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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

Ornstein, H.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Operating Reserves and Variable Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Annual Report Generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report analyzes the needs to build an annual report generator which has the properties of Modularity, Simplicity in use and Maintainability based on… (more)

Lin, Yingwei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tide operated power generating apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An improved tide operated power generating apparatus is disclosed in which a hollow float, rising and falling with the ocean tide, transmits energy to a power generator. The improvement comprises means for filling the float with water during the incoming tide to provide a substantial increase in the float dead weight during the outgoing tide. Means are further provided to then empty the float before the outgoing tide whereby the float becomes free to rise again on the next incoming tide.

Kertzman, H. Z.

1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Compact lightweight power PEMFC operating from a unique hydrogen generating system. Final report, September 1993-March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program was to investigate the feasibility, for the military, of a 120-watt, 20,000- watt-power source weighing near ten pounds. An air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) utilizing hydrogen from Lithium Borohydride (LiBH4) could theoretically meet this specification. Giner, Inc. has established that a hydrogen generator, utilizing LiBH4, provides a hydrogen current flux of 150 Amps/sq ft with about 60% long-term utilization. Additionally, Giner, Inc. demonstrated a 120-watt fuel cell system, which operated at approximately 12 volts at 100 Amps/sq ft (10 amps through a 0.1 -sq ft active area). Integrating the two systems will require further effort and development work.

Theriault, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Definition: Optimized Generator Operation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimized Generator Operation Optimized Generator Operation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Optimized Generator Operation Better forecasting and monitoring of load and grid performance would enable grid operators to dispatch a more efficient mix of generation that could be optimized to reduce cost. The coordinated operation of energy storage, distributed generation, or plug-in electric vehicle assets could also result in completely avoiding central generation dispatch.[1] Related Terms sustainability References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Optimized_Generator_Operation&oldid=502509" Categories:

7

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Jobs Plan, Governor Brown established a 2020 goal of 12,000 megawatts of localized renewable energy development, or distributed generation, in California. In May 2012, Southern California Edison, renewables, interconnection, integration, electricity, distribution, transmission, costs. Please use

8

Thermoelectric generator apparatus and operation method  

SciTech Connect

A method of operating a thermoelectric generator includes: cyclically producing increasing then decreasing temperature differences in the thermoelectric material of the generator; and generating a cyclically increasing then decreasing electrical generator output signal, in response to such temperature differences, to transmit electrical power generated by the generator from the generator. Part of the thermoelectric material reaches temperatures substantially above the melting temperature of the material. The thermoelectric material of the generator forms a part of a closed electrical loop about a transformer core so that the inductor voltage for the loop serves as the output signal of the generator. A thermoelectric generator, which can be driven by the described method of operation, incorporates fins into a thermopile to conduct heat toward or away from the alternating spaces between adjacent layers of different types of thermoelectric material. The fins extend from between adjacent layers, so that they can also conduct electrical current between such layers, perpendicularly to the direction of stacking of the layers. The exhaust from an internal combustion engine can be employed to drive the thermoelectric generator, and, also, to act as a driver for a thermoelectric generator in accordance with the method of operation initially described.

Lowther, F.E.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

10

Second generation heliostat. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The heliostat subsystem design is described. The test program is summarized, including component testing, subsystem operation at MDAC-Huntington Beach, and the shipment and installation at the Central Receiver Test Facility. The production heliostat description, the manufacturing process definitions, and the manufacturing facility definition are summarized. The installation, operations, and maintenance requirements for the 50 MWe field are summarized. Results are given of the cost analysis of the MDAC Second Generation Heliostat when produced at an annual rate of 50,000 units per year and installed and operated in a field of 5412 heliostats. Possible future development activities aimed at further cost reduction are discussed. (LEW)

Steinmeyer, D.A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995  

SciTech Connect

This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Operation REDWING 1956. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

REDWING was a 17-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapons test series conducted in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in spring and summer 1956. This is a report of DOD personnel in REDWING with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

Bruce-Henderson, S.; Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

14

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office - April 2011 April 2011 Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 This Independent Activity Report...

15

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010...

16

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project HIAR-RL-2011-08-25 This Independent Activity Report...

17

Operation of a third generation wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

A modern wind turbine was installed on May 26, 1982, at the USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas. This wind machine was used to provide electrical energy for irrigation pumping and other agricultural loads. The wind turbine purchased for this research is an Enertech Model 44, manufactured by Enertech Corporation, Norwich, Vermont. The horizontal-axis wind turbine has a 13.4 m diameter, three-bladed, fixed-pitch rotor on a 24.4-m tower. The blades are laminated epoxy-wood, and are attached to a steel hub. A 25-kW induction generator provides 240 V, 60 Hz, single-phase electrical power. The wind turbine operated 64 percent of the time, while being available to operate over 94 percent of the time. The unit had a net energy production of over 80,000 kWh in an average windspeed of 5.9 m/s at a height of 10 m in a 16-month period. The blade pitch was originally offset two degrees from design to maintain power production within the limitations of the gearbox, generator, and brakes. A maximum output of 23.2 kW averaged over a 15-second period indicated that with a new brake, the system was capable of handling more power. After a new brake was installed, the blade pitch was changed to one degree from design. The maximum power output measured after the pitch change was 29.3 kW. Modified blade tip brakes were installed on the wind turbine on July 7, 1983. These tip brakes increased power production at lower windspeeds while reducing power at higher windspeeds.

Vosper, F.C.; Clark, R.N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information. Chg 1 dated 8-12-96.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-395 04/06 Portable generators are useful when temporary or remote electric power is needed, but they can also be deadly. The primary hazards to avoid when us- ing a generator are carbon monoxide (CO) poison- ing from generator exhaust fumes..., electrocution and fire. Carbon monoxide danger Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas byproduct of incomplete combustion of fuels, such as natural gas, heating oil and diesel. This toxic gas interferes with the blood?s ability to carry oxygen...

Smith, David

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Generating Reports & Graphs in Portfolio Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on how to generate reports and graphs in Portfolio Manager.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling Operational Constraints imposed by Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investments on ­ Generation, Transmission ­ Fuel & Transportation infrastructure · Capacity · Location · Year Regulation data and Net Load change data ­ ex: ERCOT 2. Function of variability in (Net load + Generation schedule + Tie line frequency) · ex: CAISO, NREL, Xcel MN & Wind Logics 3. Fit regression model

Daniels, Thomas E.

22

Operation Crossroads-1946. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Crossroads was the first peacetime nuclear weapons test series. It was conducted at Bikini Atoll in 1946. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

Berkhouse, L.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

PEP-II Operations Report  

SciTech Connect

PEP-II is a two-ring asymmetric B factory operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. It was constructed by a SLAC-LBNL-LLNL collaboration. The collider comprises two rings, a High-Energy Ring (HER) storing 9 GeV electrons, and a Low-Energy Ring (LER) storing 3.1 GeV positrons. Commissioning of the HER began in mid-1997 and commissioning of the LER began in mid-1998. First evidence for collisions was obtained on July 23, 1998. The BaBar detector was installed in early 1999, and commissioning with the detector commenced in May 1999. By September 1999, PEP-II had reached a peak luminosity of 1.35 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. In the present run, which began in October 1999, the peak luminosity has reached 3.1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and the integrated luminosity delivered is 25 fb{sup {minus}1}. At present, PEP-II is the world's highest luminosity collider. In this paper we describe the startup experience and summarize the operational experience during fiscal year 2000 (from October 1999 through September 2000). Plan s for luminosity upgrades are briefly described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Generation of quantum logic operations from physical Hamiltonians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a systematic analysis of the physical generation of single- and two-qubit quantum operations from Hamiltonians available in various quantum systems for scalable quantum information processing. We show that generation of one-qubit operations can be transformed into a steering problem on the Bloch sphere, whereas the two-qubit problem can be generally transformed into a steering problem in a tetrahedron representing all the local equivalence classes of two-qubit operations (the Weyl chamber). We use this approach to investigate several physical examples for the generation of two-qubit operations. The steering approach provides useful guidance for the realization of various quantum computation schemes.

Jun Zhang; K. Birgitta Whaley

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off -Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Chg 1, 10-26-95. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off -Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Chg 2, 8-12-96

1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

WRAP TRUPACT loading systems operational test report  

SciTech Connect

This Operational Test Report documents the operational testing of the TRUPACT process equipment HNF-3918, Revision 0, TRUPACT Operational Test Procedure. The test accomplished the following: Procedure validation; Facility equipment interface; Facility personnel support; and Subcontractor personnel support interface. Field changes are documented as test exceptions with resolutions. All resolutions are completed or a formal method is identified to track the resolution through to completion.

DOSRAMOS, E.V.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Costs Operations and Maintenance Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent operations and maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology operations and maintenance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation.

30

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned and -leased facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels: DOE O 232.1

1997-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Operation hardtack I-1958. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

HARDTACK I was an atmospheric nuclear weapon test series held at Johnston Island and in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak and Bikini atolls in 1958. This is a report of DOD personnel in HARDTACK with an emphasis on operations and radiological safety.

Gladeck, F.R.; Gould, K.G.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

33

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Field Operations Program Activities Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

The automatic generation of mutation operators for genetic algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We automatically generate mutation operators for Genetic Algorithms (GA) and tune them to problem instances drawn from a given problem class. By so doing, we perform metalearning in which the base-level contains GAs (which learn about problem instances), ... Keywords: automatic design, genetic algorithms, genetic programming, hyper-heuristics

John R. Woodward; Jerry Swan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing The SEAB Task Force on Next Generation...

38

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Specification"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Specification" Date: November 6, 2000 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Technical Evaluation Report Approved: "DCE BOOT/OPERATE Interface Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Revision A Technical Evaluation Report "DCE BOOT

Colorado at Boulder, University of

40

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 April 2013 Operational Awareness of a Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance [HIAR-RL-2013-04-08] The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an onsite operational awareness review of a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) fire protection surveillance. Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 201

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

W-026, operational test report isokenetic stack effluent monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

This Operational Test Report was performed to assure the Isokinetic Stack Effluent Monitoring System (ISEMS) operates in accordance with system design and specifications.

Bottenus, R.J.

1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Plugging of steam generator tubes and consequences for plant operation  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of pressurized water reactor (SIROP) code was created using the SICLE software developed by the study and research department at Electricite de France. It is the largest computer code with this software (260 tubes, 1800 computation points, 19 water-steam cavities, 9 pumps, 6 turbines, 32 control system elements). It simulates the general operating conditions of a 900-MW(electric) CP2 power plant by computing the main physical parameters from the reactor core to the condenser. The study was performed by the study and research department (Reactor Physics Division) with the help of SEPTEN following an SPT (power operation department) request. It consisted of identifying the change in margins with respect to emergency shutdown protections (especially for ..delta..T protections) as a function of the number of plugged steam generators (1, 2, or 3) and the degree of plugging (10, 20, and 30%) under the following operating conditions: (1) steady state at 100% full power; and (2) main transients: manual load rejection, load rejection induced by grid fault, turbine tripping. The purpose was to assess the effect of a large number of steam generator plugged tubes on the behavior of the plant to secure a long-term prediction for the date of replacement of these steam generators.

Agnoux, D.; Chenal, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was...

44

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) self-assessment of the Technical Qualification Program (TQP). Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Savannah River

45

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2011 June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 June 2011 Hanford Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack, Operational Proficiency Demonstration [HIAR-RL-2011-06-22] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an operational awareness review of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack, Operational Proficiency Demonstration. Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011

46

TECHNICAL EVALUATION REPORT EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS STUDY RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to review technical specifications for emergency diesel generators in the context of new information developed in the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program and the application of current NRC regulatory concepts and knowledge. Aging and reliability relationships related to the standard technical specifications are reviewed and supported by data and published information to ensure that conservative and beneficial specifications are identified. Where technical specifications could adversely influence aging and reliability, the technical issues and reasonable alternatives are identified for consideration. This report documents and spans the technical progress from the published and approved regulatory documents to the current knowledge basis. This ensures that the technical bases for the technical specifications discussed are documented and relatively complete subject information is contained in one document. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has participated in the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program directed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Engineering. The NPAR study of emergency diesel generator aging was performed in two phases. In Phase I, plant operating experience, ~ata, expert opinion and statistical methods were used to produce a new data base related to aging, reliability, and operational readiness of nuclear service diesel generators. Phase II was chiefly concerned with aging mitigation measures.

Hoopingarner, K. R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2011 June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 June 2011 Hanford Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack, Operational Proficiency Demonstration [HIAR-RL-2011-06-22] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an operational awareness review of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack, Operational Proficiency Demonstration. Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June

48

UK scenario of islanded operation of active distribution networks with renewable distributed generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on the current UK scenario of islanded operation of active distribution networks with renewable distributed generators (RDGs). Different surveys indicate that the present scenario does not economically justify islanding operation of active distribution networks with RDGs. With rising DG penetration, much benefit would be lost if the \\{DGs\\} are not allowed to island only due to conventional operational requirement of utilities. Technical studies clearly indicate the need to review parts of the Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations (ESQCR) for successful islanded operations. Commercial viability of islanding operation must be assessed in relation to enhancement of power quality, system reliability and supply of potential ancillary services through network support. Demonstration projects under Registered Power Zone and Technical Architecture Projects should be initiated to investigate the utility of DG islanding. However these efforts should be compounded with a realistic judgement of the associated technical and economic issues for the development of future power networks beyond 2010.

S.P. Chowdhury; S. Chowdhury; P.A. Crossley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 June 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Review [HIAR-RL-2011-06-17] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011

50

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

April 2013 Operational Awareness of a Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance HIAR-RL-2013-04-08 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

51

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Grout Injection Operator...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

TYPE B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION BOARD REPORT GROUT INJECTION OPERATOR INJURY AT THE COLD TEST PIT SOUTH, IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, OCTOBER 15, 2001...

53

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 20-22, 2011, at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The activity consisted of observing an operational assessment of the facility's...

54

NPOESS: Next-Generation Operational Global Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United States is merging its two polar-orbiting operational environmental satellite programs operated by the Department of Commerce and the Department of Defense into a single system, which is called the National Polar-orbiting Operational ...

Thomas F. Lee; Craig S. Nelson; Patrick Dills; Lars Peter Riishojgaard; Andy Jones; Li Li; Steven Miller; Lawrence E. Flynn; Gary Jedlovec; William McCarty; Carl Hoffman; Gary McWilliams

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- June 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011...

56

Operational Awareness Records and Activity Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office - March 10-14, 2014 Contractor Transition Activities for the National Nuclear Security...

57

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management, Occurrence Reporting, Requires Crosswalk When Revised, The order promotes organizational learning consistent with DOE's Integrated Safety Management System goal of...

58

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Health, Occurrence Reporting, DNFSB Requirement The order promotes organizational learning consistent with DOE's Integrated Safety Management System goal of...

59

BPAT Operational Analysis DSO216 Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as 24, no matter when in the hour the action occurred.) 4709 4626 4543 4709 Installed Wind Capacity (as of the end of each month) Report Created On: 1052012 at 11:15 AM BPAT...

60

Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Provides detailed information for reporting occurrences and managing associated activities at DOE facilities, including NNSA facilities. Cancels DOE M 232.1-1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Center for Operational Excellence Annual Report 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by five, the largest jump in membership in five years. While the mix of companies in COE is ever-changing to encompass a wide variety of companies with a commanding presence in industries ranging from health care' journey to operational excellence. As the stakes grow greater in a changing economy, COE takes the reins

62

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB has only been detected in the influent at trace and Recirculate Tritium 4 Operate- 9 Standby- 7 100% NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC

63

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB% NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby-

64

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 100% 1 1063

65

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 Standby NA

66

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 30% NA 1062

67

Operations Training Program Status Report 1/28/99  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations Training Program Status Report 1/28/99 Michael Spata Operations Deputy Group Leader Following is a description of the various aspects of the Operations Group Training program. While most for providing on-the-job training in accelerator specific topics. The mentor will also be able to certify

68

26 CURA REPORTER Hydrogen Generation Using Magnetite to Store  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainable energy economy in the state. The generated hydrogen also might be used onsite in the mining26 CURA REPORTER Hydrogen Generation Using Magnetite to Store Energy from Alternative Sources by J is hydrogen gas, which is typically generated by using electric current (in this case, provided by wind

Levinson, David M.

69

Northwest Hydro Operators Regional Forum (pbl/generation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Year Tools Firstgov 2014 Northwest Hydro Operators Forum Agenda S1.1 2014 Northwest Hydro Operators Forum Intro S1.2 Owners'Dam Safety Program, FERC Perspective - Doug...

70

U.S. Installation, Operation, and Performance Standards for Microturbine Generator Sets, August 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report detailing the various codes and standards that are applicable for the installation, operation, and performance of microturbines.

71

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 January 2011 Presentation of Questions Associated With the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (Onsite) Multi-Canister Overpack Cask [ARPT-RL-2011-001] The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for Packaging (Onsite) Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Cask HNF-SD-SARP-017, Rev. 3, to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) representatives. The presentation was supported by a detailed document that discussed the individual questions.

72

Second-generation heliostat development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The design, manufacture, testing and cost analysis of the second generation heliostat are described in volume I. Volume II consists of appendices of supporting material. These include the drawing tree for the heliostat, structural data of the rack assembly, drive mechanism, and mirror assemblies, tests and results, a trade study on the pedestal foundation design, cost analysis worksheets, study of an edge-support mirror module, and a study of a single-motor, differential brake heliostat drive mechanism. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Operator-Generated Particles: Characterization, Monitoring and Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most operator/cleanroom garment systems in service today can be ... bubble” helmet and independent air supply, all cleanroom garment systems allow some particles, body detritus...

Eric S. Burnett

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dynamic Graph Generation for Large Scale Operational Train ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2011 ... Abstract: The aim of operational train timetabling is to find a conflict free timetable for a set of passenger and freight trains with predefined ...

Frank Fischer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Second-generation heliostat detail design report  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the Second Generation heliostat design is provided, including a summary of the compliance of the design to the key heliostat requirements. The heliostat hardware is described. The requirements, the hardware and software design used to fulfill these requirements and the analysis and test used to evaluate related performance are presented. The technical feasibility and potential cost savings of a variety of automated mirror inspection techniques are assessed. The installation process design, applicable to both the test units and production, is described. The current maintenance process design is described for the production program. (LEW)

Knowles, R.K.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report  

SciTech Connect

The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010 July 2010 Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Corrective Actions for the Building 336 Accident The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), and the Richland Operations Office (RL) performed a joint effectiveness assessment of the corrective actions taken by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) in response to the Building 336 Fall Event. The review was conducted from July 12-21, 2010, by a team consisting of four HSS and six RL personnel. The scope of the assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations.

78

Report on the Workshop on Operational Text Classification Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, user needs, personnel and training, resource demands, maintaining effectiveness over time, and inteReport on the Workshop on Operational Text Classification Systems (OTC-01) David D. Lewis on Operational Text Classification (OTC-01), occurred September 13, 2001 in New Orleans, Louisiana, US. It was co

Sebastiani, Fabrizio

79

Operational test report for 2706-T complex liquid transfer system  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Operational Test Report (OTR). It enters the Record Copy of the W-259 Operational Test Procedure (HNF-3610) into the document retrieval system. Additionally, the OTR summarizes significant issues associated with testing the 2706-T waste liquid transfer and storage system.

BENZEL, H.R.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

GOOS OPERATIONS: SEAS TRANSMISSIONS Report Date: OCT 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOOS OPERATIONS: SEAS TRANSMISSIONS Report Date: OCT 2007 GOOS Operations: XBT Program PDF file ship-by-ship detail of real-time mode XBT observations transmitted via SEAS: Ship Name Call sign Route 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 753 1405595 10511207 554 964 910 1038593 859 134911265 #12;Line-by-line details

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Smart Grids Operation with Distributed Generation and Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integration of Distributed Generation (DG) based on renewable sources in the Smart Grids (SGs) is considered a challenging task because of the problems arising for the intermittent nature of the sources (e.g....

C. Cecati; C. Citro; A. Piccolo; P. Siano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

Gruhl, Jim

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Report on System operation A background report prepared by the Nordel Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................... 3 2 COOPERATION AND PRINCIPLES AGREED IN SYSTEM OPERATION AGREEMENT REGARDING POWER SHORTAGE will further improve the system security. Training of operation people is continuously important to be able in System Operation Agreement regarding power shortage and disturbance situations 2.1 Purpose of the System

84

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of electricity generation plants  

SciTech Connect

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S.Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR™). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OperatesGeneratingPlant OperatesGeneratingPlant Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Operates Generating Plant Entity operates power generating plants (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + Akiachak Native Community Electric Co + true + Alabama Municipal Elec Authority + true + Alabama Power Co + true + Alaska Electric & Energy Coop + true + Alaska Electric Light&Power Co + true + Alaska Energy Authority + true +

86

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

87

FinancialReport 2009 Operating and Financial Review 03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FinancialReport 2009 #12;2 Operating and Financial Review 03 Independent auditors' report;3 Section 1 ­ Regulatory Regulatory environment The University is a Higher Education Corporation the University owns one- third. Section 2 ­ Strategy The University's Strategic Plan addresses a framework

Evans, Paul

88

SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

SUSTAINABLE RESERVOIR OPERATION: CAN WE GENERATE HYDROPOWER AND PRESERVE ECOSYSTEM VALUES?y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE RESERVOIR OPERATION: CAN WE GENERATE HYDROPOWER AND PRESERVE ECOSYSTEM VALUES hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal

Jager, Henriette I.

91

Six-phase induction machine operating as a stand-alone self-excited induction generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six-phase induction machine operating as a stand- alone self-excited induction generator Kamel-excited induction generator and supplying various loads under different conditions are presented. Firstly, the dynamic model of the power generation system is developed considering the magnetizing inductance

Brest, Université de

92

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect

An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Institute of Nuclear Power Operations 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1994 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

96

Operation TEAPOT, 1955 continental nuclear weapons test series. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activities of an estimated 11,000 DOD personnel, both military and civilian, in Operation TEAPOT, the fifth atmospheric nuclear weapons testing series conducted in Nevada from 18 February to 15 May 1955. Activities engaging DOD personnel included Exercise Desert Rock VI observer programs, troop tests, and technical service programs; AEC scientific and diagnostic experiments to evaluate the effects of the nuclear device; DOD operational programs; and air support.

Ponton, J.; Maag, C.; Wilkinson, M.; Shepanek, R.F.

1981-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Technical information report: Plasma melter operation, reliability, and maintenance analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a technical report of operability, reliability, and maintenance of a plasma melter for low-level waste vitrification, in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. A process description is provided that minimizes maintenance and downtime and includes material and energy balances, equipment sizes and arrangement, startup/operation/maintence/shutdown cycle descriptions, and basis for scale-up to a 200 metric ton/day production facility. Operational requirements are provided including utilities, feeds, labor, and maintenance. Equipment reliability estimates and maintenance requirements are provided which includes a list of failure modes, responses, and consequences.

Hendrickson, D.W. [ed.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports Procedure for Generating Data Quality Reports for SIRS Radiometric Measurements M. H. L. Anderberg, F. P. Rael, and T. L. Stoffell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program needs high-quality broadband shortwave (SW) (solar) and longwave (LW) irradiance information for the development and validation of atmospheric circulation and climate models. To this end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performs a quality assessment of the data from 22 Solar Infrared Stations (SIRS) in the Southern Great Plains (SGP). Data quality reports (DQRs) are instrumental in passing the resultant information to the scientific community. The value of these reports depends on clear and consistent

99

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available. Major findings of the report include: water withdrawal and consumption factors vary greatly across and within fuel technologies, and water factors show greater agreement when organized according to cooling technologies as opposed to fuel technologies; a transition to a less carbon-intensive electricity sector could result in either an increase or a decrease in water use, depending on the choice of technologies and cooling systems employed; concentrating solar power technologies and coal facilities with carbon capture and sequestration capabilities have the highest water consumption values when using a recirculating cooling system; and non-thermal renewables, such as photovoltaics and wind, have the lowest water consumption factors. Improved power plant data and further studies into the water requirements of energy technologies in different climatic regions would facilitate greater resolution in analyses of water impacts of future energy and economic scenarios. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Macknick; R Newmark; G Heath; K C Hallett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Form EIA-930 HOURLY AND DAILY BALANCING AUTHORITY OPERATIONS REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

930 930 HOURLY AND DAILY BALANCING AUTHORITY OPERATIONS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS Due Date: mm/dd/yyyy Approved: OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 10/31/2016 Burden: 0.19 hours Page 1 Draft for Discussion only PURPOSE Form EIA-930 requires Internet posting of hourly balancing authority operating data. The posted data are used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry, and to support enhancement of electric system operations. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS For the contiguous United States: all entities that are listed in NERC's Compliance Registry as a balancing authority must post balancing authority operating information required by this survey. Other than the Midwest ISO (MISO), registered balancing authorities that are parties

103

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 April 2011 Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project [HIAR-RL-2011-04-07] The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. On November 17, 2010, a HSS representative participated in a tour of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Project Engineer, the CHPRC STP Design Manager, and the DOE-RL principal support contract engineer. The HSS representative walked down the major components of the

104

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

105

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

106

How Run-of-River Operation Affects Hydropower Generation Henriette I. Jager Mark S. Bevelhimer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Run-of-River Operation Affects Hydropower Generation and Value Henriette I. Jager Ã? Mark S) are mandated to protect aquatic biota, (2) decrease hydropower generation per unit flow, and (3) decrease energy revenue. We tested these three assump- tions by reviewing hydropower projects with license

Jager, Henriette I.

107

Loss Minimizing Operation of Doubly Fed Induction Generator Based Wind Generation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grid Code Technical Regulations TF 3.2.6 [2]. Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based Wind of its advantages such as high energy controllability, reduced power converter rating, etc., DFIG has in order to derive the optimal rotor reactive current. However, it only analyzed the condition when DFIGs

Hu, Weihao

108

Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight Report _July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PTX-2012-07-19 PTX-2012-07-19 Site: Pantex Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Pantex Plant Dates of Activity : 07/16/2012-07/19/2012 Report Preparer: William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit primarily to review the status of the Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade Initiative (DSAUGI) project and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) response to recent Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) concerns regarding nuclear explosive safety (NES) issues at the Pantex

109

Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight Report _July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTX-2012-07-19 PTX-2012-07-19 Site: Pantex Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Pantex Plant Dates of Activity : 07/16/2012-07/19/2012 Report Preparer: William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit primarily to review the status of the Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade Initiative (DSAUGI) project and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) response to recent Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) concerns regarding nuclear explosive safety (NES) issues at the Pantex

110

Report on discussions with utility engineers about superconducting generators  

SciTech Connect

This report relates to a series of discussions with electric utility engineers concerning the integration of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generators into the present electric power system. The current and future interest of the utilities in the purchase and use of HTS generators is assessed. Various performance and economic factors are also considered as part of this inspection of the utility prospects for HTS generators. Integration of HTS generators into the electric utility sector is one goal of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). The SPI, a major part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, features vertical teaming of a major industrial power apparatus manufacturers, a producer of HTS wire, and an end-user with assistance and technical support for the national laboratories. The SPI effort on HTS generators is headed by a General Electric Corporation internal team comprised of the Corporate Research Laboratories, Power Generation Engineering, and Power Systems Group. Intermagnetics General corporation, which assisted in the development of the superconducting coils, is the HTS wire and tape manufacturer. Additional technical support is provided by the national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, and the New York State Institute on Superconductivity. The end-user is represented by Niagara-Mohawk and the Electric Power Research Institute.

none,

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Milliwatt Generator Project: April 1988--September 1996. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator (MWG) Project from April 1988 to September 1996. Manufacturing of heat sources for the project ended by September 1990. Beginning in October 1990, the major activities of the project have been surveillance and testing of MWGs, disposal of excess MWGs, and reclamation of the PuO{sub 2} from excess MWG heat sources. Reported activities include fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, compatibility studies, impact testing, examination and electrical testing of surveillance units, and recovery of PuO{sub 2} from heat sources.

Latimer, T.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT, respondents who have indicated in a previous filing to

113

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

115

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

116

Integrated operation of electric vehicles and renewable generation in a smart distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distribution system complexity is increasing mainly due to technological innovation, renewable Distributed Generation (DG) and responsive loads. This complexity makes difficult the monitoring, control and operation of distribution networks for Distribution System Operators (DSOs). In order to cope with this complexity, a novel method for the integrated operational planning of a distribution system is presented in this paper. The method introduces the figure of the aggregator, conceived as an intermediate agent between end-users and DSOs. In the proposed method, energy and reserve scheduling is carried out by both aggregators and DSO. Moreover, Electric Vehicles (EVs) are considered as responsive loads that can participate in ancillary service programs by providing reserve to the system. The efficiency of the proposed method is evaluated on an 84-bus distribution test system. Simulation results show that the integrated scheduling of \\{EVs\\} and renewable generators can mitigate the negative effects related to the uncertainty of renewable generation.

Alireza Zakariazadeh; Shahram Jadid; Pierluigi Siano

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems  

SciTech Connect

Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

Bowman, T.J.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

Xie, Tao

119

High-Efficiency Operation of High-Frequency DCDC Conversion for Next-Generation Microprocessors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Efficiency Operation of High-Frequency DCDC Conversion for Next-Generation Microprocessors current slew rate during load transients: all leading to faster energy transfer and better transient ZVS for majority-carrier power devices [3]. In this paper, the design of a ZVS quasi-square-wave (ZVS

Ng, Wai Tung

120

Operating Reserve Reductions from a Proposed Energy Imbalance Market with Wind and Solar Generation in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect

This paper considers several alternative forms of an energy imbalance market (EIM) proposed in the nonmarket areas of the Western Interconnection. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: balancing authority cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As the penetration of variable generation increases on the power system, additional interest in coordination would likely occur. Several alternative approaches could be used, but consideration of any form of coordinated unit commitment is beyond the scope of this analysis. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations--both separately and in concert.

King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Beuning, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2009/10 3 JET Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of experimental programme operations, on 24 October. The EP2 shutdown activity managed and conducted by CCFE Operations 3.2 OPERATIONS OVERVIEW JET commissioning and operation is conducted in a shift pattern, with twoAnnual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2009/10 3.1 3 JET Operations 3 JET Operations 3

122

Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, April 1986--March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

University of Hawaii Advisory Task Group -Operational Assessment Report on System Level Administration Operating Policies and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;University of Hawaii ­ Advisory Task Group - Operational Assessment Report on System Level on System Level Administration Operating Policies and Practices page 2 B. Ensure clear lines of authority an Operational Assessment at the System Level of the University. For purposes of this assessment, "System Level

125

Optimal operation of hydrothermal systems with Hydrological Scenario Generation through Bootstrap and Periodic Autoregressive Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In electrical power systems with strong hydro generation, the use of adequate techniques to generate synthetic hydrological scenarios is extremely important for the evaluation of the ways the system behaves in order to meet the forecast energy demand. This paper proposes a new model to generate natural inflow energy scenarios in the long-term operation planning of large-sized hydrothermal systems. This model is based on the Periodic Autoregressive Model, PAR (p), where the identification of the p orders is based on the significance of the Partial Autocorrelation Function (PACF) estimated via Bootstrap, an intensive computational technique. The scenarios generated through this new technique were applied to the operation planning of the Brazilian Electrical System (BES), using the previously developed methodology of Stochastic Dynamic Programming based on Convex Hull algorithm (SDP-CHull). The results show that identification via Bootstrap is considerably more parsimonious, leading to the identification of lower orders models in most cases which retains the statistical characteristics of the original series. Additionally it presents a closer total mean operation cost when compared to the cost obtained via historic series.

Reinaldo Castro Souza; André Lu?´s Marques Marcato; Bruno Henriques Dias; Fernando Luiz Cyrino Oliveira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Design, Operation, and Performance of the Round Hill Electrostatic Generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design, technique of operation, and performance of the Round Hill electrostatic generator are presented in some detail. The problems of operating wide paper belts, of eliminating vibration, and of controlling humidity are discussed. The original belt charging system, with the belts operated at saturation charge density, is described and its range of usefulness is indicated. A consideration of the problems of voltage control and voltage steadiness at reduced charging currents leads to two modified designs of the belt charging system. The measurement of voltage by means of the generating voltmeter is discussed with special emphasis on the precautions necessary to eliminate or to correct for sources of systematic error. Under the conditions realizable with the Round Hill generator the probable error in voltage measurements is less than one percent on a relative scale and about two percent on an absolute scale. The magnitude of voltage fluctuations is less than 0.1 percent. The generator performance data for the positive and negative terminals are given in graphical form. The maximum charging current is 2.1 ma and is practically independent of voltage. The highest voltage obtained consistently without sparking is 2.4 megavolts positive and 2.7 megavolts negative, giving 5.1 megavolts between the terminals. At this voltage there is 1.1 ma of current available for application to an accelerating tube.

L. C. van Atta; D. L. Northrup; C. M. van Atta; R. J. van de Graaff

1936-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doubly Fed Induction Generator Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz Preprint Eduard Muljadi, Mohit Singh, and Vahan Gevorgian To be presented at the IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exhibition Raleigh, North Carolina September 15-20, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55573 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

128

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

129

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90  

SciTech Connect

The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Sustainable Reservoir Operation: Can we Generate Hydropower and Preserve Ecosystem Values?  

SciTech Connect

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generations while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modeling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Project Annual Operating Report CY 1999  

SciTech Connect

A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Precursor Report of Data Needs and Recommended Practices for PV Plant Availability Operations and Maintenance Reporting.  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the factors that affect reliability of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant is an important aspect of optimal asset management. This document describes the many factors that affect operation and maintenance (O&M) of a PV plant, identifies the data necessary to quantify those factors, and describes how data might be used by O&M service providers and others in the PV industry. This document lays out data needs from perspectives of reliability, availability, and key performance indicators and is intended to be a precursor for standardizing terminology and data reporting, which will improve data sharing, analysis, and ultimately PV plant performance.

Hill, Roger R.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; John Balfour, John R Balfour, High Performance PV

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

136

Operations and maintenance report on Air Force oil/water separators. Final report, September 1985-August 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide general guidance for the routine operation and maintenance of oil/water separators. The report should help managers and operators to recognize and correct problems affecting the separation process of oil and water. The most common types of gravity separators used by the Air Force are discussed. Other topics include operation guidelines, flow measurements, maintenance service, waste disposal and regulations, sampling and testing, recordkeeping and spill-prevention measures.

Kilroy, M.D.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Aircraft energy conservation during airport ground operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies and assesses potential fuel conservation options which are available for use during ground operations at Dulles International (IAD) and Washington National (DCA) airports. The study also identifies and analyzes ground operations fuel savings options which have been considered and/or implemented by the various airlines operating at IAD and/or DCA since 1971. In addition, an evaluation of computer models which could be used for analyzing these fuel conservation options at other airports is included. The impact of socio/economic factors such as safety, environment, limitation on expansion and restrictions on accommodating forecast activity at DCA and IAD were considered during the analysis of each option.

Bauchspies, J.S.; Costello, F.A.; Felder, J.; Hilliard, H.; Thompson, J.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Operability test report for the mobile color camera system (MCCS)  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document is the Operational Test Procedure for the Mobile Color Camera System (MCCS). This is a purged camera for temporary in-tank video use in Hanford waste tanks.

Esvelt, C.A.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Eco-operation of co-generation systems optimized by environmental load value  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors introduce a life cycle assessment scheme with the aid of the environmental load value (ELV) as a numerical measure to estimate the quantitative load of any industrial activity on the environment. The value is calculated from the total summation of the respective environmental load indexes through the life cycle activity from cradle to grave. An algorithm and a software using a combined simplex and branch-bound technique are accomplished to give the numerical ELV and its optimization. This ELV scheme is applied to co-generation energy systems consisting of gas turbines, waste-heat boilers, auxiliary boilers, steam turbines, electricity operated turbo refrigerators, steam absorption refrigerators and heat exchangers, which can be easily set up on the computer display in an ICON and Q and A style, including various kinds of parameters. The two kinds of environmental loads respecting the fossil fuel depletion and the CO{sub 2} global warming due to electricity generation from power stations in Japan are chosen as the ELV criterion. The ELV optimization is calculated corresponding to the hourly energy demands for electricity, air cooling, air heating, and hot water from a district consisting eight office buildings and four hotels. As a result, the ELV scheme constructed here is found to be an attractive and powerful tool to quantitatively estimate the LCA environmental loads of any industrial activity like co-generation energy systems and to propose the eco-operation of the industrial activity of interest. The cost estimation can be made as well.

Kato, Seizo; Nomura, Nobukazu; Maruyama, Naoki

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Coal cooperative efficiency program: small mine operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study researched the concept of small coal operators combining to form a coal cooperatives as a means of providing services and to improve their economic position in coal markets. A small coal operators attitude survey was completed in Appalachia, along with actual interviews of numerous operators in two case study areas--Clearfield, Pennsylvania, and Beckley, West Virginia. A profile of small operator facilities and operations was developed along with suggested coal cooperative configurations in the two case study areas. A general administrative services co-op was suggested for the Beckley area and a capital intensive coal processing/transloading co-op for the Clearfield area. From a review of the vast experience in U.S. agricultural cooperatives a step-by-step procedure for forming a coal co-op is detailed from the idea stage to the first Board of Director's meeting. An extensive economic analysis is included to demonstrate potential member benefit-costs. Recommendations are made to operator, state, regional and federal sectors to develop demonstration coal cooperatives to further prove out the concept.

Multcher, J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

Liedl, G.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year all 232 operational days were fully utilized. Beam line tests coupled with MATRIX members combined to use 284 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and four groups were provided 48 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1992 the MATRIX group published six articles. To date, for 1993 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation nine articles. Recent research milestones include: the first quantitative structural information on the as-quenched and early stages of decomposition of supersaturated Al-Li alloys; the first quantitative diffuse scattering measurements on a complex system (Co substitute for Cu YBCO superconductor); demonstration of capabilities of a new UHV surface diffraction chamber with in-situ characterization and temperature control (30-1300K); feasibility of phasing structure factors in a quasicrystal using multiple Bragg scattering.

Liedl, G.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Independent Oversight Activity Report for the Operational Awareness...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

investigation reports and will integrate additional corrective actions into ongoing fire protection and life safety activities, e.g., installation of additional fire...

145

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 2, Concept Definition and Analysis, Task 3, Preliminary R&D and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under Contract AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and Particulates {le}25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. A survey of currently available high temperature alloys has been completed and some of their high temperature properties are shown for comparison. Several of the most promising candidates will be selected for testing to determine corrosion resistance and high temperature strength. The corrosion resistance testing of candidate refractory coatings is continuing and some of the recent results are presented. This effort will provide important design information that will ultimately establish the operating ranges of the HITAF.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

147

Project Title: Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: Mining Operation  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of small scale power generation from low temperature co-produced fluids. Phase I is to Develop, Design and Test an economically feasible low temperature ORC solution to generate power from lower temperature co-produced geothermal fluids. Phase II &III are to fabricate, test and site a fully operational demonstrator unit on a gold mine working site and operate, remotely monitor and collect data per the DOE recommended data package for one year.

Clark, Thomas M [Principal Investigator; Erlach, Celeste [Communications Mgr.

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report  

SciTech Connect

The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Generation of non-local evolution loops and exchange operations for quantum control in three dimensional anisotropic Ising model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of quantum entanglement has been considered as elemental physical resource for quantum applications in Quantum Information and Quantum Computation. Control of entangled states on a couple of atoms, ions or quantum dots are milestones in almost all quantum applications towards a scalable spin-based quantum computers or quantum devices. For magnetic systems, Ising model is an interaction which generates and modi?es entanglement properties of quantum systems based on matter. In addition, when this interaction includes driven magnetic ?elds, it can be controlled to sustain, characterize or modify entanglement and other quantum properties. In this work, recent results about evolution in a general anisotropic three dimensional Ising model including an inhomogeneous magnetic ?eld is considered to obtain some general quantum control e?ects for their sustainability, programmed evolution or transformation: Evolution loops and Exchange operations. This control is achievable through a set of physical parameters, whose prescriptions are reported. The use of a non local basis in the model to express time evolution lets take advantage to describe and control the system, in particular with those issues associated with entanglement and operations mentioned before. Finally, some analysis about equivalent gates based on our development is made including an example with teleportation, using one of the gates constructed.

Francisco Delgado

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

TECHNICAL REPORT A-78-2 ARGE-SCALE OPERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Raymond T. Kal Orange County Pollution Control Department Orlando, Fla. 32806 November 1981 Report 1 are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute Aquatic Plant Control and Orange County Pollution Control Department Research Program Orlando, Fla. 32806

US Army Corps of Engineers

151

Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1989 annual report, Power reactors  

SciTech Connect

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1989. The report is published in two separate parts. This document, NUREG-1272, Vol. 4, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. This report also compiles the status of staff actions resulting from previous Incident Investigation Team (IIT) reports. 16 figs., 9 tabs.

None

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Analysis of viscoelastic soft dielectric elastomer generators operating in an electrical circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A predicting model for soft Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEGs) must consider a realistic model of the electromechanical behaviour of the elastomer filling, the variable capacitor and of the electrical circuit connecting all elements of the device. In this paper such an objective is achieved by proposing a complete framework for reliable simulations of soft energy harvesters. In particular, a simple electrical circuit is realised by connecting the capacitor, stretched periodically by a source of mechanical work, in parallel with a battery through a diode and with an electrical load consuming the energy produced. The electrical model comprises resistances simulating the effect of the electrodes and of the conductivity current invariably present through the dielectric film. As these devices undergo a high number of electro-mechanical loading cycles at large deformation, the time-dependent response of the material must be taken into account as it strongly affects the generator outcome. To this end, the viscoelastic behaviour of the polymer and the possible change of permittivity with strains are analysed carefully by means of a proposed coupled electro-viscoelastic constitutive model, calibrated on experimental data available in the literature for an incompressible polyacrilate elastomer (3M VHB4910). Numerical results showing the importance of time-dependent behaviour on the evaluation of performance of DEGs for different loading conditions, namely equi-biaxial and uniaxial, are reported in the final section.

Eliana Bortot; Ralf Denzer; Andreas Menzel; Massimiliano Gei

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT|Year:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT|Year: REPORT|Year: 2013 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction.| |SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION| |Survey Contact| |Name:__________________________________________|Title:___________________________________________|

155

Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA�¢����s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20���ºC to 120���ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA�¢����s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

Hamrock, Steven J.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modular Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the MOD-RTG reference flight design, and Section 3.0 discusses the Ground Demonstration System design. Multicouple technology development is discussed in Section 4.0, and Section 5.0 lists all published technical papers prepared during the course of the contract.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coal transportation efficiency program: small mine operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a comprehensive two-year examination of coal distribution in Appalachia. The study was performed to determine if there are opportunities to improve the market position and profitability of smaller coal producers by modifying their distribution systems. In the first phase of the study, an in-depth evaluation of the production, transportation, and market characteristics of small mines and producers resulted in the selection of three representative study areas: Clearfield County, Pennsylvania; Harlan County, Kentucky; and Logan County, West Virginia. In the next phase, a detailed analysis was performed and a preferred distribution strategy was defined for each study area. Finally, the results of the study area analysis were used to determine their applicability to other producing areas. In addition, the implications for the nation's rail system were defined in the event that there were large-scale changes in the coal distribution system for smaller producers. The appendix to the report presents a check list for evaluating the feasibility of potential distribution options.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"  

SciTech Connect

The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

Pletzer, Alexander

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

INL Sitewide Operations and Maintenance Report for CERCLA Response Actions - FY 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report documents how remedies mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act for the Idaho National Laboratory Site were operated and maintained during fiscal year 2005. The activities addressed in the INEEL Sitewide Operations and Maintenance Plan are reported in this document. Waste Area Groups 7 and 8 are not reported in this document. Waste Area Group 7 is an operating facility, and the status of its operations is reported directly to the regulatory agencies. Waste Area Group 8 is excluded from this report, because it falls outside the direct control of U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. The INEEL Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan discusses the inspection, maintenance, repair, and reporting activities involving institutional controls at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Therefore, the maintenance of institutional controls is not discussed in this report. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan provides a reference to support this report by providing current and projected facility and land uses and by listing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites.

D. R. Fitch

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DIII-D research operations. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R&D; and collaborative efforts.

Baker, D. [ed.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1991. Volume 16  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1991) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guidelines describe the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Working Group on planning and reporting for O&M during the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

164

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

165

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

166

Environmental Assessment for the Installation and Operation of Combustion Turbine Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOElEA- 430 DOElEA- 430 LA-UR-02-6482 Nationat Nudea- Security Administration Environmental Assessment for the Installation and Operation of Combustion Turbine Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico December II,2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Environmental Assessment for the Installation and Operation of Combustion Turbine Generators at LANL DOE LASO December 11, 2002 iii Contents ACRONYMS AND TERMS.......................................................................................................V EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................... IX 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED ........................................................................................................1

167

Decision-Support Software for Grid Operators: Transmission Topology Control for Infrastructure Resilience to the Integration of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect

GENI Project: The CRA team is developing control technology to help grid operators more actively manage power flows and integrate renewables by optimally turning on and off entire power lines in coordination with traditional control of generation and load resources. The control technology being developed would provide grid operators with tools to help manage transmission congestion by identifying the facilities whose on/off status must change to lower generation costs, increase utilization of renewable resources and improve system reliability. The technology is based on fast optimization algorithms for the near to real-time change in the on/off status of transmission facilities and their software implementation.

None

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design acceptance summary report for the new generation transfer pump (NGTP)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents design review of the New Generation Transfer Pump versus the functions and requirements of the SY-101 Rapid Mitigation Project. Previously unpublished documentation for the pump is included in support of the design.

IRONS, J.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Report on Audit of Department of Energy Management and Operating Contractor Available Fees, IG-0390  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUDIT OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTOR AVAILABLE FEES The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative address: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher

173

Protocol for Enhanced Evaluations of Beyond Design Basis Events Supporting Implementation of Operating Experience Report 2013-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Protocol for Enhanced Evaluations of Beyond Design Basis Events Supporting Implementation of Operating Experience Report 2013-01

174

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

Brown, L.C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

Hartfield, R.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.4 11.4 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs Planning and Reporting for Operations & Maintenance in Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee M&V - 3 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 1 1.1 OVERVIEW OF O&M ISSUES IN ESPCS ................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Key Issues, Timing, and Available Guidance on O&M in Federal ESPCs .................................................................................................................. 2 2. STEPS OF MANAGING O&M RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................... 3

177

Planning and Reporting for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11.4 11.4 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs Planning and Reporting for Operations & Maintenance in Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Prepared by: Operations and Maintenance Working Group Approved by: Federal ESPC Steering Committee M&V - 3 Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW ...................................................................... 1 1.1 OVERVIEW OF O&M ISSUES IN ESPCS ................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Key Issues, Timing, and Available Guidance on O&M in Federal ESPCs .................................................................................................................. 2 2. STEPS OF MANAGING O&M RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................... 3

178

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 19~ 2012 Subject: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2011 (OS-DM-12-004) To: Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson Federal Technical Capability Panel National Nuclear Security Administration Reference: Memorandum, Karen Boardman to Distribution, "Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2011," dated October 13,2011 In accordance with direction in the reference, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) performed a workforce analysis and developed an Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Report. The Report is hereby submitted for the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) review and incorporation into the FTCP Annual Report to the Secretary.

180

SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and colleagues.They initially reported that an iron-based material can conduct electricity without resistance close to conducting electric- ity with zero resistance at room temperature. Such materials wouldSCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data. Annual report, 1994-FY 95  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has published reports of its activities since 1984. The first report covered January through June of 1984, and the second report covered July through December 1984. Since those first two semiannual reports, AEOD has published annual reports of its activities from 1985 through 1993. Beginning with the report for 1986, AEOD Annual Reports have been published as NUREG-1272. Beginning with the report for 1987, NUREG-1272 has been published in two parts, No. 1 covering power reactors and No. 2 covering nonreactors (changed to {open_quotes}nuclear materials{close_quotes} with the 1993 report). The 1993 AEOD Annual Report was NUREG-1272, Volume 8. AEOD has changed its annual report from a calendar year to a fiscal year report to be consistent with the NRC Annual Report and to conserve staff resources. NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1 and No. 2, therefore, are combined calendar year 1994 (1994) and fiscal year 1995 (FY 95) reports which describe activities conducted between January 1, 1994, and September 30, 1995. Certain data which have historically been reported on a calendar year basis, however, are complete through calendar year 1995. Throughout this report, whenever information is presented for fiscal year 1995, it is designated as FY 95 data. Calendar year information is always designated by the four digits of the calendar year. This report, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in non-power reactor applications. A new part has been added, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 3, which covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in FY 95 in support of the NRC`s mission.

none,

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Peer groups and operational cycle enhancements to the performance indicator report  

SciTech Connect

Accurate performance evaluation and plant trending by the performance indicator program are integral parts of monitoring the operation of commercial nuclear power plants. The presentations of the NRC/AEOD performance indicator program have undergone a number of enhancements. The diversity of the commercial nuclear plants, coupled with continued improvements in the performance indicator program, has resulted in the evaluation of plants in logical peer groups and highlighted the need to evaluate the impact of plant operational conditions on the performance indicators. These enhancements allow a more-meaningful evaluation of operating commercial nuclear power plant performance. This report proposes methods to enhance the presentation of the performance indicator data by analyzing the data in logical peer groups and displaying the performance indicator data based on the operational status of the plants. Previously, preliminary development of the operational cycle displays of the performance indicator data was documented. This report extends the earlier findings and presents the continued development of the peer groups and operational cycle trend and deviation data and displays. This report describes the peer groups and enhanced PI data presentations by considering the operational cycle phase breakdowns, calculation methods, and presentation methods.

Stromberg, H.M.; DeHaan, M.S.; Gentillon, C.D.; Wilson, G.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Vanden Heuvel, L.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 1: Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1990. The report is published in two separate parts. This document NUREG-1272, Vol. 5, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol.5, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1990 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1980 through 1990. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

None

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Operation strategy for a lab-scale grid-connected photovoltaic generation system integrated with battery energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The operation strategy for a lab-scale grid-connected photovoltaic generation system integrated with battery energy storage is proposed in this paper. The photovoltaic generation system is composed of a full-bridge inverter, a DC–DC boost converter, an isolated bidirectional DC–DC converter, a solar cell array and a battery set. Since the battery set acts as an energy buffer to adjust the power generation of the solar cell array, the negative impact on power quality caused by the intermittent and unstable output power from a solar cell array is alleviated, so the penetration rate of the grid-connected photovoltaic generation system is increased. A lab-scale prototype is developed to verify the performance of the system. The experimental results show that it achieves the expected performance.

Hurng-Liahng Jou; Yi-Hao Chang; Jinn-Chang Wu; Kuen-Der Wu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

Not Available

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

190

Report on Inspection of the Performance Based Incentive Program at the Richland Operations Office, IG-0401  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy MEMORANDUM DATE: March 10, 1997 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of the Performance Based Incentive Program at the Richland Operations Office" TO: The Acting Secretary BACKGROUND: The subject final report is provided for your information. While conducting other inspection work at the Richland Operations Office (Richland), the Office of Inspector General identified the Fiscal Year 1995 Richland Performance Based Incentive (PBI) Program as an area of concern. Specifically, we were unable to identify any

191

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 2000 [USDOE] [9th edition  

SciTech Connect

This ninth edition of the Annual Report of Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress highlights waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost savings/avoidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pollution Prevention Program for Fiscal Year 2000. This edition marks the first time that progress toward meeting the 2005 Pollution Prevention Goals, issued by the Secretary of Energy in November 1999, is being reported. In addition, the Annual Report has a new format, and now contains information on a fiscal year basis, which is consistent with other DOE reports.

None

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Generation of ultrahigh frequency air microplasma in a magnetic loop and effects of pulse modulation on operation  

SciTech Connect

An atmospheric pressure air microplasma (APAMP) source was developed under ambient conditions using a magnetic loop at an operating frequency of 740 MHz. A self-igniting, stable APAMP was generated at 9.5 W. Pulse modulation (PM) was applied to the ultra high frequency signal. The effects of PM on self-ignition and operation of the APAMP source were studied by using a square wave modulating signal in the frequency range of 5-30 KHz. With the application of PM on the APAMP, in the best case, the plasma self-ignites and is sustained at 2.5 W.

Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Perlow, Joshua; Zaghloul, Mona [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Montaser, Akbar [Department of Chemistry, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Schrödinger Operators with Singular Complex Potentials as Generators: Existence and Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

associated with Dirichlet forms and complex locally integrable V with negative real part in the Kato class we construct an extension of H + V which generates a C 0-semigroup on L

V. Liskevich; P. Stollmann

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A new approach to assess the positional accuracy of maps generated by GIS overlay operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new approach to assess the positional accuracy of maps generated by overlaying multi-scale spatial data layers with different levels of positional accuracy. The existing techniques for as...

Liu Wenbao; Xia Zongguo; Dai Honglei

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Micro-grid operation of inverter based distributed generation with voltage and frequency dependent loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution systems are experiencing increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG). One attractive option is to use the available DG capacity during utility outages by forming planned micro-grids. Load sharing ...

Zeineldin, H. H.

198

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dealing With Load and Generation Cost Uncertainties in Power System Operation Studies: A Fuzzy Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are currently facing a change of the paradigm that determined their operation and planning while being surrounded by multiple uncertainties sources. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainty is ...

Bruno André Gomes; João Tomé Saraiva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System  

SciTech Connect

An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR Team did not have the opportunity to observe a shift turnover from one crew to another. The ORR Team has evaluated the risk of not observing this activity and considers the risk to be minimal based on the fact that operating staff are very familiar with the FTS equipment and its procedures, and because existing Conduct of Operations processes and procedures are adequate and implemented. Because the ORR Team has not observed two-shift FTS operations, we recommend that additional RL oversight be provided at the start of two-shift FTS operations to evaluate the adequacy of crew turnovers.

DAVIES, T.H.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

Wight, R.H.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

Sorensen, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Unit Commitment of Generator Sets During Dynamic Positioning Operation Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Torstein I. Bø Tor Arne Johansen Eirik Mathiesen Center for Autonomous Marine Operations positioning system, diesel-electric propulsion is often used. At all time the vessel should be able decades diesel-electric propulsion has become industry standard for some types of vessels such as drilling

Johansen, Tor Arne

208

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2013 4, 2013 Subject: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2012 (EM-NSPD-13-003) To: Karen L. Boardman, Chairman Federal Technical Capability Panel National Nuclear Security Administration Reference: Memorandum, Karen Boardman to Distribution, "Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2012," dated October 24, 2012 In accordance with direction in the reference, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) performed a workforce analysis and developed an Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Report. The Report is herby submitted for the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) review and incorporation into the FTCP Annual Report to the Secretary. Questions may be addressed to the DOE-ID FTCP Agent, Mark C. Brown at (208) 526-

209

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, required by the California Environmental Quality Act, was developed by UC as part of the Final EIS/EIR process. This document describing the program is a companion to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). The Final EIS/EIR analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, which for the purposes of NEPA is: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 1 0 years) proposed projects, of LLNL and SNL, Livermore. The proposed action for the EIR is the renewal of the contract between DOE and UC for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is for implementing and monitoring progress of measures taken to mitigate the significant impacts of the proposed action. A complete description of the impacts and proposed mitigations is in Section 5 of Volume I of the Final EIS/EIR. This report summarizes the mitigation measures, identifies the responsible party at the Laboratory for implementing the mitigation measure, states when monitoring will be implemented, when the mitigation measure will be in place and monitoring completed, and who will verify that the mitigation measure was implemented.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation CROSSROADS. Volume 1. Basic report. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Form EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

INSTRUCTIONS INSTRUCTIONS Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860,

213

Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations  

SciTech Connect

This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

G. B. Mitchem

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

214

Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Experimental and thermodynamical analyses of the diesel exhaust vortex generator heat exchanger for optimizing its operating condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research, a vortex generator heat exchanger is used to recover exergy from the exhaust of an OM314 diesel engine. Twenty vortex generators with 30° angle of attack are used to increase the heat recovery as well as the low back pressure in the exhaust. The experiments are prepared for five engine loads (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% of full load), two exhaust gases amount (50 and 100%) and four water mass flow rates (50, 40, 30 and 20 g/s). After a thermodynamical analysis on the obtained data, an optimization study based on Central Composite Design (CCD) is performed due to complex effect of engine loads and water mass flow rates on exergy recovery and irreversibility to reach the best operating condition.

M. Hatami; D.D. Ganji; M. Gorji-Bandpy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A novel study for constant voltage and frequency operation of self-excited short-shunt induction generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analytical technique for selecting the optimal shunt and series capacitances required for maintaining constant load voltage and frequency of a self excited short shunt induction generator (SESSIG). The study investigates the performance of the SESSIG at different operating conditions, such as speed of the prime mover, load impedance and load power factor. The required capacitances have been determined using two second order non-linear equations based on the steady state equivalent circuit model, instead of the high order non-linear equations in the literatures. The capacitance values obtained by the proposed technique have been verified experimentally to confirm the validity and the accuracy of the proposed technique.

H.H. Hanafy; S.A. Zaid; A.M. Gesraha; M.M. Abd-Elaziz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

222

Operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasma in front of a positively biased electrode  

SciTech Connect

Stability of an anode spot plasma, which is an additional high density plasma generated in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in ambient plasma, is a critical issue for its utilization to various types of ion sources. In this study, operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasmas are experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of the bias current flowing into the positively biased electrode and the properties of ambient plasma reveal that unstable nature of the anode spot is deeply associated with the reduction of double layer potential between the anode spot plasma and the ambient plasma. It is found that stability of the anode spot plasma can be improved with increasing the ionization rate in ambient plasma so as to compensate the loss of electrons across the double layer or with enlarging the area of the biased electrode to prevent electron accumulation inside the anode spot. The results obtained from the present study give the guideline for operating conditions of anode spot plasmas as an ion source with high brightness.

Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Dang, Jeong-Jeung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN C-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN  

SciTech Connect

C-reactor disassembly basin is being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated scrap components and structures in a grout-like formulation. The disassembly basin will be the first area of the C-reactor building that will be immobilized. The scrap components contain aluminum alloy materials. Any aluminum will corrode very rapidly when it comes in contact with the very alkaline grout (pH > 13), and as a result would produce hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) reviewed and evaluated existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints are necessary. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen above the surface of the water during the injection of grout into the C-reactor disassembly area is low if the assessment of the aluminum surface area is reliable. Conservative calculations estimate that there is insufficient aluminum present in the basin areas to result in significant hydrogen accumulation in this local region. The minimum safety margin (or factor) on a 60% LFL criterion for a local region of the basin (i.e., Horizontal Tube Storage) was greater than 3. Calculations also demonstrated that a flammable situation in the vapor space above the basin is unlikely. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the risk of developing a flammable condition during grouting operations.

Wiersma, B.

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Helical magnetocumulative generators with magnetic flux amplification: Comparative advantages of amplification schemes and the operational efficiency of generators with dynamic transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The amplification capabilities of two types of helical magnetocumulative generators based on the cascade scheme of magnetic flux amplification, generators with dynamic transformation, and those with transformer ....

A. A. Bazanov

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Analysis of the operational reliability of a power-generating unit with a BN-600 reactor during the period 1980–1993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The high quality of the design and the additional improvements to separate units of the main equipment and systems at the initial stage of operation (first main circulation pump, steam generators, safety and c...

N. N. Oshkanov; A. G. Sheinkman; P. P. Govorov

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational  

SciTech Connect

This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator  

SciTech Connect

In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia-MG, CEP 38400-902 (Brazil)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

A STATCOM based voltage regulator for parallel operated isolated asynchronous generators feeding three-phase four-wire loads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation on a voltage regulator for parallel operated isolated asynchronous generators (IAGs) supplying three-phase four-wire loads driven by constant speed prime mover like diesel engine, bio-mass, gasoline, etc. The proposed voltage regulator is realised using a static compensator (STATCOM) for providing the reactive power compensation, harmonic elimination and load balancing. Three single-phase insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) based VSCs along-with three single-phase transformers and self-supporting DC bus are used as a voltage controller for supplying three-phase four-wire loads. The neutral point of the load is achieved using the neutral point of the excitation capacitors and primary windings terminal of the transformers. The proposed isolated electrical generating system is modelled and simulated on MATLAB using Simulink and power system blockset (PSB) toolboxes. The performance of the proposed voltage controller for IAGs is demonstrated while feeding linear and non-linear balanced and unbalanced loads.

Gaurav Kumar Kasal; Bhim Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

First-year's operation of a full-scale second-generation FBC in an industrial plant  

SciTech Connect

Data related to the operation of a two stage coal fired fluidized bed boiler installed for Iowa Beef Processors, Inc. Amarillo, Texas are presented. This steam generator, which has a rating of 70,000 lb/hr steam, 650 psig, is the large privately funded fluidized bed coal combustion installation in the United States. The facility includes a dual bed combustor, whereby the coal is burned in a lower bed containing steam tubes and sulfur dioxide is collected in an upper bed containing dolomite. Coal burns predominantly in the lower bed at relatively high temperatures while combustion is completed in the upper bed. The upper bed also improves sulfur capture by reacting with SO/sub 2/ generated in the freeboard, which would be difficult to capture in early designs for FBC packaged boilers. The two stage concept provides high combustion efficiency, low NO/sub X/ emissions, and high sulfur capture. The results of recent measurements of emissions of sulfur dioxide will be included in this presentation. 4 figures.

Baty, G.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A novel control strategy of a distributed generator operating in seven modes for ancillary services under grid faults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was interested in a renewable distributed generator (RDG) made up of a wind turbine used as a principal source and a supercapacitor (SC) considered as a storage system. The studied RDG is associated with loads to constitute a micro-grid (MG) which can operate in grid connected mode, stand alone mode or synchronization mode. The objective of this work is to investigate a novel control scheme for MG integrated into power electrical system in order to maintain the voltage and the frequency of the grid in an allowable range and to ensure the continuity of power supply in case of grid failure. This control strategy made up of two parts: the first one is the power management algorithm used to detect islanding in case of defect and to monitor the RDG into seven operating modes. The second one is the droop control used to control the exported or imported active and reactive powers transferred with the grid ensuring its stability by adjusting the frequency and amplitude of its output voltage. The system is simulated using MATLAB software and results are provided in order to show the feasibility of this control strategy.

Mouna Rekik; Achraf Abdelkafi; Lotfi Krichen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997  

SciTech Connect

This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

Robinson, K.S. [ed.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

Rutherford, P.D. [ed.] [ed.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Operational implementation of ammonium perchlorate biodegradation. Final report, July 1997--June 1998  

SciTech Connect

This technology is a low-cost biodegradation process that converts the perchlorate ion (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) in process wastewater to chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}). Perchlorate can be reduced from a concentration greater than 1.0% to a concentration below detection limits (< 0.5 ppm). Effluents from this process can be discharged directly to conventional sewage treatment facilities. This process will: (1) Reduce environmental liability to DoD and its contractors by reducing the generation of hazardous wastes; (2) Minimize adverse impact of environmental compliance to DoD support operations; (3) Reduce cost for solid rocket propellant and large rocket motor disposal; (4) Facilitate component, propellant, and propellant ingredient recovery and reuse; and (5) Enable the continued use of AP, a critical defense material, in propulsion systems for the DoD. The objective of this demonstration was to provide a production-scale, operational validation of the ammonium perchlorate (AP) biodegradation process that was developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. Components of an existing pilot-scale demonstration unit were modified and integrated into existing waste treatment facilities at Thiokol`s production plant near Brigham City, Utah.

Coppola, E.N.; Rine, J.; Startzell, G.

1998-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Second generation heliostat development for solar central receiver systems detailed design report. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Presented are the design of the second generation heliostat, the development of the manufacturing plan, the method of transporting the heliostats from the factory to the installation site, heliostat installation procedures, and the maintenance routines. These plans are then cost estimated to provide inputs required to develop the installed cost of the heliostat and further, the cost of owning, operating and maintaining a collector field. This volume contains the following appendices: (1) bill of materials; (2) part drawings (subassemblies); (3) assembly drawings, heliostat; (4) trade studies; (5) system studies; (6) control software; (7) test results; (8) specification S-102: surface preparation, application, and inspection of protective coatings for carbon steel heliostat piles; and (9) specification S-101: installation of open end pipe piles. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal.

Dong, Qiujie (Austin, TX); Jenkins, Michael V. (Austin, TX); Bernadas, Salvador R. (Austin, TX)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal. 17 figs.

Dong, Q.; Jenkins, M.V.; Bernadas, S.R.

1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.  

SciTech Connect

The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B. (OS Research); Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Report on Audit of the Department of Energy Program Offices' Use of Management and Operating Contractor Employees, IG-0392  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROGRAM OFFICES' USE OF MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEES The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distrution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the

248

Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

J. Francfort (INEEL); J. Argueta; M. Wehrey (Southern California Edison); D. Karner; L. Tyree (Electric Transportation Applications)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

DOE Backup Power Working Group Best Practices Handbook for Maintenance and Operation of Engine Generators, Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The lubricating oil system provides a means to introduce a lubricant in the form of a film to reduce friction and wear between surfaces that bear against each other as they move.1 The oil film which is established also cools the parts by carrying generated heat away from hot surfaces, cleans and carries dirt or metal wear particles to the filter media, and helps seal the piston to the cylinder during combustion. Most systems are pressure lubricated and distribute oil under pressure to bearings, gears, and power assemblies. Lubricating oil usually reaches main, connecting rod, and camshaft bearings through drilled passages in the cylinder block and crankshaft or through piping and common manifolds.Many parts rely on oil for cooling, so if the lube oil system fails to perform its function the engine will overheat. Metal to metal surfaces not separated by a thin film of oil rapidly build up frictional heat. As the metals reach their melting point, they tend to weld together in spots or streaks. Lube oil system failures can cause significant damage to an engine in a short period of time. Proper maintenance and operation of the lubricating oil system is essential if your engine is to accomplish its mission.

Gross, R.E.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Inspection Report - Radiological Waste Operations in Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory, INS-O-13-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Inspection Report Radiological Waste Operations in Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory INS-O-13-03 March 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 20, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Radiological Waste Operations in Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory" INTRODUCTION Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has a national security mission that includes science, engineering and technology related to radioactive and hazardous materials such as plutonium, americium, asbestos and lead. Material Disposal Area G, located in Technical Area

251

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. Impact of Increased DFIG Wind Penetration on Powerreports/2009report/vittal_dfig_pserc_final_report_s-

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. Fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen build-up. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel contains significantly less aluminum and thus a Portland cement grout may be considered as well. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation in the R-reactor vessel is very low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk will again be very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features  

SciTech Connect

Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill operations in the R-reactor vessel is low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk is again low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.97 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the NCP. This FS conforms to the conditions set forth in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 2003) and amendments, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). This also includes Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-00C for completing all 200 Area non-tank farm OU pre-Record of Decision (ROD) documents on or before December 31, 2011. This FS supports the final remedy selection for the 200-ZP-1 OU, as described in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI/FS work plan) (DOE/RL-2003-55), as agreed upon by RL and EPA. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-48B required Draft A of the 200-ZP-1 OU FS and proposed plan to be transmitted to EPA by September 30, 2007. As agreed to with EPA in the 200 Area Unit Managers Meeting Groundwater Operable Unit Status (FH-0503130), the baseline risk assessment (BRA) was delayed from inclusion in the remedial investigation (RI) report and is completed and documented in this FS. The Remedial Investigation Report for 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI report) (DOE/RL-2006-24) included an evaluation of human health and ecological risks and hazards. The RI report identified the radiological and chemical contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that represent the primary risks to human health and the environment. The complete risk assessment in this FS incorporates additional analytical data from the unconfined aquifer that were obtained during or after preparation of the RI report, particularly for carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99. This FS also includes the initial results from an ongoing study of technetium-99 contamination near WMA-T, the sampling of new wells near the 216-W-LC laundry waste crib and T Plant, updated Hanford vadose zone fate and transport modeling, and groundwater particle-tracking analysis. The purpose of this FS is to develop and evaluate alternatives for remediation of

BYRNES ME

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

260

TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A. (eds.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 3: Technical training  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1992 annual report: Power reactors. Volume 7, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1992. The report is published in two separate parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance, measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event report% diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1992 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1984--1992.

none,

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

An Operational System for Generating Cloud Drift Winds in the Australian Region and Their Impact on Numerical Weather Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has, since June 1992, produced cloud drift wind data for operational use. These data are used in the analysis cycle of the local operational numerical weather prediction system. This paper describes the ...

John Le Marshall; Neil Pescod; Bob Seaman; Graham Mills; Paul Stewart

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Report on Inspection of an Intelligence Work-For-Others Project at the Idaho Operations Office, IG-0367  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT ON INSPECTION OF AN INTELLIGENCE WORK-FOR-OTHERS PROJECT AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE The Office of Inspections wants to make the distribution of its inspection reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, we are making this report available electronically through the Internet at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vml.hqadmin.doe.gov We are experimenting with various options to facilitate audit report distribution. Your comments would be appreciated and can be provided on the Customer Comment Form attached to the

267

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water vapor profiling in the High Arctic. G. J. Nott, T. J. Duck, J. G. Doyle, M. E. W. Coffin, C. Perro, C. P. Thackray, and J. R. Drummond Department of Physics and Atmospheric

Duck, Thomas J.

268

A Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) based Photo-Voltaic (PV) excitation control strategy for single phase operation of three phase wind-turbine coupled induction generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Three phase induction generators are widely used for single phase operation in wind based micro-generation schemes to cater single phase loads due to various advantages. This paper presents an improved control methodology for self excited three phase induction generator operating in single phase mode. The excitation is controlled through an inverter with Photo-Voltaic (PV) panels providing power to the dc bus. The proposed technique enables the generator for building up voltage from low wind speeds compared to conventional three phase machines. A capacitor connected across load terminals reduces the reactive power supplied by the inverter connected across the other two phases. Gravitational search algorithm (GSA) is used to calculate the switching angles of the inverter under various load and wind speeds for minimum Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) of the generated voltage. The proposed induction generator is aimed to be conveniently used in remote and grid isolated areas as a portable source of electrical power driving single phase loads. Simulations and experiments performed on a 3-phase 1 kW, 415 V, 50 Hz, 1440 r/min induction machine validates the proposed concept.

Arunava Chatterjee; Krishna Roy; Debashis Chatterjee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development and performance assessment of a Plasma Focus electron beam generator for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Plasma Focus is a device designed to generate a plasma sheet between two coaxial electrodes by means of a high voltage difference. The plasma… (more)

Ceccolini, Elisa and#60;1983and#62

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A novel design in harvesting energy from operating machines by converting their generated waste energies to electricity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wireless devices have been widely adopted in machine health monitoring because they can acquire data from machines that are operating and can be installed in… (more)

Lam, Cheuk Yi (???)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results  

SciTech Connect

The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Phase I remedial investigation report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this remedial investigation (RI) is the 300-FF-5 operable unit, one of five operable units associated with the 300 Area aggregate of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. The 300-FF-5 operable unit is a groundwater operable unit beneath the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 source operable units. This operable unit was designated to include all contamination detected in the groundwater and sediments below the water table that emanates from the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 operable units (DOE-RL 1990a). In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 300 Area on the National Priorities List (NPL) contained within Appendix B of the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP, 53 FR 51391 et seq.). The EPA took this action pursuant to their authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, 42 USC 9601 et seq.). The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), the EPA and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), in May 1989 (Ecology et al. 1992, Rev. 2). This agreement, among other matters, governs all CERCLA efforts at the Hanford Site. In June 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) workplan for the 300-FF-5 operable unit was issued pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement.

NONE

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Turlock Lake Powerhouse. Turlock Irrigation District design report and operations manual  

SciTech Connect

The development of equipment selection and design is outlined and operational criteria for the hydroelectric power drop at the Turlock Lake California Powerhouse are established.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integration and operation of post-combustion capture system on coal-fired power generation: load following and peak power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants with post combustion capture and sequestration (CCS) systems have a variety of challenges to integrate the steam generation, air quality control, cooling water systems and steam turbine with the ...

Brasington, Robert David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.  

SciTech Connect

The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NSTX Weekly Report (November 19, 2010) FY 2011 NSTX plasma operations started on October 4, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lithium carbonate to water soluble lithium acetate was drafted and is under review. · Lithium Evaporators and photographs. A temporary floor has now been installed in the vessel, and lithium clean-up operations as well) Boundary Physics Operations (H. Kugel) · Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) - Initial inspection of the LLD

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

282

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406, Regarding Minimizing Contamination and the Generation of Waste, and Facilitating Decommissioning through the Design of Facilities and Operating Procedures  

SciTech Connect

In the very near future (perhaps as soon as the fall of 2007), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) anticipates receiving one or more license applications for new nuclear power plants. An important consideration for new facilities is that they be designed and operated to minimize contamination, to minimize the generation of waste, and to facilitate decommissioning. A relatively recent regulation, 10 CFR 20.1406, mandates these requirements. The regulation states, 'Applicants for licenses, other than renewals, after August 20, 1997, shall describe in the application how facility design and procedures for operation will minimize, to the extent practicable, contamination of the facility and the environment, facilitate eventual decommissioning, and minimize, to the extent practicable, the generation of radioactive waste'. This paper summarizes various initiatives taken by the NRC and industry to develop guidance for implementing 10 CFR 20.1406 before submission of license applications. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study Volume I.NREL). 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and TransmissionAvista Corporation Wind Integration Study. March. http://

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Design review report: 200 East upgrades for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations  

SciTech Connect

This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the contractor design verification methodology and records associated with project W-314`s 200 East (200E) Upgrades design package. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for this design. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the signatures of the participating reviewers. Project W-314 is a project within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Retrieval Program. This project provides capital upgrades for the existing Hanford tank farm waste transfer, instrumentation, ventilation, and electrical infrastructure systems. To support established TWRS programmatic objectives, the project is organized into two distinct phases. The initial focus of the project (i.e., Phase 1) is on waste transfer system upgrades needed to support the TWRS Privatization waste feed delivery system. Phase 2 of the project will provide upgrades to support resolution of regulatory compliance issues, improve tank infrastructure reliability, and reduce overall plant operating/maintenance costs. Within Phase 1 of the W-314 project, the waste transfer system upgrades are further broken down into six major packages which align with the project`s work breakdown structure. Each of these six sub-elements includes the design, procurement, and construction activities necessary to accomplish the specific tank farm upgrades contained within the package. The first design package (AN Valve Pit Upgrades) was completed in November 1997, and the associated design verification activities are documented in HNF-1893. The second design package, 200 East (200E) Upgrades, was completed in March 1998. This design package identifies modifications to existing valve pits 241-AX-B and 241-A-B, as well as several new waste transfer pipelines to be constructed within the A Farm Complex of the 200E Area. The scope of the valve pit modifications includes new pit cover blocks, valve manifolds, leak detectors, and special protective coatings similar to those previously approved for the AN Valve Pit Upgrades design package. The new transfer lines included in this package (with official line number designations) are described within.

Boes, K.A.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15, 2001, Grout Injection Operator Injury at the Cold Test Pit South, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Mark W. Frei, Acting Manager, Idaho Operations Office, U. S. Department of Energy.

287

Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study (FS) examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred altemative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965-1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-:levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228 and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9 {times} 10{sup 5}.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of infrared sensors for oil spill response operations. Final report, October 1994-June 1995  

SciTech Connect

During November 1994, the USCO conducted a field evaluation of several commercially available portable infrared (IR) sensors for their ability to detect oil on water at night. The evaluation was conducted over the natural oil seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. The portable sensors were operated from the open door of a Coast Guard HH-60J helicopter. Sensors evaluated included the Agema Thermovision 1000 and Texas Instruments LOCUSP operating in the long wave IR (LWIR) and the Cincinnati Electronics IRC-160ST and IRRIS-256ST operating in the medium wave IR (MWIR). The installed FLIR 2000 LWIR system provided a baseline reference of current CG IR capabilities.

Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Report on the establishment and operation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Daycare Center  

SciTech Connect

We have completed an inspection of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Daycare Center (Center). The purpose of the inspection was to review for efficiency, economy and compliance with laws and regulations, FERC's establishment and operation of the Center. The inspection objectives were to review: (1) FERC's compliance with Federal laws and requirements of the General Services Administration and the District of Columbia; (2) the source and amount of funds for establishing and operating the Center; and (3) the organizational relationships between FERC, the Center and the contractor operating the Center.

Not Available

1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Annual Report of the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Programme 2007/08 4 JET Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ion sources and accelerator grids of the PINIs to deliver higher power as part of the Neutral Beam; · installation of two 600 mm diameter water pipes connecting the main supply in the flywheel generator building

291

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

292

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

293

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

294

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

295

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

296

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

297

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

298

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

299

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

300

Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2014 Year-End Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTS–O&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

302

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

303

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

304

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

305

Coal-Cooperative Efficiency Program: small-mine operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study researched the concept of small coal operators combining to form coal cooperatives as a means of providing services and to improve their economic position in coal markets. A small coal operators attitude survey was completed in Appalachia, along with actual interviews of numerous operators in two case study areas - Clearfield, Pennsylvania, and Beckley, West Virginia. A profile of small operator facilities and operations was developed along with suggested coal cooperative configurations in the two case study areas. A general administrative services co-op was suggested for the Beckley area and a capital intensive coal processing/transloading co-op for the Clearfield area. From a review of the vast experience in US agricultural cooperatives a step-by-step procedure for forming a coal co-op is detailed from the idea stage to the first Board of Director's meeting. An extensive economic analysis is included to demonstrate potential member benefit-costs. Recommendations are made to operator, state, regional and federal sectors to develop demonstration coal cooperatives to further prove out the concept.

Multcher, J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect

This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented...

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electricity from wood powder report on a TPV generator in progress  

SciTech Connect

A joint project between NREL, SLU, and UCFB aims at building a wood powder fueled TPV generator. The progress of the project is presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Broman, L.; Jarefors, K. [Solar Energy Research Center (SERC), University College of Falun Borlange (UCFB), Box 10044, S-781 10 Borlange (Sweden); Marks, J. [Department of Operational Efficiency, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Herrgardsv 122, S-776 98 Garpenberg (Sweden); Wanlass, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401-3393, United States of America

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Chemical warfare: Implications for Operation Desert Storm and beyond. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the potential for use of lethal and incapacitating chemical agents in the Persian Gulf. Insight from past chemical warfare case studies, current international law, and U.S. and Soviet policy, strategy and tactics provide a basis for examination of Iraq's chemical warfare potential and operational strategy. In addition, a survey of Naval War College students assesses the current U.S. Armed Forces level of chemical warfare readiness. This analysis combined with the U.S. experience and current war with Iraq as well as proposing a more viable operational capability to meet stated national policy in response to chemical weapons.

Trummer, F.G.; Twining, B.L.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Impact of DOE Orders on Waste Management Operation. Volume 1: [Final report  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy Orders are the internal documents which govern the management of all Department of Energy facilities and operations. DOE Orders are the vehicles by which Federal and state laws and regulations are applied to Department of Energy activities. A selected set of 22 Department of Energy Orders was reviewed to identify the applicability and impact of each Order on waste management operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Of the 22 Orders reviewed, five set forth requirements which have a high degree of impact on waste management activities. Eight Orders have a moderate degree of impact on waste management activities, and the remaining nine Orders have a low degree of impact.

Klein, R.B.; Jennrich, E.A.; Shuman, R.; Sandquist, G.M. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rutz, A.C.; Littleton, M.W.; McCauce, C.H. [Wastren, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

FY 1991 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office: Work plan and quarterly reports, first and second quarter reports  

SciTech Connect

The work carried out on behalf of the DOE by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to stat and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. This document contains the Work Plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

NONE

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Backup power working group best practices handbook for maintenance and operation of engine generators, Volume 1. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is divided into the four chapters. Chapter one covers the design, procurement, storage, handling and testing of diesel fuel oil to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter two discusses the selection of automatic transfer switches to be used in DOE backup power supplies. Chapter three is about low voltage open frame air circuit breaker operation, testing, and maintenance for DOE backup power supplies. And chapter four covers installation, design, and maintenance of engine cooling water and jacket water systems.

Gross, R.; Padgett, A.B.; Burrows, K.P.; Fairchild, P.N.; Lam, T.; Janes, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Proof-of-principle test for thermoelectric generator for diesel engines; Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September of 1987, the principals of what is now Hi-Z TECHNOLOGY, INC. applied to the National Bureau of Standards (now National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) under the Energy Related Inventions Program. The invention was entitled ``Thermoelectric Generator for Diesel Engines.`` The National Institute of Standards and Technology evaluated the invention and on January 12, 1989 forwarded Recommendation Number 455 to the Department of Energy (DOE). This recommendation informed the DOE that the invention had been selected for recommendation by the NIST for possible funding by the DOE. Following the recommendation of the NIST, the DOE contacted Hi-Z to work out a development program for the generator. A contract for a grant to design, fabricate, and test a Proof-of-Principle exhaust powered thermoelectric generator for Diesel engines was signed October 19, 1989. Hi-Z provided the thermoelectric modules used in the generator as their contribution to the project. The purpose of this Grant Program was to design, build, and test a small-scale, Proof-of-Principle thermoelectric generator for a Diesel engine. 15 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1991-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Rocky Flats Plant, Building 707  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the Operational Readiness Review (ORR) activities for the resumption of Building 707 operations at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). The EH OA was simultaneously conducted with the Office of Defense Programs (DP) line management ORR, which was conducted from September 21 to October 2, 1992, and November 2 to 13, 1992. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR. Based on its oversight assessment, the EH OA believes that Building 707 operations may be safely resumed contingent upon satisfactory resolution of all DP ORR findings. The EH OA determined that the DP ORR was conducted in a comprehensive and effective manner and represents an adequate basis for recommending resumption of Building 707 operations. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR and addressed the following areas: Management and Organization, Industrial Safety, Fire Protection, Industrial Hygiene, Conduct of Operations, Maintenance, Quality Assurance, and Training. In a limited number of these areas, the EH OA conducted independent vertical-slice reviews DP ORR results.

Krupar, J.J. Jr.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Rocky Flats Plant, Building 707  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the Operational Readiness Review (ORR) activities for the resumption of Building 707 operations at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). The EH OA was simultaneously conducted with the Office of Defense Programs (DP) line management ORR, which was conducted from September 21 to October 2, 1992, and November 2 to 13, 1992. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR. Based on its oversight assessment, the EH OA believes that Building 707 operations may be safely resumed contingent upon satisfactory resolution of all DP ORR findings. The EH OA determined that the DP ORR was conducted in a comprehensive and effective manner and represents an adequate basis for recommending resumption of Building 707 operations. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the DP ORR and addressed the following areas: Management and Organization, Industrial Safety, Fire Protection, Industrial Hygiene, Conduct of Operations, Maintenance, Quality Assurance, and Training. In a limited number of these areas, the EH OA conducted independent vertical-slice reviews DP ORR results.

Krupar, J.J. Jr.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

Senate Operations Review Committee Report to Senate and Notice of Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

27, 2012 On referral from Senate from the March 2012 meeting, the Senate Operations Review Committee the May meeting options, on November 1, 2012 to learn more about their rationale for the referrals. Minutes Referral Senator Jones indicated that he has seen a change to the process since the referral

Graham, Nick

318

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Reduced gas pressure operation of sludge digesters: Expanded studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Previous investigations strongly suggested that the municipal anaerobic sludge digestion process could be enhanced by reactor operation with subatmospheric headspace pressures. Enhanced solids destruction and methane production along with increased process stability were observed in these earlier studies. However, due to the small scale of the anaerobic reactors used ( {approx}1.5 L), definitive steady-state measurements could not be obtained. These expanded studies were undertaken to verify and define the magnitude of the benefits that might be obtained with vacuum operation of sludge digesters. Four reactors ({approx}15.0 L) were fed municipal sludge at three different organic loading rates while being maintained with a 15-day solids retention time. One reactor had a constant headspace pressure of 1.02 atm; a second was maintained at 0.75 atm; and the remaining two reactors were operated for the majority of the day at 1.02 atm, and for part of the day with a 0.75 atm headspace pressure. Additional small-scale, batch experiments were performed to help identify controlling digestion mechanisms. The results of these expanded studies indicate that vacuum operation did not yield significant advantages over the organic loading range investigated (0.088 to 0.352 lb VSS/ft{sup 3}{center_dot}d).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system operational test report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of operational testing of the 241-C-106 In-Tank Video Camera Imaging System. This imaging system was installed as a component of Project W-320 to monitor sluicing and waste retrieval activities in Tank 241-C-106.

Pedersen, L.T.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Report on the Workshop on the Uses and Generation ofFemtosecond Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We describe the proceedings of the Workshop on the Uses and Generation of Femtosecond Radiation, held at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in February 1998, and some of the ideas that were generated subsequent to the workshop. The motivation for this workshop was to bring together accelerator physicists interested in the generation of ultra-short (< 200 fs) pulses of XUV and x-ray radiation, and scientists interested in using them. The primary purpose of the workshop was to educate the accelerator physicists about the source characteristics necessary to carry out specific experiments, and to inform the user community of ideas currently being explored by the accelerator community. A second objective was to develop a set of parameters and requirements that could form the basis for a broad-based femtoscience user facility. In this paper we describe some of the ideas and techniques that accelerator physicists are pursuing to iilfill the diverse requirements of this expanding community.

Jackson, A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Evaluation of steam-generator fluid mixing during layup. Final report. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop practical methods of achieving an adequately mixed chemical environment on the secondary side of PWR steam generators during periods of shutdown, cold shutdown (layup), and startup. Layup chemicals introduced into the steam generator could then be evenly dispersed to minimize corrosion processes which may occur if the chemical environment was not properly maintained. Systems for chemical feed, mixing, sampling, and removal of contaminant chemicals in the steam generator secondary side were also evaluated and recommendations have been made. Test results from a plexiglass model indicated that forced circulation and turbulent mixing were the most effective methods of achieving a rapid, homogeneous chemical environment. Natural convection and diffusion, on the other hand, were found to be less effective in achieving a thorough mixing.

MacArthur, A.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Year 1 third quarter report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

[Radioisotope thermoelectric generators and ancillary activities]. Monthly technical progress report, 1 April--28 April 1996  

SciTech Connect

Tehnical progress achieved during this period on radioisotope thermoelectric generators is described under the following tasks: engineering support, safety analysis, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication/assembly/test, RTG shipping/launch support, design/review/mission applications, and project management/quality assurance/reliability.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Operational Test Report (OTR) for U-102 Pumping and Instrumentation and Control (PIC) Skid  

SciTech Connect

Attached is the completed Operation Test Procedure (OTP-200-004, Rev. A-19 and Rev. A-20). OTP includes a print out of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Ladder Diagram. Ladder Diagram was designed for installation in the PLC used to monitor and control pumping activity for Tank Farm 241-U-102. The completed OTP and OTR are referenced in the IS PIC Skid Configuration Drawing (H-2-829998).

KOCH, M.R.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Operational Test Report (OTR) for U-103 Pumping and Instrumentation and Control (PIC) Skid  

SciTech Connect

Attached is the completed Operation Test Procedure (OTP-200-004, Rev. A-16). OTP includes a print out of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Ladder Diagram. Ladder Diagram was designed for installation in the PLC used to monitor and control pumping activity for Tank Farm 241-U-103. The completed OTP and OTR are referenced in the 25 PIC Skid Configuration Drawing (H-2-829998).

KOCH, M.R.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Operational Test Report (OTR) for U-105 Pumping and Instrumentation and Control (PIC) Skid  

SciTech Connect

Attached is the completed Operation Test Procedure (OTP-200-004, Rev. A-18). OTP includes a print out of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Ladder Diagram. Ladder Diagram was designed for installation in the PLC used to monitor and control pumping activity for Tank Farm 241-U-105. The completed OTP and OTR are referenced in the IS PIC Skid Configuration Drawing (H-2-829998).

KOCH, M.R.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)  

SciTech Connect

This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Abundance and distribution of macro-crustaceans in the intake and discharge areas before and during early operation of the Cedar Bayou Generating Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Stations 4 and 5 varied from 3. 0 to 4. 0 m. The substrate at these two stations was silt and clay, with a very high content of organic debris. Trinity Bay, Discharge Area Each of shoreline Stations 6, 9, 19, 21, and 24 were located at 1610 m (I mile...ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF MACRO-CRUSTACEANS IN THE INTAKE AND DISCHARGE AREAS BEFORE AND DURING EARLY OPERATION OF THE CEDAR BAYOU GENERATING STATION A Thesis by MONROE SCHMIDT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

Schmidt, Monroe

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports  

SciTech Connect

This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)  

SciTech Connect

The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454.

Gilbert, J.L.

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Operational Arome New Arome version in test Radar observation Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a new version of our Earth-System model has been prepared to guarantee our contributions to the upcoming 5th IPCC report. Consultations with IPSL have started to share a larger part of the Earth System modelling infrastructure. Re- search has largely contributed to the gro- wing offer of Météo

Ribes, Aurélien

334

A new emergency lubricating-oil system for steam turbine generators: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A positive-displacement pump, powered by a turbine-shaft driven permanent magnet generator (PMG) can be used to provide lubricating oil over nearly the entire turbine generator speed range. The concept offers high reliability through its simplicity; switchgear, batteries and other auxiliaries are eliminated by hard-wiring the PMG to the pump induction drive motor. In this study, an existing PMG supplying power to the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system was evaluated as the power supply for an induction motor-driven screw pump running in a ''wafting'' mode as a backup to a conventional dc emergency oil system. The screw pump rotates all the time that the turbine shaft turns; check valves allow it to deliver oil instantly if the system pressure falls. It was found that the pump drive motor would start and run reliably with no adverse effects on the PMG or the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system. 6 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

Kalan, G.L.; Oney, W.R.; Steenburgh, J.H.; Elwell, R.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

Statistical NP Generation: A First Report M. Poesio, R. Henschel, J. Hitzeman, y R. Kibble x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). As part of the GNOME project, 1 whose goal is to develop general­purpose NP generation algorithms, we have the decision algorithm. 1 The home page of the project is at http://www.cogsci.ed.ac.uk/ gnome. 1 #12; #15 are a good way of producing such output. (1) a. Jessie M. King, the Liberty artist, was not just a jewelry

Poesio, Massimo

339

Airblast and ground vibration generation and propagation from contour mine blasting. Report of investigations/1984  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines studied airblast and ground vibrations produced by surface coal mine blasting in Appalachia to determine the topographic or other region-specific effects on generation and propagation. Arrays of seismographs were used to measure blast effects in both rolling-terrain and steep-slope contour coal mining areas. Comparisons were then made with previous blasting data from studies of midwest coal mines located in flat areas.

Stachura, V.J.; Siskind, D.E.; Kopp, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Second generation heliostat. Volume II. Definition of a heliostat manufacturing facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The heliostat design is described. A study is performed to provide the definition of a heliostat manufacturing facility capable of producing 50,000 heliostats per year and to generate the manufacturing costs associated with that level of production. The heliostat plant site, plant layout, and cost of the plant are discussed. The manufacture of heliostats, including special requirements for the heliostat mirror, and production costs are given. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

In support of Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, 'Containment Emergency Sump Performance,' 11 nuclear power plants representative of different U.S. reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. A preliminary assessment was made of the potential effects of insulation debris generated as the result of a loss-of-coolant accident (pipe break).

Reyer, R.; Gahan, E.; Riddington, J.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)  

SciTech Connect

Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

NONE

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ris-R-Report 12MW: final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the scientific basis relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project started 1st char.): `12MW: final report' is for the project with the full title `12 MW wind turbines

345

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan 1990-1999 : Environmental Strategy. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

In operating and maintaining its regional power transmission system, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must address environmental concerns. Pollution sources and pathways for pollution migration, including potential contamination from hazardous or toxic materials, are present. BPA must develop and follow precautionary measures, respond to emergencies, minimize wastes, redress past problems, alert and train employees to problems and safety needs, constantly evaluate this effort and update the program for improvements and changes in regulations and technology. Part of BPA's mission is to conduct its operation, maintenance, and replacement programs in an environmentally sound manner. BPA recognizes its responsibility to be good stewards of the environment. BPA will meet its environmental obligations as set forth in environmental laws and regulations. BPA intends to make consistent and measurable progress toward meeting these responsibilities. The target for the 10-Year Plan is to achieve environmental compliance and meet the following goals: (1) protect human health and the environment; (2) avoid or limit liability (3) set up an effective internal management structure to maintain compliance; and (4) achieve cost-effective compliance. 6 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Conversion of methanol to gasoline. Operation of the demonstration plant. Milestone report  

SciTech Connect

The 100 BPD fluid-bed methanol to gasoline (MTG) demonstration plant operation has exceeded the original process objectives. Specifically, the results show: stable unit operation is achieved with excellent gas/catalyst mixing resulting in complete methanol conversion; bed temperature control is readily accomplished, although the process is highly exothermic; catalyst attrition is low, which confirms the mechanical strength of the catalyst - the small make-up used for activity control at normal conditions exceeds the low attrition rate; process parameters can be varied to obtain the desired gasoline yield and quality; and engineering design parameters have been confirmed at the pilot plant stage and a scale-up to a commercial-size MTG fluid-bed system is now deemed feasible. The results obtained gave a broad basis for the conceptual design of a coal-based commercial-size plant for the production of MTG gasoline. This study is presently in preparation and will be completed by the middle of 1985. The conceptual design will be based on a 2500 tonnes/day methanol plant feeding a single MTG fluid-bed reactor. Six trains will be used for a maximum plant capacity of 15,000 tonnes/day. 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Edwards, M.; Gierlich, H.; Gould, R.; Thiagarajan, N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation Ivy. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The radiological environments are reconstructed for eighteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak, Kwajalein, and Bikini Atolls that received fallout following Shots MIKE and KING during Operation IVY (November 1952). Secondary (late-time) fallout from Shot MIKE was the primary contributor to the low-level radiation encountered on the majority of the ships and atolls; only the M/V HORIZON received primary (early-time) fallout from this event. Fallout from Shot KING was minimal. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated and compared with available dosimetry data for fourteen of the ships. Calculated doses for the majority of the ships are in good agreement with the film badge data; however, for three of the participating destroyers (DDEs), calculated doses are significantly lower than the dosimetry data indicates. Calculated mean doses for typical shipboard personnel range from a high of 0.062 rem on the HORIZON to a low of 0.001 rem on the SPENCER F. BAIRD; for island-based personnel, calculated mean doses are less than 0.06 rem.

Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.; Klemm, J.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

SciTech Connect

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Lessons Learned Report on the Combined Construction and Operating License/Design Certification Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power 2010 Program Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report August 30, 2012 Prepared by Longenecker and Associates DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not

356

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Analysis of radiation exposure, Task Force RAZOR. Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The radiation dose to Task Force RAZOR personnel participating in Shot Apple II of Operation Teapot, Exercise Desert Rock VI, is reconstructed. Task force personnel were exposed to initial radiation while in their vehicles or in trenches at the time of Apple II detonation. They were also exposed to residual radiation during their subsequent manuever and during an inspection of the equipment display area. The calculated total gamma doses to fully-participating Task Force RAZOR personnel range from about 0.8 rem to 1.8 rem. The highest dose was received by personnel of the armored infantry platoon on right flank nearest ground zero. Internal radiation dose commitments to maximally exposed personnel inside vehicles are estimated to be about 0.4 rem to the thyroid, 0.003 rem to the whole body, and 0.002 rem to the bone.

Edwards, R.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.

1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

1999 Annual Report on Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress as Required by DOE Order 5400.1  

SciTech Connect

Hanford's missions are to safely clean-up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or clean-up mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infrastructure, and site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The clean-up activity is an immense and challenging undertaking. Including characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues.

SEGALL, P.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

Seitz, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups. For the last group a self-propelled system with an onboard self-contained power and welding system is required. (4) Pipe size range requirements range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.) in diameter. The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.) diameter, with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe.

Ian D. Harris

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

Summers, D.A.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Office of Inspector General report on audit of Department of Energy management and operating contractor available fees  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Procurement and Assistance Management has proposed changes to the method used to annually calculate and negotiate ``for profit`` management and operating contractor available fees. This proposal will increase contractor fees in exchange for the contractor`s purported assumption of additional risk. In 1991, the Department, through the Accountability Rule, increased contractor fees as an incentive to improve contractor performance and accountability. Despite the lack of measurable benefits of this effort, the Department is crafting a new fee policy which will, depending upon how it is executed, increase fees above the amount provided through the Accountability Rule as an incentive to the Department`s management and operating contractors. The objective of the audit was to determine whether the Department`s proposed change to the fee structure for determining management and operating contractor fees will be cost effective. This report describes the study`s approach, its findings and recommendations, management and auditor comments, and includes appendices with further data.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.  

SciTech Connect

Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION Survey Contact Name:__________________________________________ Title:___________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________________________________

371

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) feasibility study (FS) presented in this document completes the FS process only through the first two study phases: Phase I, Remedial Alternatives Development, and Phase II, Remedial Alternatives Screening in accordance with CERCIA guidance for performing Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) (EPA 1988a). This Phase I/II study provides a generalized view of workable remedial technologies as applied to the site contamination problems as a whole. Phase III, Detailed Analysis of Alternatives, will be performed at a later date to further evaluate screened alternatives based on the nine criteria in the CERCLA RI/FS guidance. The purpose of this Phase I/II FS is to develop and screen a range of alternatives for remediation of contamination present in the vadose zone of the 300-FF-1 OU. The scope of work for this Phase I/II FS includes five primary tasks: 1. Review existing documents and their associated data from relevant investigations and studies; 2. Establish remedial action objectives (RAO) and general response actions (GRA); 3. Identify applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) pertinent to all general response actions (including waste disposal); 4. Develop remedial alternatives (Phase I) applicable to the 300-FF-1 OU including identification and screening of technologies and process options, and assembly of remedial alternatives from representative technology types; 5. Screen alternatives (Phase II) developed in Phase I for implementability, effectiveness, and cost to identify those alternatives which warrant advancement to the detailed analysis phase (Phase III) of the FS.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Report on Testing to Expand the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Operating Envelope  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Equipment Group requested that the Numatec Hanford Corporation--Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL) perform Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Operating Envelope (OE) testing. This testing was based upon Witwer 1998a and was performed at different time periods between May and September 1998. The purpose of this testing was to raise the maximum down force limit for rotary mode core sampling as outlined in the current OE. If testing could show that a higher down force could be used while drilling into a concrete/pumice block simulant while still remaining below the 60 C limitation, then the current OE could be revised to include the new, higher, down force limit. Although the Test Plan discussed varying the purge flow rate and rotation rate to find ''optimal'' drilling conditions, the number of drill bits that could be destructively tested was limited. Testing was subsequently limited in scope such that only the down force would be varied while the purge flow rate and rotation rate were kept constant at 30 scfm and 55 rpm respectively. A second objective, which was not part of the original test plan, was added prior to testing. The Bit Improvement testing, mentioned previously, revealed that the drill bits tested in the OE testing were made of a slightly different metal matrix than the ones currently used. The older bits, a Longyear part number 100IVD/5 (/5 bit), had tungsten carbide mixed into the metal matrix that forms the cutting teeth. The currently used bits, Longyear part number 100IVD/8 (/8 bit), instead have tungsten metal in the matrix and no tungsten carbide. Rockwell C hardness testing showed that the /5 bit was significantly harder than the /8 bit, with values of /8 vs. 8, respectively. The change from the /5 bit to the /8 bit was made immediately after the previous OE testing in 1996 because of sparking concerns with the tungsten carbide in the /5 bit. This difference in hardness between the two bit materials was discovered in the Bit Improvement Testing and was expected to affect this OE testing. The second objective, therefore, was to quantify what affect this change in material had and define the OE, based on the current /8 bit design rather than the old /5 bit design.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls, South Carolina: Final operations and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prior to construction, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (BREC) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Number FC07-80ID12125 which provided $1,052,664 toward the construction of the facility. This agreement requires that BREC document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operating and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. A complete reporting covering the design, technical, construction, legal, institutional, environmental and other related aspects of the total project was furnished to DOE previously for publication as the ''Final Technical and Construction Cost Report''. For this reason these elements will not be addressed in detail in this report. In order to make this account a more meaningful discussion of the initial two-year and four month production period, it is necessary to detail several unique events concerning the project which set Cherokee Falls apart from other projects developed under similar Cooperative Agreements with DOE. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance cost and value of the power produced for the first 28 months of operation. 3 figs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Form EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year: 2013 Year: 2013 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and disclosure information, see the provisions stated on the last page of the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. SCHEDULE 1. IDENTIFICATION Survey Contact Name:__________________________________________ Title:___________________________________________

378

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program; Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

There were 2 acclimation periods at the Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period, 130,748 smolts were delivered from Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on 7 March. This group contained progeny of both the captive (53%) and conventional broodstock programs. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.9 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 14 March 2005 and ended 27 March with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 3,187) of 29,402 fish leaving the raceways. This was 22.5% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left around 1900 hours. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.9 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.2 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 204 (0.16%). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the early period was 130,544. During the second acclimation period 59,100 smolts were delivered from LGH on 28 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.8 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 3 April 2005 and ended with a force out emergency release on 7 April. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 21.8. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 64 (0.11 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 59,036. There was only 1 planned acclimation period at the Upper Grande Ronde Acclimation Facility (UGRAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period 105,418 smolts were delivered from LGH on 8 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.0 fish/lb. There was no volitional release in 2005 due to freezing air and water conditions prompting an early release. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 49 (0.05 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 105,369. Maintenance and repair activities were conducted at the acclimation facilities in 2005. Facility maintenance work consisted of snow removal, installation of drainage lines, removal of gravel from intake area, installation of new gate at the CCAF, and complete overhaul of 2 travel trailers. The Catherine Creek Adult Capture Facility (CCACF) was put into operation on 11 February 2005. The first adult summer steelhead was captured on 4 March. A total of 190 adult summer steelhead were trapped and released from 4 March to 16 May 2005. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 8 April. The first adult spring Chinook salmon was captured at CCACF on 6 May 2005. A total of 226 spring Chinook salmon were trapped from 6 May to 8 July 2005. There were 56 adults and 4 jacks unmarked and 136 adult and 30 jack marked spring Chinook salmon trapped. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 10 June for the unmarked and marked fish. None of the captive broodstock returns were collected for broodstock. Broodstock was collected systematically over the entire return from 31 May to 6 July 2005. Ten of the 34 broodstock collected and transported from CCACF to LGH were unmarked fish trapped. About 18% of the naturally produced adult males and females trapped were taken to LGH for broodstock. One jack was collected for every 5 adult males that were taken to LGH. A total of 30 age 4 and 5 and 4 age 3 fish were transported to LGH for broodstock. The hatchery component of the broodstock was 66.7%. Five weekly spawning surveys were conducted below the weir on Catherine Creek beginning 30 June 2005. During these surveys no live or dead fish were observed. The trap was removed from Catherine Creek on 3 August 2005. Temperatures at the CCACF ranged from -0.1 C on 14 February to 23.7 C on 21 July. The hourly temperatures at the adult trap during the period of operation showed that the lowest water temperatures

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800°C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3?m which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

Yamamoto,, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, K. G. [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, K. [ORNL] [ORNL; Pint, B. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, L. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

380

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] 1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] READER'S GUIDE The Final EIS/EIR is organized to assist the reader's understanding of the complex operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Organization of Documents The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports: Volume I. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives. Volume II. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume I and also provide additional information and references. Appendix E was originally identified in

383

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 5  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 5 of Volume IV, discusses: Corrective maintenance procedures; Calibration procedures; Surveillance procedures; Equipment changeover procedures; Decontamination procedures; Recovery procedures; and Cable schedule.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Complexity Science-Based Framework for Global Joint Operations Analysis to Support Force Projection: LDRD Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

Lawton, Craig R.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Report on Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at Richland Operations, IG-0378  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 INFORMATION: Report on "Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at the Richland Operations Office" The Secretary BACKGROUND: On June 3, 1993, the Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Inspections issued a Letter Report to the Department's Acting Chief Financial Officer which stated that during Fiscal Year 1993 the Department had requested and received $60 million, double the funding needed, for the safeguard and security of special nuclear material at the Richland Operations Office. In response to that Report, the Acting Chief Financial Officer took control of the funds and placed them into a management reserve account. A follow-up inspection was initiated to:

389

Report on Matters Identified at the Richland Operations Office During the Audit of the Department's Consolidated Fiscal Year 1996 Financial Statements, WR-FS-97-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT ON MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE DURING THE AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT S CONSOLIDATED FISCAL YEAR 1996 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its audit reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov

390

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of (1) > 47% thermal efficiency; (2) NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {<=}25% NSPS; (3) cost {>=}65% of heat input; (4) all solid wastes benign. In our design consideration, we have tried to render all waste streams benign and if possible convert them to a commercial product. It appears that vitrified slag has commercial values. If the flyash is reinjected through the furnace, along with the dry bottom ash, then the amount of the less valuable solid waste stream (ash) can be minimized. A limitation on this procedure arises if it results in the buildup of toxic metal concentrations in either the slag, the flyash or other APCD components. We have assembled analytical tools to describe the progress of specific toxic metals in our system. The outline of the analytical procedure is presented in the first section of this report. The strengths and corrosion resistance of five candidate refractories have been studied in this quarter. Some of the results are presented and compared for selected preparation conditions (mixing, drying time and drying temperatures). A 100 hour pilot-scale stagging combustor test of the prototype radiant panel is being planned. Several potential refractory brick materials are under review and five will be selected for the first 100 hour test. The design of the prototype panel is presented along with some of the test requirements.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

High temperature process steam application at the Southern Union Refining Company, Hobbs, New Mexico. Solar energy in the oil patch. Final report, Phase III: operation, maintenance, and performance  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the technical reports for Phase III of this project. The third phase included the operation, maintenance, upgrade and performance reporting of a 10,080 square foot Solar Industrial Process Heat System installed at the Famariss Energy Refinery of Southern Union Refining Company near Hobbs, New Mexico. This report contains a description of the upgraded system, and a summary of the overall operation, maintenance and performance of the installed system. The results of the upgrade activities can be seen in the last two months of operational data. Steam production was significantly greater in peak flow and monthly total than at any previous time. Also monthly total cost savings was greatly improved even though natural gas costs remain much lower than originally anticipated.

Wilson, L.E.; McGuire, D.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Valves - current operating experience of slurry valves (block and letdown) in coal liquefaction processes. Third quarter report  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the recent letdown and block valve experience in the liquefaction pilot plants. Also included is a brief description of the research and development activities on valves which are conducted in supporting laboratories. The purpose of the summary is to concentrate on critical component problems common to all liquefaction plants, to avoid duplication of efforts, and to help provide timely solutions to the valve problems. The main source of information used in this paper is the Minutes of the Critical Component and Materials Meeting which is sponsored by the Office of Coal Processing, Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. Other sources of information such as the technical progress reports are also included based on availability and relevance to topics covered in this paper. It is intended that this report will be followed by updates as pertinent information concerning valves becomes available. In the subsequent sections of this paper a brief outline of past valve studies is given as background material followed by a summary of the most recent valve operating experience at the liquefaction plants.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of WECC and the Compounding Effect of Wind and Solar Generation  

SciTech Connect

It is the intent of this analysis to examine the operational benefits of increased cooperation between a large number of WECC operating regions.

Jordan, G.; Piwko, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of electrolysis-cell separator for 125/sup 0/C operation. Advanced alkaline electrolysis cell development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the findings of a seven-month contracted effort. The major technical task involved a 125/sup 0/C operating temperature test of the 20 v/o polybenzimidazole (PBI) - 80 v/o potassium titanate (K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) separator in combination with the nickel-molybdenum cathode electrocatalyst system dubbed the C-AN cathode using the ARIES test system which was developed previously. The test of the PBI-K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/ separator was only partially successful. The anticipated 1.85 (75/sup 0/C) and 1.75 volt per cell (100/sup 0/C) input requirement at 550 ma/cm/sup 2/ were surpassed slightly. The test module operated stably for about 550 hr. Although there were some mechanical difficulties with the ARIES test unit, testing at 125/sup 0/C proceeded from 745 hr on test until the test was terminated at 2318 operating hours to allow diagnostic disassembly. The input voltage degraded to a value of 1.82 volt per cell at 125/sup 0/C which is unacceptable. Diagnostic disassembly showed the PBI portion of the separator was no longer present. PBI had been shown to be stable in 123/sup 0/C, 45 w/o KOH solutions in a 1000-hr test. The attack is suggested to be attributable to a peroxide or perchlorate type oxidizer which would be unique to the electrolysis mode and probably not present in alkaline fuel cell applications. Recommendations for further testing include an evaluation of the chemical compatibility of PBI with alkaline/oxidizer solutions and endurance testing the C-AN cathode with new improved anode structures at 125/sup 0/C using asbestos separators in combination with a silicate saturated KOH electrolyte. Demonstration of the stability of this 1.65 volt per cell (90% voltage efficiency) technology at 500 ma/cm/sup 2/ will document an inexpensive and intelligent hydrogen production process which will satisfy the needs of the United States in the 1990s.

Murray, J N

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Second generation heliostat development detailed design report. Volume I. Technical discussion. Period covered: July 16, 1979-April 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Presented are the design of the second generation heliostat, the development of the manufacturing plan, the method of transporting the heliostats from the factory to the installation site, heliostat installation procedures, and the maintenance routines. These plans are then cost estimated to provide inputs required to develop the installed cost of the heliostat and further, the cost of owning, operating and maintaining a collector field. It is a dual axis tracking heliostat with a central pedestal mount. The normal show position is vertical but under anticipated extreme high wind conditions it is driven to a horizontal orientation with the reflective surfaces facing up. The gross face area of the heliostat is approximately 25 feet by 25 feet. Due to mirror module spacing and edge treatment the net reflective area is 568 square feet or 52.8 square meters. Each mirror module is nominally 4 feet by 12 feet with a 3 inch depth. Twelve modules comprise the mirror array for each heliostat. The mirror support rack consists of open roof-type trusses which are combined with tubular members which connect to the drive unit. The drive unit is gear-driven with separate motors and gear systems for azimuth and elevation. The foundation for the drive consists of a one-piece cylindrical pipe which is driven into the soil at the site by conventional pile-driving techniques. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

Howard Forsythe

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

R. P. Wells

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

US/USSR cooperative program in open-cycle MHD electrical power generation: joint test report No. 4. Tests in the U-25B facility: MHD generator tests No. 6 and 7  

SciTech Connect

A description of the main results obtained during Tests No. 6 and 7 at the U-25B Facility using the new channel No. 2 is presented. The purpose of these tests was to operate the MHD generator at its design parameters. Described here are new plasma diagnostic devices: a traversing dual electrical probe for determining distribution of electron concentrations, and a traversing probe that includes a pitot tube for measuring total and static pressure, and a light detector for measuring plasma luminescence. Data are presented on heat flux distribution along the channel, the first data of this type obtained for an MHD facility of such size. Results are given of experimental studies of plasma characteristics, gasdynamic, thermal, and electrical MHD channel performance, and temporal and spatial nonuniformities. Typical modes of operation are analyzed by means of local electrical analyses. Computer models are used to obtain predictions for both localized and overall generator characteristics. These theoretical predictions agree closely with the results of the local analyses, as well as with measurements of the overall gasdynamic and electrical characteristics of the generator.

Picologlou, B F; Batenin, V M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The analysis and specification of large high-pressure, high-temperature valves for combustion turbine protection in second-generation PFB power plants: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to provide a specification for the high-pressure/high-temperature valves for turbine overspeed protection in a commercial-scale second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. In the event of a loss of external (generator) load, the gas turbine rapidly accelerates from its normal operating speed. Protection from excessive overspeed can be maintained by actuation of fuel isolation and air bypass valves. A design specification for these valves was developed by analyses of the turbine/compressor interaction during a loss of load and analyses of pressure and flow transients during operation of the overspeed protection valves. The basis for these analyses was the Phase 1 plant conceptual design prepared in 1987.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Interface and Electrode Engineering for Next-Generation Organic Photovoltaic Cells: Final Technical Report, March 2005 - August 2008  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to enable next-generation, efficient, easily manufacturable, and durable organic photovoltaics through interface and electrode engineering.

Mason, T. O.; Chang, R. P. H.; Freeman, A. J.; Marks, T. J.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

INTRODUCTION This report documents an investigation into the possibility of privatizing the civil engineering operations in the Louisiana Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and accounting services provided to civil engineering activities in the Offices of Engineering, Multimodal engineering operations in the Louisiana Department ofTransportation and Development (DOTD).The study was requested to "study the possibility of privatizing civil engineering operations in the Department

Harms, Kyle E.

404

Type B accident investigation board report of the July 2, 1997 curium intake by shredder operator at Building 513 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On July 2, 1997 at approximately 6:00 A.M., two operators (Workers 1 and 2), wearing approved personal protective equipment (PPE), began a shredding operation of HEPA filters for volume reduction in Building 513 (B-513) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The waste requisitions indicated they were shredding filters containing {le} 1 {micro}Ci of americium-241 (Am-241). A third operator (Worker 3) provided support to the shredder operators in the shredding area (hot area) from a room that was adjacent to the shredding area (cold area). At Approximately 8:00 A.M., a fourth operator (Worker 4) relieved Worker 2 in the shredding operation. Sometime between 8:30 A.M. and 9:00 A.M., Worker 3 left the cold area to make a phone call and set off a hand and foot counter in Building 514. Upon discovering the contamination, the shredding operation was stopped and surveys were conducted in the shredder area. Surveys conducted on the workers found significant levels of contamination on their PPE and the exterior of their respirator cartridges. An exit survey of Worker 1 was conducted at approximately 10:05 A.M., and found contamination on his PPE, as well as on the exterior and interior of his respirator. Contamination was also found on his face, chest, back of neck, hair, knees, and mustache. A nose blow indicated significant contamination, which was later determined to be curium-244.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Plutonium Intake between August 4, 1996, and February 10, 1997, by a Crane Operator at the Savannah River Site F-Canyon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of an accident investigation board appointed by Dr. Mario P. Fiori, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

406

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 1, 2004 through to April 14, 2004 and a total of 250,249 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2002 egg source and included captive brood (133,781) and conventional (116,468) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2004 began May 10, the first Chinook was captured on May 19, 2004 and the last Chinook was captured on September 16, 2004. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2004. A total of 1,091 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 299 natural origin fish and 792 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 46 natural and 69 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to Lookingglass Hatchery for holding and spawning, 537 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 447 hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 107 adults retained (eight additional hatchery females were collected and then later returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally) for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 22 natural females and 30 supplementation females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 221,889 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 94.9% which yielded a total of 210,661 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,267 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage and then transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they will be reared to the fingerling stage. They will then be transported back to LGH and reared to the smolt stage and then transported to the Lostine acclimation facility for release in the spring of 2006. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 3, 2003 through to April 14, 2003 and a total of 242,776 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2001 egg source and included captive broodstock (141,860) and conventional broodstock (100,916) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2003 began April 30th, the first Chinook was captured on May 16, 2003 and the last Chinook was captured on September 21, 2003. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2003. A total of 464 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 239 natural origin fish and 225 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 45 natural and 4 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 366 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 49 hatchery origin adult jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 49 adults retained for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 21 natural females and no hatchery origin females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 106,609 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 95.50% which yielded a total of 101,811 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 5,077 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage. At eye they were transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they were reared to the fingerling state at which time they were transported back to LGH until they were smolts in the spring of 2005. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2005.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from 3/5/07 through to 4/17/07 and a total of 230,010 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2005 egg source and included captive brood (24,604) and conventional (205,406) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2007 began May 14th. The first Chinook was captured on June 2, 2007 and the last Chinook was captured on September 25, 2007. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2007. A total of 637 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 240 natural origin fish and 397 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 41 natural and 81 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 403 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and only hatchery origin jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek in underseeded habitat. Of the 122 adult fish retained for broodstock, 20 natural females and 40 supplementation females were represented in spawning. The eggs from these females produced a total of 267,350 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 86.73% which yielded a total of 231,882 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,456 eggs per female. These eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until they are smolts in the spring of 2009. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2009. Due to the success of the 2007 egg collection, the number of fish produced exceeded program needs and facility capabilities. As a result, there are plans to outplant fry in 2008 and parr in early 2009 to underseeded habitat in the Wallowa River.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 4, Comments and responses  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains copies of the written comments and transcripts of individual statements at the public hearing and the responses to them.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 1, Text  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 3, Appendices F--M  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices F through M. Appendix L has been revised to reflect public information activities since publication of the Draft EIS/EIR. These appendices provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2, Appendices A--D  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task I  

SciTech Connect

Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal-fired, closed-cycle MHD power generation are reported. This volume contains the following appendices: (A) user's manual for 2-dimensional MHD generator code (2DEM); (B) performance estimates for a nominal 30 MW argon segmented heater; (C) the feedwater cooled Brayton cycle; (D) application of CCMHD in an industrial cogeneration environment; (E) preliminary design for shell and tube primary heat exchanger; and (F) plant efficiency as a function of output power for open and closed cycle MHD power plants. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

W4E HYDROPOWER DIRECT DRIVE IN-LINE HYDROTURBINE GENERATOR FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE VALIDATION TESTING REPORT MAY 2013 ALDEN LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

The W4E is a patent-pending, direct-drive, variable force turbine/generator. The equipment generates electricity through the water dependent engagement of a ring of rotating magnets with coils mounted on a stator ring. Validation testing of the W4e was performed at Alden Laboratories in the Spring of 2013. The testing was independently observed and validated by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. The observations made during testing and the results of the testing are included in the Test Summary Report

Cox, Chad W [GZA GeoEnvironmental,Inc.] [GZA GeoEnvironmental,Inc.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 32nd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXII) that were received on or before June 5, 1990. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 39th report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

Operation Castle. Project 7. 1. Electromagnetic radiation calibration, Pacific )roving ground. Report for March-May 1954  

SciTech Connect

A total of 17 stations, one close-in (320 km from Bikini and 23 km from Eniwetok) and the balance at distances, were operated for the electromagnetic experimental effort. Seventy-four sets of data were obtained from a possible total of 102. Of the remaining 28 sets, no data were obtained because equipment was not in operation, records were not readable, the alert notifications were not received, signals were not discernible, or equipment malfunctioned.

Olseon, M.H.

1984-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to analyze the impacts of the proposed action. In addition, this document discusses a no action alternative for continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative focused on specific adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative. This document also examines the alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. The environmental documentation process provides information to the public, government agencies, and decision makers about the environmental impacts of implementing the proposed and alternative actions. In addition, this environmental documentation identifies alternatives and possible ways to reduce or prevent environmental impacts. A list of the issues raised through the EIS/EIR scoping process is presented.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermionic power generation. January 1970-December 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for January 1970-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research on thermionic power generation, power plant design, converter design, and basic research on thermionic materials are cited in the bibliography. Spacecraft applications are also included. (Contains 138 citations, fully indexed and including a table of contents.)

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

New approaches for the reduction of plasma arc drop in second-generation thermionic converters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of ion generation and recombination mechanisms in the cesium plasma as they pertain to the advanced mode thermionic energy converter are described. The changes in plasma density and temperature within the converter have been studied under the influence of several promising auxiliary ionization candidate sources. Three novel approaches of external cesium ion generation have been investigated in some detail, namely vibrationally excited N/sub 2/ as an energy source of ionization of Cs ions in a DC discharge, microwave power as a means of resonant sustenance of the cesium plasma, and ion generation in a pulse N/sub 2/-Cs mixture. The experimental data obtained and discussed show that all three techniques - i.e. the non-LTE high-voltage pulsing, the energy transfer from vibrationally excited diatomic gases, and the external pumping with a microwave power - have considerable promise as schemes in auxiliary ion generation applicable to the advanced thermionic energy converter.

Hatziprokopiou, M.E.; Shaw, D.T.

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Responses to Frequently Asked Questions on DOE O 232.2, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The intent of the Responses to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on DOE O 232.2 is to provide additional insights for DOE facility personnel consideration and judgment when categorizing reportable occurrences in accordance with the Occurrence Reporting Criteria contained in DOE O 232.2.

422

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 28th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVIII) that were received on or before June 7, 1988. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semiannually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 27th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVII) that were received on or before December 3, 1987. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

An integrated computer-based training simulator for the operative personnel of the 800-MW power-generating unit at the Perm District Power Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integrated computer-based training simulator for an 800-MW power-generating unit is described. Its capacities for training the personnel of the boiler-turbine and chemical departments are shown.

N. Yu. Pevneva; V. N. Piskov; A. N. Zenkov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Regional operations research program for commercialization of geothermal energy in the Rocky Mountain basin and range. Final technical report, January 1980-March 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work accomplished from January 1980 to March 1981 in the Regional Operations Research efforts for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Geothermal Commercialization Program. The work included continued data acquisition and extension of the data base, enhancement and refinement of the economic models for electric and direct use applications, site-specific and aggregated analyses in support of the state teams, special analyses in support of several federal agencies, and marketing assistance to the state commercialization teams.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. 16th quarterly technical progress report, December 16, 1980-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The successful design of full-scale, open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. Progress in efforts to model the efficiency of an open-cycle, coal-fired MHD channel based on the characterization of the channel flow as well as laboratory experiments to validate the modeling effort is reported. In addition, studies related to understanding arcing and corrosion phenomena in the vicinity of an anode are reported.

Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.; Kolb, C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cheng, W.; Dvore, D.; Freedman, A.; Stanton, A.; Stewart, G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary-1992.html[6/24/2011 3:44:58 PM] Summary-1992.html[6/24/2011 3:44:58 PM] EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and

428

Advanced dexterous manipulation for IED defeat : report on the feasibility of using the ShadowHand for remote operations.  

SciTech Connect

Improvised Explosive Device (IED) defeat (IEDD) operations can involve intricate operations that exceed the current capabilities of the grippers on board current bombsquad robots. The Shadow Dexterous Hand from the Shadow Robot Company or 'ShadowHand' for short (www.shadowrobot.com) is the first commercially available robot hand that realistically replicates the motion, degrees-of-freedom and dimensions of a human hand (Figure 1). In this study we evaluate the potential for the ShadowHand to perform potential IED defeat tasks on a mobile platform.

Anderson, Robert J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Operation of a low temperature absorption chiller at rating point and at reduced evaporator temperature. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The returned SAM 015 (fifteen ton Solar Absorption Machine) chiller was given a cursory visual inspection, some obvious problems were remedied, and then it was placed on a test stand to get a measure of dirty performance. It was then given a standard acid clean, the water side of the tubes was brushed clean, and then the machine was retested. The before and after cleaning data were compared to equivalent data taken before the machine was shipped. The second part of our work statement was to experimentally demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating the chiller at evaporator temperatures below O/sup 0/C (32/sup 0/F) and identify any operational problems.

Best, R.; Biermann, W.; Reimann, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task 1  

SciTech Connect

Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal fired, closed cycle, magnetohydrodynamic power generation are detailed. These accomplishments relate to all system aspects of a CCMHD power generation system including coal combustion, heat transfer to the MHD working fluid, MHD power generation, heat and cesium seed recovery and overall systems analysis. Direct coal firing of the combined cycle has been under laboratory development in the form of a high slag rejection, regeneratively air cooled cyclone coal combustor concept, originated within this program. A hot bottom ceramic regenerative heat exchanger system was assembled and test fired with coal for the purposes of evaluating the catalytic effect of alumina on NO/sub x/ emission reduction and operability of the refractory dome support system. Design, procurement, fabrication and partial installation of a heat and seed recovery flow apparatus was accomplished and was based on a stream tube model of the full scale system using full scale temperatures, tube sizes, rates of temperature change and tube geometry. Systems analysis capability was substantially upgraded by the incorporation of a revised systems code, with emphasis on ease of operator interaction as well as separability of component subroutines. The updated code was used in the development of a new plant configuration, the Feedwater Cooled (FCB) Brayton Cycle, which is superior to the CCMHD/Steam cycle both in performance and cost. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 29th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXIX) that were received on or before December 2, 1988.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1989-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Process Improvements in Pratt & Whitney's Deficiency Report Investigation Process: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study describes Pratt & Whitney's process improvement activities on its deficiency report (DR) investigation process for the F100 engine program between 2004 and 2006. The DR investigation process is a customer ...

Colatat, Phech

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Solvent refined coal process: operation of the solvent refined coal pilot plant, Wilsonville, Alabama. First quarter report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the operating conditions and test results obtained during the first quarter of 1981 at the six ton per day solvent refined coal (SRC-I) pilot plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. The plant operated for approximately two-thirds of the period with a scheduled shutdown, from 22 February to 17 March, accounting for most of the downtime. Kentucky 9 coal from the Fies mine was processed throughout the period. The following potential process improvements and tests were evaluated in the respective process units. SRC Unit: Low severity run tests to evaluate SRC reactor conditions for two-stage liquefaction; process solvent quality studies while simulating demonstration plant conditions with low quality process solvent (anthracene oil); operation of the new, reduced volume and residence time, V103 High Pressure Separator; Evaluation of the hot separator mode of operation; and adjustment of the T102 Vacuum Column operation to determine if it can produce a combined trays 3 and 8 stream that would be an acceptable process solvent (95% boiling at over 450/sup 0/F). CSD Unit: Steam stripping of SRC and LSRC to reduce product-related DAS losses; and ambient and cryogenic SRC sampling comparisons for DAS determination tests. Pressure checking of the hydrotreater unit was completed, and the Dowtherm system was placed in service. Solvent circulation was initiated in the unit as efforts continued to verify equipment performance.

Lewis, H.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Evaluation of the photovoltaic generation potential and real-time analysis of the photovoltaic panel operation on a building facade in southern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar photovoltaic systems are an alternative to the current model of power generation, supplying clean energy with little environmental impact and no significant losses associated with distribution networks. This study aims to obtain data on electricity generation in real time for a photovoltaic panel installed in the city of Lajeado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, comparing the electric power generation of the photovoltaic panel with the solar radiation data of the city, obtained with the use of a pyranometer. Data from incident solar radiation, measured in the city, on the period of 2007–2012 were used. Comparisons with data from power generation of the photovoltaic panel and assessment of the solar potential were performed. The photovoltaic panel has an area of 16.5 m2 and was installed on the campus of UNIVATES University Center, arranged so that it faces the true north and tilted at an angle of 24°, for better utilization of solar radiation incident along the year. At the end of this phase of the study, it was obtained an average power generation of 11.0 kWh/day and efficiency of the modules in the order of 12.6%.

João Vicente Akwa; Odorico Konrad; Gustavo Vinícius Kaufmann; Cezar Augusto Machado

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

SciTech Connect

During the period October 1, 2003-December 31, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) continued with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations, including evaluating new sources of biomass supply. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

SciTech Connect

During the period April 1, 2003--June 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operation. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work also involved preparing a draft final report. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included a presentation at the Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Investigation of Small Wind-Turbine Induction Generators : Final Technical Report, September 16, 1980-December 31, 1982.  

SciTech Connect

A new and accurate experimental set-up was developed to test induction machines in the 1-5 kW range. Two single-phase induction generators were tested - the Enertech 1500 and Enertech 1800. A detailed mathematical model to evaluate the performance of single-phase induction generators was developed and documented in the form of a FORTRAN computer simulation program. Then the program was used to analyze the Enertech 1800 and the results were compared with the test results. (LEW)

Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Boardman, Ethan C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Downhole steam-generator study. Volume I. Conception and feasibility evaluation. Final report, September 1978-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility evaluation of a downhole steam generator was performed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International, under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, from September 1978 to September 1980. The study was conducted in four phases: (1) selection of a preliminary system design, (2) parametric analysis of the selected system, (3) experimental studies to demonstrate feasibility and develop design data, and (4) development of a final system design based on the parametric and experimental results. The feasibility of a low pressure combustion, indirect contact, downhole steam generator system was demonstrated. Key results from all phases of the study are presented herein.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Generating Renewable Energy for New Student  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Generating Renewable Energy for New Student Union Building Using Solar Cells Muhammad Usman Rizwan, Malihsa are jobs that promote environmental solutions to problems. These jobs for solar cells include will provide enough solar energy to power the SUB as long as a proper storage unit is installed as well. Also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "operable generators reporting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.