an Argentinean company competes with success in the experimental nuclear reactor market. After a period in which the nuclear sector has been largely ignored in the official interest, Argentina's authorities have launched a comprehensive plan intended to rehabilitate all aspects of nuclear activity.

Gabriel N. Barcelo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

444

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

445

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

446

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

447

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Operations (NRC)), Jim O'Brien, Director, Office of Nuclear Safety (EHSS DOE), Robert Johnson (Chief, Fuel Manufacturing Branch (NRC)) Front Row: Matt Moury, Associate Under...

448

production capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

production capacity production capacity Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released November 30th, 2009 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biodiesel ethanol location production capacity transportation Data application/zip icon Biorefineries.zip (zip, 7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

449

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

450

Hybrid Zero-capacity Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are only two known kinds of zero-capacity channels. The first kind produces entangled states that have positive partial transpose, and the second one - states that are cloneable. We consider the family of 'hybrid' quantum channels, which lies in the intersection of the above classes of channels and investigate its properties. It gives rise to the first explicit examples of the channels, which create bound entangled states that have the property of being cloneable to the arbitrary finite number of parties. Hybrid channels provide the first example of highly cloneable binding entanglement channels, for which known superactivation protocols must fail - superactivation is the effect where two channels each with zero quantum capacity having positive capacity when used together. We give two methods to construct a hybrid channel from any binding entanglement channel. We also find the low-dimensional counterparts of hybrid states - bipartite qubit states which are extendible and possess two-way key.

Sergii Strelchuk; Jonathan Oppenheim

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities that can accept changes that would support building energy objectives" Presentation Highlights Rulemaking Community and Stakeholder Identification To Support Code Changes Engagement: Building Capacity for Change Pay It Forward RULEMAKING : Plan Development and Research of Laws Relevant to Buildings How is it conducted? 'Landscape' Review Key words or phrases to look for Identify "home rule" jurisdictions Update and review cycle built in 'Landscape' Review:

452

ldrd | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Congressional...

453

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. NNSA's Navy Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This budget requests more than $1 billion to power a modern nuclear Navy: Continuation of design and development work for the OHIO-class

454

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

455

The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security

456

Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Bookmark and Share Activities in Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety research and development fulfill a primary goal of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division to promote improvements in safe and reliable operation of present and future

457

Nuclear Emergency Search Team  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) operations to malevolent radiological incidents. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help meet the nations energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the government case. The uncertainty in operations, leading to lower than optimal processing rates (or annual plant throughput), is the most detrimental issue to achieving low unit costs. Conversely, lowering debt interest rates and the required return on investments can reduce costs for private industry.

David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International | National Nuclear Security Administration International | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > International International U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

460

Capacity Allocation with Competitive Retailers Masabumi Furuhata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to uncertainty of market demands, costly capacity construction and time consuming capacity expansion. This makes the market to be unstable and malfunc- tioning. Such a problem is known as the capacity allocation investigate the properties of capacity allocation mechanisms for the markets where a sin- gle supplier

Zhang, Dongmo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

462

Y-12 builds capacity to meet nuclear testing schedule - Or: ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

support from Y-12. The test apparatus was essentially a uniquely designed thermonuclear test device, none of them were the same-all were unique designs. To keep pace with...

463

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal capacity of composite floor slabs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Thermal building simulation tools take account of the thermal capacity of the walls and floors by a one-dimensional characterization. The objective was to obtain thermal equivalent parameters for ribbed or composite slab elements that can be input into one-dimensional models. Method Transient finite element calculations (FEM) were used to establish the heat transfer to and from composite floors using four deck profiles and for daily heating cycles in compartments with defined heat gains and operating conditions. Results The performance of composite slabs was compared to a concrete flat slab for a typical office in the UK and Germany. It was shown that a deep ribbed slab generates a maximum heat flux of 30.5W/m2 for a 5C temperature variation about the mean, and that the daily heat absorbed by a typical composite slab was 220Wh/m2 floor area. Conclusions Using the thermal capacity of the ribbed floor slabs, the comfort conditions defined in terms of the number of hours over 25C are acceptable for many classes of offices. Practical implications Thermally equivalent properties of ribbed slabs can be used in conventional software to predict the thermal performance.

B. Doering; C. Kendrick; R.M. Lawson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units 15,283 15,709 16,327 16,490 16,306 16,162 1985-2013 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 17,814 17,815 17,815 17,815 17,815 17,818 1985-2013 Operating 17,005 17,228 17,239 17,450 17,439 17,623 1985-2013 Idle 809 587 576 365 376 195 1985-2013 Operable Utilization Rate (%) 85.8 88.2 91.7 92.6 91.5 90.7 1985-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table. Release Date: 11/27/2013

466

Nuclear Deployment Scorecards | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Nuclear Deployment Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Nuclear Deployment Scorecards Nuclear Deployment Scorecards October 31, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, new plant construction progress, and expected operation dates. August 8, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, new plant construction progress, and expected operation dates. May 1, 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Power Deployment Scorecard - April 2013 The scorecard includes news updates, regulatory status, reactor design certification, early site permits, and new plant construction progress.

467

On the Capacity of a Class of MIMO Cognitive Radios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive radios have been studied recently as a means to utilize spectrum in a more efficient manner. This paper focuses on the fundamental limits of operation of a MIMO cognitive radio network with a single licensed user and a single cognitive user. The channel setting is equivalent to an interference channel with degraded message sets (with the cognitive user having access to the licensed user's message). An achievable region and an outer bound is derived for such a network setting. It is shown that the achievable region is optimal for a portion of the capacity region that includes sum capacity.

Sridharan, Sriram

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

469

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

470

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

471

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Operations Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Standards BPA Operations Information (OPI) Transmission Services operates and plans for regional and national system needs. Transmission Services coordinates system operation and...

473

A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nuclear family "A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex" is a four episode

474

1994 lubricating oil and wax capacities of U. S. and Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper consists of several tables which list the names of US and Canadian refineries, their location, and their capacity for production of lubricating oil and waxes categorized by finishing operations and primary processing. A separate table lists US and Canadian re-refiners and their capacity for refining waste lubricating oils.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

AN EFFICIENT PROCEDURE FOR THE RATIONAL BUYER APPROACH FOR THE ACQUISITION OF CAPACITY-BASED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EFFICIENT PROCEDURE FOR THE RATIONAL BUYER APPROACH FOR THE ACQUISITION OF CAPACITY ­ This paper addresses the competitive pro- curement of capacity-based ancillary services (AS) in un- bundled markets by the Independent Grid Operator (IGO). These AS include upward frequency control, load follow

Gross, George

476

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF THE UPGRADED CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS AT THE NSCL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is a NSF-supported facility, with additional support from Michigan State University (MSU) for conducting research in nuclear and accelerator science. The facility consists of two superconducting cyclotrons and over fifty individual cryostats, each containing several superconducting magnets that are used in the beam transport system. Beginning in 1999 a major facility upgrade was started. New, larger magnets were added, increasing the total 4.5 K loads, necessitating an increase of the cryogenic capacity. A helium plant (nominal 1750-Watt at 4.5 K) was acquired from the United States Bureau of Mines where it had been operating as a pure liquefier since the early 1980's. It was refurbished for the NSCL with extensive support from the cryogenics group at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory. The new cryogenic system came online early in 2001. The cold-mass is relatively high in relation to the installed capacity, presenting challenges during cool downs. Reliability over the last five years has been greater than 99%. An overview of the last seven years of operations of our cryogenic systems is presented that includes normal operations, testing of new equipment, noteworthy breakdowns, routine maintenance, and system reliability.

McCartney, A. H.; Laumer, H. L.; Jones, S. A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

477

Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Announcements Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitations > Environmental Program Services Contract > Announcements

478

National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear Data Portal www.nndc.bnl.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Nuclear Data Center #12;Nuclear Data Portal www.nndc.bnl.gov Nuclear Data Portal New generation of nuclear data services, using modern and powerful DELL servers, Sybase relational database software, Linux operating system, and Java programming language. The Portal includes nuclear structure

Ohta, Shigemi

479

Investment strategies for capacity expansion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses a problem at the nexus of operations, strategy, and economics: in concentrated markets, on the one hand firms may need to expand (more)

Yang, Shu-Jung Sunny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Presentation, Safety from the Operator's Perspective: We are...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Do September 30, 2005 A presentation by Jim Ellis, President and CEO, Institute of Nuclear Power Operators (INPO), Safety from the Operator's Perspective: We Are All in this...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable nuclear capacities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

los alamos field office | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations...

482

Alarm Response Training Academy opens at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief Operating Officer, Consolidated Nuclear Security. The free course taught at...

483

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (MW)" 1,"Cumberland","Coal","Tennessee Valley Authority",2470 2,"Sequoyah","Nuclear","Tennessee Valley Authority",2277.7 3,"Johnsonville","Coal","Tennessee Valley...

484

The MV Aerial Power Grid at VHF/UHF Rivals Fiber in Capacity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ubiquitous aerial Medium Voltage Power Grid operating at UHF/VHF, has Shannon Capacities Rivalling Metro/Access Fiber. Results from transmission on real lines in India are...

Prasanna, G N Srinivasa

485

Dynamic model for small-capacity ammonia-water absorption chiller.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Optimization of the performance of absorption systems during transient operations such as start-up and shut-down is particularly important for small-capacity chillers and heat pumps to (more)

Viswanathan, Vinodh Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to Production of Radioisotope Related to Production of Radioisotope Power Systems (DOE/EIS-0373D) (07/01/05)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

32 32 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 126 / Friday, July 1, 2005 / Notices Severity and Resistance to Control, Amador Ranger District, Eldorado National Forest, Amado County, CA,Wait Period Ends: 08/01/2005, Contact: Patricia Ferrell 530-642- 5146. EIS No. 20050264, Draft EIS, NPS, ID, Minidoka Internment National Monument (Former Minidoka Relocation Center) , General Management Plan, Implementation, Jerome County, ID, Comment Period Ends: 09/19/2005, Contact: Neil King 208-837-4793. EIS No. 20050265, Final EIS, NPS, AZ, Chiricahua National Monument Fire Management Plan (FMP), Implementation, AZ, Wait Period Ends: 08/01/2005, Contact: Alan Whalon 520-824-3560. EIS No. 20050266, Draft EIS, DOE, 00, Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to Production of

487

Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR/0606 TR/0606 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs For The Persian Gulf January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf iii Preface Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian

488

Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Plan Certification - Fiscal Year 2011 Please type or print clearly and return this sheet with original signature to: Ms. Carmen Andujar, Manager Recruiting, Examining and Assessment Group Center for Talent and Capacity Policy Strategic Human Resources Policy Attn: FY 2011 FEORP Report U.S. Office of Personnel Management 1900 E Street, NW, Room 6547 Washington, D.C. 20415-9800 A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 B. Name and Title of Designated FEORP Official (include address, if different from above,

490