Sample records for open geospatial consortium

  1. The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 The Open Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube An EarthCube Technology Paper Prepared by David information that is used by the entire geosciences community. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC open source standards for sharing geospatial and observational information. The authors of this paper

  2. Geospatial Web Services, Open Standards, and Advances in Interoperability: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Cynthia

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geospatial Web Services 2. Standards for Geospatial Web Services 2.1 ISO/TC211 Standards 2.2 Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Standards 2.3 Additional Standards Resources 3. Geospatial Web Services?Special Topics 3.1 Approaches... (ies), message styles, and program coding to publish objects on the Web. Most geospatial Web services adhere to geospatial standards, developed primarily by the International Standards Organization/Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC211), the Open...

  3. April 16, 2012 GEOSHARE: Geospatial Open Source Hosting of Agriculture, Resource &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    April 16, 2012 GEOSHARE: Geospatial Open Source Hosting of the key recommendations in its recently launched report. The geospatial data

  4. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6th congressional(EC-LEDS) | Open-

  5. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6th congressional(EC-LEDS) | Open-

  6. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6th congressional(EC-LEDS) | Open-

  7. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

  8. for the Open Source Modelica Consortium December 4, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    1 BYLAWS for the Open Source Modelica Consortium (OSMC) December 4, 2007 Adopted at the statutory Source Modelica Consortium, abbreviated as OSMC. The association has its seat in Linkping, Sweden. 1 and promoting the development and usage of the OpenModelica open source implementation of the Modelica computer

  9. Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kbben, Barend

    OSMGB OSMGB Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain A use case of integrating a variety of open-source geospatial tools is presented in this paper of the volunteer nature of the commu- nity, many open-source geospatial tools have been developed around OSM

  10. An Open GeoSpatial Standards-Enabled Google Earth Application to Support Crisis Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    An Open GeoSpatial Standards-Enabled Google Earth Application to Support Crisis Management Scott-863-7943 Email: @psu.edu ABSTRACT Google Earth (GE) and related open geospatial technologies have changed both the accessibility of and audience for geospatial information dramatically

  11. Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kbben, Barend

    Selected Papers from FOSS4G 2013: OSGeo's Global Conference for Open Source Geospatial Software 1 Introduction Over the past decades, geospatial information technology has reached a significant level the submissions to the Academic Track of FOSS4G 2013, the global conference for Open Source Geospatial Software

  12. Use of Geospatial Analyses for Semantic Ashish Karmacharya1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Use of Geospatial Analyses for Semantic Reasoning Ashish Karmacharya1,2 , Christophe Cruz2 , Frank been presented in CAA 2009 [6]. #12;The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) plays a major role to develop a consensus among different stakeholder on various aspect of geospatial technology. The OGC is concerned

  13. 2005, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc. 2005, Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc. OGC Web Services: IntegratingOGC Web Services: Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for NASA)(Why WMS for NASA) Sam A. Bacharach Executive Director, Outreach www.opengeospatial.org 703 Buildings Roads Images Targets Boundaries ... Catalog View Common interfaces enable interoperability Queries

  14. Recent content in Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay County,Open Energy InformationGeospatial

  15. LifeMapper: Open Source Geospatial Tools for the Biological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Aimee

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lifemapper 2.0 Using and Creating Geospatial Data and Open Source Tools for the Biological Community Aimee Stewart, CJ Grady, Dave Vieglais, Jim Beach Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Institute University of Kansas Overview Overall Goals...

  16. Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submitCollector/ReceiverConflictConsiderationConsortium

  17. India-US Lab Consortium Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) | OpenConsortium

  18. Geospatial - Q & A | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6th congressional(EC-LEDS) | Open- Q

  19. Consortium on Digital Energy CoDE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentrating SolarConsortium on Digital Energy CoDE Jump to:

  20. Standards in Genomic Science: An Open-Access Journal of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Garrity, George

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    George Garrity of Michigan State University talks about the GSC's open-access journal SIGS at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  1. Standards in Genomic Science: An Open-Access Journal of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, George

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    George Garrity of Michigan State University talks about the GSC's open-access journal SIGS at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  2. EUHYFIS Hydrogen Filling Station Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to:(RES-AEI) | OpenEUHYFIS Hydrogen

  3. Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth America DrillingCaliforniaNorthern RioInformation

  4. US Advanced Battery Consortium USABC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa | OpenSolarUQM

  5. Consortium of Chemical International Ltd CCIL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| OpenCongress,Consolidated Edison Sol IncNew

  6. Geospatial | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geospatial Geospatial June 27, 2011 - 3:20pm Addthis Addthis Related Articles Geospatial Science Program Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National Conference...

  7. GEO-PROCESSING IN CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE: MAKING THE WEB AN EASY TO USE GEOSPATIAL COMPUTATIONAL PLATFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    GEO-PROCESSING IN CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE: MAKING THE WEB AN EASY TO USE GEOSPATIAL COMPUTATIONAL Geospatial Consortium, Crofton, MD 21114, USA gpercivall@opengeospatial.org b MINES ParisTech, Sophia standards from IETF and W3C. Access to explicitly geospatial data is routinely done using data access

  8. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  9. Genomic Standards Consortium's Eighth Annual Meeting: Opening Remarks (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Dawn

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dawn Field of the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology presents the overview of the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  10. Data Models and Query Languages for Linked Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Data Models and Query Languages for Linked Geospatial Data Manolis Koubarakis, Manos Karpathiotakis,mk,kkyzir,charnik,sioutis}@di.uoa.gr Abstract. The recent availability of geospatial information as linked open data has generated new interest in geospatial query processing and reasoning, a topic with a long tradition of research in the areas

  11. Enabling online geospatial isotopic model development and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Enabling online geospatial isotopic model development and analysis Hyojeong Lee1 , Lan Zhao1 leverages the computation resources available on the TeraGrid to perform geospatial data operations and geostatistical model calculations. It builds on a variety of open source technologies for GIS, geospatial data

  12. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geo-Spatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquini, Luca [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Crichton, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Miller, Neill [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Mattmann, Chris [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Harney, John F [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Bell, Gavin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Drach, Bob [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ananthakrishnan, Rachana [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Pascoe, Stephen [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, NCAS/BADC; Kershaw, Philip [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, NCAS/BADC; Gonzalez, Estanislao [German Climate Computing Center; Fiore, Sandro [Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change; Schweitzer, Roland [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Danvil, Sebastian [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Des Sciences de L'Environnement; Morgan, Mark [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Des Sciences de L'Environnement

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  13. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Bell, Gavin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Cinquini, Luca [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Crichton, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Danvil, Sebastian [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Des Sciences de L'Environnement; Drach, Bob [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fiore, Sandro [Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change; Gonzalez, Estanislao [German Climate Computing Center; Harney, John F [ORNL; Mattmann, Chris [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kershaw, Philip [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, NCAS/BADC; Miller, Neill [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Morgan, Mark [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Des Sciences de L'Environnement; Pascoe, Stephen [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, NCAS/BADC; Schweitzer, Roland [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  14. Geospatial knowledge for territorial intelligence Pr. Robert Laurini Geospatial Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurini, Robert

    Geospatial knowledge for territorial intelligence Pr. Robert Laurini Geospatial Knowledge Management Objective: Sustainable development #12;Geospatial knowledge for territorial intelligence Pr;Geospatial knowledge for territorial intelligence Pr. Robert Laurini Generic and specific knowledge

  15. Geospatial Science Steering Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geospatial Science Steering Committee (GSSC) functions in an advisory role to the DOE national laboratories, major facilities, and to headquarters and field office elements to actively promote...

  16. GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY The market for geospatial technologies in 2002 was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY The market for geospatial technologies in 2002 was estimated at $5 billion, Annulis,Carr) Building the Geospatial Workforce, Urban and Regional Informational Systems Association Special Education Issue, 2002) Geospatial products and specialists are expected to play a large role

  17. Preserving Geospatial Data: The National Geospatial Digital Archive's Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane, Greg

    Preserving Geospatial Data: The National Geospatial Digital Archive's Approach Greg Jane; University of California at Santa Barbara; Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract The National Geospatial Digital the question: How can we preserve geospatial data on a national scale and make it available to future

  18. Bytecode unification of geospatial computable models Bytecode unification of geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kbben, Barend

    Bytecode unification of geospatial computable models Bytecode unification of geospatial computable models by Jan Kolr Grifinor Project. jan.kolar@grifinor.net Abstract Geospatial modelling revolves heterogeneous to fix and reuse. Field-based and objects-based geospatial models of- ten share common GIS data

  19. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Standard Operating Procedures May 20, 2013 Executive Summary The Geospatial, reporting requirements, and business processes for acquiring and providing geospatial

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

  1. Advancing Solutions for an EarthCube Design. What can be learned from the CUAHSI HIS experience?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Geospatial Consortium and EarthCube" being submitted by David Maidment describes how an Open Geospatial 1 Hooper examines how the Open Geospatial Consortium's Observations and Measurement (O&M) profile can, publication, and analysis

  2. Geospatial Semantics for Topographic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usery, Lynn

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Geospatial Semantics for Topographic Data E. Lynn Usery http://cegis.usgs.gov usery@usgs.gov 11th Annual GIS Day @ KU 2 Objectives Present semantics of geospatial data from USGS... perspective Provide basis for creating geospatial semantic data in machine readable form from existing data Provide examples of using geospatial semantics for mapping and connecting USGS data with other data 3 Outline Background The National...

  3. Automated Methods for Interpreting Geospatial Natural Language Dr Kristin Stock, Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University of Nottingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    NaturalGeo Automated Methods for Interpreting Geospatial Natural Language Dr Kristin Stock, Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University of Nottingham 2012-2014 What is geospatial natural language diagrams best match 2000 geospatial natural language expressions. The results will populate our

  4. Web 2.0 and Geospatial Convergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiss, Geoff

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    2005 Autodesk 1 Web 2.0 and Geospatial Convergence Geoff Zeiss, Director of Technology 6th Annual GIS Day @ KU Symposium 2005 Autodesk 2 Worldwide Challenges 2005 Autodesk 3 Global Climate Change The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided... is Developing New Technologies 2005 Autodesk 14 Location-enabling IT GIS Ge ne ral IT Ge ne ral IT Ge osp ati al en ab led 2005 / 2006 Examples: Web search, RDBMS, CAD, architectural design, engineering, 2005 Autodesk 15 Open Standards October 2007...

  5. Geospatial Data Store Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geospatial Data Store Colorado School of Mines White Paper February 2006 Martin Spann, Adjunct Professor EPICS #12;2 A Geospatial Data Store Contents Executive Summary Proposed Budget (short version) General Information Geospatial Data Geospatial Data Store Library Geospatial Committee Academic

  6. A Geospatial Analysis on Empirical Distribution with Applications to Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Level 3 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Geospatial Analysis . . . . . . . . .5 Geospatial Lattice Analysis byof California Los Angeles A Geospatial Analysis on Empirical

  7. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,JumpValleyTopicsGeorgia/WindGeorgia:GsT)

  8. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being

  9. geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel's Home Kyoung'sandreasfundinggeospatial

  10. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXAGarnet VRXRate-MakingConferenceToolkit

  11. OpenEI Community - geospatial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0 en The Energybegun!

  12. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) |Information 6th congressional(EC-LEDS) |

  13. John E. Hasse, Geospatial Research Lab,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ap Executive Summary July 2010 John E. Hasse, Geospatial Research Lab Geospatial Research Laboratory Department of Geography Rowan University 201 Mullica Hill Road Glassboro by John Reiser, GIS specialist for the Rowan Geospatial Research Laboratory. http

  14. Geospatial Analysis School of Forest Resources &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Geospatial Analysis GIS 4121 School of Forest Resources & Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 4121 Geospatial Analysis INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr MATERIALS: de Smith, MJ, Goodchild, MF, & Longley, PA (2010). Geospatial Analysis (3rd ed.). Leicester

  15. CENTER FOR GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    1 CENTER FOR GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Center for Geospatial Technology is to promote, facilitate and support the application of geospatial technologies in interdisciplinary research, education and community service. VISION STATEMENT

  16. NEW BSE EMPHASIS: Geospatial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) Geospatial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW BSE EMPHASIS: Geospatial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) Geospatial Engineering The Geospatial Engineering pathway was defined to study geospatial concepts that include and metadata formats, and visualization. The approved plan reflects state-of-the-art geospatial research

  17. Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial-Intelligence to the Dismounted James E. Richards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial. #12;2 [This Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;3 Army`s Geospatial Architecture: delivering Geospatial-Intelligence of complex and urban terrain to the dismounted Soldier by James E. Richards ABSTRACT The Army`s Geospatial

  18. Semantics and Ontologies for Geospatial Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Semantics and Ontologies for Geospatial Information Dr Kristin Stock #12;Introduction The study of semantics addresses the issue of what data means, including: 1. The meaning and nature of basic geospatial constructs. 2. How the meaning of geospatial data can be determined. 3. How the meaning of geospatial data

  19. EXTENDING GEOSPATIAL REPOSITORIES WITH GEOSEMANTIC PROXIMITY FUNCTIONALITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXTENDING GEOSPATIAL REPOSITORIES WITH GEOSEMANTIC PROXIMITY FUNCTIONALITIES TO FACILITATE THE INTEROPERABILITY OF GEOSPATIAL DATA Jean Brodeur a, b , Yvan Bdard a a Centre for Research in Geomatics, Laval.Bedard@scg.ulaval.ca Commission IV, WG IV/1 KEY WORDS: Geospatial data interoperability, Geospatial repository, Geosemantic

  20. Identifying Patterns in Geospatial Natural Language Kristin Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Identifying Patterns in Geospatial Natural Language Kristin Stock Nottingham Geospatial Institute University of Nottingham Abstract The automated interpretation of geospatial be suitable as an approach to the representation of geospatial natural language that supports

  1. Intagorn et al. Harvesting Geospatial Knowledge from Social Metadata Harvesting Geospatial Knowledge from Social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lerman, Kristina

    Intagorn et al. Harvesting Geospatial Knowledge from Social Metadata Harvesting Geospatial Institute lerman@isi.edu ABSTRACT Up-to-date geospatial information can help crisis management community of the social photo-sharing site Flickr to learn geospatial concepts and relations. Our method leverages

  2. A Geospatial Analysis on Empirical Distribution with Applications to Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Level 3 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Geospatial Analysis . . . . . . . . .5 Geospatial Lattice Analysis byFour Months CHAPTER 3 Geospatial Analysis In this chapter, I

  3. Use Case Compendium of Derived Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Mike J.

    The realisation that everything happens somewhere has driven widespread commercial and non-commercial thirst for geospatial data. The ability to collect, handle and distribute geospatial information has proven of major ...

  4. Geospatial Intelligence at the Environmental Protection Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Casey

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Geospatial Intelligence at the Environmental Protection Agency Casey McLaughlin, GISP Mclaughlin.casey@epa.gov http://blog.epa.gov/bigbluethread GIS DAY 2012 2 Kansas Was an Ocean Protect Human Health and the Environment ? Develop... Whats GeoSpatial National Projects What we do regionally 4 http://nationalmap.gov/ustopo/history.html Cartography Roots 5 Chat Piles Waste Discharge EPA Cleans up Waste Geospatial Intelligence Geospatial Intelligence: it is the means...

  5. Geographica: A Benchmark for Geospatial RDF Stores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Geographica: A Benchmark for Geospatial RDF Stores George Garbis, Kostis Kyzirakos, and Manolis. Geospatial extensions of SPARQL like GeoSPARQL and stSPARQL have recently been defined and corresponding geospatial RDF stores have been implemented. However, there is no widely used bench- mark for evaluating

  6. Automotive Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive Components from Structural Composites Automotive Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive Components from Structural...

  7. Stakeholder Consortium Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Stakeholder Consortium Meeting March 22, 2013 Susan Riha Director, NYS Water Resources Institute of regional water planning / inefficiencies "Build it they will come" has resulted in significant excess Resources Institute #12;#12;NYS POTW Design Flows 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960

  8. Montana State University 1 Geospatial &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Geospatial & Environmental Analysis Option Freshman Year (equiv to 270) GPHY 357 - GPS Fund/App in Mapping 3 GPHY 384 - Adv GIS and Spatial Analysis 3 University GIS & Spatial Analysis 3 Choose one of the following: 3 NRSM 430 - Natural Resource Law PSCI 362

  9. Geospatial Science and Technology for Bioenergy Modeling the Sustainability of the National Bioenergy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensing, and geospatial data services. With High Performance Computing (HPC), global geospatial data

  10. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  11. Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise : synchronizing geospatial-intelligence to the dismounted soldier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, James E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Army's Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) has an emerging identity and value proposition arising from the need to synchronize geospatial information activities across the Army in order to deliver value to military decision ...

  12. Geospatial Data Integration with Linked Data and Provenance Andreas Harth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil, Yolanda

    Geospatial Data Integration with Linked Data and Provenance Tracking Andreas Harth Karlsruhe report on our experiences with integrating geospatial datasets using Linked Data technologies. We describe NeoGeo, an integration vocabulary, and an integration scenario involving two geospatial datasets

  13. Structural Alignment Methods with Applications to Geospatial Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz, Isabel F.

    Structural Alignment Methods with Applications to Geospatial Ontologies Isabel F. Cruz and William Methods Keywords: ontology alignment, geospatial ontologies, data integration, semantic web Corresponding correspondences between their con- cepts. We have tested our methods on geospatial ontologies pertaining

  14. An algebraic approach to automated geospatial information fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worboys, Mike

    An algebraic approach to automated geospatial information fusion Matt Duckham , Mike Worboys using the example of geospatial land cover data. The method is then extended to operate under web. Keywords interoperability, qualitative spatial reasoning, geospatial ontology, uncer- tainty

  15. Hierarchical multi-touch selection techniques for collaborative geospatial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wartell, Zachary

    Hierarchical multi-touch selection techniques for collaborative geospatial analysis Thomas and military use. Keywords: Multi-touch, hierarchical selection, geospatial analysis, GIS, collaborative selection of complex regions-of-interest within a hierarchical geospatial environment, as well as methods

  16. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  17. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  18. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank Vincent [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  19. Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2011 to accelerate the development and deployment of new, lower cost carbon fiber composite materials. The Consortium draws on the broad experience that the Oak Ridge National...

  20. DCC Briefing Paper: Curating Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarva, Guy

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    , and recreation; in fact, almost all activities rely on geospatial data to some extent. It is widely accepted that the majority of all data held in corporate and government databases include some kind of geospatial characteristics. Such data are important not only...

  1. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

  2. Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Dr. Jose Olivares of Los...

  3. GNSS Driving Innovation in the Geospatial Industry/Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    GNSS Driving Innovation in the Geospatial Industry/Community Don Grant Associate Professor in Geospatial Science, RMIT University GNSS Futures UNSW, Sydney, 7-8 July 2014 #12;Outline Does my topic;So is this even the right topic? Is GNSS driving geospatial innovation? Or are geospatial

  4. Geospatial Mapping K12 (GMap) 5th Annual Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Geospatial Mapping K12 (GMap) 5th Annual Workshop Oct 18-20, 2013 The Geospatial Mapping K12Teacher to collect, analyze, and map geospatial data on the Colorado Plateau.The project involves mapping two. Use GIS, GPS, and other geospatial technologies to enhance the understanding of issues and facilitate

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis: Geospatial Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNRELPowerNewsletter ArchiveThomasYiminGeospatial

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  7. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  8. geospatial data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel's Home Kyoung'sandreasfunding

  9. OpenEI Community - geospatial data

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0 en The Energybegun!

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  15. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) â?? Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : â?¢ Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. â?¢ Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. â?¢ Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. â?¢ Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. â?¢ Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. â?¢ Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. â?¢ Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. â?¢ Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  16. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  17. Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USDA awards 1 million eor e. coli research by Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Consortium February 29, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 29, 2012-Researchers from...

  18. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  19. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  20. Draft of Preliminary Syllabus Applying Geospatial Analysis-Project Based Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Draft of Preliminary Syllabus Applying Geospatial Analysis- Project Based Learning Listed as, and analysis (2) formulate and evaluate research questions relating to geospatial approaches (3) learn geospatial techniques (4) learn data management, data conversion, and data analysis (5) apply geospatial

  1. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkadi, N.; Starke, M.; Ma, O.; Nimbalkar, S.; Cox, D.; Dowling, K.; Johnson, B.; Khan, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption...

  2. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LTC University Consortium A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines Acknowledgements DOE LTC Consortium project...

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  4. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, clean coal combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered allowable under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  5. The Geospatial Information Sciences Yulia R. Gel, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    The Geospatial Information Sciences Program Presents Yulia R. Gel, PhD Associate Professor Society (TIES). GeospatialInformationSciences ColloquiumSeries (Light lunch will be served from 1pm 1

  6. 3D/4D geospatial visualization using Makai Voyager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    3D/4D geospatial visualization using Makai Voyager John C. Anderson Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc-based, geospatially-enabled software that can fuse and visualize large, multi-variable data sets that change in space

  7. Geospatial technologies and digital geomorphological mapping: Concepts, issues and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Geospatial technologies and digital geomorphological mapping: Concepts, issues and research Michael visualization was primarily relied upon for analysis, introducing subjectivity and biases with respect and rapidly evolving geospatial technologies. Consequently, new capabilities exist but numerous issues have

  8. BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results...

  9. Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy Didier Leibovici, Gobe Hobona, Kristin Stock and Mike Jackson Centre for Geospatial Sciences, University.leibovici@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract--Sharing geospatial data and geoprocessing models within a system like GEOSS (Global Earth

  10. SWING: An Integrated Environment for Geospatial Semantic Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Jrg -FR 6.2

    SWING: An Integrated Environment for Geospatial Semantic Web Services Mihai Andrei1 , Arne Berre2, France, first-initial . last @brgm.fr Abstract. Geospatial Web services allow to access and to process Geospatial data. Despite significant standardisation efforts, severe heterogeneity and inter- operability

  11. Enhancing the Benefits of Geospatial Data NNeebbrraasskkaaMMAAPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Enhancing the Benefits of Geospatial Data NNeebbrraasskkaaMMAAPP http://www.NebraskaMAP.gov Improving Access to Geospatial Data for Nebraskans More than 80% of the decisions made in government and the private sector are based on analyses of geospatial data. Such decisions involve property valuation

  12. Sextant: Browsing and Mapping the Ocean of Linked Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Sextant: Browsing and Mapping the Ocean of Linked Geospatial Data Charalampos Nikolaou, Kallirroi {charnik,kallirroi,kkyzir,koubarak}@di.uoa.gr Abstract. Linked geospatial data has recently received available on the Web. With the rapid population of the Web of data with geospatial information, applications

  13. SexTant: Visualizing Time-Evolving Linked Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    SexTant: Visualizing Time-Evolving Linked Geospatial Data Konstantina Bereta1 , Charalampos SexTant, a Web-based system for the visualiza- tion and exploration of time-evolving linked geospatial geospatial data has recently received attention as researchers and prac- titioners have started tapping

  14. Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    1 GIS 553 Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications Spring 2014 Final project risk assessment and fuels management planning. Geospatial analysis and fire modeling can provide excellent insight for evaluating complex fire management issues. ArcFuels10 incorporates geospatial analysis

  15. Towards a Discipline of Geospatial Distributed Event Based Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    Towards a Discipline of Geospatial Distributed Event Based Systems Annie Liu Computer Science, Caltech 1200 E California Blvd Pasadena, CA 91125, USA mani@cms.caltech.edu ABSTRACT A geospatial system is one in which the state space in- cludes one, two or three-dimensional space and time. A geospatial

  16. User Requirements for Geospatial Provenance Daniel Garijo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil, Yolanda

    User Requirements for Geospatial Provenance Daniel Garijo1 , Yolanda Gil2 , and Andreas Harth3 1 dgarijo@fi.upm.es, gil@isi.edu, harth@kit.edu Abstract. The surge in availability of geospatial data sources, the increased use of crowdsourced maps and the advent of geospatial mashups have brought us

  17. Challenges in Modeling Geospatial Provenance Daniel Garijo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil, Yolanda

    Challenges in Modeling Geospatial Provenance Daniel Garijo1 , Yolanda Gil2 , and Andreas Harth3 1 dgarijo@fi.upm.es, gil@isi.edu, harth@kit.edu Abstract. The surge in availability of geospatial data sources, the increased use of crowdsourced maps and the advent of geospatial mashups have brought us

  18. Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    1 GIS 553 Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications Spring 2012 Final project Analysis of Golf Shot Locations 3 Mark Busing Geospatial and Geostatistical Analysis of Colorado River Data Overturf Estimating Wetland Acreage with USGS DEMs and Auxiliary Public Sources #12;2 Geospatial

  19. DSTO-TR-0672 Implementation of a Geospatial Imagery Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawick, Ken

    DHPC-047 DSTO-TR-0672 Implementation of a Geospatial Imagery Digital Library using Java and CORBA P a prototype distributed system for managing and accessing a digital li- brary of geospatial imagery over a wide-area network. The system conforms to a subset of the Geospatial and Imagery Access Services (GIAS

  20. Structure-based Methods to Enhance Geospatial Ontology Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz, Isabel F.

    Structure-based Methods to Enhance Geospatial Ontology Alignment William Sunna and Isabel F. Cruz 60607, USA [wsunna,ifc]@cs.uic.edu Abstract. In geospatial applications with heterogeneous on a set of geospatial ontologies pertaining to the domain of wetlands and on four sets that belong

  1. Modeling and Detection of Geospatial Objects Using Texture Motifs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 Modeling and Detection of Geospatial Objects Using Texture Motifs Sitaram Bhagavathy, Member- teristic spatially recurrent patterns for modeling and detecting geospatial objects. A method is proposed. We then emphasize the utility of such models for detecting the presence or absence of geospatial

  2. National Geospatial Digital Archive University of California at Santa Barbara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane, Greg

    National Geospatial Digital Archive Greg Jane University of California at Santa Barbara #12;Greg Jane Geospatial data preservation workshop 2006-10-27 2 Overview One of 8 NDIIPP projects funded of geospatial data Preservation architecture & prototype archive single-digit terabytes CaSIL: GIS

  3. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems COMPUTATION WITH IMPRECISE GEOSPATIAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worboys, Mike

    Computers, Environment and Urban Systems 1 COMPUTATION WITH IMPRECISE GEOSPATIAL DATA MICHAEL collections of geospatial data. Imprecision is clearly a major dimension of spatial data quality, arising from associated with geospatial data sets that can be used with both single data sets and distributed

  4. Exploring Geospatial Music Listening Patterns in Microblog Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    Exploring Geospatial Music Listening Patterns in Microblog Data David Hauger and Markus Schedl that integrates these diverse pieces of information mined from music-related tweets. Including geospatial" as seen by the "Twittersphere". Keywords: microblogs, geospatial music taste, music listening patterns 1

  5. Generating Descriptions that Summarize Geospatial and Temporal Data Martin Molina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Martn

    pattern analysis, etc. In addition, geospatial and temporal data summarization can be combined with domainGenerating Descriptions that Summarize Geospatial and Temporal Data Martin Molina Department a knowledge-based method for automatically generating summaries of geospatial and temporal data, i.e. data

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  7. Certificate in Geospatial Technology The School of Earth, Environment, and Society offers a graduate certificate in Geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Certificate in Geospatial Technology The School of Earth, Environment, and Society offers a graduate certificate in Geospatial Technology. The purpose of the certificate program is to provide graduate students with training in geospatial theory, research design, and its application in fields

  8. Exergy Consortium Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources(RECP)CoolersExcelsior,ExelonExergy

  9. Adelaide Solar Citizens Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to:Ohio: Energy955°,6671°,Multiphase FlowsAdelaide

  10. Consortium for Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentrating Solar

  11. Consolidated Construction Consortium Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:WindOil andBasics (The

  12. The Solar Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to:UncertaintySocial Carbon

  13. Alice Solar City Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisinInformation ASHRAE 169-2006AlgoilAlice Solar City

  14. Florida Biomass Energy Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,andJump to: navigation, searchFlorida

  15. A geospatial analysis of market integration: the case of the 2004/5 food crisis in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORIGINAL PAPER A geospatial analysis of market integration:dominance of the A geospatial analysis of market integrationsegments and A geospatial analysis of market integration

  16. Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, Robyn [University of Massachusetts Boston] [University of Massachusetts Boston

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

  17. GIS and Geospatial applications Assignment 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GIS and Geospatial applications Assignment 7 Point Pattern Analysis By: Leigh Stuemke Presented to Analysis allows GIS users to infer spatial relationships among their datasets using both visual. We then utilized point pattern analysis methods to determine if we should reject or fail to reject

  18. Developing Geospatial Intelligence Stewardship for Multinational Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeff

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    , Directs reachback analysis Improved Situational Awareness/Understanding Greater Common Operational Picture Survey A detailed survey to a broad multinational audience consisting of Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, Multinational, Industry...Developing Geospatial Intelligence Stewardship for Multinational Operations Jeff Thomas, BA, MPPA, MS Major, US Army Corps of Engineers Student, Space Operations US Army Command & General Staff College Fort Leavenworth, Kansas GIS Day @ KU Nov 18...

  19. ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0 May, 2012 Walter and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history. #12;ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial....................................................................................................................................22 Geospatial technology

  20. Performance Evaluation and Analysis Consortium End Station |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    highlighting the "bucket" algorithm from UIUC. Credit: Leonid Oliker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Performance Evaluation and Analysis Consortium End Station PI Name:...

  1. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  2. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  3. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  4. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high...

  5. A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium 1 8/18/10 A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann Executive Documentation Consortium," it would leverage the efforts and commitments of multiple agencies, such as NOAA in the deployment of ISOcompliant documentation. Such exemplars can be found in a growing and diverse set

  6. Lab Subcontractor Consortium provides grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab Subcontractor Consortium

  7. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  8. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  9. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High...

  10. SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Blades SMART Wind Consortium Composites Subgroup Virtual Meeting: Advanced...

  11. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission...

  12. Sandia Energy - Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

  13. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and...

  14. DOE Announces Webinars on Algal Biofuels Consortium Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algal Biofuels Consortium Research Results, Solar Energy Maps, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Algal Biofuels Consortium Research Results, Solar Energy Maps, and More June 10,...

  15. US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    US Geological Survey, Geospatial Information Response Team Team Charter Revised December 15, 2010 Information Response Team (GIRT). Purpose--The primary purpose of the Geospatial Information Response Team will be designated to provide linkage to the hazard response teams, such as the Operational and Scientific Storm

  16. GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR MOBILE FIELD DATA COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR MOBILE FIELD DATA COLLECTION Sarah Nusser and Leslie Miller, and natural resources. These data are gathered largely by mobile field data collection. Although geospatial-linked data, it is nearly always used in printed forms due to limitations in mobile computing systems

  17. PHOTOREALISTIC BUILDING MODELING AND VISUALIZATION IN 3-D GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    PHOTOREALISTIC BUILDING MODELING AND VISUALIZATION IN 3-D GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION SYSTEM Yonghak: Despite geospatial information systems are widely used in many different fields as a powerful tool in geospatial information system (GIS). Such 3-D photorealistic visualization is able to provide geospatial

  18. A Case of Visual and Interactive Data Analysis: Geospatial Redescription Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Case of Visual and Interactive Data Analysis: Geospatial Redescription Mining Esther Galbrun1ucken, Germany, pmiettin@mpi-inf.mpg.de Abstract. We present a method for visual and interactive geospatial redescription mining. The goal of geospatial redescription mining is to characterize geospatial areas using two

  19. Visualization of Heterogeneous GeoSpatial Intelligence in a Mobile Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodha, Suresh K.

    Visualization of Heterogeneous GeoSpatial Intelligence in a Mobile Environment Srikumar Ramalingam for visualization of heterogeneous geospatial information in a synchronous manner. Geospatial reg- istration between to enable location awareness for the mobile agents. Querying of geospatial databases is supported to obtain

  20. National Aggregates of Geospatial Data Collection: Population, Landscape And Climate Estimates, Version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 National Aggregates of Geospatial Data Collection: Population, Landscape And Climate Estimates of Geospatial Data: Population, Landscape and Climate Estimates Version 3 (PLACE III), Palisades, NY: CIESIN.............................................................................................................. 16 #12;2 I. Introduction The National Aggregates of Geospatial Data collection converts geospatial

  1. Geospatial Science Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003NotEnergyProgram Geospatial Science

  2. Geospatial Science Steering Committee | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003NotEnergyProgram Geospatial

  3. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos April 7, 2014 Laboratory can help groom next generation of arms- control-technology experts LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 7, 2014-A...

  4. DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DTC DATA MINING CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS I Collaboration with leading companies I BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY DRUG DISCOVERY BUSINESS SALES & MARKETING AUTOMOTIVE CRM GOVERNMENT CYBER SECURITY Creation Analysis Optimization Scalable Database Mining Auto-Mining Agents CUTTING-EDGE CAPABILITIES

  5. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 1920, 2011.

  6. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 2526, 2011.

  7. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  8. Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biometric Consortium 2004 Conference R. JAMES WOOLSEY Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton 8283 joined Booz Allen Hamilton in July 2002 as a Vice President and officer in the firm's Global Resilience

  9. Proc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalerchuk, Boris

    ., Seattle, WA, 98178 ABSTRACT Geospatial data analysis relies on Spatial Data Fusion and Mining (SDFMProc. SPIE 8396, Geospatial InfoFusion II, 83960N (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.920878 Modeling spatial uncertainties in geospatial data fusion and mining Boris Kovalerchuka* , Leonid Perlovskyb

  10. Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Project Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GIS 551 Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2011 Project Presentation Date Presenter and White-tailed Deer Analysis and Management Plan Using GIS 12-8 Amy Urbanovsky & Ricardo Romero Bike Racks

  11. Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Project Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GIS 551 Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2012 Project Presentation Date Presenter Zhengyi Wang GIS Tools for Hydrology Analysis 12-6 Ross Maynard Melissa Bozarth Using GIS to Evaluate

  12. Extracting Geospatial Preferences Using Relational Neighbors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Sandholm, Thomas; Nunes, Iury; Nbrega, Caio; Arajo, Jordo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing popularity of location-based social media applications and devices that automatically tag generated content with locations, large repositories of collaborative geo-referenced data are appearing on-line. Efficiently extracting user preferences from these data to determine what information to recommend is challenging because of the sheer volume of data as well as the frequency of updates. Traditional recommender systems focus on the interplay between users and items, but ignore contextual parameters such as location. In this paper we take a geospatial approach to determine locational preferences and similarities between users. We propose to capture the geographic context of user preferences for items using a relational graph, through which we are able to derive many new and state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms, including combinations of them, requiring changes only in the definition of the edge weights. Furthermore, we discuss several solutions for cold-start scenarios. Finally, we con...

  13. GeoComputational Intelligence and High-Performance Geospatial Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Qingfeng

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoComputational Intelligence and High-performance Geospatial Computing Qingfeng (Gene) Guan, Ph.D Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies School of Natural Resources University of Nebraska - Lincoln GIS Day @ University... of Kansas Nov. 16th, 2011 Contents 1. Computational Science and GeoComputation 2. GeoComputational Intelligence - ANN-based Urban-CA model 3. High-performance Geospatial Computing - Parallel Geostatistical Areal Interpolation - pRPL and pSLEUTH 4. Conclusion...

  14. in Proceedings of the 26th Annual ESRI International User Conference (San Diego, USA) 2006. MULTIROLE GEOSPATIAL DATA INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    . MULTIROLE GEOSPATIAL DATA INFRASTRUCTURE NUNES, Luis SILVA, Alberto Abstract The Geographic Institute maintenance, and the Multinational Geospatial Coproduction Program from several areas of the Globe. This paper describes a Geospatial Data Infrastructure (GDI), an integrated and operational system to provide

  15. A geospatial analysis of market integration: the case of the 2004/5 food crisis in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems (GIS) and related geospatial technology (e.g. GPS,and the influence of geospatial technology on democracy.He has also served as a geospatial technology expert/

  16. Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishiguchi, Michele

    Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the Southwestern United and decision products will be based on geospatial modeling coupled with field experiments and draw on a wealth

  17. Geospatial and Temporal Semantic Analytics Matthew Perry, Amit Sheth, Ismailcem Budak Arpinar, Farshad Hakimpour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpinar, I. Budak

    1 Geospatial and Temporal Semantic Analytics Matthew Perry, Amit Sheth, Ismailcem Budak Arpinar thematic knowledge of entities and their relationships with geospatial knowledge for purposes of semantic analysis and discovery. Next generation geoinformatics applications that can successfully combine knowledge

  18. Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Analysis Instructor: Dr. I-Kuai Hung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GIS 551 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2010 Outcomes: Students will demonstrate competency in the fundamentals of GIS and geospatial analysis system for the management, analysis, and display of geographic information. GIS includes a set

  19. Geospatial Data-sharing in UK Higher Education: informal repositories and users perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robin S.

    This report outlines research into the sharing of geospatial datasets by researchers based in UK universities as part of the GRADE project, a scoping exercise for the creation of a geospatial data ...

  20. Christine L. Harvey, M.S. Page 1 CHRISTINE L. HARVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    ) Department of Advanced Geospatial Modeling and Simulation: Perform geospatial engineering supporting the Phantom Works CEMSA project (Complex Events Modeling Simulation and Analysis) Developed prototype P components Voting member of the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) #12;Christine L. Harvey, M.S. Page 2

  1. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  2. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by enabling higher fuel burnups Enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability integrity Violation of safety limits Reduces cost of electricity Essentially expands existing nuclearPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

  3. Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    in Fig. 2, the gas fuel (such as propane C3H8) and oxygen leaving the torch combust into a high of the heat is transported away through radiation and advection with the combustion gas and the rest- 1 - Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO Modeling Steel Slab Heat Transfer During

  4. Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium I. BACKGROUND Recent measurements of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G are in disagreement, with discrepancies that are roughly ten times forces on a laboratory scale. It also raises the question of whether the Newtonian force law

  5. A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

  6. Geospatial Open Source Software As A Tool For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on state-of-the-art techniques Same timing as similar commercial products Web-based cooperative development of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon Emergency action planning Oil refineries and pipelines (Petrobras

  7. Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXAGarnet VRXRate-MakingConferenceToolkit (GsT)

  8. Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:State Parks and Historic Sites -Game

  9. Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreviewAl.,RenGenAmes,Renewable Energy and

  10. An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images Valliappa and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing on different types of geospatial radar and satel- lite images. Pointers are provided on the effective choice

  11. K.Stock et al. Creating a corpus of geospatial language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    K.Stock et al. Creating a corpus of geospatial language Kristin Stock* , Robert C Pasley, Zoe Gardner, Paul Brindley, Jeremy Morley and Claudia Cialone Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University, examples of geospatial language are usually collected from the personal knowledge of researchers

  12. Geometric modeling of geospatial data for visualization-assisted Sanat Talmaki a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Geometric modeling of geospatial data for visualization-assisted excavation Sanat Talmaki a of the lack of an effective approach to synergize the geospatial utility locations and the movement operators. A critical aspect of enabling such a knowledge-based excavation approach is the geospatial

  13. GeoDec: A Framework to Effectively Visualize and Query Geospatial Data for Decision-Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    GeoDec: A Framework to Effectively Visualize and Query Geospatial Data for Decision-Making Cyrus-to-end system that enables geospatial decision-making by virtualizing the real-world geolocations. With GeoDec, first the geolocation of interest is rapidly and realistically simulated and all relevant geospatial

  14. Localized Regression Analysis as a Method for Detecting Erroneous Measurements in Geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Localized Regression Analysis as a Method for Detecting Erroneous Measurements in Geospatial at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA Abstract Geospatial databases generally consist of measurements dealing with many other types of point data. Keywords: Geospatial Databases; Error Detection; Gravity Data

  15. GIS 553.001, GIS 553.020 Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    1 GIS 553.001, GIS 553.020 Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Applications Spring Description: GIS 553 GIS and Geospatial Applications. 3 semester hours, 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per Science majors as well as those including Geospatial Analyst Certificate, Environmental Science

  16. Data Integration for Querying Geospatial Isabel F. Cruz and Huiyong Xiao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz, Isabel F.

    Data Integration for Querying Geospatial Sources Isabel F. Cruz and Huiyong Xiao Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Chicago {ifc | hxiao}@cs.uic.edu Abstract. Geospatial data and is critical in emergency management. However, geospatial data are distributed, complex, and heterogeneous due

  17. An Approach to the Management of Multiple Aligned Multilingual Ontologies for a Geospatial Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    An Approach to the Management of Multiple Aligned Multilingual Ontologies for a Geospatial Earth Observation System Kristin Stock, Claudia Cialone Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, UK the geospatial context to support semantic search that is capable of returning suitable resources. Some large

  18. Geomatica, vol. 57, no 1, 2003, pp. 49-57 Geosemantic Proximity to Improve Geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geomatica, vol. 57, no 1, 2003, pp. 49-57 1 Geosemantic Proximity to Improve Geospatial Information Today, more and more geospatial data sources, which have been created for specific purposes using the efficiency of search engines when looking for geospatial data. More specifically, we describe a framework

  19. Ad Hoc Categories and Geospatial Ontology Position Paper for COSIT Ontology Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 Ad Hoc Categories and Geospatial Ontology Position Paper for COSIT Ontology Workshop Jeffrey S and Geospatial Ontology There is a dependence relationship which exists between the domain of contraband prevention and geospatial ontology, namely the former domain would not exist if there were not also entities

  20. A geosemantic proximity-based prototype for the interoperability of geospatial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A geosemantic proximity-based prototype for the interoperability of geospatial data Jean Brodeur a 2004 Abstract The research agenda related to the interoperability of geospatial data is influenced by the increased accessibility of geospatial databases on the Internet, as well as their sharing

  1. Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal densities; therefore, geospatial analysis, when applied to decadal lidar time series, needs to address

  2. Enabling Access to Timeseries, Geospatial Data for On-demand Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallickara, Shrideep

    Enabling Access to Timeseries, Geospatial Data for On-demand Visualization Sangmi Lee Pallickara visualizing them. Here, we provide an overview of how a geospatial storage system, GALILEO, provides storage-series data, distributed geospatial storage. 1 INTRODUCTION In the geosciences there is often a need

  3. To Ontologise or Not To Ontologise: An Information Model for a Geospatial Knowledge Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    To Ontologise or Not To Ontologise: An Information Model for a Geospatial Knowledge Infrastructure Robertsong *a Centre for Geospatial Science, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK, University of Edinburgh, UK f University of Muenster, Germany g EDINA, UK A geospatial knowledge

  4. Using Clustering Methods in Geospatial Information Systems Department of Geomatics Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Using Clustering Methods in Geospatial Information Systems Xin Wang Department of Geomatics to integrate the proper clustering methods in geospatial information systems, two problems are discussed will discuss some issues of using the spatial clustering methods in the geospatial information systems

  5. Strabon: A Semantic Geospatial DBMS Kostis Kyzirakos, Manos Karpathiotakis, and Manolis Koubarakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Strabon: A Semantic Geospatial DBMS Kostis Kyzirakos, Manos Karpathiotakis, and Manolis Koubarakis Strabon, a new RDF store that supports the state of the art semantic geospatial query languages st all other geospatial RDF stores it has been compared with. 1 Introduction The Web of data has recently

  6. Promoting the Benefits of Geospatial Data and Applications NebraskaView

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Promoting the Benefits of Geospatial Data and Applications NebraskaView Center for Advanced Land-Lincoln Geospatial Information for Nebraska Since the early 1970's, billions of dollars have been spent by the federal government and private sector on satellite-based earth observing systems. Hundreds of geospatial

  7. Geospatial Data Collection/Use in Disaster Response: A United States Nationwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Michael E.

    Geospatial Data Collection/Use in Disaster Response: A United States Nationwide Survey of State to provide assistance (in the form of monies, staff, geospatial data, etc.) to states when the disaster overwhelms the resources of the state. Geospatial support is one of the forms of assistance and a frequent

  8. Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Characterizing Geospatial Dynamics of Application Usage in a 3G Cellular Data Network M. Zubair provided the evidence that significant geospatial correla- tions, in terms of traffic volume and application access, exist in cellular network usage. Such geospatial correlation patterns provide local

  9. ESTIMATION OF JUVENILE SALMON HABITAT IN PACIFIC RIM RIVERS USING MULTISCALAR REMOTE SENSING AND GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    AND GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS D. C. WHITED*, J. S. KIMBALL, M. S. LORANG and J. A. STANFORD Flathead Lake Biological at the different spatial scales and to evaluate the utility of moderate scale geospatial data for determining.g. pools, ponds, off-channel springs, tributaries). Comprehensive and systematic geospatial data describing

  10. Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International Standards in Geomatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International Abstract: This paper presents the result of recent work on the use of geospatial repositories to store and database concepts, a geospatial repository can be defined as a collection of (meta) data structured

  11. The Machinery of Knowledge: An Ontology-Registry for a Geospatial Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    1 The Machinery of Knowledge: An Ontology-Registry for a Geospatial Knowledge Infrastructure for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, UK 2 Allworlds Geothinking, UK 3 EDINA, UK 4 Cardiff University *Corresponding author: Centre for Geospatial Science, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK

  12. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    #12;Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology Arlen F. Chasea,1. The impor- tance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from in the remote geospatial imaging of cultural landscapes, including ancient communities and their anthropogenic

  13. Geospatial Web services semantic discovery approach using quality Rezeg Khaled *1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servigne, Sylvie

    Geospatial Web services semantic discovery approach using quality Rezeg Khaled *1 , Laskri Mohamed.servigne@insa-lyon.fr Abstract The use of geographic data through Web services shows the geospatial Web Services (GWS). A growing quality, Geospatial Web Service. 1. Introduction The geographic information systems today provide access

  14. A systematic approach for managing the risk related to semantic interoperability between geospatial datacubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A systematic approach for managing the risk related to semantic interoperability between geospatial in Geospatial Databases for Decision-Support tarek.sboui.1@ulaval.ca, mehrdad.salehi.1@ulaval.ca, yvan.bedard@scg.ulaval.ca Abstract Geospatial datacubes are the database backend of novel types of spatiotemporal decision- support

  15. Geospatial Mapping and Navigation of the Web Kevin S. McCurley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurley, Kevin

    Geospatial Mapping and Navigation of the Web Kevin S. McCurley IBM Almaden Research Center 650 proximity. Keywords:. Geospatial information retrieval, geographic in- formation systems, browsers by geospatial criteria. Information re- trieval based on geographic criteria is a fairly common task. Examples

  16. Quality-Driven Geospatial Data Integration Snehal Thakkar, Craig A. Knoblock, Jose Luis Ambite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambite, Jos Luis

    Quality-Driven Geospatial Data Integration Snehal Thakkar, Craig A. Knoblock, Jose Luis Ambite thakkar,knoblock,ambite@isi.edu ABSTRACT Accurate and efficient integration of geospatial data of the key chal- lenges in supporting large-scale geospatial data integration are automatically computing

  17. Envisioning uncertainty in geospatial information Kathryn Blackmond Laskey a,*, Edward J. Wright b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valtorta, Marco

    Envisioning uncertainty in geospatial information Kathryn Blackmond Laskey a,*, Edward J. Wright b in revised form 17 May 2009 Accepted 20 May 2009 Available online 21 June 2009 Keywords: Geospatial reasoning Geographic information systems Geospatial metadata Probabilistic ontologies Multi-entity Bayesian networks

  18. Geospatial Data Provider Workshop The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Stanford University invite you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane, Greg

    1 Geospatial Data Provider Workshop The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Stanford of geospatial data. The workshop is tentatively scheduled to take place March 7-8 in Santa Barbara. Background at specific types of at-risk content. Our project, the National Geospatial Digital Archive (NGDA; http

  19. Towards a Quantitative Evaluation of Geospatial Metadata Quality in the Context of Semantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Quantitative Evaluation of Geospatial Metadata Quality in the Context of Semantic to facilitate the reuse of geospatial data in a distributed and heterogeneous environment. In this process, the provided geospatial metadata that are appropriate for the intended use may be incomplete or not appropriate

  20. The University of Texas at Dallas 1 Bachelor of Science in Geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    The University of Texas at Dallas 1 Bachelor of Science in Geospatial Information Sciences Geospatial information sciences (GISc) harness ground- breaking technologies to analyze features of the Earth range of fields to combine efforts on leading-edge research. Careers in Geospatial Information Sciences

  1. How to Improve Geospatial Data Usability: From Metadata to Quality-Aware GIS Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How to Improve Geospatial Data Usability: From Metadata to Quality-Aware GIS Community R. Devillers), Canada 3 Industrial Research Chair in Geospatial Databases for Decision Support, Laval University, retrieve and analyze geospatial data. The field grew exponentially and, in the last two decades

  2. 11 A WYSIWYG Interface for User-Friendly Access to Geospatial Data Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    11 A WYSIWYG Interface for User-Friendly Access to Geospatial Data Collections Helen Jenny1 offer online access to their geospatial data repositories. Users can visually browse and some- times greatly from novice to GIS expert. Two types of user interfaces for geospatial data collections

  3. Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast.1080/08920750590883132 Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast YEQIAO WANG and the area of woodland interspersed with agriculture increased. This study demonstrates how geospatial

  4. Mathematical support for combining geospatial data Boris Kovalerchuk and James Schwing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalerchuk, Boris

    Mathematical support for combining geospatial data Boris Kovalerchuk and James Schwing Department by addressing mathematical issues. Issues considered include: growing geospatial data from multiple sources by introducing: measures of the correctness for the combination of geospatial data using the formalized concepts

  5. Geospatial analysis of a coastal sand dune field evolution: Jockey's Ridge, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of a coastal sand dune field evolution: Jockey's Ridge, North Carolina Helena, geospatial analysis, feature extraction, and quantification of change. These techniques were applied requires in-depth understanding of their evolution. Modern geospatial technologies such as lidar, real time

  6. DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium shares technical information and experiences related to LED street and area lighting demonstrations and serves as an objective resource for evaluating new products on the market intended for those applications. Cities, power providers, and others who invest in street and area lighting are invited to join the Consortium and share their experiences. The goal is to build a repository of valuable field experience and data that will significantly accelerate the learning curve for buying and implementing high-quality, energy-efficient LED lighting. Consortium members are part of an international knowledge base and peer group, receive updates on Consortium tools and resources, receive the Consortium E-Newsletter, and help steer the work of the Consortium by participating on a committee. Learn more about the Consortium.

  7. GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings Kostis the tool GeoTriples that allows the transformation of Earth Observation data and geospatial data into RDF of geospatial data. GeoTriples is a semi- automated tool that transforms geospatial information into RDF follow

  8. 3-D HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING IN A GEOSPATIAL FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; Alfred Garrett, A; Larry Koffman, L; David Hayes, D

    2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D hydrodynamic models are used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to simulate the transport of thermal and radionuclide discharges in coastal estuary systems. Development of such models requires accurate bathymetry, coastline, and boundary condition data in conjunction with the ability to rapidly discretize model domains and interpolate the required geospatial data onto the domain. To facilitate rapid and accurate hydrodynamic model development, SRNL has developed a pre- and post-processor application in a geospatial framework to automate the creation of models using existing data. This automated capability allows development of very detailed models to maximize exploitation of available surface water radionuclide sample data and thermal imagery.

  9. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  10. How can I open .ASC files contained in the following linkhttp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode61 Home > Groups > Geospatial I really need the Kenya wind data develop by Riso by i cant open the files provided. I will apprecite some...

  11. Consortium Support (Fixed Support) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergyConsortium Support (Fixed Support)

  12. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  13. Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Project Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GIS 551 Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2009 Project Presentation Date Presenter-03 Huiqing Li Yungfei Li Hydrological Analysis of Alto Watershed, Texas 12-03 Erica Lundberg Wes Ward T Fire Department Service Call Density and Location Analysis 12-10 Rachel Blodgett Kelly Searles SFA

  14. A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines (UM - lead, MIT, UCB) A University Consortium on High Pressure, Lean Combustion for Efficient and Clean IC Engines...

  15. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review Washington, D.C., May 18-22, 2009 LTC University Consortium Overview TIMELINE * Start - Jan 2006 * Finish - June 2009 * 85%...

  16. Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and MaterialsPhoenix, AZ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to presentations and materials from the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Annual Meeting held in Phoenix on September 11, 2013.

  17. area consortium research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    138 Introduction Report 21 of the Consortium project "Seismic Waves in Complex 3D Structures" Geosciences Websites Summary: on Seismic Anisotropy in Bahrain in 2012, and...

  18. NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffrey Hawk of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Far West region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Outstanding Technology Development...

  19. Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor The Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor is available to any current UC Berkeley student in good academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Seminar: Mobile City Chronicles: Gaming with New Technologies of Detection and Security (Note: There mayGeospatial Information Science and Technology Minor The Geospatial Information Science and Technology Minor is available to any current UC Berkeley student in good academic standing. The deadline

  20. U. K. consortium Stirling engine programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, G.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper covers the design and construction of a high pressure helium-charged two cylinder 20 kW Stirling engine to be operated in either the alpha or gamma configuration. The design includes a sodium heat pipe head. A joint University/ Industry Consortium was set up for the production of this research engine and the various contributions of the members are outlined in the paper. A dynamic test rig has been built to test regenerators and the paper illustrates the unique feature of this rig which enables measurement of the enthalpy loss through the regenerator and its effectiveness.

  1. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  2. Commercial Buildings Consortium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoal CombustionSmart Grid RFI:onConsortium Commercial Buildings

  3. A geospatial analysis of Arctic marine traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucker, William

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    encounters with ice and often reported the location of the sea-ice edge, the boundary between open water and a threshold of sea-ice concentration (Scoresby, 1820; Ackley et al., 2003; Divine and Dick, 2006). Airships and aeroplanes of the 20th century...

  4. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  5. West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium G-68 Engineering Sciences Building West Virginia.nasa.wvu.edu West Virginia University Bethany College Bluefield State College Fairmont State University Consortium Foundation West Virginia State University WVU Institute of Technology West Virginia Wesleyan

  6. THE DANISH CONSORTIUM FOR WIND ENERGY RESEARCH Lars Landberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Aalborg University) and DHI ­ Water and Environment. The structure of the consortium can be seen in Figure University of Denmark, Aalborg University, DHI ­ Water and Environment. 2.1 Mission and vision The Mission in 2003. Basically the joint R&D effort among the consortium partners in the medium to long term

  7. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance] [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energys Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortiums programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub-grantee program was designed to address the unique local conditions and population of its community. There was great diversity in programs design, types of financing and incentives, building stock characteristics, climate and partnerships. From 2010 through 2013, SEEA and its sub-grantee programs focused on determining best practices in program administration, workforce development, marketing and consumer education, financing, and utility partnerships. One of the common themes among programs that were most successful in each of these areas was strong partnerships and collaborations with people or organizations in the community. In many instances engaged partners proved to be the key to addressing barriers such as access to financing, workforce development opportunities and access to utility bill data. The most challenging barrier proved to be the act of building a market for energy efficiency where none previously existed. With limited time and resources, educating homeowners of the value in investing in energy efficiency while engaging electric and gas utilities served as a significant barrier for several programs. While there is still much work to be done to continue to transform the energy efficiency market in the Southeast, the programmatic activities led by SEEA and its sub-grantees resulted in 8,180 energy audits and 5,155 energy efficiency retrofits across the Southeast. In total the Southeast Consortium saved an estimated 27,915,655.93 kWh and generated an estimated $ 2,291,965.90 in annual energy cost savings in the region.

  8. ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADA/EMS Cyber...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security Assessment at National SCADA Test Bed ABB and Energy Utilities Form Consortium to Fund SCADAEMS Cyber Security...

  9. KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 in disease surveillance, spatial epidemiology, population genetics, landscape ecology, crime analysis

  10. International Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration and Geospatial Analysis as an Integrative Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tool Melinda Laituri, Colorado State University This talk will focus on the role of interdisciplinary new methods and tools for analysis. Geospatial technologies provide useful tools for furthering

  11. Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire,CA 94105AdvancedAcid Battery

  12. Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium NAVC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource History View New

  13. Plug In Hybrid Development Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratini Energia S APlataformaTexas:PlotWatt Jump

  14. MHK Projects/SEEWEC Consortium Brevik NO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet.7413°, -155.488° Project Phase Phase

  15. Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwaterTMATalbot County DPWConsortium

  16. The Solar Energy Consortium TSEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to:UncertaintySocial Carbon CompanyTSEC

  17. Kentucky Consortium for Carbon Storage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec Srl Jump to: navigation,

  18. Chemical Consortium Holdings Inc ChemCon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es unaChelmsford, Massachusetts: Energy

  19. Wallula Energy Resource Center Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph Home Wzeng'sVortexWagonerWallula Energy

  20. SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBY Solutions Jump to: navigation, searchSDEMSEEWEC

  1. Brazil-US Lab Consortium Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston CollegeBraziland EEREEPA ProgramLab

  2. A state-of-the art component based spatio-temporal framework for education and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kbben, Barend

    as well. Google Maps and NASA World Wind, together with their Application Programming Interface (API from scratch. The system is based on standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC http

  3. GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE AND NDVI VALUES IN THE ANGELINA FOREST Peter P. Siska and I. K. Hung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF REFLECTANCE AND NDVI VALUES IN THE ANGELINA FOREST ECOSYSTEM* Peter P. Siska International Conference on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and Forestry, Denver, Colorado, 5-7 November

  4. Presented in Conway, Lee, Merrimack and Plymouth, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. Participants will learn to: symbolize GIS data; add labelsPresented in Conway, Lee, Merrimack and Plymouth, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Arc

  5. Presented in Concord, Merrimack and West Lebanon, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. Participants will learn to: symbolize GIS data; add labelsPresented in Concord, Merrimack and West Lebanon, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Arc

  6. Presented in Lee and Concord, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    .1 to produce effective maps, edit and create GIS data, as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. ParticipantsPresented in Lee and Concord, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Winter

  7. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  8. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  9. GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings Kostis the linked data paradigm. Therefore, Earth Ob- servation data and other kinds of geospatial data and geospatial data into RDF graphs. GeoTriples goes beyond the state of the art by extending the R2RML mapping

  10. Brochure published and printed by the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis, Rutgers University, for the Geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, for the Geospatial Information Science Graduate Certificate Program, Revised, Sep. '12 of the Certificate Program in Geospatial Information Science: More information on the Geo- Spatial Information@crssa.rutgers.edu Students may also be interested in pursuing the Geospatial Information Systems & Technology Program offered

  11. Machine Induction of Geospatial P A Whigham1, R I McKay2 & J R Davis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Machine Induction of Geospatial Knowledge P A Whigham1, R I McKay2 & J R Davis1 1CSIRO Division the implications of inductive techniques applied to geospatial data in a logical framework. It is argued trivial of cases. A heavily constrained geospatial domain, topographic representation, is described as one

  12. Multi-Focused Geospatial Analysis Using Probes Thomas Butkiewicz, Wenwen Dou, Zachary Wartell, William Ribarsky, and Remco Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wartell, Zachary

    Multi-Focused Geospatial Analysis Using Probes Thomas Butkiewicz, Wenwen Dou, Zachary Wartell, William Ribarsky, and Remco Chang Abstract--Traditional geospatial information visualizations often be incorporated into a variety of geospatial visualizations to empower users with the ability to observe

  13. GIS 551.001, GIS 551.020 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    1 GIS 551.001, GIS 551.020 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial majors as well as Geospatial Analyst Certificate, and thus competency is required. The course is designed Outcomes: Students will demonstrate competency in the fundamentals of GIS and geospatial analysis

  14. 5D-ODETLAP: A NOVEL FIVE-DIMENSIONAL COMPRESSION METHOD ON TIME-VARYING MULTIVARIABLE GEOSPATIAL DATASET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    5D-ODETLAP: A NOVEL FIVE-DIMENSIONAL COMPRESSION METHOD ON TIME-VARYING MULTIVARIABLE GEOSPATIAL dimensional (5D) geospatial dataset consists of several multivariable 4D datasets, which are sequences of time technique for 5D geospatial data as a whole, instead of applying 3D compression method on each 3D slice

  15. Charles J. Vorosmarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators of Emerging Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Charles J. Vorosmarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators. Geospatial analysis at 8 km resolution shows that 64% of Africans rely on water resources that are limited explicit geospatial indicators that link biogeophysical, socioeconomic, and engineering perspectives

  16. Supporting visual integration and analysis of geospatially-referenced data through web-deployable, cross-platform tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting visual integration and analysis of geospatially-referenced data through web-analytical methods that can support agency missions by enabling integrated analysis of geospatial data from within and analysis goals, and provide examples of the kinds of multivariate geospatial data in- tegration

  17. The Dynamic Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Hot-Spots A Case Study into the GeoSpatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universitt

    @infoscience.otago.ac.nz Extended Abstract Macro-Level Analysis with Aggregates Modelling and analysis of dynamic geospatial, our research is concerned with a macro-level analysis of a certain class of geospatial phenomena of geospatial phenomena in disparate domains such as crime analysis, wild-life biology, epidemiology

  18. GIT Certificate Dr. Laurence W. Carstensen August 22, 2011 1 Graduate Level Geospatial Information Technology Certification Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    the College of Natural Resources has developed a PhD. in Geospatial and Environmental Analysis that beganGIT Certificate Dr. Laurence W. Carstensen August 22, 2011 1 Graduate Level Geospatial Information Technology Certification Program 1. Rationale and need: Geospatial information technology (GIT) includes

  19. SOLAP technology: Merging business intelligence with geospatial technology for interactive spatio-temporal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAP technology: Merging business intelligence with geospatial technology for interactive spatio-temporal exploration and analysis of data Sonia Rivest a,1 , Yvan Bdard a,, Marie-Jose Proulx a,1 , Martin Nadeau a,1 in Geospatial Databases for Decision Support, Centre for Research in Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec, Canada

  20. ASPRS 2005 Annual Conference "Geospatial Goes Global: From Your Neighborhood to the Whole Planet"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ASPRS 2005 Annual Conference "Geospatial Goes Global: From Your Neighborhood to the Whole Planet" March 7-11, 2005 Baltimore, Maryland EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF AERIAL CAMERA FILTERS FOR SHORELINE MAPPING "Geospatial Goes Global: From Your Neighborhood to the Whole Planet" March 7-11, 2005 Baltimore, Maryland

  1. VISUAL QUERY OF TIME-DEPENDENT 3D WEATHER IN A GLOBAL GEOSPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Chris

    1 VISUAL QUERY OF TIME-DEPENDENT 3D WEATHER IN A GLOBAL GEOSPATIAL ENVIRONMENT William Ribarsky and Spatial Analysis Technologies, Georgia Institute of Technology This Technical Report is a draft WEATHER IN A GLOBAL GEOSPATIAL ENVIRONMENT William Ribarsky, Nickolas Faust, Zachary Wartell, Christopher

  2. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1 , S. Hatten2 , W in the seed industry, new applications emerge for mapping, analysis, and interpretation of cultivar. In addition, a geospatial framework was developed to identify the soil landscapes that had the best soil

  3. Where are the Academic Jobs? Interactive Exploration of Job Advertisements in Geospatial and Topical Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    Data Preparation and Analysis NNature.com Job Postings Location Text Description Levels on Geospatial Map LevelsWhere are the Academic Jobs? Interactive Exploration of Job Advertisements in Geospatial of such data can: provide overviews and details of complex phenomena,p p p , facilitate trend analysis

  4. Discovery of Geospatial Discriminating Patterns from Remote Sensing Datasets Tomasz Stepinski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Discovery of Geospatial Discriminating Patterns from Remote Sensing Datasets Wei Ding Tomasz. Several geospatial feature vari- ables are fused together, and the vector of their values at each spatial cell is considered as a transaction to be used in association analysis. The concept of emerging

  5. Frequently Asked Questions About the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page addresses many of the questions about the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium.

  6. Open Data, Open Source and Open Standards in chemistry: The Blue Obelisk five years on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Boyle, Noel M; Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon L; Adams, Samuel E; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Bradley, Jean-Claude; Filippov, Igor V; Hanson, Robert M; Hanwell, Marcus D; Hutchison, Geoffrey R; James, Craig A; Jeliazkova, Nina; Lang, Andrew SID; Langner, Karol M; Lonie, David C; Lowe, Daniel M; Pansanel, Jerome; Pavlov, Dmitry; Spjuth, Ola; Steinbeck, Christoph; Tenderholt, Adam L; Theisen, Kevin J; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    be considered finished. After that point, the next logical step would be to start work on a standard for the SMARTS language, the extension to SMILES that specifies patterns that match chemical substructures. Open Data A considerable stumbling block... does it follow the industry consortium model. Rather it is a grassroots organisation, catalysed by an initial core of interested scientists, but with membership open to all who share one or more of the goals of the group: Open Data in Chemistry. One...

  7. DOE Street Lighting Consortium Releases Results of Public Street...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S., conducted...

  8. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Kansas City, MO, March 89, 2011.

  9. 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium North Central Region Workshop, held in Detroit, June 1617, 2011.

  10. 3710 McClintock Avenue Induced Seismicity Consortium (ISC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    of environmental safety associated with hydraulic fracturing operations, waste water injection, fluid production critical and under of environmental safety associated with hydraulic fracturing operations, waste water regulatory agency partners. The consortium will support two key integrated programs; 1) advancing geoscience

  11. CAIIAC: Consortium for Accelerated Innovation and Insertion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Grant Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMTech) Program will spur consortium-planned, industry-led R Standardized composite design and testing for faster and more affordable certifications Recycling and reuse

  12. Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific Northwest...

  13. Geospatial semantics: beyond ontologies, towards an enactive approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Donato, Pasquale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current approaches to semantics in the geospatial domain are mainly based on ontologies, but ontologies, since continue to build entirely on the symbolic methodology, suffers from the classical problems, e.g. the symbol grounding problem, affecting representational theories. We claim for an enactive approach to semantics, where meaning is considered to be an emergent feature arising context-dependently in action. Since representational theories are unable to deal with context, a new formalism is required toward a contextual theory of concepts. SCOP is considered a promising formalism in this sense and is briefly described.

  14. Contacts for Geospatial Science Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010Conferencing and SpecialUsGeospatial Science

  15. University consortium faulted on management, accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.

    1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Four years into the job of building the superconducting Super Collider (SSC)-and in the face of growing political pressure to kill the project-congressional and federal officials are questioning whether the university consortium that run the SSC is up to the job. Universities Research Association Inc. (URA), a group of 80 public and private research universities that also operates Fermilab, was selected as prime contractor in January 1989. But after repeated charges of mismanagement and accounting buses, the Department of Energy (DOE), which funds the project, is contemplating major changes to the contract, including terminating it. DOE Secretary Hazel O'Leary has begun a 30-day review of the project and has laid out three options: terminating the URA contract; awarding separate contracts for science and conventional construction; and renegotiating the existing contract to give DOE a larger oversight role. Sources close to the project predict that O'Leary will pick a variation of the third option and will remove at least one of the managers grilled at last week's hearing.

  16. Geospatial Visualization of Global Satellite Images with Vis-EROS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Standart, G. D.; Stulken, K. R.; Zhang, Xuesong; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center of U.S. Geological Survey is currently managing and maintaining the world largest satellite images distribution system, which provides 24/7 free download service for researchers all over the globe in many areas such as Geology, Hydrology, Climate Modeling, and Earth Sciences. A large amount of geospatial data contained in satellite images maintained by EROS is generated every day. However, this data is not well utilized due to the lack of efficient data visualization tools. This software implements a method for visualizing various characteristics of the global satellite image download requests. More specifically, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files are generated which can be loaded into an earth browser such as Google Earth. Colored rectangles associated with stored satellite scenes are painted onto the earth browser; and the color and opacity of each rectangle is varied as a function of the popularity of the corresponding satellite image. An analysis of the geospatial information obtained relative to specified time constraints provides an ability to relate image download requests to environmental, political, and social events.

  17. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  18. Demystifying Open Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mele, Salvatore

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The tenets of Open Access are to grant anyone, anywhere and anytime free access to the results of scientific research. HEP spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-WWW era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peer-review system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a possible plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs incurred to organise the peer-review service and give Open Access to the final version of articles. SCOAP3 will be funded by all countries active in HEP under a 'fair share' scenario, according to their production of HEP articles. In this talk I will present a short overview of the history of Open Access in HEP, the details of the SCOAP3 model and the outlook for its implementation.

  19. Validating Dynamic Message Sign Freeway Travel Time Messages Using Ground Truth Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Validating Dynamic Message Sign Freeway Travel Time Messages Using Ground Truth Geospatial Data agencies have invested more than $300 million in dynamic message sign (DMS) systems for communicating important messages to travelers, including weather conditions, incidents, construction, homeland security

  20. Resolution of linear entity and path geometries expressed via partially-geospatial natural language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrero, John Javier

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When conveying geospatial information via natural language, people typically combine implicit, commonsense knowledge with explicitly-stated information. Usually, much of this is contextual and relies on establishing locations ...

  1. Peter Siska*, Vaughn M. Bryant Jr**, I-Kuai Hung*** GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF SOUTHERN PINE BIOME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    239 Peter Siska*, Vaughn M. Bryant Jr**, I-Kuai Hung*** GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS OF SOUTHERN PINE BIOME AND POLLEN DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS IN SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES P. Siska, Vaughn M. Bryant Jr, I-Kuai Hung

  2. LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

  3. A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Automotive Industry September 6, 2006 United States Automotive Materials Partnership, A Consortium .....................................................................................................11 Chapter 2 The Expanding Role of NDE in the Automotive Industry.................................13A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation

  4. Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Rolf

    Internship Opportunities at Hessen Universities Consortium, New York Office The New York office in Hessen to serve as interns. Successful candidates will be motivated and energetic individuals who expenses incurred in New York. Important notice: New York City is an expensive city. Applicants must budget

  5. The Chicago Wilderness Consortium Melinda Pruett-Jones, Executive Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of natural areas embedded in the third largest metropolitan area in the country, a consortium of diverse is to reclaim the cultural tradition of restoring, protecting and managing the globally outstanding natural to the protection, restoration and management of the Chicago region's natural resources. The Chicago Wilderness

  6. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnups Enhance nuclear safety by enablingPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL

  7. Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability Research & Development Consortium for DoD Installations Warner College of Natural the growing need for sustainability planning, imple- mentation, and facilitation on United States military bases. CEMML is already a proven global provider of re- search and sustainable management of natural

  8. Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology MEMBERSHIP ADVANTAGES I opportunities MISSION Explores pre-competitive development of intelligent object-based storage systems I, and public sector I OBJECTS INTERCONNECT STORAGE DEVICE BLOCKS FILE SYSTEM FILE SYSTEM USER COMPONENT FILE

  9. McMaster University Libraries library.mcmaster.ca 905.525.9140 x22533 library@mcmaster.ca Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    Master University Libraries library.mcmaster.ca 905.525.9140 x22533 library@mcmaster.ca Geospatial Data.3 Colour Printer FME installed Google Earth Pro #12;http://library.mcmaster.ca/maps/geospatial #12

  10. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Mapping Contest at Boston College Students are invited to present their GIS Mapping work as part of a campus-wide celebration of geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    to present their GIS Mapping work as part of a campus-wide celebration of geospatial research at Boston

  11. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation (IGATE-E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [DOE EERE] [DOE EERE; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; Cox, Daryl [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IGATE-E is an energy analysis tool for industrial energy evaluation. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple publicly available datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using DOE s Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE s Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to other commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool provides validation against DOE s EIA-MECS state level energy estimations and permits several statistical examinations. IGATE-E is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike.

  12. PhD Geospatial Information Systems Requirements Other courses may be substituted for those listed below with the written permission in advance of the Director of the GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    PhD Geospatial Information Systems Requirements Other courses may be substituted for those listed below with the written permission in advance of the Director of the GIS Doctoral program. Geospatial or POEC 5316 Advanced Regression Geospatial Specialization Area Select from one of the following

  13. ATTP 3-34.80 (FM 3-34.230, FM 5-33, and TC 5-230) GEOSPATIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ATTP 3-34.80 (FM 3-34.230, FM 5-33, and TC 5-230) July 2010 GEOSPATIAL ENGINEERING DISTRIBUTION-33, and TC 5-230) HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Washington, DC 29 July 2010 Geospatial Engineering.................................................................................................vii Chapter 1 GEOSPATIAL ENGINEERING IN SUPPORT OF FULL SPECTRUM OPERATIONS

  14. GIS 551.001, GIS 551.021, GIS 551.022 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    ) and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2012 Instructor: Dr. I-Kuai Hung Department: Forestry Office: Forestry 104 Phone Environmental Science majors as well as Geospatial Analyst Certificate, and thus competency is required. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate competency in the fundamentals of GIS and geospatial

  15. GIS 551.001, GIS 551.021, GIS 551.022 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Geospatial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    ) and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2013 Instructor: Dr. I-Kuai Hung Department: Forestry Office: Forestry 104 Phone Environmental Science majors as well as Geospatial Analyst Certificate, and thus competency is required. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate competency in the fundamentals of GIS and geospatial

  16. 327USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Effective management of forest resources requires access to current and consistent geospatial information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    resources requires access to current and consistent geospatial information that can be shared by resource managers and the public. Geospatial information describing our land and natural resources comes from many sources and is most effective when stored in a geospatial database and used in a geographic information

  17. revised: 12MAY2006; 26JUL2006; 28AUG2006; 07SEP06; 20SEP06; 26SEP06; 02OCT06 GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING DOCTORAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 revised: 12MAY2006; 26JUL2006; 28AUG2006; 07SEP06; 20SEP06; 26SEP06; 02OCT06 GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING DOCTORAL PROGRAM The Ph.D. in Geospatial Science & Engineering (GS&E) program provides an interdisciplinary course of study. COURSE LISTING FOR GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING I. REQUIRED COURSES (6

  18. GEODEC: ENABLING GEOSPATIAL DECISION MAKING Cyrus Shahabi, Yao-Yi Chiang, Kelvin Chung, Kai-Chen Huang, Jeff Khoshgozaran-Haghighi, Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    GEODEC: ENABLING GEOSPATIAL DECISION MAKING Cyrus Shahabi, Yao-Yi Chiang, Kelvin Chung, Kai of geospatial data has motivated the effort to seamlessly integrate this information into an information and accuracy pose a challenge to such efforts. We describe the Geospatial Decision Making (GeoDec) system

  19. Voronoi-based Geospatial Query Processing with MapReduce Afsin Akdogan, Ugur Demiryurek, Farnoush Banaei-Kashani, and Cyrus Shahabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Voronoi-based Geospatial Query Processing with MapReduce Afsin Akdogan, Ugur Demiryurek, Farnoush Angeles, CA 90089 [aakdogan, demiryur, banaeika, shahabi]@usc.edu Abstract Geospatial queries (GQ) have of parallel geospatial query processing with the MapReduce programming model. Our proposed approach creates

  20. Metadata should help users to assess the quality (fitness for use) of geospatial data, thus reducing the risk of data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Metadata should help users to assess the quality (fitness for use) of geospatial data in order to reduce user meta-uncertainty related to geospatial data quality, and then reduce the risks information at different levels of analysis. Using a multidimensional database approach, this paper proposes

  1. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  2. Linking Texas irrigation: Consortium communicates research, education projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the development and implementation of irrigation systems and practices in Texas, yet few efforts have been made to coordinate ongoing programs and results. With the formation of the Consortium for Irrigation Research and Education (CIRE) in 2007... research plots, and center pivot and drip irrigation systems at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Uvalde. These plots are part of the Precision Irrigators Network project funded by Texas Water Development Board and the Rio Grande Basin...

  3. Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergyConsortium Support (Fixed

  4. Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

  5. GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION (must incorporate three science courses and a statistics course) In order to have a concentration in GISC, the student must take all the courses with an * even though they

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION (must incorporate three science courses and a statistics course) In order/1104 History of Earth and Life lower-division course GEOS 2301 Introduction to Geospatial Information Science and Geospatial Analysis lower-division course GEOS 2406* (ll) Geospatial Science and Methods lower

  6. A sustainable business model for Open-Access journal publishing a proposed plan for High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigen, Jens

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics community over the last 15 years has achieved so-called full green Open Access through the wide dissemination of preprints via arXiv, a central subject repository managed by Cornell University. However, green Open Access does not alleviate the economic difficulties of libraries as they are still expected to offer access to versions of record of the peer-reviewed literature. For this reason the particle physics community is now addressing the issue of gold Open Access by converting a set of the existing core journals to Open Access. A Working Party has been established to bring together funding agencies, laboratories and libraries into a single consortium, called SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). This consortium will engage with publishers to build a sustainable model for Open Access publishing. In this model, subscription fees from multiple institutions are replaced by contracts with publishers of Open Access journals, where the SCOAP3 conso...

  7. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  8. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool" webcast, held April 3, 2012.

  9. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and MaterialsLos Angeles, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Los Angeles April 1920, 2012.

  10. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and MaterialsDallas, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Dallas March 1516, 2012.

  11. Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff webcast, held May 6, 2010.

  12. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and MaterialsBoston, MA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Boston August 23, 2012.

  13. GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies Aldouri, R.; Keller, G. R of subsurface information to provide a 3-D perspective on data. Geophysical data provide information about projects has required the development of many sophisticated tools to allow users to utilize geophysical

  14. Community Health Map: A geospatial and multivariate data visualization tool for public health datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    on health care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services keeps track of a variety of health care that enables users to visualize health care data in multivariate space as well as geospatially. It is designed a compre- hensible and powerful interface for policy makers to visualize health care quality, public health

  15. The GLIMS geospatial glacier database: A new tool for studying glacier change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The GLIMS geospatial glacier database: A new tool for studying glacier change Bruce Raup a,, Adina's estimated 160000 glaciers. Each institution (called a Regional Center, or RC) oversees the analysis of satellite imagery for a particular region containing glacier ice. Data received by the GLIMS team

  16. What We Do Spatial Video Geospatial video, also known as mobile mapping or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    What We Do Spatial Video Geospatial video, also known as mobile mapping or spatial video, is an emerging technology that combines Global Positioning Systems (GPS) with video. This approach enables illustrates the part of Colorado Springs, Colorado in which spatially-encoded video data were collected

  17. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  18. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative agreements and their completion were problematic for the US and world economies. This resulted in the President and Congress implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, abbreviated ARRA (Pub.L. 111-5), commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act. The stimulus money available for transportation projects encouraged the SCAQMD to seek additional funds. In August of 2009, they eventually were awarded an additional $45.5 M, and the scope of their project was expanded to 378 vehicles. However, as a consequence of the stimulus money and the inundation of DOE with applications for new project under the ARRA, the expected time table for producing and testing vehicles was significantly delayed. As a result, these vehicles were not available for validating the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium. Therefore, in April of 2011, the Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) for the project was revised, and limited to producing the draft protocol for PHEV certification as its deliverable.

  19. Consortium for Algal Biofuels Commercialization (CAB-Comm)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013 Sanyo: Notice of AllowanceAugustPublicConsortium

  20. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  1. The first pilot project of the consortium for top-down proteomics: A status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Xibei; Scotcher, Jenna; Wu, Si; Chu, Rosalie K.; Tolic, Nikola; Ntai, Ioanna; Thomas, Paul; Fellers , Ryan T.; Early, Bryan P.; Zheng, Yupeng; Durbin, Kenneth R.; LeDuc, Richard D.; Wolff, Jeremy J.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Pan, Jingxi; Han, Jun; Shaw, Jared B.; Salisbury, Joseph P.; Easterling, Michael; Borchers, Christoph H.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Agar, Jeffrey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Kelleher, Neil; Young, Nicolas L.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilot Project #1the identification and characterization of human histone H4 proteoforms by top-down MSis the first project launched by the Consortium for Top-Down Proteomics (CTDP) to refine and validate top-down MS. Within the initial results from seven participating laboratories, all reported the probability-based identification of human histone H4 (UniProt accession P62805) with expectation values ranging from 10?13 to 10?105. Regarding characterization, a total of 74 proteoforms were reported, with 21 done so unambiguously; one new PTM, K79ac, was identified. Inter-laboratory comparison reveals aspects of the results that are consistent, such as the localization of individual PTMs and binary combinations, while other aspects are more variable, such as the accurate characterization of low-abundance proteoforms harboring >2 PTMs. An open-access tool and discussion of proteoform scoring are included, along with a description of general challenges that lie ahead including improved proteoform separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis, better instrumentation performance, and software development.

  2. Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caruthers, James; Dietz, J.; Pelter, Libby; Chen, Jie; Roberson, Glen; McGinn, Paul; Kizhanipuram, Vinodegopal

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec) is an educational partnership between six universities and colleges in Indiana focused on developing the education materials needed to support electric vehicle technology. The I-AEVtec has developed and delivered a number of degree and certificate programs that address various aspects of electric vehicle technology, including over 30 new or significantly modified courses to support these programs. These courses were shared on the SmartEnergyHub. The I-AEVtec program also had a significant outreach to the community with particular focus on K12 students. Finally, the evGrandPrix was established which is a university/college student electric go-kart race, where the students get hands-on experience in designing, building and racing electric vehicles. The evGrandPrix now includes student teams from across the US as well as from Europe and it is currently being held on Opening Day weekend for the Indy500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

  3. OSGeo Journal The Journal of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation Volume 3 / December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Deforestation Monitoring System: A Large Environmental Database Developed on TerraLib and PostgreSQL #12;OSGeo Journal The Amazon Deforestation Monitoring System Vol. 3, Dec. 2007 The Amazon Deforestation Monitoring deforestation rates in the Brazilian Amazon. TerraLib implements the archiving of ge- ographic vector and raster

  4. iGlobe: an interactive visualization and analysis framework for geospatial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an interactive visualization and analysis system for integrating climate data with other geospatial data sets, such as environmental and demographic data. The \\eviz system is a desktop-based visualization and analysis environment which allows seamless integration of multiple geospatial data sets from varied sources and provides an interface to interactively analyze the different data sets and apply sophisticated data analysis and mining algorithms in a near real time fashion. The framework is highly desirable in domains such as earth and climate sciences where great emphasis is placed on simultaneous analysis of different data sets such as remote sensing images, climate model simulation outputs, and other environmental and demographic databases, to understand weather and climate systems and the impact of climate change on nature and people.

  5. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  6. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 1 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  7. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energys Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings dedicated to technology transfer to showcase and review SWC-funded technology. The workshops were open to the stripper well industry.

  8. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

  9. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  10. www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au Opening the door to universities in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au Opening the door to universities in Indonesia ACICIS is a non-profit, international consortium of universities which provides access to high quality study options in Indonesia #12;www.acicis.murdoch.edu.au Opening the door to universities in Indonesia ACICIS 21 Member

  11. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Tong, Xiaonan; McDonnell, Kevin T.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Mueller, Klaus

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate research produces a wealth of multivariate data. These data often have a geospatial reference and so it is of interest to show them within their geospatial context. One can consider this configuration as a multi field visualization problem, where the geospace provides the expanse of the field. However, there is a limit on the amount of multivariate information that can be fit within a certain spatial location, and the use of linked multivari ate information displays has previously been devised to bridge this gap. In this paper we focus on the interactions in the geographical display, present an implementation that uses Google Earth, and demonstrate it within a tightly linked parallel coordinates display. Several other visual representations, such as pie and bar charts are integrated into the Google Earth display and can be interactively manipulated. Further, we also demonstrate new brushing and visualization techniques for parallel coordinates, such as fixedwindow brushing and correlationenhanced display. We conceived our system with a team of climate researchers, who already made a few important discov eries using it. This demonstrates our systems great potential to enable scientific discoveries, possibly also in oth er domains where data have a geospatial reference.

  12. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Burk, Thomas E [University of Minnesota; Lime, Steve [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  13. New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support of the Stripper Well Consortium.

  14. Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest...

  15. Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released an update to its Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway...

  16. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  17. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

  18. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  19. Please cite this article in press as: Kellogg, D.Q., et al., A geospatial approach for assessing denitrification sinks within lower-order catchments. Ecol. Eng. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.ecoleng.2010.02.006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Please cite this article in press as: Kellogg, D.Q., et al., A geospatial approach for assessing.elsevier.com/locate/ecoleng A geospatial approach for assessing denitrification sinks within lower-order catchments D.Q. Kellogg , Arthur J Available online xxx Keywords: Watershed management Nitrogen sink Geospatial analysis Riparian wetland

  20. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  1. UC Davis Models: Geospatial Station Network Design Tool and Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout Economic Analysis Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTestFeedEnergyUC Davis Models Geospatial Station Network

  2. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  3. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  4. Space System Architecture: Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust I and II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Daniel

    The Space Systems, Policy and Architecture Research Consortium (SSPARC) was formed to make substantial progress on problems of national importance. The goals of SSPARC were to:

  5. Google Earth as a geospatial tool for development organisations: mapping climate change vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossley, Janet Ruth

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    needed to represent the issue of vulnerability, and Google Earth allows for users to explore and understand even more information. This study draws examples from a mapping project of climate change vulnerability in Niger, and discusses the lessons...Geographical Information Systems have not been as successful in the non-governmental humanitarian sector as GIS professionals had hoped. If geospatial tools are to become more widely used and valuable within the humanitarian sector, it is perhaps time for a new approach to be taken. A debate is currently underway about the potential role of Google Earth in emergency relief operations. This research extends the scope of this discussion into the wider development sector, and asks whether Google Earth has the potential to become a useful tool in various aspects of development NGO work. Information management tools need to have wide support within an organisation to be successful, and it seems that many are very interested in what can be done using compromise geospatial/geovisualisation tools such as Google Earth. However there is also scepticism about its usefulness. This research suggests practical applications and recommendations for good use so that actors within the development sector can take the research further....

  6. Geospatial Analysis Requires a Different Way of Thinking: The Problem of Spatial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Bin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geospatial analysis is very much dominated by a Gaussian way of thinking, which assumes that things in the world can be characterized by a well-defined mean, i.e., things are more or less similar in size. However, this assumption is not always valid. In fact, many things in the world lack a well-defined mean, and therefore there are far more small things than large ones. This paper attempts to argue that geospatial analysis requires a different way of thinking - a Paretian way of thinking that underlies skewed distribution such as power laws, Pareto and lognormal distributions. I review two properties of spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity, and point out that the notion of spatial heterogeneity in current spatial statistics is only used to characterize local variance of spatial dependence. I subsequently argue for a broad perspective on spatial heterogeneity, and suggest it be formulated as a scaling law. I further discuss the implications of Paretian thinking and the scaling law for better understan...

  7. The RNA Ontology Consortium: An open invitation to the RNA community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green,Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowl- ing Green,

  8. New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium NY BEST | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel WindNew GridHyTep JumpsourceJump to:NewEnergy

  9. Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen EnergyStetsonOpen Energy

  10. Global Environmental Change 14 (2004) 105123 Downscaling and geo-spatial gridding of socio-economic projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Environmental Change 14 (2004) 105­123 Downscaling and geo-spatial gridding of socio Broadway, New York, NY 10025, USA b Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), 61 work. r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Greenhouse gas emissions scenarios

  11. National Concrete Consortium Meeting March 31 April 2, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    obtained. An open house is planned for early 2010. Tom Adams of the American Coal Ash Association shared information on recent deliberations by the EPA on disposal of coal combustion products (CCPs). The EPA is considering whether to designate fly ash as a hazardous material. He will send our group

  12. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

  13. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren Reece

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  14. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

  15. Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Physics, often referred to as High Energy Physics (HEP), spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-Web era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peerreview system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs...

  16. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei (Wendy) [Wendy; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as baseline data for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a baseline data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION of this report.

  17. Biodegradation by bioaugmentation of dairy wastewater by fungal consortium on a bioreactor lab-scale and on a pilot-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Biodegradation by bioaugmentation of dairy wastewater by fungal consortium on a bioreactor lab 257 and 153% after bio-augmentation with fungi. An inoculated bioreactor with fungal consortium

  18. BS in GEOGRAPHY: Geospatial Intelligence Emphasis (733732) MAP Sheet Department of Geography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    2 1 1 12 12 1 34 Variable Hours 4.0 2.0 2.0 36.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 03.0 3.0 6.0 3.0 3.0 35.0 37.0 3.0 of the Sahara 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Complete the following: Geog 441 Sem in Geog & Geospatial Intell 1 Geog 442 Sem in Geog

  19. Applying Geospatial Semantic Array Programming for a Reproducible Set of Bioclimatic Indices in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caudullo, Giovanni

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioclimate-driven regression analysis is a widely used approach for modelling ecological niches and zonation. Although the bioclimatic complexity of the European continent is high, a particular combination of 12 climatic and topographic covariates was recently found able to reliably reproduce the ecological zoning of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) for forest resources assessment at pan-European scale, generating the first fuzzy similarity map of FAO ecozones in Europe. The reproducible procedure followed to derive this collection of bioclimatic indices is now presented. It required an integration of data-transformation modules (D-TM) using geospatial tools such as Geographic Information System (GIS) software, and array-based mathematical implementation such as semantic array programming (SemAP). Base variables, intermediate and final covariates are described and semantically defined by providing the workflow of D-TMs and the mathematical formulation following the SemAP notat...

  20. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    -WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA-MW CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-Cheng Chu, Rajit Gadh Wireless Internet for the Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) - wireless://winmec.ucla.edu/ WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2003-301-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA-MW CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA

  1. Results from an array produced by the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasisekharan, Ram

    to provide internal controls. (Source: Consortium for Functional Glycomics) Sugar-Coated Proteins Though its, Counting Carbs: Glycomics Gears Up Alan Dove, PhD, Contributing Editor Drug Discovery & Development - March sugar modifications is the biochemical equivalent of an extreme sport, and much of the gear is still

  2. Enhanced biodegradation of phenol by a microbial consortium in a solidliquid two phase partitioning bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    partitioning bioreactor George P. Prpich & Andrew J. Daugulis* Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen@chee.queensu.ca) Accepted 10 August 2004 Key words: biodegradation, bioreactor, ethylene vinyl acetate, microbial consortium, phenol Abstract Two phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) operate by partitioning toxic substrates

  3. THE CONSORTIUM OF MANON ASSELIN ARCHITECTE + JODOIN LAMARRE PRATTE ARCHITECTES WIN THE MONTREAL MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS' ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION TO DESIGN ITS NEW FIFTH PAVILION THIS NEW PAVILION, in the presence of Maka Kotto, Quebec's Ministre de la Culture et des Communications, the Montreal Museum of Fine Museums Day, Sunday, May 26, at the MMFA. "With the consortium of Manon Asselin Architecte and Jodoin

  4. Short Communication A rapid selection strategy for an anodophilic consortium for microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) a b s t r a c t A rapid selection method was developed to enrich for a stable and efficient anodophilic consortium (AC) for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A biofilm sample from a microbial. Introduction Current generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is dependent on the presence of exoelectrogenic

  5. Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-45272 Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Grid of the Future White Paper on The Federal Role in Electric System R&D During a Time of Industry Transition: An Application of Scenario Berkeley National Laboratory CERTS Grid of the Future Project Team Carlos Martinez, Edison Technology

  6. Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research Captain Jeff Kline, USN (ret)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /SSG § Advanced Undersea Warfare Systems (AUWS) Warfare Innovation Workshop § Systems Engineering Analysis § Ux) Wargame Competition § Chair for Undersea Warfare FUNS Wargame ­ Mar 2011 AUWS ­ Dec 2010 #12;Consortium Aerial Vehicles (UAV) § LT Matthew Pawlenko § Self-propelled semi-submersibles [electronic resource

  7. Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon The International Aphid Genomics Consortium"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum The International Aphid Genomics Consortium we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple

  8. University of Delaware -Tribology Laboratory Atlantic Advanced O shore Wind Energy Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    substantially increased the cost of wind power; improvements are needed to make the technology economically for analysis by the group. Downtime hours accumulated from 2003 to 2007 for wind turbines in Germany #12 Wind Energy Consortium Assessing Tribological Aspects of Gearbox Reliability in Wind Turbines Prof

  9. Cyberinfrastructure Development for the Western Consortium of Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico Project Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    Cyberinfrastructure Development for the Western Consortium of Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico Project, and New Mexico independently submitted NSF EPSCoR Track 1 Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII monitoring tools across the state. New Mexico: New Mexico activities will enhance connectivity to academic

  10. Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    are in the areas of nano-engineered advanced composites, bulk nanostructured materials, carbon-based material applications. Such hybrid advanced composites employ aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance laminate Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT

  11. Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated) This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric

  12. A RESTful API for exchanging Materials Data in the AFLOWLIB.org consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    A RESTful API for exchanging Materials Data in the AFLOWLIB.org consortium Richard H. Taylor1 Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20878, USA 2 Department of Mechanical, an Application Program Interface (API) follow- ing REST principles is introduced for the AFLOWLIB.org materials

  13. U of M awarded $51 million, joins national consortium of Clinical and Translational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    at which the results of clinical trials translate into new treatments, cures and improved health outcomes, therapies and clinical trials outcomes to patients faster, offering more immediate benefits from discoveriesU of M awarded $51 million, joins national consortium of Clinical and Translational Science Award

  14. The Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy by providing a new innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    conservation and management through the application of advanced weather modeling and smart grid technologiesThe Southern Ontario Smart Computing Consortium helps strengthen Canada's digital economy by providing a new innovation framework that helps solve critical challenges facing our cities, environment

  15. CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium WG Workshop 3 -Wireless Aspects for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    1 CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium WG Workshop 3 - Wireless Aspects for deployment StationIdentities Management MAC, IP addresses, Station ID, Driver ID, ... Shared with Security Layer (protects the identities... Forum 2011 Operational components Cross-layer Management Managing and sharing common parameters

  16. Midwest Consortium for Wind Turbine Reliability and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Dana; Douglas E. Adams; Noah J. Myrent

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the efforts aimed to establish a student focused laboratory apparatus that will enhance Purdue's ability to recruit and train students in topics related to the dynamics, operations and economics of wind turbines. The project also aims to facilitate outreach to students at Purdue and in grades K-12 in the State of Indiana by sharing wind turbine operational data. For this project, a portable wind turbine test apparatus was developed and fabricated utilizing an AirX 400W wind energy converter. This turbine and test apparatus was outfitted with an array of sensors used to monitor wind speed, turbine rotor speed, power output and the tower structural dynamics. A major portion of this project included the development of a data logging program used to display real-time sensor data and the recording and creation of output files for data post-processing. The apparatus was tested in an open field to subject the turbine to typical operating conditions and the data acquisition system was adjusted to obtain desired functionality to facilitate use for student projects in existing courses offered at Purdue University and Indiana University. Data collected using the data logging program is analyzed and presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the test apparatus related to wind turbine dynamics and operations.

  17. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    , COMMUNICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS (TOMCCAP) CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2005-201-SVG Gadh UCLA Wireless Internet for Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) This research investigates, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh, UCLA-WIN

  18. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium annual report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The HBCU/MI Environmental Technology and Waste Management Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) agreed to work together to initiate research, technology development and education programs to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. As a group the HBCU/MI Consortium is uniquely positioned to reach women and the minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. As part of their initial work, they developed the Research, Education, and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan to actualize the Consortium`s guiding principles. In addition to developing a comprehensive research agenda, four major programs were begun to meet these goals. This report summarizes the 1990--1991 progress.

  19. Zipf's Law for All the Natural Cities in the United States: A Geospatial Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Bin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a new geospatial perspective on whether or not Zipf's law holds for all cities or for the largest cities in the United States. A major problem around this issue is how to define cities or city boundaries. Most of the investigations of Zipf's law rely on the demarcations of cities imposed by census data, e.g., metropolitan areas and census-designated places. These demarcations or definitions are criticized for being arbitrary. Alternative solutions to defining cities are suggested, but they still rely on census data for their definition. In this paper we demarcate urban agglomerations by clustering street nodes (including intersections and ends), forming what we call natural cities. Based on the demarcation, we found that Zipf's law holds remarkably well for all the natural cities (over 2-4 million in total) across the United States. There is little sensitivity for the holding with respect to the clustering resolution used for demarcating the natural cities. This is a big contrast to urban ...

  20. Data management for geospatial vulnerability assessment of interdependencies in US power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.Y.; Scown, C.D.; Soibelman, L.; Matthews, H.S.; Garrett, J.H.; Dodrill, K.; McSurdy, S. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructures maintain our society's stability, security, and quality of life. These systems are also interdependent, which means that the disruption of one infrastructure system can significantly impact the operation of other systems. Because of the heavy reliance on electricity production, it is important to assess possible vulnerabilities. Determining the source of these vulnerabilities can provide insight for risk management and emergency response efforts. This research uses data warehousing and visualization techniques to explore the interdependencies between coal mines, rail transportation, and electric power plants. By merging geospatial and nonspatial data, we are able to model the potential impacts of a disruption to one or more mines, rail lines, or power plants, and visually display the results using a geographical information system. A scenario involving a severe earthquake in the New Madrid Seismic Zone is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the model when given input in the form of a potentially impacted area. This type of interactive analysis can help decision makers to understand the vulnerabilities of the coal distribution network and the potential impact it can have on electricity production.

  1. VERIFICATION & VALIDATION OF A SEMANTIC IMAGE TAGGING FRAMEWORK VIA GENERATION OF GEOSPATIAL IMAGERY GROUND TRUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed [ORNL; Dema, Mesfin A [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of increasing geospatial image libraries, many algorithms are being developed to automatically extract and classify regions of interest from these images. However, limited work has been done to compare, validate and verify these algorithms due to the lack of datasets with high accuracy ground truth annotations. In this paper, we present an approach to generate a large number of synthetic images accompanied by perfect ground truth annotation via learning scene statistics from few training images through Maximum Entropy (ME) modeling. The ME model [1,2] embeds a Stochastic Context Free Grammar (SCFG) to model object attribute variations with Markov Random Fields (MRF) with the final goal of modeling contextual relations between objects. Using this model, 3D scenes are generated by configuring a 3D object model to obey the learned scene statistics. Finally, these plausible 3D scenes are captured by ray tracing software to produce synthetic images with the corresponding ground truth annotations that are useful for evaluating the performance of a variety of image analysis algorithms.

  2. Haddad, T., Wright, D., Dailey, M., Klarin, P., Dana, R., Marra, J., and Revell, D., in press. The tools of the Oregon Coastal Atlas, in Wright, D.J. and Scholz, A.J. (eds.), Place Matters--Geospatial Tools for Marine Science, Conservation, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    . The tools of the Oregon Coastal Atlas, in Wright, D.J. and Scholz, A.J. (eds.), Place Matters--Geospatial geospatial analysis tools, and direct download access to an array of natural resource data sets relating for viewing data, some that are used for geospatial analysis; and tools for a diverse audience some best

  3. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  4. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  5. The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Petra M.

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: To lead New York State to increase its usage of solar electric systems. The expected outcome is that appropriate technologies will be made available which in turn will help to eliminate barriers to solar energy usage in New York State. Background: The Solar Energy Consortium has been created to lead New York State research on solar systems specifically directed at doubling the efficiency, halving the cost and reducing the cost of installation as well as developing unique form factors for the New York City urban environment.

  6. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  7. GreenTouch Consortium Passes 50-Member Milestone, Adds Seven New Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'InGreenTouch Consortium

  8. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K. [California State University, Fresno; Yeasmin, Dilruba [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  9. Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity: Development of a geospatial model to predict the occurrence and ice cover breakup and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity: Development of a geospatial model Security (GIWS) and the School of Environment and Sustainability (SENS) at the University of Saskatchewan are seeking a Master in Environment and Sustainability candidate with experience in space-borne remote sensing

  10. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 20002008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  11. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA(Expenditure-Based) TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT

  12. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA(Expenditure-Based) TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT

  13. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA(Expenditure-Based) TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT

  14. CONSORTIUM MODEL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA(Expenditure-Based) TECHNOLOGY

  15. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Uncertainty-aware visualization and proximity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    -aware, geospatial-AR system for real time visualization and proximity analysis. Uncertainties are modeled excavation: a geospatial augmented reality approach Xing Su1 , Sanat Talmaki2 , Hubo Cai3* and Vineet R Kamat an uncertainty-aware, geospatial augmented reality (AR) to visualize and monitor the proximity between invisible

  17. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    /WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2005-110-CONTENT SUBMITTED TO WIRELESSCOM2005 CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu, Chu and Gadh Engineering Computing Xiaoyong Su, B.S. Prabhu, Chi-Cheng Chu, Rajit Gadh UCLA Wireless Internet for Mobile Enterprise Consortium (WINMEC) 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 x.y.su, bsp, cchu, gadh

  18. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    /WHITE PAPER UCLA-WINMEC-2003-303-MOBILE_MULTIMEDIA-ENTERPRISE CONFIDENTIAL, Su, Prabhu and Gadh, UCLA (MobIME) Xiaoyong Su, B. S. Prabhu, Rajit Gadh Wireless Internet for the Mobile Enterprise Consortium and Gadh, UCLA-WINMEC-2003-303-MOBILE-MULTIMEDIA- ENTERPRISE, December 2003. PCA device [2]. CC/PP is very

  19. Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Energy's patented technology produces a clean-burning by-product from the widest variety of processed-efficient technology represented by the coal-substitute technology. The same technology will be deployed by DIGGDigital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital

  20. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    . Content delivery will be based on IP networks in which packets of data are used to deliver content-609-MULTICAST-Bband, Nov. 2003. 1 Efficient broadband multi-media data distribution over the Internet using Enterprise Consortium, wireless@winmec.ucla.edu University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza

  1. Wireless Internet for The Mobile Enterprise Consortium http://winmec.ucla.edu/ TECHNICAL REPORT/WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    the smart RFID data management scheme developed in WINMEC. It pre-processes received RFID data based Consortium (WINMEC) http://winmec.ucla.edu/, 420 Westwood Plaza, University of California, Los Angeles, CA to upper-layer applications. This makes it easy to be integrated into various backend data processing

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

  3. The University of Toronto Map and Data Library: An Introduction to Maps and Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    .maps@utoronto.ca Phone: 416-978-5589 Web: http://mdl.library.utoronto.ca Hours Regular Robarts open hours or http, and Printing Maps One 36" wide map scanner, photocopier, printer, one 8.5" X 11" regular photocopier human visual tool. In other words, maps are part of a core group of basic tools for human communication

  4. Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

  5. OPEN HONE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003040IBMPC00 The Open Host Network Packet Process Correlator for Windows http://www.github.com/HoneProject/

  6. Open Recreation Open Recreation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    43 Open Recreation Open Recreation Policy These policies apply to all University Recreation scheduled for their chosen activity at that time. The Open Recreation Policy has been revised to read due to violations of policies or inappropriate behavior, i.e.: fighting, using abusive language, etc

  7. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  8. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  9. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  10. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  11. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  12. The Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering will be host-ing our 6th annual consortium meeting on August 16-18, 2006. We

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    as well as refereed technical publications in reputable scien- tific journals. Our strength lies in yet collaboration with consortium members through summer intern- ships and new in-house application projects. Our

  13. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) issuing subcontracts, (2) SWC membership class expansion, (3) planning SWC technology transfer meetings, and (4) extending selected 2001 project periods of performance. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  14. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  15. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  17. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Nomination and election of the Executive Council members for the 2006-07 term, (2) Finalize and release the 2006 Request for Proposals (RFP), (3) Invoice and recruit members, (4) Plan for the spring meeting, (5) Improving communication efforts, and (6) Continue distribution of the DVD entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''.

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the SWC fall technology transfer meetings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and State College, Pennsylvania, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC spring proposal meeting, (3) release of the SWC Request-for-proposals (RFP), (4) revision of the SWC By-Laws, and (5) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members.

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) hosting three fall technology transfer meetings in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania, (2) releasing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposal (RFP), and (3) initial planning of the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado for selecting the 2004 SWC projects. The Fall technology transfer meetings attracted 100+ attendees between the three workshops. The SWC membership which attended the Casper, Wyoming workshop was able to see several SWC-funded projects operating in the field at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The SWC is nearing the end of its initial funding cycle. The Consortium has a solid membership foundation and a demonstrated ability to review and select projects that have relevancy to meet the needs of domestic stripper well operators.

  1. A University Consortium on Low Temperature Combustion for High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis N. Assanis; Arvind Atreya; Jyh-Yuan Chen; Wai K. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble; Chris Edwards; Zoran S. Filipi; Christian Gerdes; Hong Im; George A. Lavoie; Margaret S. Wooldridge

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the University consortium was to investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines and develop methods to extend those boundaries to improve the fuel economy of these engines, while operating with ultra low emissions. This work involved studies of thermal effects, thermal transients and engine management, internal mixing and stratification, and direct injection strategies for affecting combustion stability. This work also examined spark-assisted Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and exhaust after-treatment so as to extend the range and maximize the benefit of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)/ Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) operation. In summary the overall goals were: ? Investigate the fundamental processes that determine the practical boundaries of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engines. ? Develop methods to extend LTC boundaries to improve the fuel economy of HCCI engines fueled on gasoline and alternative blends, while operating with ultra low emissions. ? Investigate alternate fuels, ignition and after-treatment for LTC and Partially Premixed compression Ignition (PPCI) engines.

  2. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  3. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  4. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

  5. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from differences in soil data resolution.

  6. Centro de Energas Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Herramientas Biopower Tool Webinar CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable...

  7. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

  8. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the Spring SWC meeting in Pearl River, New York, (2) working with successful applicants and Penn State's Office of Sponsored Research to get subcontracts in place, and (3) planning three SWC technology transfer meetings to take place in the fall of 2003. During this reporting period, the efforts were focused primarily on the organizing and hosting the SWC Spring proposal meeting and organizing the fall technology transfer meetings.

  9. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and Evaluation |quasicrystals65Open Issues Open

  10. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners from theOpen

  11. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners"Unable to open

  12. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  13. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  14. Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook NY 11794-3717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    Sensor Consortium, Rm 214 Old Chemistry Building, State University of New York at Stony Brook twice won the NYS Advisor of the Year Award. The seminar will cover the following topics: Statement and rationales Lunch will be served at 12:30 PM The NYS SBDC is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business

  15. Nature of Institutional Sponsorship/Compliance Policy/Definitions The GME Consortium will oversee all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornfeld, S. Kerry

    /or educational arrangement for major affiliation agreements. The DIO will provide periodic updates to the GME all matters pertaining to graduate medical education including ensuring that all GME programs comply, the GME Consortium will serve as the "sponsoring institution" for all graduate medical education conducted

  16. An introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    data was prepared. It was also desired to dig dee- per into pretreatment attributes to try to revealAn introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) Pretreatment is among the most

  17. 5:00 6:00 p.m.: Displays by Arizona Energy Consortium 6:00 7:30 p.m.: Panel Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , a prominent atmospheric and energy scientist, and an environmental filmmaker. Sustainability reporter Eve-in-Residence for Sustainability, ASU's School of Sustainability Founder, Citizens for Affordable Energy Former President, Shell5:00 6:00 p.m.: Displays by Arizona Energy Consortium 6:00 7:30 p.m.: Panel Discussion 7:30 8

  18. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  19. Open University

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Michel Pentz est ne en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et prsident de l'associaion du personnel. Il est galement fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genve et a particip la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pdagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la mthode peut s'appliquer.

  20. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners from

  1. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners

  2. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data

  3. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved:runtime

  6. Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS Nano GO Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Tian; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Bonner, James C.; Crandall, Edward D.; Elder, Alison C.; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Girtsman, Teri A.; Mitra, Somenath; Ntim, Susana A.; Orr, Galya; Tagmount, Mani; Taylor, Alexia J.; Telesca, Donatello; Tolic, Ana; Vulpe, Chris D.; Walker, Andrea J.; Wang, Xiang; Witzmann, Frank A.; Wu, Nianqiang; Xie, Yumei; Zink, Jeffery I.; Nel, Andre; Holian, Andrij

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Differences in interlaboratory research protocols contribute to the conflicting data in the literature regarding engineered nanomaterial (ENM) bioactivity. Objectives: Grantees of a National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded consortium program performed two phases of in vitro testing with selected ENMs in an effort to identify and minimize sources of variability. Methods: Consortium program participants (CPPs) conducted ENM bioactivity evaluations on zinc oxide (ZnO), three forms of titanium dioxide (TiO2), and three forms of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In addition, CPPs performed bioassays using three mammalian cell lines (BEAS-2B, RLE-6TN, and THP-1) selected in order to cover two different species (rat and human), two different lung epithelial cells (alveolar type II and bronchial epithelial cells), and two different cell types (epithelial cells and macrophages). CPPs also measured cytotoxicity in all cell types while measuring inflammasome activation [interleukin-1? (IL-1?) release] using only THP-1 cells. Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were as follows: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at ? 50 ? g/mL, but did not induce IL-1?. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1? production in THP-1 cells. MWCNTs did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1? production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1?. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false-negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity.

  7. Advancing Geospatial Data Curation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Rajendra; Reitsma, Femke

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital curation is a new term that encompasses ideas from established disciplines: it defines a set of activities to manage and improve the transfer of the increasing volume of data products from producers of digital ...

  8. Open Energy Information Systems (OpenEIS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Open Energy Information Systems (OpenEIS) Open Energy Information Systems (OpenEIS) Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA Project Partners: --...

  9. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and Evaluation |quasicrystals65 (9/12)JeffersonOpen

  10. Open Issues

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners fromFIXED] JGI data

  11. Open Issues

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners fromFIXED] JGI

  12. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners fromFIXED]

  13. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners fromFIXED]Segfaults

  14. Open Issues

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  15. Open Issues

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners"Unable

  16. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen Data Winners"UnableResolved:

  17. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved: Reports of Hanging

  18. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved: Reports of

  19. Open Issues

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  20. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved: Reports ofUnable

  1. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved: Reports"error

  2. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved:runtime error

  3. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen DataResolved:runtime errorRunning

  4. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and enzymatic conversion. All three of these processes are of particular interest to states in the Southeastern US since the agricultural products produced in this region are highly variable in terms of actual crop, production quantity, and the ability of land areas to support a particular type of crop. This greatly differs from the Midwestern US where most of this region's agricultural land supports one to two primary crops, such as corn and soybean. Therefore, developing processes which are relatively flexible in terms of biomass feedstock is key to the southeastern region of the US if this area is going to be a 'player' in the developing biomass to chemicals arena. With regard to the fermentation of syngas, research was directed toward developing improved biocatalysts through organism discovery and optimization, improving ethanol/acetic acid separations, evaluating potential bacterial contaminants, and assessing the use of innovative fermentors that are better suited for supporting syngas fermentation. Acid hydrolysis research was directed toward improved conversion yields and rates, acid recovery using membranes, optimization of fermenting organisms, and hydrolyzate characterization with changing feedstocks. Additionally, a series of development efforts addressed novel separation techniques for the separation of key chemicals from fermentation activities. Biogas related research focused on key factors hindering the widespread use of digester technologies in non-traditional industries. The digestion of acetic acids and other fermentation wastewaters was studied and methods used to optimize the process were undertaken. Additionally, novel laboratory methods were designed along with improved methods of digester operation. A search for better performing digester consortia was initiated coupled with improved methods to initiate their activity within digester environments. The third activity of the consortium generally studied the production of 'other' chemicals from waste biomass materials found in Mississippi. The two primary examples of this activity are production of chem

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  6. The Consortium The CORAS consortium consists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    ), - Solinet (Germany) and - Telenor (Norway); seven research institutes: - CLRC/RAL (UK), - CTI (Greece), - FORTH (Greece), - IFE (Norway), - NST (Norway), - NR (Norway) and - SINTEF (Norway); as well as one

  7. Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, Miriam

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  9. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly concentrated protein co-product, has shown that the process is economically viable resulting in an increase in net present value (Perkis et al., 2008). According to the study, the revenue is expected to increase further with improved amino acid profile of the protein rich co-products and lower cost of cellulase enzyme mixture. Also, Kim and Dale (2008) discuss using life cycle analysis to enhance the environmental performance of the corn based ethanol. On the second phase of the research, concerted efforts were directed on assessing compositional variability of dry milling co-products collected from 4 different dry grind ethanol plants has been measured and its effect on enzymatic digestibility and fermentability. Fermentation utilized a recombinant glucose/xylose co-fermenting yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST)). No significant compositional variability among the samples was found. Simultaneous saccharification and glucose/xylose co-fermentation of the pretreated distillers grains at solids and cellulase loadings of 150 g dry solids per liter and 6.4 mg protein per g dry substrate, respectively, yielded 74-801% of theoretical maximum ethanol concentration using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST). The paper summarizing the results from the second phase of the Midwest Consortium is currently submitted to Bioresource Technology journal. The copy of the paper submitted is enclosed.

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  11. Open Access Task Force Open Access to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Libraries Initiative launched by National Science Foundation; Social Sciences Research Network (SSRN Library System rgmiller@pitt.edu #12;Open Access Task Force Open Access is... A family of copyright The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain

  12. CONSORTIUM MEMBERS EU Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    coordinator > University of Tirana, Albania > University of Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina > South East Foundation, Belgium > University of Tuzla, Bosnia & Herzegovina > Roma Virtual Network, Israel > University

  13. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  14. Semisolid Metal Processing Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apelian,Diran

    2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical modeling and simulations of semisolid filling processes remains a critical issue in understanding and optimizing the process. Semisolid slurries are non-Newtonian materials that exhibit complex rheological behavior. There the way these slurries flow in cavities is very different from the way liquid in classical casting fills cavities. Actually filling in semisolid processing is often counter intuitive

  15. Commercial Buildings Consortium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational BroadbandofCommercial BuildingCommercial

  16. FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl, K.D. ~obel,E.K. ~essber~er', S. ~ i n ~ n e rl, H. palme 3, B. sPettel3, .~tnde-nn2 , and H. ~ S n k e, Institut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of a consortium study of Apollo 14 rocks (1, 2, 3 assumption that the Fra Muuro formation sampled by the Apollo 14 mission is part of the continuous ejecta

  17. Open Burning (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health...

  18. Job Openings at CEES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Openings at the Center for Electrical Energy Storage All CEES positions are currently filled. For more information about Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs at Argonne, please...

  19. OpenXC | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThe community Energy ToolsOpenXC Home

  20. OpenBarter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen) OpenOpenBarter Jump